Cisco ASA 5500 Series Guide de configuration en utilisant la CLI, 8.2

 

 

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Cisco ASA 5500 Series Guide de configuration en utilisant la CLI, 8.2

Americas Headquarters Cisco Systems, Inc. 170 West Tasman Drive San Jose, CA 95134-1706 USA http://www.cisco.com Tel: 408 526-4000 800 553-NETS (6387) Fax: 408 527-0883 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI Software Version 8.2 Customer Order Number: N/A, Online only Text Part Number: OL-18970-03THE SPECIFICATIONS AND INFORMATION REGARDING THE PRODUCTS IN THIS MANUAL ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE. ALL STATEMENTS, INFORMATION, AND RECOMMENDATIONS IN THIS MANUAL ARE BELIEVED TO BE ACCURATE BUT ARE PRESENTED WITHOUT WARRANTY OF ANY KIND, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED. USERS MUST TAKE FULL RESPONSIBILITY FOR THEIR APPLICATION OF ANY PRODUCTS. THE SOFTWARE LICENSE AND LIMITED WARRANTY FOR THE ACCOMPANYING PRODUCT ARE SET FORTH IN THE INFORMATION PACKET THAT SHIPPED WITH THE PRODUCT AND ARE INCORPORATED HEREIN BY THIS REFERENCE. IF YOU ARE UNABLE TO LOCATE THE SOFTWARE LICENSE OR LIMITED WARRANTY, CONTACT YOUR CISCO REPRESENTATIVE FOR A COPY. The Cisco implementation of TCP header compression is an adaptation of a program developed by the University of California, Berkeley (UCB) as part of UCB’s public domain version of the UNIX operating system. All rights reserved. Copyright © 1981, Regents of the University of California. NOTWITHSTANDING ANY OTHER WARRANTY HEREIN, ALL DOCUMENT FILES AND SOFTWARE OF THESE SUPPLIERS ARE PROVIDED “AS IS” WITH ALL FAULTS. CISCO AND THE ABOVE-NAMED SUPPLIERS DISCLAIM ALL WARRANTIES, EXPRESSED OR IMPLIED, INCLUDING, WITHOUT LIMITATION, THOSE OF MERCHANTABILITY, FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE AND NONINFRINGEMENT OR ARISING FROM A COURSE OF DEALING, USAGE, OR TRADE PRACTICE. IN NO EVENT SHALL CISCO OR ITS SUPPLIERS BE LIABLE FOR ANY INDIRECT, SPECIAL, CONSEQUENTIAL, OR INCIDENTAL DAMAGES, INCLUDING, WITHOUT LIMITATION, LOST PROFITS OR LOSS OR DAMAGE TO DATA ARISING OUT OF THE USE OR INABILITY TO USE THIS MANUAL, EVEN IF CISCO OR ITS SUPPLIERS HAVE BEEN ADVISED OF THE POSSIBILITY OF SUCH DAMAGES. Cisco and the Cisco Logo are trademarks of Cisco Systems, Inc. and/or its affiliates in the U.S. and other countries. A listing of Cisco's trademarks can be found at www.cisco.com/go/trademarks. Third party trademarks mentioned are the property of their respective owners. The use of the word partner does not imply a partnership relationship between Cisco and any other company. (1005R) Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI Copyright © 2010 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved.iii Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 C O N T E N T S About This Guide lix Document Objectives lix Audience lix Related Documentation lx Document Conventions lx Obtaining Documentation, Obtaining Support, and Security Guidelines lx P A R T 1 Getting Started and General Information C H A P T E R 1 Introduction to the ASA 1-1 Supported Software, Models, and Modules 1-1 VPN Specifications 1-1 New Features 1-1 New Features in Version 8.2(5) 1-2 New Features in Version 8.2(4.4) 1-2 New Features in Version 8.2(4.1) 1-2 New Features in Version 8.2(4) 1-2 New Features in Version 8.2(3.9) 1-2 New Features in Version 8.2(3) 1-2 New Features in Version 8.2(2) 1-2 New Features in Version 8.2(1) 1-5 Firewall Functional Overview 1-10 Security Policy Overview 1-11 Permitting or Denying Traffic with Access Lists 1-11 Applying NAT 1-11 Protecting from IP Fragments 1-12 Using AAA for Through Traffic 1-12 Applying HTTP, HTTPS, or FTP Filtering 1-12 Applying Application Inspection 1-12 Sending Traffic to the Advanced Inspection and Prevention Security Services Module 1-12 Sending Traffic to the Content Security and Control Security Services Module 1-12 Applying QoS Policies 1-12 Applying Connection Limits and TCP Normalization 1-13 Enabling Threat Detection 1-13Contents iv Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Firewall Mode Overview 1-13 Stateful Inspection Overview 1-13 VPN Functional Overview 1-14 Security Context Overview 1-15 C H A P T E R 2 Getting Started 2-1 Factory Default Configurations 2-1 Restoring the Factory Default Configuration 2-2 ASA 5505 Default Configuration 2-2 ASA 5510 and Higher Default Configuration 2-3 Accessing the Command-Line Interface 2-4 Working with the Configuration 2-5 Saving Configuration Changes 2-5 Saving Configuration Changes in Single Context Mode 2-5 Saving Configuration Changes in Multiple Context Mode 2-6 Copying the Startup Configuration to the Running Configuration 2-7 Viewing the Configuration 2-7 Clearing and Removing Configuration Settings 2-8 Creating Text Configuration Files Offline 2-8 Applying Configuration Changes to Connections 2-9 C H A P T E R 3 Managing Feature Licenses 3-1 Supported Feature Licenses Per Model 3-1 Licenses Per Model 3-1 License Notes 3-9 VPN License and Feature Compatibility 3-10 Information About Feature Licenses 3-10 Preinstalled License 3-11 Temporary, VPN Flex, and Evaluation Licenses 3-11 How the Temporary License Timer Works 3-11 How Multiple Licenses Interact 3-11 Failover and Temporary Licenses 3-13 Shared Licenses 3-13 Information About the Shared Licensing Server and Participants 3-13 Communication Issues Between Participant and Server 3-14 Information About the Shared Licensing Backup Server 3-14 Failover and Shared Licenses 3-15 Maximum Number of Participants 3-16 Licenses FAQ 3-17Contents v Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Guidelines and Limitations 3-18 Viewing Your Current License 3-19 Obtaining an Activation Key 3-21 Entering a New Activation Key 3-21 Upgrading the License for a Failover Pair 3-23 Upgrading the License for a Failover (No Reload Required) 3-23 Upgrading the License for a Failover (Reload Required) 3-24 Configuring a Shared License 3-25 Configuring the Shared Licensing Server 3-25 Configuring the Shared Licensing Backup Server (Optional) 3-26 Configuring the Shared Licensing Participant 3-27 Monitoring the Shared License 3-28 Feature History for Licensing 3-30 C H A P T E R 4 Configuring the Transparent or Routed Firewall 4-1 Configuring the Firewall Mode 4-1 Information About the Firewall Mode 4-1 Information About Routed Firewall Mode 4-2 Information About Transparent Firewall Mode 4-2 Licensing Requirements for the Firewall Mode 4-4 Default Settings 4-4 Guidelines and Limitations 4-5 Setting the Firewall Mode 4-7 Feature History for Firewall Mode 4-8 Configuring ARP Inspection for the Transparent Firewall 4-8 Information About ARP Inspection 4-8 Licensing Requirements for ARP Inspection 4-9 Default Settings 4-9 Guidelines and Limitations 4-9 Configuring ARP Inspection 4-9 Task Flow for Configuring ARP Inspection 4-9 Adding a Static ARP Entry 4-10 Enabling ARP