Cisco ASR 9000 Series Aggregation Services Router Interface and Hardware Component Configuration Guide, Release 4.2.x

 

 

Cisco ASR 9000 Series Aggregation Services Router Interface Guide de configuration et Composant matériel, Release 4.2.x
 
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Americas Headquarters Cisco Systems, Inc. 170 West Tasman Drive San Jose, CA 95134-1706 USA http://www.cisco.com Tel: 408 526-4000 800 553-NETS (6387) Fax: 408 527-0883 Cisco ASR 9000 Aggregation Services Router Interfaces and Hardware Component Configuration Guide Cisco IOS XR Software Release 4.2.x Text Part Number: OL-26061-02THE SPECIFICATIONS AND INFORMATION REGARDING THE PRODUCTS IN THIS MANUAL ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE. ALL STATEMENTS, INFORMATION, AND RECOMMENDATIONS IN THIS MANUAL ARE BELIEVED TO BE ACCURATE BUT ARE PRESENTED WITHOUT WARRANTY OF ANY KIND, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED. USERS MUST TAKE FULL RESPONSIBILITY FOR THEIR APPLICATION OF ANY PRODUCTS. THE SOFTWARE LICENSE AND LIMITED WARRANTY FOR THE ACCOMPANYING PRODUCT ARE SET FORTH IN THE INFORMATION PACKET THAT SHIPPED WITH THE PRODUCT AND ARE INCORPORATED HEREIN BY THIS REFERENCE. IF YOU ARE UNABLE TO LOCATE THE SOFTWARE LICENSE OR LIMITED WARRANTY, CONTACT YOUR CISCO REPRESENTATIVE FOR A COPY. The Cisco implementation of TCP header compression is an adaptation of a program developed by the University of California, Berkeley (UCB) as part of UCB’s public domain version of the UNIX operating system. All rights reserved. Copyright © 1981, Regents of the University of California. NOTWITHSTANDING ANY OTHER WARRANTY HEREIN, ALL DOCUMENT FILES AND SOFTWARE OF THESE SUPPLIERS ARE PROVIDED “AS IS” WITH ALL FAULTS. CISCO AND THE ABOVE-NAMED SUPPLIERS DISCLAIM ALL WARRANTIES, EXPRESSED OR IMPLIED, INCLUDING, WITHOUT LIMITATION, THOSE OF MERCHANTABILITY, FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE AND NONINFRINGEMENT OR ARISING FROM A COURSE OF DEALING, USAGE, OR TRADE PRACTICE. IN NO EVENT SHALL CISCO OR ITS SUPPLIERS BE LIABLE FOR ANY INDIRECT, SPECIAL, CONSEQUENTIAL, OR INCIDENTAL DAMAGES, INCLUDING, WITHOUT LIMITATION, LOST PROFITS OR LOSS OR DAMAGE TO DATA ARISING OUT OF THE USE OR INABILITY TO USE THIS MANUAL, EVEN IF CISCO OR ITS SUPPLIERS HAVE BEEN ADVISED OF THE POSSIBILITY OF SUCH DAMAGES. Cisco and the Cisco logo are trademarks or registered trademarks of Cisco and/or its affiliates in the U.S. and other countries. To view a list of Cisco trademarks, go to this URL: www.cisco.com/go/trademarks. Third-party trademarks mentioned are the property of their respective owners. The use of the word partner does not imply a partnership relationship between Cisco and any other company. (1110R) Any Internet Protocol (IP) addresses used in this document are not intended to be actual addresses. Any examples, command display output, and figures included in the document are shown for illustrative purposes only. Any use of actual IP addresses in illustrative content is unintentional and coincidental. Cisco ASR 9000 Aggregation Services Router Interfaces and Hardware Component Configuration Guide © 2010-2011 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.HC-iii Cisco ASR 9000 Series Aggregation Services Router Interface and Hardware Component Configuration Guide OL-26061-02 C O N T E N T S Preface HC-xxix Changes to This Document HC-xxix Obtaining Documentation and Submitting a Service Request HC-xxix Preconfiguring Physical Interfaces on the Cisco ASR 9000 Series Router HC-1 Contents HC-2 Prerequisites for Preconfiguring Physical Interfaces HC-2 Information About Preconfiguring Physical Interfaces HC-2 Physical Interface Preconfiguration Overview HC-2 Benefits of Interface Preconfiguration HC-3 Use of the Interface Preconfigure Command HC-3 Active and Standby RSPs and Virtual Interface Configuration HC-4 How to Preconfigure Physical Interfaces HC-4 Configuration Examples for Preconfiguring Physical Interfaces HC-6 Preconfiguring an Interface: Example HC-6 Additional References HC-7 Related Documents HC-7 Standards HC-7 MIBs HC-7 RFCs HC-7 Technical Assistance HC-8 Advanced Configuration and Modification of the Management Ethernet Interface on the Cisco ASR 9000 Series Router HC-9 Contents HC-9 Prerequisites for Configuring Management Ethernet Interfaces HC-10 Information About Configuring Management Ethernet Interfaces HC-10 Default Interface Settings HC-10 How to Perform Advanced Management Ethernet Interface Configuration HC-11 Configuring a Management Ethernet Interface HC-11 Configuring the Duplex Mode for a Management Ethernet Interface HC-13 Configuring the Speed for a Management Ethernet Interface HC-14 Modifying the MAC Address for a Management Ethernet Interface HC-16 Verifying Management Ethernet Interface Configuration HC-17Contents HC-iv Cisco ASR 9000 Series Aggregation Services Router Interface and Hardware Component Configuration Guide OL-26061-02 Configuration Examples for Management Ethernet Interfaces HC-18 Configuring a Management Ethernet Interface: Example HC-18 Additional References HC-19 Related Documents HC-19 Standards HC-19 MIBs HC-19 RFCs HC-19 Technical Assistance HC-20 Configuring Ethernet Interfaces on the Cisco ASR 9000 Series Router HC-21 Contents HC-23 Prerequisites for Configuring Ethernet Interfaces HC-23 Information About Configuring Ethernet HC-24 16-Port 10-Gigabit Ethernet SFP+ Line Card HC-24 Features HC-24 Restrictions HC-25 Default Configuration Values for Gigabit Ethernet and 10-Gigabit Ethernet HC-25 Layer 2 VPN on Ethernet Interfaces HC-26 Gigabit Ethernet Protocol Standards Overview HC-27 IEEE 802.3 Physical Ethernet Infrastructure HC-27 IEEE 802.3ab 1000BASE-T Gigabit Ethernet HC-27 IEEE 802.3z 1000 Mbps Gigabit Ethernet HC-27 IEEE 802.3ae 10 Gbps Ethernet HC-27 IEEE 802.3ba 100 Gbps Ethernet HC-28 MAC Address HC-28 MAC Accounting HC-28 Ethernet MTU HC-28 Flow Control on Ethernet Interfaces HC-29 802.1Q VLAN HC-29 VRRP HC-29 HSRP HC-29 Link Autonegotiation on Ethernet Interfaces HC-30 Subinterfaces on the Cisco ASR 9000 Series Router HC-30 Layer 2, Layer 3, and EFP's HC-33 Enhanced Performance Monitoring for Layer 2 Subinterfaces (EFPs) HC-35 Frequency Synchronization and SyncE HC-36 How to Configure Ethernet HC-37 Configuring Ethernet Interfaces HC-37 Configuring Gigabit Ethernet Interfaces HC-38 What to Do Next HC-40Contents HC-v Cisco ASR 9000 Series Aggregation Services Router Interface and Hardware Component Configuration Guide OL-26061-02 Configuring MAC Accounting on an Ethernet Interface HC-41 Configuring a L2VPN Ethernet Port HC-43 What to Do Next HC-44 Configuring Frequency Synchronization and SyncE HC-44 Global Configuration HC-45 Line Interface Configuration HC-46 Configuration Examples for Ethernet HC-47 Configuring an Ethernet Interface: Example HC-47 Configuring MAC-Accounting: Example HC-48 Configuring a Layer 2 VPN AC: Example HC-48 Clock Interface Configuration: Example HC-49 Enabling an Interface for Frequency Synchronization: Example HC-49 Where to Go Next HC-49 Additional References HC-49 Related Documents HC-49 Standards HC-50 MIBs HC-50 RFCs HC-50 Technical Assistance HC-50 Configuring Ethernet OAM on the Cisco ASR 9000 Series Router HC-51 Contents HC-53 Prerequisites for Configuring Ethernet OAM HC-53 Information About Configuring Ethernet OAM HC-54 Ethernet Link OAM HC-54 Neighbor Discovery HC-55 Link Monitoring HC-55 MIB Retrieval HC-55 Miswiring Detection (Cisco-Proprietary) HC-55 Remote Loopback HC-55 SNMP Traps HC-55 Unidirectional Link Fault Detection HC-55 Ethernet CFM HC-56 Maintenance Domains HC-57 Services HC-59 Maintenance Points HC-59 CFM Protocol Messages HC-62 MEP Cross-Check HC-69 Configurable Logging HC-70Contents HC-vi Cisco ASR 9000 Series Aggregation Services Router Interface and Hardware Component Configuration Guide OL-26061-02 EFD HC-70 Flexible VLAN Tagging for CFM HC-71 CFM on MC-LAG HC-72 Ethernet SLA (Y.1731 Performance Monitoring) HC-75 Ethernet SLA Concepts HC-76 Statistics Measurement and Ethernet SLA Operations Overview HC-78 Configuration Overview of Scheduled Ethernet SLA Operations HC-79 Ethernet LMI HC-79 E-LMI Messaging HC-80 Cisco-Proprietary Remote UNI Details Information Element HC-81 E-LMI Operation HC-81 Supported E-LMI PE Functions on the Cisco ASR 9000 Series Router HC-81 Unsupported E-LMI Functions HC-82 Unidirectional Link Detection Protocol HC-83 UDLD Operation HC-83 Types of Fault Detection HC-83 UDLD Modes of Operation HC-84 UDLD Aging Mechanism HC-84 State Machines HC-84 How to Configure Ethernet OAM HC-85 Configuring Ethernet Link OAM HC-85 Configuring an Ethernet OAM Profile HC-85 Attaching an Ethernet OAM Profile to an Interface HC-91 Configuring Ethernet OAM at an Interface and Overriding the Profile Configuration HC-92 Verifying the Ethernet OAM Configuration HC-93 Configuring Ethernet CFM HC-94 Configuring a CFM Maintenance Domain HC-94 Configuring Services for a CFM Maintenance Domain HC-96 Enabling and Configuring Continuity Check for a CFM Service HC-97 Configuring Automatic MIP Creation for a CFM Service HC-99 Configuring Cross-Check on a MEP for a CFM Service HC-101 Configuring Other Options for a CFM Service HC-103 Configuring CFM MEPs HC-105 Configuring Y.1731 AIS HC-107 Configuring EFD for a CFM Service HC-111 Configuring Flexible VLAN Tagging for CFM HC-112 Verifying the CFM Configuration HC-114 Troubleshooting Tips HC-114 Configuring Ethernet SLA HC-116 Ethernet SLA Configuration Guidelines HC-116Contents HC-vii Cisco ASR 9000 Series Aggregation Services Router Interface and Hardware Component Configuration Guide OL-26061-02 Configuring an SLA Operation Profile HC-116 Configuring SLA Probe Parameters in a Profile HC-117 Configuring SLA Statistics Measurement in a Profile HC-119 Configuring a Schedule for an SLA Operation Probe in a Profile HC-121 Configuring an SLA Operation HC-123 Configuring an On-Demand SLA Operation HC-124 Verifying SLA Configuration HC-126 Configuring Ethernet LMI HC-126 Prerequisites for Configuring E-LMI HC-127 Restrictions for Configuring E-LMI HC-127 Creating EVCs for E-LMI HC-127 Configuring Ethernet CFM for E-LMI HC-131 Configuring UNI Names on the Physical Interface HC-133 Enabling E-LMI on the Physical Interface HC-134 Configuring the Polling Verification Timer HC-136 Configuring the Status Counter HC-137 Disabling Syslog Messages for E-LMI Errors or Events HC-139 Disabling Use of the Cisco-Proprietary Remote UNI Details Information Element HC-140 Verifying the Ethernet LMI Configuration HC-142 Troubleshooting Tips for E-LMI Configuration HC-142 Configuring UDLD HC-144 Configuration Examples for Ethernet OAM HC-146 Configuration Examples for EOAM Interfaces HC-146 Configuring an Ethernet OAM Profile Globally: Example HC-146 Configuring Ethernet OAM Features on an Individual Interface: Example HC-147 Configuring Ethernet OAM Features to Override the Profile on an Individual Interface: Example HC-147 Configuring a Remote Loopback on an Ethernet OAM Peer: Example HC-148 Clearing Ethernet OAM Statistics on an Interface: Example HC-148 Enabling SNMP Server Traps on a Router: Example HC-148 Configuration Examples for Ethernet CFM HC-148 Ethernet CFM Domain Configuration: Example HC-149 Ethernet CFM Service Configuration: Example HC-149 Flexible Tagging for an Ethernet CFM Service Configuration: Example HC-149 Continuity Check for an Ethernet CFM Service Configuration: Example HC-149 MIP Creation for an Ethernet CFM Service Configuration: Example HC-149 Cross-check for an Ethernet CFM Service Configuration: Example HC-149 Other Ethernet CFM Service Parameter Configuration: Example HC-150 MEP Configuration: Example HC-150 Ethernet CFM Show Command: Examples HC-150Contents HC-viii Cisco ASR 9000 Series Aggregation Services Router Interface and Hardware Component Configuration Guide OL-26061-02 AIS for CFM Configuration: Examples HC-153 AIS for CFM Show Commands: Examples HC-154 EFD Configuration: Examples HC-158 Displaying EFD Information: Examples HC-158 Configuration Examples for Ethernet SLA HC-159 Ethernet SLA Profile Type Configuration: Examples HC-160 Ethernet SLA Probe Configuration: Examples HC-160 Profile Statistics Measurement Configuration: Examples HC-161 Scheduled SLA Operation Probe Configuration: Examples HC-162 Ethernet SLA Operation Probe Scheduling and Aggregation Configuration: Example HC-162 Ongoing Ethernet SLA Operation Configuration: Example HC-163 On-Demand Ethernet SLA Operation Basic Configuration: Examples HC-164 Ethernet SLA Show Commands: Examples HC-164 Configuration Example for Ethernet LMI HC-167 Where to Go Next HC-168 Additional References HC-168 Related Documents HC-168 Standards HC-169 MIBs HC-169 RFCs HC-169 Technical Assistance HC-169 Configuring Integrated Routing and Bridging on the Cisco ASR 9000 Series Router HC-171 Contents HC-173 Prerequisites for Configuring IRB HC-173 Restrictions for Configuring IRB HC-173 Information About Configuring IRB HC-175 IRB Introduction HC-175 Bridge-Group Virtual Interface HC-176 BVI Introduction HC-176 Supported Features on a BVI HC-177 BVI MAC Address HC-177 BVI Interface and Line Protocol States HC-177 Packet Flows Using IRB HC-177 Packet Flows When Host A Sends to Host B on the Bridge Domain HC-178 Packet Flows When Host A Sends to Host C From the Bridge Domain to a Routed Interface HC-178 Packet Flows When Host C Sends to Host B From a Routed Interface to the Bridge Domain HC-179 Supported Environments for IRB HC-179Contents HC-ix Cisco ASR 9000 Series Aggregation Services Router Interface and Hardware Component Configuration Guide OL-26061-02 Additional IPv4-Specific Environments Supported for IRB HC-180 Additional IPv6-Specific Environments Supported for IRB HC-180 How to Configure IRB HC-181 Configuring the Bridge Group Virtual Interface HC-181 Configuration Guidelines HC-181 Configuring the Layer 2 AC Interfaces HC-183 Prerequisites HC-183 Configuring a Bridge Group and Assigning Interfaces to a Bridge Domain HC-185 Associating the BVI as the Routed Interface on a Bridge Domain HC-187 Displaying Information About a BVI HC-189 Configuration Examples for IRB HC-189 Basic IRB Configuration: Example HC-189 IRB Using ACs With VLANs: Example HC-190 IPv4 Addressing on a BVI Supporting Multiple IP Networks: Example HC-190 Comprehensive IRB Configuration with BVI Bundle Interfaces and Multicast Configuration: Example HC-191 IRB With BVI and VRRP Configuration: Example HC-192 6PE/6VPE With BVI Configuration: Example HC-192 Additional References HC-194 Related Documents HC-194 Standards HC-195 MIBs HC-195 RFCs HC-195 Technical Assistance HC-195 Configuring Link Bundling on the Cisco ASR 9000 Series Router HC-197 Contents HC-198 Prerequisites for Configuring Link Bundling HC-198 Prerequisites for Configuring Link Bundling on Cisco ASR 9000 Series Router HC-199 Information About Configuring Link Bundling HC-199 Link Bundling Overview HC-200 Features and Compatible Characteristics of Ethernet Link Bundles HC-200 Characteristics of POS Link Bundles in Cisco ASR 9000 Series Router HC-201 Restrictions of POS Link Bundles in Cisco ASR 9000 Series Router HC-202 Link Aggregation Through LACP HC-202 IEEE 802.3ad Standard HC-202 Multichassis Link Aggregation HC-203 Failure Cases HC-203 Interchassis Communication Protocol HC-204 Access Network Redundancy Model HC-205Contents HC-x Cisco ASR 9000 Series Aggregation Services Router Interface and Hardware Component Configuration Guide OL-26061-02 Core Network Redundancy Model