Inspection 4-10 Monitoring ARP Inspection 4-11 Feature History for ARP Inspection 4-11 Customizing the MAC Address Table for the Transparent Firewall 4-11 Information About the MAC Address Table 4-12 Licensing Requirements for the MAC Address Table 4-12 Default Settings 4-12Contents vi Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Guidelines and Limitations 4-13 Configuring the MAC Address Table 4-13 Adding a Static MAC Address 4-13 Setting the MAC Address Timeout 4-14 Disabling MAC Address Learning 4-14 Monitoring the MAC Address Table 4-14 Feature History for the MAC Address Table 4-15 Firewall Mode Examples 4-15 How Data Moves Through the Security Appliance in Routed Firewall Mode 4-15 An Inside User Visits a Web Server 4-16 An Outside User Visits a Web Server on the DMZ 4-17 An Inside User Visits a Web Server on the DMZ 4-18 An Outside User Attempts to Access an Inside Host 4-19 A DMZ User Attempts to Access an Inside Host 4-20 How Data Moves Through the Transparent Firewall 4-21 An Inside User Visits a Web Server 4-22 An Inside User Visits a Web Server Using NAT 4-23 An Outside User Visits a Web Server on the Inside Network 4-24 An Outside User Attempts to Access an Inside Host 4-25 C H A P T E R 5 Managing Multiple Context Mode 5-1 Information About Security Contexts 5-1 Common Uses for Security Contexts 5-2 Unsupported Features 5-2 Context Configuration Files 5-2 Context Configurations 5-2 System Configuration 5-2 Admin Context Configuration 5-3 How the Security Appliance Classifies Packets 5-3 Valid Classifier Criteria 5-3 Invalid Classifier Criteria 5-4 Classification Examples 5-5 Cascading Security Contexts 5-8 Management Access to Security Contexts 5-9 System Administrator Access 5-9 Context Administrator Access 5-10 Enabling or Disabling Multiple Context Mode 5-10 Backing Up the Single Mode Configuration 5-10 Enabling Multiple Context Mode 5-10Contents vii Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Restoring Single Context Mode 5-11 Configuring Resource Management 5-11 Classes and Class Members Overview 5-11 Resource Limits 5-12 Default Class 5-13 Class Members 5-14 Configuring a Class 5-14 Configuring a Security Context 5-16 Automatically Assigning MAC Addresses to Context Interfaces 5-20 Information About MAC Addresses 5-21 Default MAC Address 5-21 Interaction with Manual MAC Addresses 5-21 Failover MAC Addresses 5-21 MAC Address Format 5-21 Enabling Auto-Generation of MAC Addresses 5-22 Viewing Assigned MAC Addresses 5-22 Viewing MAC Addresses in the System Configuration 5-22 Viewing MAC Addresses Within a Context 5-24 Changing Between Contexts and the System Execution Space 5-25 Managing Security Contexts 5-25 Removing a Security Context 5-25 Changing the Admin Context 5-26 Changing the Security Context URL 5-26 Reloading a Security Context 5-27 Reloading by Clearing the Configuration 5-27 Reloading by Removing and Re-adding the Context 5-28 Monitoring Security Contexts 5-28 Viewing Context Information 5-28 Viewing Resource Allocation 5-29 Viewing Resource Usage 5-32 Monitoring SYN Attacks in Contexts 5-33 C H A P T E R 6 Configuring Interfaces 6-1 Information About Interfaces 6-1 ASA 5505 Interfaces 6-2 Understanding ASA 5505 Ports and Interfaces 6-2 Maximum Active VLAN Interfaces for Your License 6-2 VLAN MAC Addresses 6-4 Power Over Ethernet 6-4Contents viii Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Monitoring Traffic Using SPAN 6-4 Auto-MDI/MDIX Feature 6-4 Security Levels 6-5 Dual IP Stack 6-5 Management Interface (ASA 5510 and Higher) 6-5 Licensing Requirements for Interfaces 6-6 Guidelines and Limitations 6-6 Default Settings 6-7 Starting Interface Configuration (ASA 5510 and Higher) 6-8 Task Flow for Starting Interface Configuration 6-9 Enabling the Physical Interface and Configuring Ethernet Parameters 6-9 Configuring a Redundant Interface 6-11 Configuring a Redundant Interface 6-11 Changing the Active Interface 6-14 Configuring VLAN Subinterfaces and 802.1Q Trunking 6-14 Assigning Interfaces to Contexts and Automatically Assigning MAC Addresses (Multiple Context Mode) 6-15 Starting Interface Configuration (ASA 5505) 6-16 Task Flow for Starting Interface Configuration 6-16 Configuring VLAN Interfaces 6-16 Configuring and Enabling Switch Ports as Access Ports 6-17 Configuring and Enabling Switch Ports as Trunk Ports 6-19 Completing Interface Configuration (All Models) 6-22 Task Flow for Completing Interface Configuration 6-23 Entering Interface Configuration Mode 6-23 Configuring General Interface Parameters 6-24 Configuring the MAC Address 6-26 Configuring IPv6 Addressing 6-27 Allowing Same Security Level Communication 6-30 Enabling Jumbo Frame Support (ASA 5580 and 5585-X) 6-31 Monitoring Interfaces 6-32 Configuration Examples for Interfaces 6-32 Feature History for Interfaces 6-33 C H A P T E R 7 Configuring DHCP and Dynamic DNS Services 7-1 Configuring DHCP Services 7-1 Information about DHCP 7-1 Licensing Requirements for DHCP 7-1Contents ix Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Guidelines and Limitations 7-2 Configuring a DHCP Server 7-2 Enabling the DHCP Server 7-2 Configuring DHCP Options 7-3 Using Cisco IP Phones with a DHCP Server 7-5 Configuring DHCP Relay Services 7-6 Feature History for DHCP 7-7 Configuring DDNS Services 7-7 Information about DDNS 7-7 Licensing Requirements For DDNS 7-7 Configuring DDNS 7-8 Configuration Examples for DDNS 7-8 Example 1: Client Updates Both A and PTR RRs for Static IP Addresses 7-8 Example 2: Client Updates Both A and PTR RRs; DHCP Server Honors Client Update Request; FQDN Provided Through Configuration 7-9 Example 3: Client Includes FQDN Option Instructing Server Not to Update Either RR; Server Overrides Client and Updates Both RRs. 7-9 Example 4: Client Asks Server To Perform Both Updates; Server Configured to Update PTR RR Only; Honors Client Request and Updates Both A and PTR RR 7-10 Example 5: Client Updates A RR; Server Updates PTR RR 7-10 Feature History for DDNS 7-11 C H A P T E R 8 Configuring Basic Settings 8-1 Changing the Login Password 8-1 Changing the Enable Password 8-2 Setting the Hostname 8-2 Setting the Domain Name 8-3 Setting the Date and Time 8-3 Setting the Time Zone and Daylight Saving Time Date Range 8-4 Setting the Date and Time Using an NTP Server 8-5 Setting the Date and Time Manually 8-6 Configuring the DNS Server 8-6 Setting the Management IP Address for a Transparent Firewall 8-7 Information About the Management IP Address 8-7 Licensing Requirements for the Management IP Address for a Transparent Firewall 8-8 Guidelines and Limitations 8-8 Configuring the IPv4 Address 8-9 Configuring the IPv6 Address 8-9 Configuration Examples for the Management IP Address for a Transparent Firewall 8-10Contents x Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Feature History for the Management IP Address for a Transparent Firewall 8-10 C H A P T E R 9 Using Modular Policy Framework 9-1 Information About Modular Policy Framework 9-1 Modular Policy Framework Supported Features 9-1 Supported Features for Through Traffic 9-2 Supported Features for Management Traffic 9-2 Information About Configuring Modular Policy Framework 9-2 Information About Inspection Policy Maps 9-4 Information About Layer 3/4 Policy Maps 9-5 Feature Directionality 9-5 Feature Matching Within a Policy Map 9-6 Order in Which Multiple Feature Actions are Applied 9-6 Incompatibility of Certain Feature Actions 9-8 Feature Matching for Multiple Policy Maps 9-8 Licensing Requirements for Modular Policy Framework 9-9 Guidelines and Limitations 9-9 Default Settings 9-10 Default Configuration 9-10 Default Class Maps 9-11 Default Inspection Policy Maps 9-11 Configuring Modular Policy Framework 9-12 Task Flow for Configuring Hierarchical Policy Maps 9-12 Identifying Traffic (Layer 3/4 Class Map) 9-13 Creating a Layer 3/4 Class Map for Through Traffic 9-13 Creating a Layer 3/4 Class Map for Management Traffic 9-15 Configuring Special Actions for Application Inspections (Inspection Policy Map) 9-16 Defining Actions in an Inspection Policy Map 9-17 Identifying Traffic in an Inspection Class Map 9-19 Creating a Regular Expression 9-21 Creating a Regular Expression Class Map 9-23 Defining Actions (Layer 3/4 Policy Map) 9-24 Applying Actions to an Interface (Service Policy) 9-25 Monitoring Modular Policy Framework 9-26 Configuration Examples for Modular Policy Framework 9-26 Applying Inspection and QoS Policing to HTTP Traffic 9-27 Applying Inspection to HTTP Traffic Globally 9-27 Applying Inspection and Connection Limits to HTTP Traffic to Specific Servers 9-28 Applying Inspection to HTTP Traffic with NAT 9-29Contents xi Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Feature History for Modular Policy Framework 9-30 P A R T 2 Configuring Access Lists C H A P T E R 10 Information About Access Lists 10-1 Access List Types 10-1 Access Control Entry Order 10-2 Access Control Implicit Deny 10-3 IP Addresses Used for Access Lists When You Use NAT 10-3 Where to Go Next 10-6 C H A P T E R 11 Adding an Extended Access List 11-1 Information About Extended Access Lists 11-1 Allowing Broadcast and Multicast Traffic through the Transparent Firewall 11-2 Licensing Requirements for Extended Access Lists 11-2 Guidelines and Limitations 11-2 Default Settings 11-4 Configuring Extended Access Lists 11-4 Task Flow for Configuring Extended Access Lists 11-4 Adding an Extended Access List 11-5 Adding Remarks to Access Lists 11-6 Deleting an Extended Access List Entry 11-6 What to Do Next 11-7 Monitoring Extended Access Lists 11-7 Configuration Examples for Extended Access Lists 11-7 Feature History for Extended Access Lists 11-8 C H A P T E R 12 Adding an EtherType Access List 12-1 Information About EtherType Access Lists 12-1 Supported EtherTypes 12-1 Implicit Permit of IP and ARPs Only 12-2 Implicit and Explicit Deny ACE at the End of an Access List 12-2 Allowing MPLS 12-2 Licensing Requirements for EtherType Access Lists 12-2 Guidelines and Limitations 12-2 Default Settings 12-3 Configuring EtherType Access Lists 12-4Contents xii Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Task Flow for Configuring EtherType Access Lists 12-4 Adding EtherType Access Lists 12-5 Adding Remarks to Access Lists 12-6 What to Do Next 12-6 Monitoring EtherType Access Lists 12-6 Configuration Examples for EtherType Access Lists 12-7 Feature History for EtherType Access Lists 12-7 C H A P T E R 13 Adding a Standard Access List 13-1 Information About Standard Access Lists 13-1 Licensing Requirements for Standard Access Lists 13-1 Guidelines and Limitations 13-1 Default Settings 13-2 Adding a Standard Access List 13-3 Task Flow for Configuring Extended Access Lists 13-3 Adding a Standard Access List 13-3 Adding Remarks to Access Lists 13-4 What to Do Next 13-4 Monitoring Access Lists 13-4 Configuration Examples for Standard Access Lists 13-5 Feature History for Standard Access Lists 13-5 C H A P T E R 14 Adding a Webtype Access List 14-1 Licensing Requirements for Webtype Access Lists 14-1 Guidelines and Limitations 14-1 Default Settings 14-2 Adding Webtype Access Lists 14-2 Task Flow for Configuring Webtype Access Lists 14-2 Adding Webtype Access Lists with a URL String 14-3 Adding Webtype Access Lists with an IP Address 14-4 Adding Remarks to Access Lists 14-5 What to Do Next 14-5 Monitoring Webtype Access Lists 14-5 Configuration Examples for Webtype Access Lists 14-5 Feature History for Webtype Access Lists 14-7Contents xiii Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 C H A P T E R 15 Adding an IPv6 Access List 15-1 Information About IPv6 Access Lists 15-1 Licensing Requirements for IPv6 Access Lists 15-1 Prerequisites for Adding IPv6 Access Lists 15-2 Guidelines and Limitations 15-2 Default Settings 15-3 Configuring IPv6 Access Lists 15-4 Task Flow for Configuring IPv6 Access Lists 15-4 Adding IPv6 Access Lists 15-5 Adding Remarks to Access Lists 15-6 Monitoring IPv6 Access Lists 15-7 Configuration Examples for IPv6 Access Lists 15-7 Where to Go Next 15-7 Feature History for IPv6 Access Lists 15-7 C H A P T E R 16 Configuring Object Groups 16-1 Configuring Object Groups 16-1 Information About Object Groups 16-2 Licensing Requirements for Object Groups 16-2 Guidelines and Limitations for Object Groups 16-3 Adding Object Groups 16-4 Adding a Protocol Object Group 16-4 Adding a Network Object Group 16-5 Adding a Service Object Group 16-6 Adding an ICMP Type Object Group 16-7 Removing Object Groups 16-8 Monitoring Object Groups 16-8 Nesting Object Groups 16-9 Feature History for Object Groups 16-10 Using Object Groups with Access Lists 16-10 Information About Using Object Groups with Access Lists 16-10 Licensing Requirements for Using Object Groups with Access Lists 16-10 Guidelines and Limitations for Using Object Groups with Access Lists 16-11 Configuring Object Groups with Access Lists 16-11 Monitoring the Use of Object Groups with Access Lists 16-12 Configuration Examples for Using Object Groups with Access Lists 16-12 Feature History for Using Object Groups with Access Lists 16-13 Adding Remarks to Access Lists 16-13Contents xiv Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Scheduling Extended Access List Activation 16-14 Information About Scheduling Access List Activation 16-14 Licensing Requirements for Scheduling Access List Activation 16-14 Guidelines and Limitations for Scheduling Access List Activation 16-15 Configuring and Applying Time Ranges 16-15 Configuration Examples for Scheduling Access List Activation 16-16 Feature History for Scheduling Access Lis t Activation 16-17 C H A P T E R 17 Configuring Logging for Access Lists 17-1 Configuring Logging for Access Lists 17-1 Information About Logging Access List Activity 17-1 Licensing Requirements for Access List Logging 17-2 Guidelines and Limitations 17-3 Default Settings 17-3 Configuring