HC-206 Switchovers HC-207 MC-LAG Topologies HC-208 Load Balancing HC-210 Layer 2 Ingress Load Balancing on Link Bundles HC-210 Layer 3 Egress Load Balancing on Link Bundles HC-211 Dynamic Load Balancing for LAG HC-212 QoS and Link Bundling HC-212 VLANs on an Ethernet Link Bundle HC-212 Link Bundle Configuration Overview HC-213 Nonstop Forwarding During Card Failover HC-213 Link Failover HC-214 Multi-Gigabit Service Control Point HC-214 How to Configure Link Bundling HC-215 Configuring Ethernet Link Bundles HC-215 Configuring EFP Load Balancing on an Ethernet Link Bundle HC-216 Configuring VLAN Bundles HC-218 Configuring POS Link Bundles HC-219 Configuring Multichassis Link Aggregation HC-223 Configuring Interchassis Communication Protocol HC-223 Configuring Multichassis Link Aggregation Control Protocol Session HC-226 Configuring Multichassis Link Aggregation Control Protocol Bundle HC-228 Configuring Dual-Homed Device HC-230 Configuring Access Backup Pseudowire HC-232 Configuring One-way Pseudowire Redundancy in MC-LAG HC-235 Configuring VPWS Cross-Connects in MC-LAG HC-237 Configuring VPLS in MC-LAG HC-240 How to Configure MGSCP HC-242 Prerequisites for Configuring MGSCP HC-242 Restrictions for Configuring MGSCP HC-243 Configuring the Access Bundle for the Subscriber-Facing Side HC-244 Configuring the Network Bundle for the Core-Facing Side HC-246 Configuring the Bundle Member Interfaces HC-248 Configuring VRFs to Route Traffic to the Bundles HC-249 Configuring VRFs with Static Routing HC-249 Configuring VRFs with Dynamic Routing HC-250 Configuration Examples for Link Bundling HC-250 Example: Configuring an Ethernet Link Bundle HC-250 Example: Configuring a VLAN Link Bundle HC-251Contents HC-xi Cisco ASR 9000 Series Aggregation Services Router Interface and Hardware Component Configuration Guide OL-26061-02 Example: Configuring a POS Link Bundle HC-251 Example: Configuring EFP Load Balancing on an Ethernet Link Bundle HC-252 Example: Configuring Multichassis Link Aggregation HC-252 Configuration Examples for MGSCP HC-256 Example: Configuring Bundle Interfaces and Member Links HC-257 Examples: Configuring VRFs to Route Traffic to the Bundles HC-258 Example: Configuring VRFs with Static Routing HC-258 Example: Configuring VRFs with OSPF Routing HC-259 Example: Configuring MGSCP with ABF to Route Traffic to the Bundles HC-260 Additional References HC-261 Related Documents HC-261 Standards HC-261 MIBs HC-261 RFCs HC-262 Technical Assistance HC-262 Configuring Traffic Mirroring on the Cisco ASR 9000 Series Router HR-263 Contents HR-263 Restrictions for Traffic Mirroring HR-263 Performance Impact with Traffic Mirroring HR-264 Information about Traffic Mirroring HR-264 Introduction to Traffic Mirroring HR-264 Implementing Traffic Mirroring on the Cisco ASR 9000 Series Router HR-265 Traffic Mirroring Terminology HR-265 Characteristics of the Source Port HR-266 Characteristics of the Monitor Session HR-266 Characteristics of the Destination Port HR-267 Supported Traffic Mirroring Types HR-267 Pseudowire Traffic Mirroring HR-268 ACL-Based Traffic Mirroring HR-269 Configuring Traffic Mirroring HR-269 How to Configure Local Traffic Mirroring HR-269 How to Configure Remote Traffic Mirroring HR-271 How to Configure Traffic Mirroring over Pseudowire HR-273 How to Configure ACL-Based Traffic Mirroring HR-277 Prerequisites HR-277 Troubleshooting ACL-Based Traffic Mirroring HR-280 How to Configure Partial Packet Mirroring HR-280 Traffic Mirroring Configuration Examples HR-282Contents HC-xii Cisco ASR 9000 Series Aggregation Services Router Interface and Hardware Component Configuration Guide OL-26061-02 Traffic Mirroring with Physical Interfaces (Local): Example HR-282 Traffic Mirroring with EFPs (Remote): Example HR-283 Viewing Monitor Session Status: Example HR-283 Monitor Session Statistics: Example HR-284 Traffic Mirroring over Pseudowire: Example HR-285 Layer 3 ACL-Based Traffic Mirroring: Example HR-285 Layer 2 ACL-Based Traffic Mirroring: Example HR-285 Partial Packet Mirroring: Example HR-286 Troubleshooting Traffic Mirroring HR-286 Where to Go Next HR-289 Additional References HR-289 Related Documents HR-289 Standards HR-289 MIBs HR-290 RFCs HR-290 Technical Assistance HR-290 Configuring Virtual Loopback and Null Interfaces on the Cisco ASR 9000 Series Router HC-291 Contents HC-291 Prerequisites for Configuring Virtual Interfaces HC-292 Information About Configuring Virtual Interfaces HC-292 Virtual Loopback Interface Overview HC-292 Null Interface Overview HC-292 Virtual Management Interface Overview HC-293 Active and Standby RPs and Virtual Interface Configuration HC-293 How to Configure Virtual Interfaces HC-294 Configuring Virtual Loopback Interfaces HC-294 Restrictions HC-294 Configuring Null Interfaces HC-295 Configuring Virtual IPv4 IPV4 Interfaces HC-296 Configuration Examples for Virtual Interfaces HC-297 Configuring a Loopback Interface: Example HC-298 Configuring a Null Interface: Example HC-298 Configuring a Virtual IPv4 Interface: Example HC-298 Additional References HC-299 Related Documents HC-299 Standards HC-299 MIBs HC-300 RFCs HC-300Contents HC-xiii Cisco ASR 9000 Series Aggregation Services Router Interface and Hardware Component Configuration Guide OL-26061-02 Technical Assistance HC-300 Configuring Channelized SONET/SDH on the Cisco ASR 9000 Series Router HC-301 Contents HC-301 Prerequisites for Configuring Channelized SONET/SDH HC-301 Information About Configuring Channelized SONET/SDH HC-302 Channelized SONET Overview HC-302 Channelized SDH Overview HC-307 Default Configuration Values for Channelized SONET/SDH HC-310 How to Configure Channelized SONET/SDH HC-311 Configuring SONET T3 and VT1.5-Mapped T1 Channels HC-311 Prerequisites HC-311 Restrictions HC-311 Configuring Packet over SONET Channels HC-316 Prerequisites HC-316 Configuring a Clear Channel SONET Controller for T3 HC-319 Prerequisites HC-319 Configuring Channelized SONET APS HC-322 Prerequisites HC-322 Restrictions HC-323 Configuring SDH AU-3 HC-325 Configuring SDH AU-3 Mapped to C11-T1 or C12-E1 HC-325 Configuring SDH AU-3 Mapped to T3 or E3 HC-329 Configuring SDH AU-4 HC-333 Prerequisites HC-333 Restrictions HC-333 Configuration Examples for Channelized SONET HC-338 Channelized SONET Examples HC-338 Channelized SONET T3 to T1 Configuration: Example HC-338 Channelized SONET in VT1.5 Mode and T1 Channelization to NxDS0 HC-338 Channelized Packet over SONET Configuration: Example HC-339 SONET Clear Channel T3 Configuration: Example HC-339 Channelized SONET APS Multirouter Configuration: Example HC-339 Channelized SDH Examples HC-340 Channelized SDH AU-3 Configuration: Examples HC-340 Channelized SDH AU-4 Configuration: Examples HC-341 Additional References HC-344 Related Documents HC-344 Standards HC-344Contents HC-xiv Cisco ASR 9000 Series Aggregation Services Router Interface and Hardware Component Configuration Guide OL-26061-02 MIBs HC-345 RFCs HC-345 Technical Assistance HC-345 Configuring Circuit Emulation over Packet on the Cisco ASR 9000 Series Router HC-347 Contents HC-347 Prerequisites for Configuration HC-347 Overview of Circuit Emulation over Packet Service HC-348 Information About Configuring CEoP Channelized SONET/SDH HC-349 Channelized SONET and SDH Overview HC-349 Default Configuration Values for Channelized SONET/SDH HC-353 Clock Distribution HC-354 How to implement CEM HC-355 Configuring SONET VT1.5-Mapped T1 Channels and Creating CEM Interface HC-356 Prerequisites HC-356 Configuring SDH AU-3 Mapped to C11-T1 or C12-E1 HC-359 Configuring SDH AU-3 Mapped to C11-T1 and Creating CEM Interface HC-359 Configuring SDH AU-3 Mapped to C12-E1 and Creating CEM Interface HC-362 Configuring CEM Interface HC-365 Configuration Guidelines and Restrictions HC-366 Configuring a Global CEM Class HC-366 Attaching a CEM Class HC-368 HC-369 Configuring Payload Size HC-370 Setting the Dejitter Buffer Size HC-370 Setting an Idle Pattern HC-371 Enabling Dummy Mode HC-371 Setting a Dummy Pattern HC-371 Configuring Clocking HC-373 Configuring Clock Recovery HC-373 Verifying Clock recovery HC-375 Configuration Examples for CEM HC-376 Circuit Emulation Interface Configuration: Examples HC-376 Channelized Sonet / SDH Configurations and CEM Interface Creation HC-376 Clock Recovery : Example HC-378 Adaptive Clock Recovery Configuration: HC-378 Differential Clock Recovery Configuration: HC-378 Additional References HC-379 Related Documents HC-379Contents HC-xv Cisco ASR 9000 Series Aggregation Services Router Interface and Hardware Component Configuration Guide OL-26061-02 Standards HC-379 MIBs HC-380 RFCs HC-380 Technical Assistance HC-380 Configuring Clear Channel SONET Controllers on the Cisco ASR 9000 Series Router HC-381 Contents HC-382 Prerequisites for Configuring Clear Channel SONET Controllers HC-382 Information About Configuring SONET Controllers HC-382 SONET Controller Overview HC-382 Default Configuration Values for SONET Controllers HC-383 SONET APS HC-384 How to Configure Clear Channel SONET Controllers HC-384 Configuring a Clear Channel SONET Controller HC-385 Prerequisites HC-385 Configuring SONET APS HC-388 Prerequisites HC-388 Restrictions HC-388 Configuring a Hold-off Timer to Prevent Fast Reroute from Being Triggered HC-393 Prerequisites HC-393 Configuration Examples for SONET Controllers HC-395 SONET Controller Configuration: Example HC-395 SONET APS Group Configuration: Example HC-395 Additional References HC-396 Related Documents HC-396 Standards HC-396 MIBs HC-396 RFCs HC-396 Technical Assistance HC-397 Configuring Clear Channel T3/E3 and Channelized T3 and T1/E1 Controllers on the Cisco ASR 9000 Series Router HC-399 Contents HC-400 Prerequisites for Configuring T3/E3 Controllers HC-400 Information About T3/E3 Controllers and Serial Interfaces HC-400 Loopback Support HC-404 Configuration Overview HC-406 Default Configuration Values for T3 and E3 Controllers HC-406 Default Configuration Values for T1 and E1 Controllers HC-407 Link Noise Monitoring on T1 or E1 Links HC-408Contents HC-xvi Cisco ASR 9000 Series Aggregation Services Router Interface and Hardware Component Configuration Guide OL-26061-02 LNM Events HC-408 LNM Logging HC-409 How to Configure Clear Channel T3/E3 Controllers and Channelized T1/E1 Controllers HC-409 Configuring a Clear Channel E3 Controller HC-409 Restrictions HC-409 What to Do Next HC-411 Modifying the Default E3 Controller Configuration HC-411 Prerequisites HC-411 Restrictions HC-412 What to Do Next HC-413 Configuring a Clear Channel T3 Controller HC-414 Prerequisites HC-414 Restrictions HC-414 What to Do Next HC-415 Configuring a Channelized T3 Controller HC-415 Prerequisites HC-416 What to Do Next HC-417 Modifying the Default T3 Controller Configuration HC-418 Prerequisites HC-418 What to Do Next HC-421 Configuring a T1 Controller HC-421 Prerequisites HC-421 Restrictions HC-422 What to Do Next HC-425 Configuring an E1 Controller HC-425 Prerequisites HC-425 Restrictions HC-426 What to Do Next HC-429 Configuring BERT HC-429 Configuring BERT on T3/E3 and T1/E1 Controllers HC-430 Prerequisites HC-430 Restrictions HC-430 Configuring BERT on a DS0 Channel Group HC-433 Prerequisites HC-433 Configuring Link Noise Monitoring on a T1 or E1 Channel HC-436 Prerequisites HC-436 Restrictions HC-436 Verifying Link Noise Monitoring Configuration and Status HC-438 Clearing Link Noise Monitoring States and Statistics HC-439 Configuration Examples HC-439Contents HC-xvii Cisco ASR 9000 Series Aggregation Services Router Interface and Hardware Component Configuration Guide OL-26061-02 Configuring a Clear Channel T3 Controller: Example HC-440 Configuring a T3 Controller with Channelized T1 Controllers: Example HC-440 Configuring BERT on a T3 Controller: Example HC-441 Configuring Link Noise Monitoring on a T1 Controller: Examples HC-442 QoS on T3 Channels: Example HC-443 Additional References HC-443 Related Documents HC-443 Standards HC-444 MIBs HC-444 RFCs HC-444 Technical Assistance HC-445 Configuring Dense Wavelength Division Multiplexing Controllers on the Cisco ASR 9000 Series Router HC-447 Contents HC-447 Prerequisites for Configuring DWDM Controller Interfaces HC-448 Information About the DWDM Controllers HC-448 Information about IPoDWDM HC-449 How to Configure DWDM Controllers HC-450 Configuring G.709 Parameters HC-450 Prerequisites HC-450 What to Do Next HC-452 How to Perform Performance Monitoring on DWDM Controllers HC-453 Configuring DWDM Controller Performance Monitoring HC-453 Configuring IPoDWDM HC-457 Configuring the Optical Layer DWDM Ports HC-457 Configuring the Administrative State of DWDM Optical Ports HC-459 Configuring Proactive FEC-FRR Triggering HC-461 Configuration Examples HC-463 Turning On the Laser: Example HC-463 Turning Off the Laser: Example HC-464 DWDM Controller Configuration: Examples HC-464 DWDM Performance Monitoring: Examples HC-464 IPoDWDM Configuration: Examples HC-465 Optical Layer DWDM Port Configuration: Examples HC-465 Administrative State of DWDM Optical Ports Configuration: Examples HC-465 Proactive FEC-FRR Triggering Configuration: Examples HC-466 Additional References HC-466 Related Documents HC-466Contents HC-xviii Cisco ASR 9000 Series Aggregation Services Router Interface and Hardware Component Configuration Guide OL-26061-02 Standards HC-466 MIBs HC-466 RFCs HC-467 Technical Assistance HC-467 Configuring POS Interfaces onthe Cisco ASR 9000 Series Router HC-469 Contents HC-469 Prerequisites for Configuring POS Interfaces HC-470 Information About Configuring POS Interfaces HC-470 Default Settings for POS Interfaces HC-470 Cisco HDLC Encapsulation HC-471 PPP Encapsulation HC-471 Keepalive Timer HC-472 Frame Relay Encapsulation HC-473 LMI on Frame Relay Interfaces HC-474 How to Configure a POS Interface HC-475 Bringing Up a POS Interface HC-475 Prerequisites HC-475 Restrictions HC-475 What to Do Next HC-478 Configuring Optional POS Interface Parameters HC-478 Prerequisites HC-478 Restrictions HC-478 What to Do Next HC-480 Creating a Point-to-Point POS Subinterface with a PVC HC-480 Prerequisites HC-480 Restrictions HC-480 What to Do Next HC-482 Configuring Optional PVC Parameters HC-482 Prerequisites HC-483 Restrictions HC-483 What to Do Next HC-485 Modifying the Keepalive Interval on POS Interfaces HC-485 Prerequisites HC-485 Restrictions HC-485 How to Configure a Layer 2 Attachment Circuit HC-487 Creating a Layer 2 Frame Relay Subinterface with a PVC HC-488 Prerequisites HC-488 Restrictions HC-488 What to Do Next HC-489Contents HC-xix Cisco ASR 9000 Series Aggregation Services Router Interface and Hardware Component Configuration Guide OL-26061-02 Configuring Optional Layer 2 PVC Parameters HC-490 Prerequisites HC-490 Configuring Optional Layer 2 Subinterface Parameters HC-492 Prerequisites HC-492 Restrictions HC-492 Configuration Examples for POS Interfaces HC-494 Bringing Up and Configuring a POS Interface with Cisco HDLC Encapsulation: Example HC-494 Configuring a POS Interface with Frame Relay Encapsulation: Example HC-494 Configuring a POS Interface with PPP Encapsulation: Example HC-496 Additional References HC-496 Related Documents HC-496 Standards HC-497 MIBs HC-497 RFCs HC-497 Technical Assistance HC-498 Configuring Serial Interfaces on the Cisco ASR 9000 Series Router HC-499 Contents HC-501 Prerequisites for Configuring Serial Interfaces HC-501 Information About Configuring Serial Interfaces HC-502 High-Level Overview: Serial Interface Configuration on Clear-Channel SPAs HC-503 High-Level Overview: Serial