Access List Logging 17-3 Monitoring Access Lists 17-4 Configuration Examples for Access List Logging 17-4 Feature History for Access List Logging 17-5 Managing Deny Flows 17-5 Information About Managing Deny Flows 17-6 Licensing Requirements for Managing Deny Flows 17-6 Guidelines and Limitations 17-6 Default Settings 17-7 Managing Deny Flows 17-7 Monitoring Deny Flows 17-8 Feature History for Managing Deny Flows 17-8 P A R T 3 Configuring IP Routing C H A P T E R 18 Information About Routing 18-1 Information About Routing 18-1 Switching 18-1 Path Determination 18-2 Supported RouteTypes 18-2 How Routing Behaves Within the Adaptive Security Appliance 18-3 Egress Interface Selection Process 18-3 Next Hop Selection Process 18-4 Supported Internet Protocols for Routing 18-4 Information About the Routing Table 18-5Contents xv Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Displaying the Routing Table 18-5 How the Routing Table is Populated 18-5 Backup Routes 18-7 How Forwarding Decisions are Made 18-7 Dynamic Routing and Failover 18-8 Information About IPv6 Support 18-8 Features that Support IPv6 18-8 IPv6-Enabled Commands 18-9 IPv6 Command Guidelines in Transparent Firewall Mode 18-10 Entering IPv6 Addresses in Commands 18-10 C H A P T E R 19 Configuring Static and Default Routes 19-1 Information About Static and Default Routes 19-1 Licensing Requirements for Static and Default Routes 19-2 Guidelines and Limitations 19-2 Configuring Static and Default Routes 19-2 Configuring a Static Route 19-2 Configuring a Default Static Route 19-3 Limitations on Configuring a Default Static Route 19-4 Configuring IPv6 Default and Static Routes 19-4 Monitoring a Static or Default Route 19-5 Configuration Examples for Static or Default Routes 19-7 Feature History for Static and Default Routes 19-7 C H A P T E R 20 Defining Route Maps 20-1 Overview 20-1 Permit and Deny Clauses 20-2 Match and Set Commands 20-2 Licensing Requirements for Route Maps 20-3 Guidelines and Limitations 20-3 Defining a Route Map 20-4 Customizing a Route Map 20-4 Defining a Route to Match a Specific Destination Address 20-4 Configuring the Metric Values for a Route Action 20-5 Configuration Example for Route Maps 20-6 Related Documents 20-6 Feature History for Route Maps 20-6Contents xvi Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 C H A P T E R 21 Configuring OSPF 21-1 Overview 21-1 Licensing Requirements for OSPF 21-2 Guidelines and Limitations 21-3 Configuring OSPF 21-3 Enabling OSPF 21-3 Restarting the OSPF Process 21-4 Customizing OSPF 21-4 Redistributing Routes Into OSPF 21-5 Generating a Default Route 21-6 Configuring Route Summarization When Redistributing Routes into OSPF 21-7 Configuring Route Summarization Between OSPF Areas 21-8 Configuring OSPF Interface Parameters 21-8 Configuring OSPF Area Parameters 21-11 Configuring OSPF NSSA 21-12 Defining Static OSPF Neighbors 21-13 Configuring Route Calculation Timers 21-13 Logging Neighbors Going Up or Down 21-14 Monitoring OSPF 21-15 Configuration Example for OSPF 21-16 Feature History for OSPF 21-17 Additional References 21-17 Related Documents 21-18 C H A P T E R 22 Configuring RIP 22-1 Overview 22-1 Routing Update Process 22-1 RIP Routing Metric 22-2 RIP Stability Features 22-2 RIP Timers 22-2 Licensing Requirements for RIP 22-2 Guidelines and Limitations 22-2 Configuring RIP 22-3 Enabling RIP 22-3 Customizing RIP 22-3 Generating a Default Route 22-4 Configuring Interfaces for RIP 22-4 Disabling Route Summarization 22-5Contents xvii Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Filtering Networks in RIP 22-5 Redistributing Routes into the RIP Routing Process 22-6 Configuring RIP Send/Receive Version on an Interface 22-7 Enabling RIP Authentication 22-8 Monitoring RIP 22-8 Configuration Example for RIP 22-9 Feature History for RIP 22-10 Additional References 22-10 Related Documents 22-10 C H A P T E R 23 Configuring EIGRP 23-1 Overview 23-1 Licensing Requirements for EIGRP 23-2 Guidelines and Limitations 23-2 Configuring EIGRP 23-3 Enabling EIGRP 23-3 Enabling EIGRP Stub Routing 23-3 Restarting the EIGRP Process 23-4 Customizing EIGRP 23-4 Configuring Interfaces for EIGRP 23-5 Configuring the Summary Aggregate Addresses on Interfaces 23-6 Changing the Interface Delay Value 23-6 Enabling EIGRP Authentication on an Interface 23-7 Defining an EIGRP Neighbor 23-8 Redistributing Routes Into EIGRP 23-9 Filtering Networks in EIGRP 23-10 Customizing the EIGRP Hello Interval and Hold Time 23-11 Disabling Automatic Route Summarization 23-12 Disabling EIGRP Split Horizon 23-13 Monitoring EIGRP 23-13 Configuration Example for EIGRP 23-14 Feature History for EIGRP 23-15 Additional References 23-15 Related Documents 23-15 C H A P T E R 24 Configuring Multicast Routing 24-17 Information About Multicast Routing 24-17 Stub Multicast Routing 24-18Contents xviii Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 PIM Multicast Routing 24-18 Multicast Group Concept 24-18 Licensing Requirements for Multicast Routing 24-18 Guidelines and Limitations 24-18 Enabling Multicast Routing 24-19 Customizing Multicast Routing 24-20 Configuring Stub Multicast Routing 24-20 Configuring a Static Multicast Route 24-20 Configuring IGMP Features 24-21 Disabling IGMP on an Interface 24-22 Configuring IGMP Group Membership 24-22 Configuring a Statically Joined IGMP Group 24-22 Controlling Access to Multicast Groups 24-23 Limiting the Number of IGMP States on an Interface 24-23 Modifying the Query Messages to Multicast Groups 24-24 Changing the IGMP Version 24-25 Configuring PIM Features 24-25 Enabling and Disabling PIM on an Interface 24-26 Configuring a Static Rendezvous Point Address 24-26 Configuring the Designated Router Priority 24-27 Filtering PIM Register Messages 24-28 Configuring PIM Message Intervals 24-28 Configuring a Multicast Boundary 24-28 Filtering PIM Neighbors 24-29 Supporting Mixed Bidirectional/Sparse-Mode PIM Networks 24-29 Configuration Example for Multicast Routing 24-30 Additional References 24-31 Related Documents 24-31 RFCs 24-31 C H A P T E R 25 Configuring IPv6 Neighbor Discovery 25-1 Configuring Neighbor Solicitation Messages 25-1 Configuring Neighbor Solicitation Message Interval 25-1 Information About Neighbor Solicitation Messages 25-2 Licensing Requirements for Neighbor Solicitation Messages 25-3 Guidelines and Limitations for the Neighbor Solicitation Message Interval 25-3 Default Settings for the Neighbor Solicitation Message Interval 25-3 Configuring the Neighbor Solicitation Message Interval 25-3 Monitoring Neighbor Solicitation Message Intervals 25-4Contents xix Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Feature History for Neighbor Solicitation Message Interval 25-4 Configuring the Neighbor Reachable Time 25-5 Information About Neighbor Reachable Time 25-5 Licensing Requirements for Neighbor Reachable Time 25-5 Guidelines and Limitations for Neighbor Reachable Time 