Interface Configuration on Channelized SPAs HC-504 Cisco HDLC Encapsulation HC-506 PPP Encapsulation HC-506 Multilink PPP HC-507 Keepalive Timer HC-508 Frame Relay Encapsulation HC-509 LMI on Frame Relay Interfaces HC-510 Layer 2 Tunnel Protocol Version 3-Based Layer 2 VPN on Frame Relay HC-510 Default Settings for Serial Interface Configurations HC-511 Serial Interface Naming Notation HC-511 IPHC Overview HC-512 QoS and IPHC HC-513 How to Configure Serial Interfaces HC-514 Bringing Up a Serial Interface HC-514 Prerequisites HC-515 Restrictions HC-515 What to Do Next HC-518 Configuring Optional Serial Interface Parameters HC-518 Prerequisites HC-518Contents HC-xx Cisco ASR 9000 Series Aggregation Services Router Interface and Hardware Component Configuration Guide OL-26061-02 Restrictions HC-518 What to Do Next HC-520 Creating a Point-to-Point Serial Subinterface with a PVC HC-521 Prerequisites HC-521 Restrictions HC-521 What to Do Next HC-523 Configuring Optional PVC Parameters HC-524 Prerequisites HC-524 Restrictions HC-524 What to Do Next HC-526 Modifying the Keepalive Interval on Serial Interfaces HC-526 Prerequisites HC-527 Restrictions HC-527 How to Configure a Layer 2 Attachment Circuit HC-528 Creating a Serial Layer 2 Subinterface with a PVC HC-529 Prerequisites HC-529 Restrictions HC-529 What to Do Next HC-530 Configuring Optional Serial Layer 2 PVC Parameters HC-531 Prerequisites HC-531 Restrictions HC-531 What to Do Next HC-533 Configuring IPHC HC-533 Prerequisites for Configuring IPHC HC-533 Configuring the IPHC Slot Level Command HC-534 Configuring an IPHC Profile HC-536 Configuring an IPHC Profile HC-538 Enabling an IPHC Profile on an Interface HC-541 Configuration Examples for Serial Interfaces HC-542 Bringing Up and Configuring a Serial Interface with Cisco HDLC Encapsulation: Example HC-542 Configuring a Serial Interface with Frame Relay Encapsulation: Example HC-543 Configuring a Serial Interface with PPP Encapsulation: Example HC-545 IPHC Configuration: Examples HC-545 IPHC Profile Configuration: Example HC-546 IPHC on a Serial Interface Configuration: Examples HC-546 IPHC on Multilink Configuration: Example HC-546 IPHC on a Serial Interface with MLPPP/LFI and QoS Configuration: Example HC-547 Additional References HC-547 Related Documents HC-547 Standards HC-548Contents HC-xxi Cisco ASR 9000 Series Aggregation Services Router Interface and Hardware Component Configuration Guide OL-26061-02 MIBs HC-548 RFCs HC-548 Technical Assistance HC-548 Configuring Frame Relay on the Cisco ASR 9000 Series Router HC-549 Contents HC-550 Prerequisites for Configuring Frame Relay HC-550 Information About Frame Relay Interfaces HC-550 Frame Relay Encapsulation HC-550 LMI HC-551 Multilink Frame Relay (FRF.16) HC-553 Multilink Frame Relay High Availability HC-553 Multilink Frame Relay Configuration Overview HC-553 End-to-End Fragmentation (FRF.12) HC-557 Configuring Frame Relay HC-557 Modifying the Default Frame Relay Configuration on an Interface HC-557 Prerequisites HC-557 Restrictions HC-558 Disabling LMI on an Interface with Frame Relay Encapsulation HC-560 Configuring Multilink Frame Relay Bundle Interfaces HC-562 Prerequisites HC-562 Restrictions HC-562 Configuring FRF.12 End-to-End Fragmentation on a Channelized Frame Relay Serial Interface HC-568 Configuration Examples for Frame Relay HC-572 Optional Frame Relay Parameters: Example HC-573 Multilink Frame Relay: Example HC-575 End-to-End Fragmentation: Example HC-576 Additional References HC-576 Related Documents HC-577 Standards HC-577 MIBs HC-577 RFCs HC-577 Technical Assistance HC-578 Configuring PPP on the Cisco ASR 9000 Series Router HC-579 Contents HC-580 Prerequisites for Configuring PPP HC-580 Information About PPP HC-581 PPP Authentication HC-581Contents HC-xxii Cisco ASR 9000 Series Aggregation Services Router Interface and Hardware Component Configuration Guide OL-26061-02 PAP Authentication HC-582 CHAP Authentication HC-582 MS-CHAP Authentication HC-582 Multilink PPP HC-582 MLPPP Feature Summary HC-583 IPHC Over MLPPP HC-583 ICSSO for PPP and MLPPP HC-584 Multi-Router Automatic Protection Switching (MR-APS) HC-584 Session State Redundancy Protocol (SSRP) HC-584 Redundancy Group Manager (RG-MGR) HC-585 IP Fast Reroute (IP-FRR) HC-585 VPN Routing And Forwarding (VRF) HC-585 Open Shortest Path First (OSPF) HC-586 ICSSO Configuration Overview HC-586 Multiclass MLPPP with QoS HC-586 T3 SONET Channels HC-587 How to Configure PPP HC-588 Modifying the Default PPP Configuration HC-588 Prerequisites HC-588 Configuring PPP Authentication HC-591 Enabling PAP, CHAP, and MS-CHAP Authentication HC-591 Prerequisites HC-591 Where To Go Next HC-593 Configuring a PAP Authentication Password HC-594 Configuring a CHAP Authentication Password HC-596 Configuring an MS-CHAP Authentication Password HC-598 Disabling an Authentication Protocol HC-599 Disabling PAP Authentication on an Interface HC-599 Disabling CHAP Authentication on an Interface HC-601 Disabling MS-CHAP Authentication on an Interface HC-602 Configuring Multilink PPP HC-604 Prerequisites HC-604 Restrictions HC-604 Configuring the Controller HC-604 Configuring the Interfaces HC-607 Configuring MLPPP Optional Features HC-610 Configuring ICSSO for PPP and MLPPP HC-612 Prerequisites HC-612 Restrictions HC-613 Configuring a Basic ICSSO Implementation HC-613Contents HC-xxiii Cisco ASR 9000 Series Aggregation Services Router Interface and Hardware Component Configuration Guide OL-26061-02 Configuring MR-APS HC-614 Configuring SSRP on Serial and Multilink Interfaces HC-616 Configuration Examples for PPP HC-621 Configuring a POS Interface with PPP Encapsulation: Example HC-621 Configuring a Serial Interface with PPP Encapsulation: Example HC-621 Configuring MLPPP: Example HC-622 ICSSO for PPP and MLPPP Configuration: Examples HC-622 ICSSO Configuration: Example HC-623 Channelized SONET Controller Configuration for Use with ICSSO: Example HC-623 MR-APS Configuration: Example HC-623 SSRP on Serial and Multilink Interfaces Configuration: Example HC-624 VRF on Multilink Configuration for Use with ICSSO: Example HC-625 VRF on Ethernet Configuration for Use with ICSSO: Example HC-625 OSPF Configuration for Use with ICSSO: Example HC-626 Verifying ICSSO Configuration: Examples HC-626 Verifying SSRP Groups: Example HC-626 Verifying ICSSO Status: Example HC-627 Verifying MR-APS Configuration: Example HC-627 Verifying OSPF Configuration: Example HC-628 Verifying Multilink PPP Configurations HC-629 show multilink interfaces: Examples HC-629 show ppp interfaces multilink: Example HC-631 show ppp interface serial: Example HC-632 show imds interface multilink: Example HC-632 Additional References HC-633 Related Documents HC-633 Standards HC-633 MIBs HC-633 RFCs HC-633 Technical Assistance HC-634 Configuring 802.1Q VLAN Interfaces on the Cisco ASR 9000 Series Router HC-635 Contents HC-635 Prerequisites for Configuring 802.1Q VLAN Interfaces HC-635 Information About Configuring 802.1Q VLAN Interfaces HC-636 802.1Q VLAN Overview HC-636 802.1Q Tagged Frames HC-636 CFM on 802.1Q VLAN Interfaces HC-637 Subinterfaces HC-637Contents HC-xxiv Cisco ASR 9000 Series Aggregation Services Router Interface and Hardware Component Configuration Guide OL-26061-02 Subinterface MTU HC-637 Native VLAN HC-637 EFPs HC-637 Layer 2 VPN on VLANs HC-638 Other Layer 2 VPN Features HC-639 How to Configure 802.1Q VLAN Interfaces HC-639 Configuring 802.1Q VLAN Subinterfaces HC-639 Configuring an Attachment Circuit on a VLAN HC-641 What to Do Next HC-643 Removing an 802.1Q VLAN Subinterface HC-643 Configuration Examples for VLAN Interfaces HC-645 VLAN Subinterfaces: Example HC-645 Additional References HC-647 Related Documents HC-647 Standards HC-647 MIBs HC-647 Technical Assistance HC-648 Configuring Bidirectional Forwarding Detection on the Cisco ASR 9000 Series Router HC-649 Contents HC-650 Prerequisites for Configuring BFD HC-650 Restrictions for Configuring BFD HC-651 Information About BFD HC-652 Differences in BFD in Cisco IOS XR Software and Cisco IOS Software HC-652 BFD Modes of Operation HC-653 BFD Packet Information HC-653 BFD Source and Destination Ports HC-654 BFD Packet Intervals and Failure Detection HC-654 Priority Settings for BFD Packets HC-658 BFD for IPv4 HC-658 BFD for IPv6 HC-660 BFD on Bundled VLANs HC-660 BFD Over Member Links on Link Bundles HC-660 Overview of BFD State Change Behavior on Member Links and Bundle Status HC-661 BFD Multipath Sessions HC-663 BFD for MultiHop Paths HC-663 Setting up BFD Multihop HC-663 How to Configure BFD HC-663 BFD Configuration Guidelines HC-664Contents HC-xxv Cisco ASR 9000 Series Aggregation Services Router Interface and Hardware Component Configuration Guide OL-26061-02 Configuring BFD Under a Dynamic Routing Protocol or Using a Static Route HC-664 Enabling BFD on a BGP Neighbor HC-665 Enabling BFD for OSPF on an Interface HC-667 Enabling BFD for OSPFv3 on an Interface HC-669 Enabling BFD on a Static Route HC-671 Configuring BFD on Bundle Member Links HC-673 Prerequisites HC-673 Specifying the BFD Destination Address on a Bundle HC-673 Enabling BFD Sessions on Bundle Members HC-674 Configuring the Minimum Thresholds for Maintaining an Active Bundle HC-675 Configuring BFD Packet Transmission Intervals and Failure Detection Times on a Bundle HC-677 Configuring Allowable Delays for BFD State Change Notifications Using Timers on a Bundle HC-679 Enabling Echo Mode to Test the Forwarding Path to a BFD Peer HC-681 Overriding the Default Echo Packet Source Address HC-681 Specifying the Echo Packet Source Address Globally for BFD HC-682 Specifying the Echo Packet Source Address on an Individual Interface or Bundle HC-683 Configuring BFD Session Teardown Based on Echo Latency Detection HC-685 Prerequisites HC-685 Restrictions HC-685 Delaying BFD Session Startup Until Verification of Echo Path and Latency HC-686 Prerequisites HC-686 Restrictions HC-686 Disabling Echo Mode HC-689 Disabling Echo Mode on a Router HC-689 Disabling Echo Mode on an Individual Interface or Bundle HC-690 Minimizing BFD Session Flapping Using BFD Dampening HC-692 Enabling and Disabling IPv6 Checksum Support HC-693 Enabling and Disabling IPv6 Checksum Calculations for BFD on a Router HC-694 Enabling and Disabling IPv6 Checksum Calculations for BFD on an Individual Interface or Bundle HC-695 Clearing and Displaying BFD Counters HC-696 Configuration Examples for Configuring BFD HC-697 BFD Over BGP: Example HC-698 BFD Over OSPF: Examples HC-698 BFD Over Static Routes: Examples HC-699 BFD on Bundled VLANs: Example HC-699 Echo Packet Source Address: Examples HC-701 Echo Latency Detection: Examples HC-701Contents HC-xxvi Cisco ASR 9000 Series Aggregation Services Router Interface and Hardware Component Configuration Guide OL-26061-02 Echo Startup Validation: Examples HC-702 BFD Echo Mode Disable: Examples HC-702 BFD Dampening: Examples HC-702 BFD IPv6 Checksum: Examples HC-703 BFD Peers on Routers Running Cisco IOS and Cisco IOS XR Software: Example HC-703 Where to Go Next HC-704 Additional References HC-704 Related Documents HC-704 Standards HC-704 RFCs HC-705 MIBs HC-705 Technical Assistance HC-705 Configuring the Satellite Network Virtualization (nV) System on the Cisco ASR 9000 Series Router HC-707 Contents HC-707 Prerequisites for Configuration HC-708 Overview of Satellite nV Switching System HC-708 Benefits of Satellite nV System HC-709 Overview of Port Extender Model HC-710 Features Supported in the Satellite nV System HC-711 Satellite System Physical Topology HC-711 Inter-Chassis Link Redundancy Modes and Load Balancing HC-711 Satellite Discovery and Control Protocols HC-712 Satellite Discovery and Control Protocol IP Connectivity HC-712 Layer-2 and L2VPN Features HC-712 Layer-3 and L3VPN Features HC-712 Layer-2 and Layer-3 Multicast Features HC-712 Quality of Service HC-713 Cluster Support HC-713 Time of Day Synchronization HC-713 Satellite Chassis Management HC-713 Restrictions of the Satellite nV System HC-714 Implementing a Satellite nV System HC-714 Defining the Satellite nV System HC-714 Configuring the host IP address HC-717 Configuring the Inter-Chassis Links and IP Connectivity HC-718 Configuring the Satellite nV Access Interfaces HC-720 Plug and Play Satellite nV Switch Turn up: (Rack, Plug, and Go installation) HC-721Contents HC-xxvii Cisco ASR 9000 Series Aggregation Services Router Interface and Hardware Component Configuration Guide OL-26061-02 Upgrading and Managing Satellite nV Software HC-722 Prerequisites HC-722 Installing a Satellite HC-722 Monitoring the Satellite Software HC-723 Monitoring the Satellite Protocol Status HC-724 Monitoring the Satellite Inventory HC-725 Reloading the Satellite Device HC-727 Port Level Parameters Configured on a Satellite HC-727 Configuration Examples for Satellite nV System HC-728 Satellite System Configuration: Example HC-728 Satellite Global Configuration HC-728 ICL (satellite-fabric-link) Interface Configuration HC-728 Satellite Interface Configuration HC-729 Satellite Management using private VRF HC-729 Additional References HC-730 Related Documents HC-730 Standards HC-730 MIBs HC-730 RFCs HC-731 Technical Assistance HC-731 Configuring the nV Edge System on the Cisco ASR 9000 Series Router HC-733 Contents HC-733 Prerequisites for Configuration HC-734 Overview of Cisco ASR 9000 nV Edge Architecture HC-734 Inter Rack Links on Cisco ASR 9000 Series nV Edge System HC-735 Failure Detection in Cisco ASR 9000 Series nV Edge System HC-736 Scenarios for High Availability HC-736 Benefits of Cisco ASR 9000 Series nV Edge System HC-737 Restrictions of the Cisco ASR 9000 Series nV Edge System HC-738 Implementing a Cisco ASR 9000 Series nV Edge System HC-738 Configuring Cisco ASR 9000 nV Edge System HC-738 Single Chassis to Cluster Migration HC-738 Configuration Examples for nV Edge System HC-739 nV Edge System Configuration: Example HC-739 IRL (inter-rack-link) Interface Configuration HC-739 Cisco nV Edge IRL link Support from 10Gig interface HC-740 Additional References HC-741 Related Documents HC-741Contents HC-xxvii Cisco ASR 9000 Series Aggregation Services Router Interface and Hardware Component Configuration Guide OL-26061-02 Standards HC-741 MIBs HC-742 RFCs HC-742 Technical Assistance HC-742 IndexHC-xxix Cisco ASR 9000 Series Aggregation Services Router Interface and Hardware Component Configuration Guide OL-26061-02 Preface The Cisco ASR 9000 Series Aggregation Services Router Interface and Hardware Component Configuration Guide provides information and procedures related to router interface and hardware configuration. The preface contains the following sections: • Changes to This Document • Obtaining Documentation and Submitting a Service Request Changes to This Document Table 1 lists the technical changes made to this document since it was first printed. Obtaining Documentation and Submitting a Service Request For information on obtaining documentation, submitting a service request, and gathering additional information, see the monthly What’s New in Cisco Product Documentation, which also lists all new and revised Cisco technical documentation, at: http://www.cisco.com/en/US/docs/general/whatsnew/whatsnew.html Subscribe to the What’s New in Cisco Product Documentation as a Really Simple Syndication (RSS) feed and set content to be delivered directly to your desktop using a reader application. The RSS feeds are a free service and Cisco currently supports RSS version 2.0. Table 1 Changes to This Document Revision Date Change Summary OL-26061-02 June 2012 Republished with documentation updates for Cisco IOS XR Release 4.2.1 features. OL-26061-01 December 2011 Initial release of this document.Preface HC-xxx Cisco ASR 9000 Series Aggregation Services Router Interface and Hardware Component Configuration Guide OL-26061-02HC-1 Cisco ASR 9000 Series Aggregation Services Router Interface and Hardware Component Configuration Guide OL-26061-02 Preconfiguring Physical Interfaces on the Cisco ASR 9000 Series Router This module describes the preconfiguration of physical interfaces on the Cisco ASR 9000 Series Aggregation Services Routers. Preconfiguration is supported for the following types of interfaces and controllers: • Gigabit Ethernet • 10-Gigabit Ethernet • Management Ethernet • Packet-over-SONET/SDH (POS) • Serial • SONET controllers and channelized SONET controllers Preconfiguration allows you to configure modular services cards before they are inserted into the router. When the cards are inserted, they are instantly configured. The preconfiguration information is created in a different system database tree (known as the preconfiguration directory on the route switch processor [RSP]), rather than with the regularly configured interfaces. There may be some preconfiguration data that cannot be verified unless the modular services card is present, because the verifiers themselves run only on the modular services card. Such preconfiguration data is verified when the modular services card is inserted and the verifiers are initiated. A configuration is rejected if errors are found when the configuration is copied from the preconfiguration area to the active area. Note Only physical interfaces can be preconfigured. Feature History for Preconfiguring Physical Interfaces Release Modification Release 3.7.2 Ethernet interface preconfiguration was introduced. Release 4.0.0 POS interface preconfiguration was introduced.Preconfiguring Physical Interfaces on the Cisco ASR 9000 Series Router Contents HC-2 Cisco ASR 9000 Series Aggregation Services Router Interface and Hardware Component Configuration Guide OL-26061-02 Contents • Prerequisites for Preconfiguring Physical Interfaces, page 2 • Information About Preconfiguring Physical Interfaces, page 2 • How to Preconfigure Physical Interfaces, page 4 • Configuration Examples for Preconfiguring Physical Interfaces, page 6 • Additional References, page 7 Prerequisites for Preconfiguring Physical Interfaces You must be in a user group associated with a task group that includes the proper task IDs. The command reference guides include the task IDs required for each command. If you suspect user group assignment is preventing you from using a command, contact your AAA administrator for assistance. Before preconfiguring physical interfaces, be sure that the following conditions are met: • Preconfiguration drivers and files are installed. Although it may be possible to preconfigure physical interfaces without a preconfiguration driver installed, the preconfiguration files are required to set the interface definition file on the router that supplies the strings for valid interface names. Information About Preconfiguring Physical Interfaces To preconfigure interfaces, you must understand the following concepts: • Physical Interface Preconfiguration Overview, page 2 • Benefits of Interface Preconfiguration, page 3 • Use of the Interface Preconfigure Command, page 3 • Active and Standby RSPs and Virtual Interface Configuration, page 4 Physical Interface Preconfiguration Overview Preconfiguration is the process of configuring interfaces before they are present in the system. Preconfigured interfaces are not verified or applied until the actual interface with the matching location (rack/slot/module) is inserted into the router. When the anticipated modular services card is inserted and the interfaces are created, the precreated configuration information is verified and, if successful, immediately applied to the router’s running configuration. Note When you plug the anticipated modular services card in, make sure to verify any preconfiguration with the appropriate show commands. Use the show run command to see interfaces that are in the preconfigured state. Preconfiguring Physical Interfaces on the Cisco ASR 9000 Series Router Information About Preconfiguring Physical Interfaces HC-3 Cisco ASR 9000 Series Aggregation Services Router Interface and Hardware Component Configuration Guide OL-26061-02 Note We recommend filling out preconfiguration information in your site planning guide, so that you can compare that anticipated configuration with the actual preconfigured interfaces when that card is installed and the interfaces are up. Tip Use the commit best-effort command to save the preconfiguration to the running configuration file. The commit best-effort command merges the target configuration with the running configuration and commits only valid configuration (best effort). Some configuration might fail due to semantic errors, but the valid configuration still comes up. Benefits of Interface Preconfiguration Preconfigurations reduce downtime when you add new cards to the system. With preconfiguration, the new modular services card can be instantly configured and actively running during modular services card bootup. Another advantage of performing a preconfiguration is that during a card replacement, when the modular services card is removed, you can still see the previous configuration and make modifications. Use of the Interface Preconfigure Command Interfaces that are not yet present in the system can be preconfigured with the interface preconfigure command in global configuration mode. The interface preconfigure command places the router in interface configuration mode. Users should be able to add any possible interface commands. The verifiers registered for the preconfigured interfaces verify the configuration. The preconfiguration is complete when the user enters the end command, or any matching exit or global configuration mode command. Note It is possible that some configurations cannot be verified until the modular services card is inserted. Note Do not enter the no shutdown command for new preconfigured interfaces, because the no form of this command removes the existing configuration, and there is no existing configuration. Users are expected to provide names during preconfiguration that will match the name of the interface that will be created. If the interface names do not match, the preconfiguration cannot be applied when the interface is created. The interface names must begin with the interface type that is supported by the router and for which drivers have been installed. However, the slot, port, subinterface number, and channel interface number information cannot be validated. Note Specifying an interface name that already exists and is configured (or an abbreviated name like e0/3/0/0) is not permitted.Preconfiguring Physical Interfaces on the Cisco ASR 9000 Series Router How to Preconfigure Physical Interfaces HC-4 Cisco ASR 9000 Series Aggregation Services Router Interface and Hardware Component Configuration Guide OL-26061-02 Active and Standby RSPs and Virtual Interface Configuration The standby RSP is available and in a state in which it can take over the work from the active RSP should that prove necessary. Conditions that necessitate the standby RSP to become the active RSP and assume the active RSP’s duties include: • Failure detection by a watchdog • Standby RSP is administratively commanded to take over • Removal of the active RSP from the chassis If a second RSP is not present in the chassis while the first is in operation, a second RSP may be inserted and will automatically become the standby RSP. The standby RSP may also be removed from the chassis with no effect on the system other than loss of RSP redundancy. After failover, the virtual interfaces will all be present on the standby (now active) RSP. Their state and configuration will be unchanged, and there will have been no loss of forwarding (in the case of tunnels) over the interfaces during the failover. The Cisco ASR 9000 Series Router uses nonstop forwarding (NSF) over tunnels through the failover of the host RSP. Note The user does not need to configure anything to guarantee that the standby interface configurations are maintained. How to Preconfigure Physical Interfaces This task describes only the most basic preconfiguration of an interface. SUMMARY STEPS 1. configure 2. interface preconfigure type interface-path-id 3. ipv4 address ip-address subnet-mask 4. Configure additional interface parameters. 5. end or commit 6. exit 7. exit 8. show running-configPreconfiguring Physical Interfaces on the Cisco ASR 9000 Series Router How to Preconfigure Physical Interfaces HC-5 Cisco ASR 9000 Series Aggregation Services Router Interface and Hardware Component Configuration Guide OL-26061-02 DETAILED STEPS Command or Action Purpose Step 1 configure Example: RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# configure Enters global configuration mode. Step 2 interface preconfigure type interface-path-id Example: RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)# interface preconfigure GigabitEthernet 0/1/0/0 Enters interface preconfiguration mode for an interface, where type specifies the supported interface type that you want to configure and interface-path-id specifies the location where the interface will be located in rack/slot/module/port notation. Step 3 ipv4 address ip-address subnet-mask or ipv4 address ip-address/prefix Example: RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-if-pre)# ipv4 address 192.168.1.2/32 Assigns an IP address and mask to the interface. Step 4 Configure additional interface parameters, as described in this manual in the configuration chapter that applies to the type of interface that you are configuring. Preconfiguring Physical Interfaces on the Cisco ASR 9000 Series Router Configuration Examples for Preconfiguring Physical Interfaces HC-6 Cisco ASR 9000 Series Aggregation Services Router Interface and Hardware Component Configuration Guide OL-26061-02 Configuration Examples for Preconfiguring Physical Interfaces This section contains the following example: Preconfiguring an Interface: Example, page 6 Preconfiguring an Interface: Example The following example shows how to preconfigure a basic Ethernet interface: RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# configure RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)# interface preconfigure GigabitEthernet 0/1/0/0 RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-if)# ipv4 address 192.168.1.2/32 RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-if)# commit Step 5 end or commit best-effort Example: RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-if-pre)# end or RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-if-pre)# commit Saves configuration changes. • When you issue the end command, the system prompts you to commit changes: Uncommitted changes found, commit them before exiting (yes/no/cancel)? – Entering yes saves configuration changes to the running configuration file, exits the configuration session, and returns the router to EXEC mode. – Entering no exits the configuration session and returns the router to EXEC mode without committing the configuration changes. – Entering cancel leaves the router in the current configuration session without exiting or committing the configuration changes. • Use the commit best-effort command to save the configuration changes to the running configuration file and remain within the configuration session. The commit best-effort command merges the target configuration with the running configuration and commits only valid changes (best effort). Some configuration changes might fail due to semantic errors. Step 6 show running-config Example: RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# show running-config (Optional) Displays the configuration information currently running on the router. Command or Action PurposePreconfiguring Physical Interfaces on the Cisco ASR 9000 Series Router Additional References HC-7 Cisco ASR 9000 Series Aggregation Services Router Interface and Hardware Component Configuration Guide OL-26061-02 Additional References The sections that follow provide references related to the preconfiguration of physical interfaces. Related Documents Standards MIBs RFCs Related Topic Document Title Master command reference Cisco ASR 9000 Series Aggregation Services Routers Master Command Listing Interface configuration commands Cisco ASR 9000 Series Aggregation Services Routers Interface and Hardware Component Command Reference Initial system bootup and configuration information Cisco ASR 9000 Series Router Getting Started Guide Information about user groups and task IDs Cisco IOS XR Task ID Reference Guide Standards Title No new or modified standards are supported by this feature, and support for existing standards has not been modified by this feature. — MIBs MIBs Link There are no applicable MIBs for this module. To locate and download MIBs for selected platforms using Cisco IOS XR Software, use the Cisco MIB Locator found at the following URL: http://cisco.com/public/sw-center/netmgmt/cmtk/mibs.shtml RFCs Title No new or modified RFCs are supported by this feature, and support for existing RFCs has not been modified by this feature. —Preconfiguring Physical Interfaces on the Cisco ASR 9000 Series Router Additional References HC-8 Cisco ASR 9000 Series Aggregation Services Router Interface and Hardware Component Configuration Guide OL-26061-02 Technical Assistance Description Link The Cisco Technical Support website contains thousands of pages of searchable technical content, including links to products, technologies, solutions, technical tips, and tools. Registered Cisco.com users can log in from this page to access even more content. http://www.cisco.com/techsupportHC-9 Cisco ASR 9000 Series Aggregation Services Router Interface and Hardware Component Configuration Guide OL-26061-02 Advanced Configuration and Modification of the Management Ethernet Interface on the Cisco ASR 9000 Series Router This module describes the configuration of Management Ethernet interfaces on the Cisco ASR 9000 Series Aggregation Services Routers. Before you can use Telnet to access the router through the LAN IP address, you must set up a Management Ethernet interface and enable Telnet servers, as described in the Configuring General Router Features module of the Cisco ASR 9000 Series Router Getting Started Guide. This module describes how to modify the default configuration of the Management Ethernet interface after it has been configured, as described in the Cisco ASR 9000 Series Router Getting Started Guide. Note Forwarding between physical layer interface modules (PLIM) ports and Management Ethernet interface ports is disabled by default. To enable forwarding between PLIM ports and Management Ethernet interface ports, use the rp mgmtethernet forwarding command. Note Although the Management Ethernet interfaces on the system are present by default, the user must configure these interfaces to use them for accessing the router, using protocols and applications such as Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP), Common Object Request Broker Architecture (CORBA), HTTP, extensible markup language (XML), TFTP, Telnet, and command-line interface (CLI). Feature History for Configuring Management Ethernet