25-5 Default Settings for Neighbor Reachable Time 25-6 Configuring Neighbor Reachable Time 25-6 Monitoring Neighbor Reachable Time 25-7 Feature History for Neighbor Reachable Time 25-7 Configuring Router Advertisement Messages 25-7 Information About Router Advertisement Messages 25-8 Configuring the Router Advertisement Transmission Interval 25-9 Licensing Requirements for Router Advertisement Transmission Interval 25-9 Guidelines and Limitations for Router Advertisement Transmission Interval 25-9 Default Settings for Router Advertisement Transmission Interval 25-10 Configuring Router Advertisement Transmission Interval 25-10 Monitoring Router Advertisement Transmission Interval 25-11 Feature History for Router Advertisement Transmission Interval 25-11 Configuring the Router Lifetime Value 25-12 Licensing Requirements for Router Advertisement Transmission Interval 25-12 Guidelines and Limitations for Router Advertisement Transmission Interval 25-12 Default Settings for Router Advertisement Transmission Interval 25-13 Configuring Router Advertisement Transmission Interval 25-13 Monitoring Router Advertisement Transmission Interval 25-14 Where to Go Next 25-14 Feature History for Router Advertisement Transmission Interval 25-14 Configuring the IPv6 Prefix 25-15 Licensing Requirements for IPv6 Prefixes 25-15 Guidelines and Limitations for IPv6 Prefixes 25-15 Default Settings for IPv6 Prefixes 25-16 Configuring IPv6 Prefixes 25-17 Monitoring IPv6 Prefixes 25-18 Additional References 25-18 Feature History for IPv6 Prefixes 25-19 Suppressing Router Advertisement Messages 25-19 Licensing Requirements for Suppressing Router Advertisement Messages 25-20 Guidelines and Limitations for Suppressing Router Advertisement Messages 25-20 Default Settings for Suppressing Router Advertisement Messages 25-20 Suppressing Router Advertisement Messages 25-21 Monitoring Router Advertisement Messages 25-21Contents xx Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Feature History for Suppressing Router Advertisement Messages 25-22 Configuring a Static IPv6 Neighbor 25-22 Information About a Static IPv6 Neighbor 25-22 Licensing Requirements for Static IPv6 Neighbor 25-22 Guidelines and Limitations 25-22 Default Settings 25-23 Configuring a Static IPv6 Neighbor 25-24 Monitoring Neighbor Solicitation Messages 25-24 Feature History for Configuring a Static IPv6 Neighbor 25-25 P A R T 4 Configuring Network Address Translation C H A P T E R 26 Information About NAT 26-1 Introduction to NAT 26-1 NAT Types 26-2 NAT in Routed Mode 26-2 NAT in Transparent Mode 26-3 Policy NAT 26-5 NAT and Same Security Level Interfaces 26-8 Order of NAT Commands Used to Match Real Addresses 26-8 Mapped Address Guidelines 26-8 DNS and NAT 26-9 Where to Go Next 26-11 C H A P T E R 27 Configuring NAT Control 27-1 Information About NAT Control 27-1 NAT Control and Inside Interfaces 27-1 NAT Control and Same Security Interfaces 27-2 NAT Control and Outside Dynamic NAT 27-2 NAT Control and Static NAT 27-3 Bypassing NAT When NAT Control is Enabled 27-3 Licensing Requirements 27-3 Prerequisites for NAT Control 27-4 Guidelines and Limitations 27-4 Default Settings 27-4 Configuring NAT Control 27-5 Monitoring NAT Control 27-5Contents xxi Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Configuration Examples for NAT Control 27-5 Feature History for NAT Control 27-6 C H A P T E R 28 Configuring Static NAT 28-1 Information About Static NAT 28-1 Licensing Requirements for Static NAT 28-2 Guidelines and Limitations 28-2 Default Settings 28-3 Configuring Static NAT 28-4 Configuring Policy Static NAT 28-5 Configuring Regular Static NAT 28-8 Monitoring Static NAT 28-9 Configuration Examples for Static NAT 28-9 Typical Static NAT Examples 28-9 Example of Overlapping Networks 28-10 Additional References 28-11 Related Documents 28-11 Feature History for Static NAT 28-11 C H A P T E R 29 Configuring Dynamic NAT and PAT 29-1 Information About Dynamic NAT and PAT 29-1 Information About Dynamic NAT 29-1 Information About PAT 29-4 Information About Implementing Dynamic NAT and PAT 29-5 Licensing Requirements for Dynamic NAT and PAT 29-10 Guidelines and Limitations 29-11 Default Settings 29-11 Configuring Dynamic NAT or Dynamic PAT 29-13 Task Flow for Configuring Dynamic NAT and PAT 29-13 Configuring Policy Dynamic NAT 29-15 Configuring Regular Dynamic NAT 29-17 Monitoring Dynamic NAT and PAT 29-18 Configuration Examples for Dynamic NAT and PAT 29-18 Feature History for Dynamic NAT and PAT 29-19 C H A P T E R 30 Configuring Static PAT 30-1 Information About Static PAT 30-1Contents xxii Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Licensing Requirements for Static PAT 30-3 Prerequisites for Static PAT 30-3 Guidelines and Limitations 30-4 Default Settings 30-4 Configuring Static PAT 30-5 Configuring Policy Static PAT 30-5 Configuring Regular Static PAT 30-7 Monitoring Static PAT 30-9 Configuration Examples for Static PAT 30-9 Examples of Policy Static PAT 30-9 Examples of Regular Static PAT 30-9 Example of Redirecting Ports 30-10 Feature History for Static PAT 30-11 C H A P T E R 31 Bypassing NAT 31-1 Configuring Identity NAT 31-1 Information About Identity NAT 31-2 Licensing Requirements for Identity NAT 31-2 Guidelines and Limitations for Identity NAT 31-2 Default Settings for Identity NAT 31-3 Configuring Identity NAT 31-4 Monitoring Identity NAT 31-5 Feature History for Identity NAT 31-5 Configuring Static Identity NAT 31-5 Information About Static Identity NAT 31-5 Licensing Requirements for Static Identity NAT 31-6 Guidelines and Limitations for Static Identity NAT 31-6 Default Settings for Static Identity NAT 31-7 Configuring Static Identity NAT 31-7 Configuring Policy Static Identity NAT 31-8 Configuring Regular Static Identity NAT 31-9 Monitoring Static Identity NAT 31-10 Feature History for Static Identity NAT 31-10 Configuring NAT Exemption 31-11 Information About NAT Exemption 31-11 Licensing Requirements for NAT Exemption 31-11 Guidelines and Limitations for NAT Exemption 31-12 Default Settings for NAT Exemption 31-12Contents xxiii Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Configuring NAT Exemption 31-13 Monitoring NAT Exemption 31-13 Configuration Examples for NAT Exemption 31-13 Feature History for NAT Exemption 31-14 P A R T 5 Configuring High Availability C H A P T E R 32 Information About High Availability 32-1 Information About Failover and High Availability 32-1 Failover System Requirements 32-2 Hardware Requirements 32-2 Software Requirements 32-2 Licensing Requirements 32-3 Failover and Stateful Failover Links 32-3 Failover Link 32-3 Stateful Failover Link 32-4 Failover Interface Speed for Stateful Links 32-5 Avoiding Interrupted Failover Links 32-5 Active/Active and Active/Standby Failover 32-9 Determining Which Type of Failover to Use 32-9 Stateless (Regular) and Stateful Failover 32-10 Stateless (Regular) Failover 32-10 Stateful