Interfaces Contents • Prerequisites for Configuring Management Ethernet Interfaces, page 10 • Information About Configuring Management Ethernet Interfaces, page 10 • How to Perform Advanced Management Ethernet Interface Configuration, page 11 • Configuration Examples for Management Ethernet Interfaces, page 18 • Additional References, page 19 Release Modification Release 3.7.2 This feature was introduced on the Cisco ASR 9000 Series Router.Advanced Configuration and Modification of the Management Ethernet Interface on the Prerequisites for Configuring Management Ethernet Interfaces HC-10 Cisco ASR 9000 Series Aggregation Services Router Interface and Hardware Component Configuration Guide OL-26061-02 Prerequisites for Configuring Management Ethernet Interfaces You must be in a user group associated with a task group that includes the proper task IDs. The command reference guides include the task IDs required for each command. If you suspect user group assignment is preventing you from using a command, contact your AAA administrator for assistance. Before performing the Management Ethernet interface configuration procedures that are described in this chapter, be sure that the following tasks and conditions are met: • You have performed the initial configuration of the Management Ethernet interface, as described in the Configuring General Router Features module of the Cisco ASR 9000 Series Router Getting Started Guide. • You must be in a user group associated with a task group that includes the proper task IDs. The command reference guides include the task IDs required for each command. • You know how to apply the generalized interface name specification rack/slot/module/port. For further information on interface naming conventions, refer to the Cisco ASR 9000 Series Router Getting Started Guide. Note For transparent switchover, both active and standby Management Ethernet interfaces are expected to be physically connected to the same LAN or switch. Information About Configuring Management Ethernet Interfaces To configure Management Ethernet interfaces, you must understand the following concept: • Default Interface Settings, page 10 Default Interface Settings Table 2 describes the default Management Ethernet interface settings that can be changed by manual configuration. Default settings are not displayed in the show running-config command output. Table 2 Management Ethernet Interface Default Settings Parameter Default Value Configuration File Entry Speed in Mbps Speed is autonegotiated. speed [10 | 100 | 1000] To return the system to autonegotiate speed, use the no speed [10 | 100 | 1000] command.Advanced Configuration and Modification of the Management Ethernet Interface on the Cisco ASR 9000 Series Router How to Perform Advanced Management Ethernet Interface Configuration HC-11 Cisco ASR 9000 Series Aggregation Services Router Interface and Hardware Component Configuration Guide OL-26061-02 How to Perform Advanced Management Ethernet Interface Configuration This section contains the following procedures: • Configuring a Management Ethernet Interface, page 11 (required) • Configuring the Duplex Mode for a Management Ethernet Interface, page 13 (optional) • Configuring the Speed for a Management Ethernet Interface, page 14 (optional) • Modifying the MAC Address for a Management Ethernet Interface, page 16 (optional) • Verifying Management Ethernet Interface Configuration, page 17 (optional) Configuring a Management Ethernet Interface Perform this task to configure a Management Ethernet interface. This procedure provides the minimal configuration required for the Management Ethernet interface. The MTU is not configurable for the Management Ethernet Interface. The default value is 1514 bytes. Note You do not need to perform this task if you have already set up the Management Ethernet interface to enable telnet servers, as described in the “Configuring General Router Features” module of the Cisco ASR 9000 Series Router Getting Started Guide. SUMMARY STEPS 1. configure 2. interface MgmtEth interface-path-id 3. ipv4 address ip-address mask 4. no shutdown 5. end or commit 6. show interfaces MgmtEth interface-path-id Duplex mode Duplex mode is autonegotiated. duplex {full | half} To return the system to autonegotiated duplex operation, use the no duplex {full | half} command, as appropriate. MAC address MAC address is read from the hardware burned-in address (BIA). mac-address address To return the device to its default MAC address, use the no mac-address address command. Table 2 Management Ethernet Interface Default Settings Parameter Default Value Configuration File EntryAdvanced Configuration and Modification of the Management Ethernet Interface on the How to Perform Advanced Management Ethernet Interface Configuration HC-12 Cisco ASR 9000 Series Aggregation Services Router Interface and Hardware Component Configuration Guide OL-26061-02 DETAILED STEPS Command or Action Purpose Step 1 configure Example: RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# configure Enters global configuration mode. Step 2 interface MgmtEth interface-path-id Example: RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)# interface MgmtEth 0/RSP0/CPU0/0 Enters interface configuration mode and specifies the Ethernet interface name and notation rack/slot/module/port. The example indicates port 0 on the RSP card that is installed in slot 0. Step 3 ipv4 address ip-address mask Example: RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-if)# ipv4 address 172.18.189.38 255.255.255.224 Assigns an IP address and subnet mask to the interface. • Replace ip-address with the primary IPv4 address for the interface. • Replace mask with the mask for the associated IP subnet. The network mask can be specified in either of two ways: – The network mask can be a four-part dotted decimal address. For example, 255.0.0.0 indicates that each bit equal to 1 means that the corresponding address bit belongs to the network address. – The network mask can be indicated as a slash (/) and number. For example, /8 indicates that the first 8 bits of the mask are ones, and the corresponding bits of the address are network address. Step 4 no shutdown Example: RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-if)# no shutdown Removes the shutdown configuration, which removes the forced administrative down on the interface, enabling it to move to an up or down state.Advanced Configuration and Modification of the Management Ethernet Interface on the Cisco ASR 9000 Series Router How to Perform Advanced Management Ethernet Interface Configuration HC-13 Cisco ASR 9000 Series Aggregation Services Router Interface and Hardware Component Configuration Guide OL-26061-02 Configuring the Duplex Mode for a Management Ethernet Interface Perform this task to configure the duplex mode of the Management Ethernet interfaces for the RPs. SUMMARY STEPS 1. configure 2. interface MgmtEth interface-path-id 3. duplex [full | half] 4. end or commit Step 5 end or commit Example: RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-if)# end or RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-if)# commit Saves configuration changes. • When you issue the end command, the system prompts you to commit changes: Uncommitted changes found, commit them before exiting(yes/no/cancel)? [cancel]: – Entering yes saves configuration changes to the running configuration file, exits the configuration session, and returns the router to EXEC mode. – Entering no exits the configuration session and returns the router to EXEC mode without committing the configuration changes. – Entering cancel leaves the router in the current configuration session without exiting or committing the configuration changes. • Use the commit command to save the configuration changes to the running configuration file and remain within the configuration session. Step 6 show interfaces MgmtEth interface-path-id Example: RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# show interfaces MgmtEth 0/RSP0/CPU0/0 (Optional) Displays statistics for interfaces on the router. Command or Action PurposeAdvanced Configuration and Modification of the Management Ethernet Interface on the How to Perform Advanced Management Ethernet Interface Configuration HC-14 Cisco ASR 9000 Series Aggregation Services Router Interface and Hardware Component Configuration Guide OL-26061-02 DETAILED STEPS Configuring the Speed for a Management Ethernet Interface Perform this task to configure the speed of the Management Ethernet interfaces for the RPs. SUMMARY STEPS 1. configure 2. interface MgmtEth interface-path-id 3. speed {10 | 100 | 1000} Command or Action Purpose Step 1 configure Example: RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# configure Enters global configuration mode. Step 2 interface MgmtEth interface-path-id Example: RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)# interface MgmtEth 0/RSP0/CPU0/0 Enters interface configuration mode and specifies the Management Ethernet interface name and instance. Step 3 duplex [full | half] Example: RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-if)# duplex full Configures the interface duplex mode. Valid options are full or half. Note To return the system to autonegotiated duplex operation, use the no duplex command. Step 4 end or commit Example: RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-if)# end or RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-if)# commit Saves configuration changes. • When you issue the end command, the system prompts you to commit changes: Uncommitted changes found, commit them before exiting(yes/no/cancel)? [cancel]: – Entering yes saves configuration changes to the running configuration file, exits the configuration session, and returns the router to EXEC mode. – Entering no exits the configuration session and returns the router to EXEC mode without committing the configuration changes. – Entering cancel leaves the router in the current configuration session without exiting or committing the configuration changes. • Use the commit command to save the configuration changes to the running configuration file and remain within the configuration session.Advanced Configuration and Modification of the Management Ethernet Interface on the Cisco ASR 9000 Series Router How to Perform Advanced Management Ethernet Interface Configuration HC-15 Cisco ASR 9000 Series Aggregation Services Router Interface and Hardware Component Configuration Guide OL-26061-02 4. end or commit DETAILED STEPS Command or Action Purpose Step 1 configure Example: RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# configure Enters global configuration mode. Step 2 interface MgmtEth interface-path-id Example: RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)# interface MgmtEth 0/RSP0/CPU0/0 Enters interface configuration mode and specifies the Management Ethernet interface name and instance. Step 3 speed {10 | 100 | 1000} Example: RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-if)# speed 100 Configures the interface speed parameter. On a Cisco ASR 9000 Series Router, valid speed options are 10 or 100 Mbps. Note The default Management Ethernet interface speed is autonegotiated. Note To return the system to the default autonegotiated speed, use the no speed command. Step 4 end or commit Example: RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-if)# end or RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-if)# commit Saves configuration changes. • When you issue the end command, the system prompts you to commit changes: Uncommitted changes found, commit them before exiting(yes/no/cancel)? [cancel]: – Entering yes saves configuration changes to the running configuration file, exits the configuration session, and returns the router to EXEC mode. – Entering no exits the configuration session and returns the router to EXEC mode without committing the configuration changes. – Entering cancel leaves the router in the current configuration session without exiting or committing the configuration changes. • Use the commit command to save the configuration changes to the running configuration file and remain within the configuration session.Advanced Configuration and Modification of the Management Ethernet Interface on the How to Perform Advanced Management Ethernet Interface Configuration HC-16 Cisco ASR 9000 Series Aggregation Services Router Interface and Hardware Component Configuration Guide OL-26061-02 Modifying the MAC Address for a Management Ethernet Interface Perform this task to configure the MAC layer address of the Management Ethernet interfaces for the RPs. SUMMARY STEPS 1. configure 2. interface MgmtEth interface-path-id 3. mac-address address 4. end or commit DETAILED STEPS Command or Action Purpose Step 1 configure Example: RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# configure Enters global configuration mode. Step 2 interface MgmtEth interface-path-id Example: RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)# interface MgmtEth 0/RSP0/CPU0/0 Enters interface configuration mode and specifies the Management Ethernet interface name and instance.Advanced Configuration and Modification of the Management Ethernet Interface on the Cisco ASR 9000 Series Router How to Perform Advanced Management Ethernet Interface Configuration HC-17 Cisco ASR 9000 Series Aggregation Services Router Interface and Hardware Component Configuration Guide OL-26061-02 Verifying Management Ethernet Interface Configuration Perform this task to verify configuration modifications on the Management Ethernet interfaces for the RPs. SUMMARY STEPS 1. show interfaces MgmtEth interface-path-id 2. show running-config Step 3 mac-address address Example: RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-if)# mac-address 0001.2468.ABCD Configures the MAC layer address of the Management Ethernet interface. Note To return the device to its default MAC address, use the no mac-address address command. Step 4 end or commit Example: RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-if)# end or RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-if)# commit Saves configuration changes. • When you issue the end command, the system prompts you to commit changes: Uncommitted changes found, commit them before exiting(yes/no/cancel)? [cancel]: – Entering yes saves configuration changes to the running configuration file, exits the configuration session, and returns the router to EXEC mode. – Entering no exits the configuration session and returns the router to EXEC mode without committing the configuration changes. – Entering cancel leaves the router in the current configuration session without exiting or committing the configuration changes. • Use the commit command to save the configuration changes to the running configuration file and remain within the configuration session. Command or Action Purpose Step 1 show interfaces MgmtEth interface-path-id Example: RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# show interfaces MgmtEth 0/RSP0/CPU0/0 Displays the Management Ethernet interface configuration. Step 2 show running-config interface MgmtEth interface-path-id Example: RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# show running-config interface MgmtEth 0/RSP0/CPU0/0 Displays the running configuration.Advanced Configuration and Modification of the Management Ethernet Interface on the Configuration Examples for Management Ethernet Interfaces HC-18 Cisco ASR 9000 Series Aggregation Services