Failover 32-10 Transparent Firewall Mode Requirements 32-11 Auto Update Server Support in Failover Configurations 32-12 Auto Update Process Overview 32-12 Monitoring the Auto Update Process 32-13 Failover Health Monitoring 32-14 Unit Health Monitoring 32-15 Interface Monitoring 32-15 Failover Feature/Platform Matrix 32-16 Failover Times by Platform 32-16 Failover Messages 32-17 Failover System Messages 32-17 Debug Messages 32-17 SNMP 32-17Contents xxiv Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 C H A P T E R 33 Configuring Active/Standby Failover 33-1 Information About Active/Standby Failover 33-1 Active/Standby Failover Overview 33-1 Primary/Secondary Status and Active/Standby Status 33-2 Device Initialization and Configuration Synchronization 33-2 Command Replication 33-3 Failover Triggers 33-4 Failover Actions 33-4 Optional Active/Standby Failover Settings 33-5 Licensing Requirements for Active/Standby Failover 33-5 Prerequisites for Active/Standby Failover 33-6 Guidelines and Limitations 33-6 Configuring Active/Standby Failover 33-7 Task Flow for Configuring Active/Standby Failover 33-7 Configuring the Primary Unit 33-7 Configuring the Secondary Unit 33-10 Configuring Optional Active/Standby Failover Settings 33-11 Enabling HTTP Replication with Stateful Failover 33-11 Disabling and Enabling Interface Monitoring 33-12 Configuring the Interface Health Poll Time 33-12 Configuring Failover Criteria 33-13 Configuring Virtual MAC Addresses 33-13 Controlling Failover 33-15 Forcing Failover 33-15 Disabling Failover 33-15 Restoring a Failed Unit 33-15 Testing the Failover Functionality 33-16 Monitoring Active/Standby Failover 33-16 Feature History for Active/Standby Failover 33-16 C H A P T E R 34 Configuring Active/Active Failover 34-1 Information About Active/Active Failover 34-1 Active/Active Failover Overview 34-1 Primary/Secondary Status and Active/Standby Status 34-2 Device Initialization and Configuration Synchronization 34-3 Command Replication 34-3 Failover Triggers 34-4 Failover Actions 34-5Contents xxv Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Optional Active/Active Failover Settings 34-6 Licensing Requirements for Active/Active Failover 34-6 Prerequisites for Active/Active Failover 34-7 Guidelines and Limitations 34-7 Configuring Active/Active Failover 34-8 Task Flow for Configuring Active/Active Failover 34-8 Configuring the Primary Failover Unit 34-8 Configuring the Secondary Failover Unit 34-11 Configuring Optional Active/Active Failover Settings 34-13 Configuring Failover Group Preemption 34-13 Enabling HTTP Replication with Stateful Failover 34-15 Disabling and Enabling Interface Monitoring 34-15 Configuring Interface Health Monitoring 34-16 Configuring Failover Criteria 34-17 Configuring Virtual MAC Addresses 34-17 Configuring Support for Asymmetrically Routed Packets 34-19 Remote Command Execution 34-22 Changing Command Modes 34-23 Security Considerations 34-24 Limitations of Remote Command Execution 34-24 Controlling Failover 34-24 Forcing Failover 34-24 Disabling Failover 34-25 Restoring a Failed Unit or Failover Group 34-25 Testing the Failover Functionality 34-25 Monitoring Active/Active Failover 34-26 Feature History for Active/Active Failover 34-26 P A R T 6 Configuring Access Control C H A P T E R 35 Permitting or Denying Network Access 35-1 Information About Inbound and Outbound Access Rules 35-1 Licensing Requirements for Access Rules 35-2 Prerequisites 35-3 Guidelines and Limitations 35-3 Default Settings 35-4 Applying an Access List to an Interface 35-4 Monitoring Permitting or Denying Network Access 35-5Contents xxvi Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Configuration Examples for Permitting or Denying Network Access 35-6 Feature History for Permitting or Denying Network Access 35-7 C H A P T E R 36 Configuring AAA Servers and the Local Database 36-1 AAA Overview 36-1 About Authentication 36-2 About Authorization 36-2 About Accounting 36-2 AAA Server and Local Database Support 36-3 Summary of Support 36-3 RADIUS Server Support 36-4 Authentication Methods 36-4 Attribute Support 36-4 RADIUS Authorization Functions 36-5 TACACS+ Server Support 36-5 RSA/SDI Server Support 36-5 RSA/SDI Version Support 36-5 Two-step Authentication Process 36-5 SDI Primary and Replica Servers 36-6 NT Server Support 36-6 Kerberos Server Support 36-6 LDAP Server Support 36-6 SSO Support for Clientless SSL VPN with HTTP Forms 36-6 Local Database Support 36-7 User Profiles 36-7 Fallback Support 36-7 Configuring the Local Database 36-8 Identifying AAA Server Groups and Servers 36-9 Configuring an LDAP Server 36-13 Authentication with LDAP 36-14 Authorization with LDAP for VPN 36-15 LDAP Attribute Mapping 36-16 Using Certificates and User Login Credentials 36-17 Using User Login Credentials 36-18 Using certificates 36-18 Differentiating User Roles Using AAA 36-19 Using Local Authentication 36-19 Using RADIUS Authentication 36-20 Using LDAP Authentication 36-20Contents xxvii Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Using TACACS+ Authentication 36-21 C H A P T E R 37 Configuring Management Access 37-1 Allowing Telnet Access 37-1 Allowing SSH Access 37-2 Configuring SSH Access 37-2 Using an SSH Client 37-3 Allowing HTTPS Access for ASDM 37-4 Enabling HTTPS Access 37-4 Accessing ASDM from Your PC 37-4 Configuring Management Access Over a VPN Tunnel 37-5 Configuring AAA for System Administrators 37-5 Configuring Authentication for CLI and ASDM Access 37-5 Configuring Authentication To Access Privileged EXEC Mode (the enable Command) 37-6 Configuring Authentication for the enable Command 37-6 Authenticating Users Using the Login Command 37-7 Limiting User CLI and ASDM Access with Management Authorization 37-7 Configuring Command Authorization 37-8 Command Authorization Overview 37-9 Configuring Local Command Authorization 37-11 Configuring TACACS+ Command Authorization 37-14 Configuring Command Accounting 37-18 Viewing the Current Logged-In User 37-18 Recovering from a Lockout 37-19 Configuring a Login Banner 37-20 C H A P T E R 38 Applying AAA for Network Access 38-1 AAA Performance 38-1 Configuring Authentication for Network Access 38-1 Authentication Overview 38-2 One-Time Authentication 38-2 Applications Required to Receive an Authentication Challenge 38-2 Security Appliance Authentication Prompts 38-2 Static PAT and HTTP 38-3 Enabling Network Access Authentication 38-3 Enabling Secure Authentication of Web Clients 38-5 Authenticating Directly with the Security Appliance 38-6 Enabling Direct Authentication Using HTTP and HTTPS 38-6 Enabling Direct Authentication Using Telnet 38-7Contents xxviii Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Configuring Authorization for Network Access 38-8 Configuring TACACS+ Authorization 38-8 Configuring RADIUS Authorization 38-9 Configuring a RADIUS Server to Send Downloadable Access Control Lists 38-10 Configuring a RADIUS Server