Router Interface and Hardware Component Configuration Guide OL-26061-02 Configuration Examples for Management Ethernet Interfaces This section provides the following configuration examples: • Configuring a Management Ethernet Interface: Example, page 18 Configuring a Management Ethernet Interface: Example This example displays advanced configuration and verification of the Management Ethernet interface on the RP: RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# configure RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)# interface MgmtEth 0/RSP0/CPU0/0 RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)# ipv4 address 172.29.52.70 255.255.255.0 RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-if)# speed 100 RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-if)# duplex full RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-if)# no shutdown RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-if)# commit RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:Mar 26 01:09:28.685 :ifmgr[190]:%LINK-3-UPDOWN :Interface MgmtEth0/RSP0/CPU0/0, changed state to Up RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-if)# end RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# show interfaces MgmtEth 0/RSP0/CPU0/0 MMgmtEth0/RSP0/CPU0/0 is up, line protocol is up Hardware is Management Ethernet, address is 0011.93ef.e8ea (bia 0011.93ef.e8ea ) Description: Connected to Lab LAN Internet address is 172.29.52.70/24 MTU 1514 bytes, BW 100000 Kbit reliability 255/255, txload 1/255, rxload 1/255 Encapsulation ARPA, loopback not set, ARP type ARPA, ARP timeout 04:00:00 Last clearing of "show interface" counters never 5 minute input rate 3000 bits/sec, 7 packets/sec 5 minute output rate 0 bits/sec, 1 packets/sec 30445 packets input, 1839328 bytes, 64 total input drops 0 drops for unrecognized upper-level protocol Received 23564 broadcast packets, 0 multicast packets 0 runts, 0 giants, 0 throttles, 0 parity 57 input errors, 40 CRC, 0 frame, 0 overrun, 0 ignored, 0 abort 171672 packets output, 8029024 bytes, 0 total output drops Output 16 broadcast packets, 0 multicast packets 0 output errors, 0 underruns, 0 applique, 0 resets 0 output buffer failures, 0 output buffers swapped out 1 carrier transitions RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# show running-config interface MgmtEth 0/RSP0/CPU0/0 interface MgmtEth0/RSP0/CPU0/0 description Connected to Lab LAN ipv4 address 172.29.52.70 255.255.255.0 !Advanced Configuration and Modification of the Management Ethernet Interface on the Cisco ASR 9000 Series Router Additional References HC-19 Cisco ASR 9000 Series Aggregation Services Router Interface and Hardware Component Configuration Guide OL-26061-02 Additional References The following sections provide references related to Management Ethernet interface configuration. Related Documents Standards MIBs RFCs Related Topic Document Title Cisco ASR 9000 Series Router master command reference Cisco ASR 9000 Series Router Master Commands List Cisco ASR 9000 Series Router interface configuration commands Cisco ASR 9000 Series Router Interface and Hardware Component Command Reference Initial system bootup and configuration information for a Cisco ASR 9000 Series Router using the Cisco IOS XR Software. Cisco ASR 9000 Series Router Getting Started Guide Information about user groups and task IDs Cisco ASR 9000 Series Router Interface and Hardware Component Command Reference Standards Title No new or modified standards are supported by this feature, and support for existing standards has not been modified by the feature. — MIBs MIBs Link There are no applicable MIBs for this module. To locate and download MIBs for selected platforms using Cisco IOS XR Software, use the Cisco MIB Locator found at the following URL: http://cisco.com/public/sw-center/netmgmt/cmtk/mibs.shtml RFCs Title No new or modified RFCs are supported by this feature, and support for existing RFCs has not been modified by this feature. —Advanced Configuration and Modification of the Management Ethernet Interface on the Additional References HC-20 Cisco ASR 9000 Series Aggregation Services Router Interface and Hardware Component Configuration Guide OL-26061-02 Technical Assistance Description Link The Cisco Technical Support website contains thousands of pages of searchable technical content, including links to products, technologies, solutions, technical tips, and tools. Registered Cisco.com users can log in from this page to access even more content. http://www.cisco.com/techsupportHC-21 Cisco ASR 9000 Series Aggregation Services Router Interface and Hardware Component Configuration Guide OL-26061-02 Configuring Ethernet Interfaces on the Cisco ASR 9000 Series Router This module describes the configuration of Ethernet interfaces on the Cisco ASR 9000 Series Aggregation Services Routers. The distributed Gigabit Ethernet and 10-Gigabit Ethernet architecture and features deliver network scalability and performance, while enabling service providers to offer high-density, high-bandwidth networking solutions designed to interconnect the router with other systems in POPs, including core and edge routers and Layer 2 and Layer 3 switches. Feature History for Configuring Ethernet Interfaces on the Cisco ASR 9000 Series Router Release Modification Release 3.7.2 Support was added on the Cisco ASR 9000 Series Router for the following line cards: • 40-Port Gigabit Ethernet Medium Queue and High Queue Line Cards (A9K-40GE-B and A9K-40GE-E) • 4-Port 10-Gigabit Ethernet Medium Queue and High Queue Line Cards (A9K-4T-B and A9K-4T-E) • 8-Port 10-Gigabit Ethernet Medium Queue and High Queue DX Line Cards (A9K-8T/4-B and A9K-8T/4-E) (2:1 oversubscribed)Configuring Ethernet Interfaces on the Cisco ASR 9000 Series Router HC-22 Cisco ASR 9000 Series Aggregation Services Router Interface and Hardware Component Configuration Guide OL-26061-02 Release 3.9.0 Support was added on the Cisco ASR 9000 Series Router for the following line cards: • 40-Port Gigabit Ethernet Low Queue Line Card (A9K-40GE-L) • 4-Port 10-Gigabit Ethernet Low Queue Line Card (A9K-4T-L) • 8-Port 10-Gigabit Ethernet Low Queue DX Line Card (A9K-8T/4-L) (2:1 oversubscribed) • 8-Port 10-Gigabit Ethernet Low and High Queue Line Card (A9K-8T-L and A9K-8T-E) • 2-Port 10-Gigabit Ethernet, 20-Port Gigabit Ethernet Medium Queue and High Queue Combination Line Cards (A9K-2T20GE-B and A9K-2T20GE-L) Support for the following features was added: • Frequency Synchronization • SyncE Release 3.9.1 Support was added on the Cisco ASR 9000 Series Router for the following line cards: • 8-Port 10-Gigabit Ethernet Medium Queue Line Card (A9K-8T-B) • 16-Port 10-Gigabit Ethernet SFP+ Line Card (A9K-16T/8-B and A9K-16T/8-B+AIP) Release 4.0.1 Support for Layer 2 statistics collection for performance monitoring on Layer 2 subinterfaces (EFPs) is added. Release 4.1.1 Support was added for MAC address accounting feature.Configuring Ethernet Interfaces on the Cisco ASR 9000 Series Router Contents HC-23 Cisco ASR 9000 Series Aggregation Services Router Interface and Hardware Component Configuration Guide OL-26061-02 Contents • Prerequisites for Configuring Ethernet Interfaces, page 24 • Information About Configuring Ethernet, page 26 • Configuring Ethernet Interfaces, page 42 • Configuration Examples for Ethernet, page 55 • Where to Go Next, page 58 • Additional References, page 58 Prerequisites for Configuring Ethernet Interfaces You must be in a user group associated with a task group that includes the proper task IDs. The command reference guides include the task IDs required for each command. If you suspect user group assignment is preventing you from using a command, contact your AAA administrator for assistance. Before configuring Ethernet interfaces, be sure that the following tasks and conditions are met: • Confirm that at least one of the following line cards supported on the router is installed: – 2-Port 10-Gigabit Ethernet, 20-Port Gigabit Ethernet Combination line card (A9K-2T20GE-B and A9K-2T20GE-L) – 4-Port 10-Gigabit Ethernet line card (A9K-4T-L, -B, or -E) – 8-Port 10-Gigabit Ethernet DX line card (A9K-8T/4-L, -B, or -E) – 8-Port 10-Gigabit Ethernet line card (A9K-8T-L, -B, or -E) – 16-Port 10-Gigabit Ethernet SFP+ line card (A9K-16T/8-B and A9K-16T/8-B+AIP) – 40-Port Gigabit Ethernet line card (A9K-40GE-L, -B, or -E) • Know the interface IP address. • You know how to apply the specify the generalized interface name with the generalized notation rack/slot/module/port. Configuring Ethernet Interfaces on the Cisco ASR 9000 Series Router Information About Configuring Ethernet HC-24 Cisco ASR 9000 Series Aggregation Services Router Interface and Hardware Component Configuration Guide OL-26061-02 Information About Configuring Ethernet Ethernet is defined by the IEEE 802.3 international standard. It enables the connection of up to 1024 nodes over coaxial, twisted-pair, or fiber-optic cable. The Cisco ASR 9000 Series Router supports Gigabit Ethernet (1000 Mbps) and 10-Gigabit Ethernet (10 Gbps) interfaces. This section provides the following information sections: • 16-Port 10-Gigabit Ethernet SFP+ Line Card, page 26 • Default Configuration Values for Gigabit Ethernet and 10-Gigabit Ethernet, page 27 • Layer 2 VPN on Ethernet Interfaces, page 28 • Gigabit Ethernet Protocol Standards Overview, page 29 • MAC Address, page 30 • MAC Accounting, page 31 • Ethernet MTU, page 31 • Flow Control on Ethernet Interfaces, page 31 • 802.1Q VLAN, page 32 • VRRP, page 32 • HSRP, page 32 • Link Autonegotiation on Ethernet Interfaces, page 33 • Subinterfaces on the Cisco ASR 9000 Series Router, page 34 • Frequency Synchronization and SyncE, page 40 16-Port 10-Gigabit Ethernet SFP+ Line Card The 16-Port10-Gigabit Ethernet SFP+ line card is a Small Form Factor (SFP transceiver) optical line card introduced in Cisco IOS XR Release 3.9.1 on the Cisco ASR 9000 Series Router. The 16-Port10-Gigabit Ethernet SFP+ line card supports all of the Gigabit Ethernet commands and configurations currently supported on the router. The 16-Port10-Gigabit Ethernet SFP+ line card is compatible with all existing Cisco ASR 9000 Series Router line cards, route/switch processors (RSPs), and chassis. Features The 16-Port10-Gigabit Ethernet SFP+ line card supports the following features: • 16 10-Gigabit Ethernet ports • 128 10-Gigabit Ethernet ports per system • 1.28 Tbps per system • 160 Gbps forwarding • 120 Gbps bidirectional performance • SR/LR/ER SFP+ optics • Feature parity with existing line cardsConfiguring Ethernet Interfaces on the Cisco ASR 9000 Series Router Information About Configuring Ethernet HC-25 Cisco ASR 9000 Series Aggregation Services Router Interface and Hardware Component Configuration Guide OL-26061-02 • Unicast and multicast forwarding at 160 Gbps, with zero packet loss during RSP switchover Restrictions The following features are not supported on the 16-Port10-Gigabit Ethernet SFP+ line card: • DWDM (G.709) Default Configuration Values for Gigabit Ethernet and 10-Gigabit Ethernet Table 3 describes the default interface configuration parameters that are present when an interface is enabled on a Gigabit Ethernet or 10-Gigabit Ethernet modular services card and its associated PLIM. Note You must use the shutdown command to bring an interface administratively down. The interface default is no shutdown. When a modular services card is first inserted into the router, if there is no established preconfiguration for it, the configuration manager adds a shutdown item to its configuration. This shutdown can be removed only be entering the no shutdown command. Table 3 Gigabit Ethernet and 10-Gigabit Ethernet Modular Services Card Default Configuration Values Parameter Configuration File Entry Default Value MAC accounting mac-accounting off Flow control flow-control egress on ingress off MTU mtu • 1514 bytes for normal frames • 1518 bytes for 802.1Q tagged frames. • 1522 bytes for Q-in-Q frames. MAC address mac address Hardware burned-in address (BIA) Table 4 Fast Ethernet Default Configuration Values Parameter Configuration File Entry Default Value MAC accounting mac-accounting off Duplex operation duplex full duplex half Auto-negotiates duplex operation MTU mtu 1500 bytes Interface speed speed 100 Mbps Auto-negotiation negotiation auto disableConfiguring Ethernet Interfaces on the Cisco ASR 9000 Series Router Information About Configuring Ethernet HC-26 Cisco ASR 9000 Series Aggregation Services Router Interface and Hardware Component Configuration Guide OL-26061-02 Layer 2 VPN on Ethernet Interfaces Layer 2 Virtual Private Network (L2VPN) connections emulate the behavior of a LAN across an L2 switched, IP or MPLS-enabled IP network, allowing Ethernet devices to communicate with each other as if they were connected to a common LAN segment. The L2VPN feature enables service providers (SPs) to provide Layer 2 services to geographically disparate customer sites. Typically, an SP uses an access network to connect the customer to the core network. On the Cisco ASR 9000 Series Router, this access network is typically Ethernet. Traffic from the customer travels over this link to the edge of the SP core network. The traffic then tunnels through an L2VPN over the SP core network to another edge router. The edge router sends the traffic down another attachment circuit (AC) to the customer's remote site. On the Cisco ASR 9000 Series Router, an AC is an interface that is attached to an L2VPN component, such as a bridge domain, pseudowire, or local connect. The L2VPN feature enables users to implement different types of end-to-end services. Cisco IOS XR software supports a point-to-point end-to-end service, where two Ethernet circuits are connected together. An L2VPN Ethernet port can operate in one of two modes: • Port Mode—In this mode, all packets reaching the port are sent over the PW (pseudowire), regardless of any VLAN tags that are present on the packets. In VLAN mode, the configuration is performed under the l2transport configuration mode. • VLAN Mode—Each VLAN on a CE (customer edge) or access network to PE (provider edge) link can be configured as a separate L2VPN connection (using either VC type 4 or VC type 5). In VLAN mode, the configuration is performed under the individual subinterface. Switching can take place in three ways: • AC-to-PW—Traffic reaching the PE is tunneled over a PW (and conversely, traffic arriving over the PW is sent out over the AC). This is the most common scenario. • Local switching—Traffic arriving on one AC is immediately sent out of another AC without passing through a pseudowire. • PW stitching—Traffic arriving on a PW is not sent to an AC, but is sent back into the core over another PW. Keep the following in mind when configuring L2VPN on an Ethernet interface: • L2VPN links support QoS (Quality of Service) and MTU (maximum transmission unit) configuration. • If your network requires that packets are transported transparently, you may need to modify the packet’s destination MAC (Media Access Control) address at the edge of the Service Provider (SP) network. This prevents the packet from being consumed by the devices in the SP network. Use the show interfaces command to display AC and PW information. To configure a point-to-point pseudowire xconnect on an AC, refer to these documents: • Cisco ASR 9000 Series Aggregation Services Router L2VPN and Ethernet Services Configuration Guide • Cisco ASR 9000 Series Aggregation Services Router L2VPN and Ethernet