to Download Per-User Access Control List Names 38-14 Configuring Accounting for Network Access 38-14 Using MAC Addresses to Exempt Traffic from Authentication and Authorization 38-15 C H A P T E R 39 Applying Filtering Services 39-1 Configuring ActiveX Filtering 39-1 Information About ActiveX Filtering 39-2 Licensing Requirements for ActiveX Filtering 39-2 Configuring ActiveX Filtering 39-2 Configuration Examples for ActiveX Filtering 39-3 Feature History for ActiveX Filtering 39-3 Configuring Java Applet Filtering 39-3 Information About Java Applet Filtering 39-3 Licensing Requirements for Java Applet Filtering 39-4 Configuring Java Applet Filtering 39-4 Configuration Examples for Java Applet Filtering 39-4 Feature History for Java Applet Filtering 39-5 Configuring URLs and FTP Requests with an External Server 39-5 Information About URL Filtering 39-5 Licensing Requirements for URL Filtering 39-6 Identifying the Filtering Server 39-6 Buffering the Content Server Response 39-7 Caching Server Addresses 39-8 Filtering HTTP URLs 39-8 Configuring HTTP Filtering 39-8 Enabling Filtering of Long HTTP URLs 39-9 Truncating Long HTTP URLs 39-9 Exempting Traffic from Filtering 39-10 Filtering HTTPS URLs 39-10 Filtering FTP Requests 39-11 Viewing Filtering Statistics and Configuration 39-11 Viewing Filtering Server Statistics 39-11 Viewing Buffer Configuration and Statistics 39-12 Viewing Caching Statistics 39-13 Viewing Filtering Performance Statistics 39-13Contents xxix Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Viewing Filtering Configuration 39-14 Feature History for URL Filtering 39-14 P A R T 7 Configuring Application Inspection C H A P T E R 40 Getting Started With Application Layer Protocol Inspection 40-1 Information about Application Layer Protocol Inspection 40-1 How Inspection Engines Work 40-1 When to Use Application Protocol Inspection 40-2 Guidelines and Limitations 40-3 Default Settings 40-4 Configuring Application Layer Protocol Inspection 40-6 C H A P T E R 41 Configuring Inspection of Basic Internet Protocols 41-1 DNS Inspection 41-1 How DNS Application Inspection Works 41-2 How DNS Rewrite Works 41-2 Configuring DNS Rewrite 41-3 Using the Static Command for DNS Rewrite 41-4 Using the Alias Command for DNS Rewrite 41-4 Configuring DNS Rewrite with Two NAT Zones 41-4 DNS Rewrite with Three NAT Zones 41-5 Configuring DNS Rewrite with Three NAT Zones 41-7 Configuring a DNS Inspection Policy Map for Additional Inspection Control 41-8 Verifying and Monitoring DNS Inspection 41-11 FTP Inspection 41-12 FTP Inspection Overview 41-12 Using the strict Option 41-12 Configuring an FTP Inspection Policy Map for Additional Inspection Control 41-13 Verifying and Monitoring FTP Inspection 41-17 HTTP Inspection 41-19 HTTP Inspection Overview 41-19 Configuring an HTTP Inspection Policy Map for Additional Inspection Control 41-19 ICMP Inspection 41-23 ICMP Error Inspection 41-24 Instant Messaging Inspection 41-24 IM Inspection Overview 41-24 Configuring an Instant Messaging Inspection Policy Map for Additional Inspection Control 41-24Contents xxx Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 IP Options Inspection 41-27 IP Options Inspection Overview 41-28 Configuring an IP Options Inspection Policy Map for Additional Inspection Control 41-28 NetBIOS Inspection 41-29 NetBIOS Inspection Overview 41-29 Configuring a NetBIOS Inspection Policy Map for Additional Inspection Control 41-30 PPTP Inspection 41-31 SMTP and Extended SMTP Inspection 41-32 SMTP and ESMTP Inspection Overview 41-32 Configuring an ESMTP Inspection Policy Map for Additional Inspection Control 41-33 TFTP Inspection 41-36 C H A P T E R 42 Configuring Inspection for Voice and Video Protocols 42-1 CTIQBE Inspection 42-1 CTIQBE Inspection Overview 42-1 Limitations and Restrictions 42-2 Verifying and Monitoring CTIQBE Inspection 42-2 H.323 Inspection 42-3 H.323 Inspection Overview 42-4 How H.323 Works 42-4 H.239 Support in H.245 Messages 42-5 ASA-Tandberg Interoperability with H.323 Inspection 42-5 Limitations and Restrictions 42-6 Configuring an H.323 Inspection Policy Map for Additional Inspection Control 42-6 Configuring H.323 and H.225 Timeout Values 42-9 Verifying and Monitoring H.323 Inspection 42-9 Monitoring H.225 Sessions 42-9 Monitoring H.245 Sessions 42-10 Monitoring H.323 RAS Sessions 42-11 MGCP Inspection 42-11 MGCP Inspection Overview 42-11 Configuring an MGCP Inspection Policy Map for Additional Inspection Control 42-13 Configuring MGCP Timeout Values 42-14 Verifying and Monitoring MGCP Inspection 42-14 RTSP Inspection 42-15 RTSP Inspection Overview 42-15 Using RealPlayer 42-16 Restrictions and Limitations 42-16 Configuring an RTSP Inspection Policy Map for Additional Inspection Control 42-16Contents xxxi Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 SIP Inspection 42-19 SIP Inspection Overview 42-19 SIP Instant Messaging 42-20 Configuring a SIP Inspection Policy Map for Additional Inspection Control 42-21 Configuring SIP Timeout Values 42-24 Verifying and Monitoring SIP Inspection 42-25 Skinny (SCCP) Inspection 42-25 SCCP Inspection Overview 42-26 Supporting Cisco IP Phones 42-26 Restrictions and Limitations 42-26 Configuring a Skinny (SCCP) Inspection Policy Map for Additional Inspection Control 42-27 Verifying and Monitoring SCCP Inspection 42-29 C H A P T E R 43 Configuring Inspection of Database and Directory Protocols 43-1 ILS Inspection 43-1 SQL*Net Inspection 43-2 Sun RPC Inspection 43-3 Sun RPC Inspection Overview 43-3 Managing Sun RPC Services 43-4 Verifying and Monitoring Sun RPC Inspection 43-4 C H A P T E R 44 Configuring Inspection for Management Application Protocols 44-1 DCERPC Inspection 44-1 DCERPC Overview 44-1 Configuring a DCERPC Inspection Policy Map for Additional Inspection Control 44-2 GTP Inspection 44-3 GTP Inspection Overview 44-4 Configuring a GTP Inspection Policy Map for Additional Inspection Control 44-5 Verifying and Monitoring GTP Inspection 44-8 RADIUS Accounting Inspection 44-9 RADIUS Accounting Inspection Overview 44-10 Configuring a RADIUS Inspection Policy Map for Additional Inspection Control 44-10 RSH Inspection 44-11 SNMP Inspection 44-11 SNMP Inspection Overview 44-11 Configuring an SNMP Inspection Policy Map for Additional Inspection Control 44-11 XDMCP Inspection 44-12Contents xxxii Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 P A R T 8 Configuring Unified Communications C H A P T E R 45 Information About Cisco Unified Communications Proxy Features 45-1 Information About the Adaptive Security Appliance in Cisco Unified Communications 45-1 TLS Proxy Applications in Cisco Unified Communications 45-2 Licensing for Cisco Unified Communications Proxy Features 45-4 C H A P T E R 46 Configuring the Cisco Phone Proxy 46-1 Information About the Cisco Phone Proxy 46-1 Phone Proxy Functionality 46-1 Supported Cisco UCM and IP Phones for the Phone Proxy 46-3 Licensing Requirements