Services Command Reference To attach Layer 2 service policies, such as QoS, to the Ethernet interface, refer to the appropriate Cisco IOS XR software configuration guide.Configuring Ethernet Interfaces on the Cisco ASR 9000 Series Router Information About Configuring Ethernet HC-27 Cisco ASR 9000 Series Aggregation Services Router Interface and Hardware Component Configuration Guide OL-26061-02 Gigabit Ethernet Protocol Standards Overview The Gigabit Ethernet interfaces support the following protocol standards: • IEEE 802.3 Physical Ethernet Infrastructure, page 30 • IEEE 802.3ab 1000BASE-T Gigabit Ethernet, page 30 • IEEE 802.3z 1000 Mbps Gigabit Ethernet, page 30 • IEEE 802.3ae 10 Gbps Ethernet, page 30 These standards are further described in the sections that follow. IEEE 802.3 Physical Ethernet Infrastructure The IEEE 802.3 protocol standards define the physical layer and MAC sublayer of the data link layer of wired Ethernet. IEEE 802.3 uses Carrier Sense Multiple Access with Collision Detection (CSMA/CD) access at a variety of speeds over a variety of physical media. The IEEE 802.3 standard covers 10 Mbps Ethernet. Extensions to the IEEE 802.3 standard specify implementations for Gigabit Ethernet, 10-Gigabit Ethernet, and Fast Ethernet. IEEE 802.3ab 1000BASE-T Gigabit Ethernet The IEEE 802.3ab protocol standards, or Gigabit Ethernet over copper (also known as 1000BaseT) is an extension of the existing Fast Ethernet standard. It specifies Gigabit Ethernet operation over the Category 5e/6 cabling systems already installed, making it a highly cost-effective solution. As a result, most copper-based environments that run Fast Ethernet can also run Gigabit Ethernet over the existing network infrastructure to dramatically boost network performance for demanding applications. IEEE 802.3z 1000 Mbps Gigabit Ethernet Gigabit Ethernet builds on top of the Ethernet protocol, but increases speed tenfold over Fast Ethernet to 1000 Mbps, or 1 Gbps. Gigabit Ethernet allows Ethernet to scale from 10 or 100 Mbps at the desktop to 100 Mbps up to 1000 Mbps in the data center. Gigabit Ethernet conforms to the IEEE 802.3z protocol standard. By leveraging the current Ethernet standard and the installed base of Ethernet and Fast Ethernet switches and routers, network managers do not need to retrain and relearn a new technology in order to provide support for Gigabit Ethernet. IEEE 802.3ae 10 Gbps Ethernet Under the International Standards Organization’s Open Systems Interconnection (OSI) model, Ethernet is fundamentally a Layer 2 protocol. 10-Gigabit Ethernet uses the IEEE 802.3 Ethernet MAC protocol, the IEEE 802.3 Ethernet frame format, and the minimum and maximum IEEE 802.3 frame size. 10 Gbps Ethernet conforms to the IEEE 802.3ae protocol standards. Just as 1000BASE-X and 1000BASE-T (Gigabit Ethernet) remained true to the Ethernet model, 10-Gigabit Ethernet continues the natural evolution of Ethernet in speed and distance. Because it is a full-duplex only and fiber-only technology, it does not need the carrier-sensing multiple-access with the CSMA/CD protocol that defines slower, half-duplex Ethernet technologies. In every other respect, 10-Gigabit Ethernet remains true to the original Ethernet model.Configuring Ethernet Interfaces on the Cisco ASR 9000 Series Router Information About Configuring Ethernet HC-28 Cisco ASR 9000 Series Aggregation Services Router Interface and Hardware Component Configuration Guide OL-26061-02 IEEE 802.3ba 100 Gbps Ethernet IEEE 802.3ba is supported on the Cisco 1-Port 100-Gigabit Ethernet PLIM beginning in Cisco IOS XR 4.0.1. MAC Address A MAC address is a unique 6-byte address that identifies the interface at Layer 2. MAC Accounting The MAC address accounting feature provides accounting information for IP traffic based on the source and destination MAC addresses on LAN interfaces. This feature calculates the total packet and byte counts for a LAN interface that receives or sends IP packets to or from a unique MAC address. It also records a time stamp for the last packet received or sent. These statistics are used for traffic monitoring, debugging and billing. For example, with this feature you can determine the volume of traffic that is being sent to and/or received from various peers at NAPS/peering points. This feature is currently supported on Ethernet, FastEthernet, and bundle interfaces and supports Cisco Express Forwarding (CEF), distributed CEF (dCEF), flow, and optimum switching. Note A maximum of 512 MAC addresses per trunk interface are supported for MAC address accounting. Ethernet MTU The Ethernet maximum transmission unit (MTU) is the size of the largest frame, minus the 4-byte frame check sequence (FCS), that can be transmitted on the Ethernet network. Every physical network along the destination of a packet can have a different MTU. Cisco IOS XR software supports two types of frame forwarding processes: • Fragmentation for IPV4 packets–In this process, IPv4 packets are fragmented as necessary to fit within the MTU of the next-hop physical network. Note IPv6 does not support fragmentation. • MTU discovery process determines largest packet size–This process is available for all IPV6 devices, and for originating IPv4 devices. In this process, the originating IP device determines the size of the largest IPv6 or IPV4 packet that can be sent without being fragmented. The largest packet is equal to the smallest MTU of any network between the IP source and the IP destination devices. If a packet is larger than the smallest MTU of all the networks in its path, that packet will be fragmented as necessary. This process ensures that the originating device does not send an IP packet that is too large. Jumbo frame support is automatically enable for frames that exceed the standard frame size. The default value is 1514 for standard frames and 1518 for 802.1Q tagged frames. These numbers exclude the 4-byte frame check sequence (FCS). Configuring Ethernet Interfaces on the Cisco ASR 9000 Series Router Information About Configuring Ethernet HC-29 Cisco ASR 9000 Series Aggregation Services Router Interface and Hardware Component Configuration Guide OL-26061-02 Flow Control on Ethernet Interfaces The flow control used on 10-Gigabit Ethernet interfaces consists of periodically sending flow control pause frames. It is fundamentally different from the usual full- and half-duplex flow control used on standard management interfaces. Flow control can be activated or deactivated for ingress traffic only. It is automatically implemented for egress traffic. 802.1Q VLAN A VLAN is a group of devices on one or more LANs that are configured so that they can communicate as if they were attached to the same wire, when in fact they are located on a number of different LAN segments. Because VLANs are based on logical instead of physical connections, it is very flexible for user and host management, bandwidth allocation, and resource optimization. The IEEE's 802.1Q protocol standard addresses the problem of breaking large networks into smaller parts so broadcast and multicast traffic does not consume more bandwidth than necessary. The standard also helps provide a higher level of security between segments of internal networks. The 802.1Q specification establishes a standard method for inserting VLAN membership information into Ethernet frames. VRRP The Virtual Router Redundancy Protocol (VRRP) eliminates the single point of failure inherent in the static default routed environment. VRRP specifies an election protocol that dynamically assigns responsibility for a virtual router to one of the VPN concentrators on a LAN. The VRRP VPN concentrator controlling the IP addresses associated with a virtual router is called the master, and forwards packets sent to those IP addresses. When the master becomes unavailable, a backup VPN concentrator takes the place of the master. For more information on VRRP, see the Implementing VRRP module of Cisco ASR 9000 Series Router IP Addresses and Services Configuration Guide. HSRP Hot Standby Routing Protocol (HSRP) is a proprietary protocol from Cisco. HSRP is a routing protocol that provides backup to a router in the event of failure. Several routers are connected to the same segment of an Ethernet, FDDI, or token-ring network and work together to present the appearance of a single virtual router on the LAN. The routers share the same IP and MAC addresses and therefore, in the event of failure of one router, the hosts on the LAN are able to continue forwarding packets to a consistent IP and MAC address. The transfer of routing responsibilities from one device to another is transparent to the user. HSRP is designed to support non disruptive switchover of IP traffic in certain circumstances and to allow hosts to appear to use a single router and to maintain connectivity even if the actual first hop router they are using fails. In other words, HSRP protects against the failure of the first hop router when the source host cannot learn the IP address of the first hop router dynamically. Multiple routers participate in HSRP and in concert create the illusion of a single virtual router. HSRP ensures that one and only one of the routers is forwarding packets on behalf of the virtual router. End hosts forward their packets to the virtual router. Configuring Ethernet Interfaces on the Cisco ASR 9000 Series Router Information About Configuring Ethernet HC-30 Cisco ASR 9000 Series Aggregation Services Router Interface and Hardware Component Configuration Guide OL-26061-02 The router forwarding packets is known as the active router. A standby router is selected to replace the active router should it fail. HSRP provides a mechanism for determining active and standby routers, using the IP addresses on the participating routers. If an active router fails a standby router can take over without a major interruption in the host's connectivity. HSRP runs on top of User Datagram Protocol (UDP), and uses port number 1985. Routers use their actual IP address as the source address for protocol packets, not the virtual IP address, so that the HSRP routers can identify each other. For more information on HSRP, see the Implementing HSRP module of Cisco ASR 9000 Series Router IP Addresses and Services Configuration Guide. Link Autonegotiation on Ethernet Interfaces Link autonegotiation ensures that devices that share a link segment are automatically configured with the highest performance mode of interoperation. Use the negotiation auto command in interface configuration mode to enable link autonegotiation on an Ethernet interface. On line card Ethernet interfaces, link autonegotiation is disabled by default. Note The negotiation auto command is available on Gigabit Ethernet interfaces only. Subinterfaces on the Cisco ASR 9000 Series Router In Cisco IOS XR, interfaces are, by default, main interfaces. A main interface is also called a trunk interface, which is not to be confused with the usage of the word trunk in the context of VLAN trunking. There are three types of trunk interfaces: • Physical • Bundle On the Cisco ASR 9000 Series Router, physical interfaces are automatically created when the router recognizes a card and its physical interfaces. However, bundle interfaces are not automatically created. They are created when they are configured by the user. The following configuration samples are examples of trunk interfaces being created: • interface gigabitethernet 0/5/0/0 • interface bundle-ether 1 A subinterface is a logical interface that is created under a trunk interface. To create a subinterface, the user must first identify a trunk interface under which to place it. In the case of bundle interfaces, if one does not already exist, a bundle interface must be created before any subinterfaces can be created under it. The user then assigns a subinterface number to the subinterface to be created. The subinterface number must be a positive integer from zero to some high value. For a given trunk interface, each subinterface under it must have a unique value. Subinterface numbers do not need to be contiguous or in numeric order. For example, the following subinterfaces numbers would be valid under one trunk interface: 1001, 0, 97, 96, 100000 Subinterfaces can never have the same subinterface number under one trunk. Configuring Ethernet Interfaces on the Cisco ASR 9000 Series Router Information About Configuring Ethernet HC-31 Cisco ASR 9000 Series Aggregation Services Router Interface and Hardware Component Configuration Guide OL-26061-02 In the following example, the card in slot 5 has trunk interface, GigabitEthernet 0/5/0/0. A subinterface, GigabitEthernet 0/5/0/0.0, is created under it. RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# conf Mon Sep 21 11:12:11.722 EDT RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)# interface GigabitEthernet0/5/0/0.0 RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-subif)# encapsulation dot1q 100 RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-subif)# commit RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:Sep 21 11:12:34.819 : config[65794]: %MGBL-CONFIG-6-DB_COMMIT : Configuration committed by user 'root'. Use 'show configuration commit changes 1000000152' to view the changes. RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-subif)# end RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:Sep 21 11:12:35.633 : config[65794]: %MGBL-SYS-5-CONFIG_I : Configured from console by root RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# The show run command displays the trunk interface first, then the subinterfaces in ascending numerical order. RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# show run | begin GigabitEthernet0/5/0/0 Mon Sep 21 11:15:42.654 EDT Building configuration... interface GigabitEthernet0/5/0/0 shutdown ! interface GigabitEthernet0/5/0/0.0 encapsulation dot1q 100 ! interface GigabitEthernet0/5/0/1 shutdown ! When a subinterface is first created, the Cisco ASR 9000 Series Router recognizes it as an interface that, with few exceptions, is interchangeable with a trunk interface. After the new subinterface is configured further, the show interface command can display it along with its unique counters: The following example shows the display output for the trunk interface, GigabitEthernet 0/5/0/0, followed by the display output for the subinterface GigabitEthernet 0/5/0/0.0. RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# show interface gigabitEthernet 0/5/0/0 Mon Sep 21 11:12:51.068 EDT GigabitEthernet0/5/0/0 is administratively down, line protocol is administratively down Interface state transitions: 0 Hardware is GigabitEthernet, address is 0024.f71b.0ca8 (bia 0024.f71b.0ca8) Internet address is Unknown MTU 1514 bytes, BW 1000000 Kbit reliability 255/255, txload 0/255, rxload 0/255 Encapsulation 802.1Q Virtual LAN, Full-duplex, 1000Mb/s, SXFD, link type is force-up output flow control is off, input flow control is off loopback not set, ARP type ARPA, ARP timeout 04:00:00 Last input never, output never Last clearing of "show interface" counters never 5 minute input rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec 5 minute output rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec 0 packets input, 0 bytes, 0 total input drops 0 drops for unrecognized upper-level protocolConfiguring Ethernet Interfaces on the Cisco ASR 9000 Series Router Information About Configuring Ethernet HC-32 Cisco ASR 9000 Series Aggregation Services Router Interface and Hardware Component Configuration Guide OL-26061-02 Received 0 broadcast packets, 0 multicast packets 0 runts, 0 giants, 0 throttles, 0 parity 0 input errors, 0 CRC, 0 frame, 0 overrun, 0 ignored, 0 abort 0 packets output, 0 bytes, 0 total output drops Output 0 broadcast packets, 0 multicast packets 0 output errors, 0 underruns, 0 applique, 0 resets 0 output buffer failures, 0 output buffers swapped out 0 carrier transitions RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# show interface gigabitEthernet0/5/0/0.0 Mon Sep 21 11:12:55.657 EDT GigabitEthernet0/5/0/0.0 is administratively down, line protocol is administratively down Interface state transitions: 0 Hardware is VLAN sub-interface(s), address is 0024.f71b.0ca8 Internet address is Unknown MTU 1518 bytes, BW 1000000 Kbit reliability 255/255, txload 0/255, rxload 0/255 Encapsulation 802.1Q Virtual LAN, VLAN Id 100, loopback not set, ARP type ARPA, ARP timeout 04:00:00 Last input never, output never Last clearing of "show interface" counters never 5 minute input rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec 5 minute output rate 0 bits/sec, 0 packets/sec 0 packets input, 0 bytes, 0 total input drops 0 drops for unrecognized upper-level protocol Received 0 broadcast packets, 0 multicast packets 0 packets output, 0 bytes, 0 total output drops Output 0 broadcast packets, 0 multicast packets The following example shows two interfaces being created at the same time: first, the bundle trunk interface, then a subinterface attached to the trunk: RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# conf Mon Sep 21 10:57:31.736 EDT RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)# interface Bundle-Ether1 RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-if)# no shut RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-if)# interface bundle-Ether1.0 RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-subif)# encapsulation dot1q 100 RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-subif)# commit RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:Sep 21 10:58:15.305 : config[65794]: %MGBL-CONFIG-6-DB_COMMIT : C onfiguration committed by user 'root'. Use 'show configuration commit changes 10 00000149' to view the changes. RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# show run | begin Bundle-Ether1 Mon Sep 21 10:59:31.317 EDT Building configuration... interface Bundle-Ether1 ! interface Bundle-Ether1.0 encapsulation dot1q 100 ! You delete a subinterface using the no interface command. RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# show run | begin GigabitEthernet0/5/0/0 Mon Sep 21 11:42:27.100 EDT Building configuration... interface GigabitEthernet0/5/0/0 negotiation auto ! interface GigabitEthernet0/5/0/0.0 encapsulation dot1q 100Configuring Ethernet Interfaces on the Cisco ASR 9000 Series Router Information About Configuring Ethernet HC-33 Cisco ASR 9000 Series Aggregation Services Router Interface and Hardware Component Configuration Guide OL-26061-02 ! interface GigabitEthernet0/5/0/1 shutdown ! RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# conf Mon Sep 21 11:42:32.374 EDT RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)# no interface GigabitEthernet0/5/0/0.0 RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)# commit RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:Sep 21 11:42:47.237 : config[65794]: %MGBL-CONFIG-6-DB_COMMIT : Configuration committed by user 'root'. Use 'show configuration commit changes 1000000159' to view the changes. RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)# end RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:Sep 21 11:42:50.278 : config[65794]: %MGBL-SYS-5-CONFIG_I : Configured from console by root RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# show run | begin GigabitEthernet0/5/0/0 Mon Sep 21 11:42:57.262 EDT Building configuration... interface GigabitEthernet0/5/0/0 negotiation auto ! interface GigabitEthernet0/5/0/1 shutdown ! Layer 2, Layer 3, and EFP's On the Cisco ASR 9000 Series Router, a trunk interface can be either a Layer 2 or Layer 3 interface. A Layer 2 interface is configured using the interface command with the l2transport keyword. When the l2transport keyword is not used, the interface is a Layer 3 interface. Subinterfaces are configured as Layer 2 or Layer 3 subinterface in the same way. A Layer 3 trunk interface or subinterface is a routed interface and can be assigned an IP address. Traffic sent on that interface is routed. A Layer 2 trunk interface or subinterface is a switched interface and cannot be assigned an IP address. A Layer 2 interface must be connected to an L2VPN component. Once it is connected, it is called an access connection. Subinterfaces can only be created under a Layer 3 trunk interface. Subinterfaces cannot be created under a Layer 2 trunk interface. A Layer 3 trunk interface can have any combination of Layer 2 and Layer 3 interfaces. The following example shows an attempt to configure a subinterface under an Layer 2 trunk and the commit errors that occur. It also shows an attempt to change the Layer 2 trunk interface to an Layer 3 interface and the errors that occur because the interface already had an IP address assigned to it. RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# config Mon Sep 21 12:05:33.142 EDT RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)# interface GigabitEthernet0/5/0/0 RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-if)# ipv4 address 10.0.0.1/24 RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-if)# commit RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:Sep 21 12:05:57.824 : config[65794]: %MGBL-CONFIG-6-DB_COMMIT : Configuration committed by user 'root'. Use 'show configuration commit changes 1000000160' to view the changes. RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-if)# end RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:Sep 21 12:06:01.890 : config[65794]: %MGBL-SYS-5-CONFIG_I : Configured from console by root RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# show run | begin GigabitEthernet0/5/0/0 Mon Sep 21 12:06:19.535 EDT Building configuration... interface GigabitEthernet0/5/0/0Configuring Ethernet Interfaces on the Cisco ASR 9000 Series Router Information About Configuring Ethernet HC-34 Cisco ASR 9000 Series Aggregation Services Router Interface and Hardware Component Configuration Guide OL-26061-02 ipv4 address 10.0.0.1 255.255.255.0 negotiation auto ! interface GigabitEthernet0/5/0/1 shutdown ! RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# conf Mon Sep 21 12:08:07.426 EDT RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)# interface GigabitEthernet0/5/0/0 l2transport RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-if-l2)# commit % Failed to commit one or more configuration items during a pseudo-atomic operation. All changes made have been reverted. Please issue 'show configuration failed' from this session to view the errors RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-if-l2)# no ipv4 address RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-if)# commit RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:Sep 21 12:08:33.686 : config[65794]: %MGBL-CONFIG-6-DB_COMMIT : Configuration committed by user 'root'. Use 'show configuration commit changes 1000000161' to view the changes. RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-if)# end RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:Sep 21 12:08:38.726 : config[65794]: %MGBL-SYS-5-CONFIG_I : Configured from console by root RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# show run interface GigabitEthernet0/5/0/0 Mon Sep 21 12:09:02.471 EDT interface GigabitEthernet0/5/0/0 negotiation auto l2transport ! ! RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# conf Mon Sep 21 12:09:08.658 EDT RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)# interface GigabitEthernet0/5/0/0.0 ^ RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config)# interface GigabitEthernet0/5/0/0.0 RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-subif)# commit % Failed to commit one or more configuration items during a pseudo-atomic operation. All changes made have been reverted. Please issue 'show configuration failed' from this session to view the errors RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-subif)# RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-subif)# interface GigabitEthernet0/5/0/0 RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-if)# no l2transport RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-if)# interface GigabitEthernet0/5/0/0.0 RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-subif)# encapsulation dot1q 99 RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-subif)# ipv4 address 11.0.0.1/24 RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-subif)# interface GigabitEthernet0/5/0/0.1 l2transport RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-subif)# encapsulation dot1q 700 RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-subif)# commit RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:Sep 21 12:11:45.896 : config[65794]: %MGBL-CONFIG-6-DB_COMMIT : Configuration committed by user 'root'. Use 'show configuration commit changes 1000000162' to view the changes. RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router(config-subif)# end RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:Sep 21 12:11:50.133 : config[65794]: %MGBL-SYS-5-CONFIG_I : Configured from console by root RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# RP/0/RSP0/CPU0:router# show run | b GigabitEthernet0/5/0/0 Mon Sep 21 12:12:00.248 EDT Building configuration... interface GigabitEthernet0/5/0/0 negotiation autoConfiguring Ethernet Interfaces on the Cisco ASR 9000 Series Router Information About Configuring Ethernet HC-35 Cisco ASR 9000 Series Aggregation Services Router Interface and Hardware Component Configuration Guide OL-26061-02 ! interface GigabitEthernet0/5/0/0.0 ipv4 address 11.0.0.1 255.255.255.0 encapsulation dot1q 99 ! interface GigabitEthernet0/5/0/0.1 l2transport encapsulation dot1q 700 ! interface GigabitEthernet0/5/0/1 shutdown ! All subinterfaces must have unique encapsulation statements, so that the router can send incoming packets and frames to the correct subinterface. If a subinterface does not have an encapsulation statement, the router will not send any traffic to it. In Cisco IOS XR, an Ethernet Flow Point (EFP) is implemented as a Layer 2 subinterface, and consequently, a Layer 2 subinterface is often called an EFP. For more information about EFPs, see the Cisco ASR 9000 Series Aggregation Services Router L2VPN and Ethernet Services Configuration Guide. A Layer 2 trunk interface can be used as an access connection. However, a Layer 2 trunk interface is not an EFP because an EFP, by definition, is a substream of an overall stream of traffic. Cisco IOS XR also has other restrictions on what can be configured as a Layer 2 or Layer 3 interface. Certain configuration blocks only accept Layer 3 and not Layer 2. For example, OSPF only accepts Layer 3 trunks and subinterface. Refer to the appropriate Cisco IOS XR configuration guide for other restrictions. Enhanced Performance Monitoring for Layer 2 Subinterfaces (EFPs) Beginning in Cisco IOS XR Release 4.0.1, the Cisco ASR 9000 Series Router adds support for basic counters for performance monitoring on Layer 2 subinterfaces. This section provides a summary of the new support for Layer 2 interface counters. For information about how to configure Performance Monitoring, see the “Implementing Performance Management” chapter of the Cisco ASR 9000 Series Aggregation Services Router System Monitoring Configuration Guide. The interface basic-counters keyword has been added to support a new entity for performance statistics collection and display on Layer 2 interfaces in the following commands: • performance-mgmt statistics interface basic-counters • performance-mgmt threshold interface basic-counters • performance-mgmt apply statistics interface basic-counters • performance-mgmt apply threshold interface basic-counters • performance-mgmt apply monitor interface basic-counters • show performance-mgmt monitor interface basic-counters • show performance-mgmt statistics interface basic-countersConfiguring Ethernet Interfaces on the Cisco ASR 9000 Series Router Information About Configuring Ethernet HC-36 Cisco ASR 9000 Series Aggregation Services Router Interface and Hardware Component Configuration Guide OL-26061-02 The performance-mgmt threshold interface basic-counters command supports the following attribute values for Layer 2 statistics, which also appear in the show performance-mgmt statistics interface basic-counters and show performance-mgmt monitor interface basic-counters command: Other Performance Management Enhancements The following additional performance management enhancements are included in Cisco IOS XR Release 4.0.1: • You can retain performance management history statistics across a process restart or route processor (RP) failover using the new history-persistent keyword option for the performance-mgmt statistics interface command. • You can save performance management statistics to a local file using the performance-mgmt resources dump local command. • You can filter performance management instances by defining a regular expression group (performance-mgmt regular-expression command), which includes multiple regular expression indices that specify strings to match. You apply a defined regular expression group to one or more statistics or threshold templates in the performance-mgmt statistics interface or performance-mgmt thresholds interface commands. Frequency Synchronization and SyncE Cisco IOS XR Release 3.9 introduces support for SyncE-capable Ethernet on the Cisco ASR 9000 Series Router. Frequency Synchronization provides the ability to distribute precision clock signals around the network. Highly accurate timing signals are initially injected into the Cisco ASR 9000 router in the network from an external timing technology (such as Cesium atomic clocks, or GPS), and used to clock the router's physical interfaces. Peer routers can then recover this precision frequency from the line, and also transfer it around the network. This feature is traditionally applicable to SONET/SDH networks, but with Cisco IOS XR Release 3.9, is now provided over Ethernet for Cisco ASR 9000 Series Aggregation Services Routers with Synchronous Ethernet capability. interface controller Attribute Description InOctets Bytes received (64-bit) InPackets Packets received (64-bit) InputQueueDrops Input queue drops (64-bit) InputTotalDrops Inbound correct packets discarded (64-bit) InputTotalErrors Inbound incorrect packets discarded (64-bit) OutOctets Bytes sent (64-bit) OutPackets Packets sent (64-bit) OutputQueueDrops Output queue drops (64-bit) OutputTotalDrops Outband correct packets discarded (64-bit) OutputTotalErrors Outband incorrect packets discarded (64-bit)Configuring Ethernet Interfaces on the Cisco ASR 9000 Series Router How to Configure Ethernet HC-37 Cisco ASR 9000 Series Aggregation Services Router Interface and Hardware Component Configuration Guide OL-26061-02 clock-interface sync location Where expands to: frequency synchronization selection input ssm disable priority quality transmit { lowest [ highest ] | highest | exact } quality receive { lowest [ highest ] | highest | exact } wait-to-restore