for the Phone Proxy 46-4 Prerequisites for the Phone Proxy 46-5 Media Termination Instance Prerequisites 46-5 Certificates from the Cisco UCM 46-6 DNS Lookup Prerequisites 46-6 Cisco Unified Communications Manager Prerequisites 46-7 Access List Rules 46-7 NAT and PAT Prerequisites 46-7 Prerequisites for IP Phones on Multiple Interfaces 46-8 7960 and 7940 IP Phones Support 46-8 Cisco IP Communicator Prerequisites 46-9 Prerequisites for Rate Limiting TFTP Requests 46-10 Rate Limiting Configuration Example 46-10 About ICMP Traffic Destined for the Media Termination Address 46-11 End-User Phone Provisioning 46-11 Ways to Deploy IP Phones to End Users 46-11 Phone Proxy Guidelines and Limitations 46-12 General Guidelines and Limitations 46-12 Media Termination Address Guidelines and Limitations 46-13 Configuring the Phone Proxy 46-14 Task Flow for Configuring the Phone Proxy in a Non-secure Cisco UCM Cluster 46-14 Importing Certificates from the Cisco UCM 46-15 Task Flow for Configuring the Phone Proxy in a Mixed-mode Cisco UCM Cluster 46-16 Creating Trustpoints and Generating Certificates 46-17 Creating the CTL File 46-18 Using an Existing CTL File 46-20 Creating the TLS Proxy Instance for a Non-secure Cisco UCM Cluster 46-20Contents xxxiii Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Creating the TLS Proxy for a Mixed-mode Cisco UCM Cluster 46-21 Creating the Media Termination Instance 46-22 Creating the Phone Proxy Instance 46-23 Enabling the Phone Proxy with SIP and Skinny Inspection 46-25 Configuring Linksys Routers for UDP Port Forwarding 46-26 Configuring Your Router 46-26 Troubleshooting the Phone Proxy 46-27 Debugging Information from the Security Appliance 46-27 Debugging Information from IP Phones 46-31 IP Phone Registration Failure 46-32 TFTP Auth Error Displays on IP Phone Console 46-32 Configuration File Parsing Error 46-33 Configuration File Parsing Error: Unable to Get DNS Response 46-33 Non-configuration File Parsing Error 46-34 Cisco UCM Does Not Respond to TFTP Request for Configuration File 46-34 IP Phone Does Not Respond After the Security Appliance Sends TFTP Data 46-35 IP Phone Requesting Unsigned File Error 46-36 IP Phone Unable to Download CTL File 46-36 IP Phone Registration Failure from Signaling Connections 46-37 SSL Handshake Failure 46-39 Certificate Validation Errors 46-40 Media Termination Address Errors 46-40 Audio Problems with IP Phones 46-41 Saving SAST Keys 46-42 Configuration Examples for the Phone Proxy 46-43 Example 1: Nonsecure Cisco UCM cluster, Cisco UCM and TFTP Server on Publisher 46-43 Example 2: Mixed-mode Cisco UCM cluster, Cisco UCM and TFTP Server on Publisher 46-45 Example 3: Mixed-mode Cisco UCM cluster, Cisco UCM and TFTP Server on Different Servers 46-46 Example 4: Mixed-mode Cisco UCM cluster, Primary Cisco UCM, Secondary and TFTP Server on Different Servers 46-47 Example 5: LSC Provisioning in Mixed-mode Cisco UCM cluster; Cisco UCM and TFTP Server on Publisher 46-49 Example 6: VLAN Transversal 46-51 Feature History for the Phone Proxy 46-53 C H A P T E R 47 Configuring the TLS Proxy for Encrypted Voice Inspection 47-1 Information about the TLS Proxy for Encrypted Voice Inspection 47-1 Decryption and Inspection of Unified Communications Encrypted Signaling 47-2 CTL Client Overview 47-3Contents xxxiv Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Licensing for the TLS Proxy 47-5 Prerequisites for the TLS Proxy for Encrypted Voice Inspection 47-6 Configuring the TLS Proxy for Encrypted Voice Inspection 47-6 Task flow for Configuring the TLS Proxy for Encrypted Voice Inspection 47-7 Creating Trustpoints and Generating Certificates 47-8 Creating an Internal CA 47-9 Creating a CTL Provider Instance 47-10 Creating the TLS Proxy Instance 47-11 Enabling the TLS Proxy Instance for Skinny or SIP Inspection 47-12 Monitoring the TLS Proxy 47-14 Feature History for the TLS Proxy for Encrypted Voice Inspection 47-16 C H A P T E R 48 Configuring Cisco Mobility Advantage 48-1 Information about the Cisco Mobility Advantage Proxy Feature 48-1 Cisco Mobility Advantage Proxy Functionality 48-1 Mobility Advantage Proxy Deployment Scenarios 48-2 Mobility Advantage Proxy Using NAT/PAT 48-4 Trust Relationships for Cisco UMA Deployments 48-5 Licensing for the Mobility Advantage Proxy 48-6 Configuring Cisco Mobility Advantage 48-6 Task Flow for Configuring Cisco Mobility Advantage 48-7 Installing the Cisco UMA Server Certificate 48-7 Creating the TLS Proxy Instance 48-8 Enabling the TLS Proxy for MMP Inspection 48-9 Monitoring for Cisco Mobility Advantage Proxy 48-10 Configuration Examples for Cisco Mobility Advantage 48-11 Example 1: Cisco UMC/Cisco UMA Architecture – Security Appliance as Firewall with TLS Proxy and MMP Inspection 48-11 Example 2: Cisco UMC/Cisco UMA Architecture – Security Appliance as TLS Proxy Only 48-12 Feature History for Cisco Mobility Advantage 48-14 C H A P T E R 49 Configuring Cisco Unified Presence 49-1 Information About Cisco Unified Presence 49-1 Architecture for Cisco Unified Presence 49-1 Trust Relationship in the Presence Federation 49-3 Security Certificate Exchange Between Cisco UP and the Security Appliance 49-4 Licensing for Cisco Unified Presence 49-4 Configuring Cisco Unified Presence 49-5Contents xxxv Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Task Flow for Configuring Cisco Unified Presence 49-5 Creating Trustpoints and Generating Certificates 49-6 Installing Certificates 49-7 Creating the TLS Proxy Instance 49-8 Enabling the TLS Proxy for SIP Inspection 49-9 Monitoring Cisco Unified Presence 49-10 Configuration Example for Cisco Unified Presence 49-11 Feature History for Cisco Unified Presence 49-13 P A R T 9 Configuring Advanced Connection Settings C H A P T E R 50 Configuring Threat Detection 50-1 Information About Threat Detection 50-1 Configuring Basic Threat Detection Statistics 50-1 Information About Basic Threat Detection Statistics 50-2 Guidelines and Limitations 50-2 Default Settings 50-3 Configuring Basic Threat Detection Statistics 50-4 Monitoring Basic Threat Detection Statistics 50-5 Feature History for Basic Threat Detection Statistics 50-6 Configuring Advanced Threat Detection Statistics 50-6 Information About Advanced Threat Detection Statistics 50-6 Guidelines and Limitations 50-6 Default Settings 50-7 Configuring Advanced Threat Detection Statistics 50-7 Monitoring Advanced Threat Detection Statistics 50-9 Feature History for Advanced Threat Detection Statistics 50-13 Configuring Scanning Threat Detection 50-13 Information About Scanning Threat Detection 50-14 Guidelines and Limitations 50-14 Default Settings 50-14 Configuring Scanning Threat Detection 50-15 Monitoring Shunned Hosts, Attackers, and Targets 50-16 Feature History for Scanning Threat Detection 50-16 Configuration Examples for Threat Detection 50-17 C H A P T E R 51 Configuring TCP State Bypass 51-1 Information About TCP State Bypass 51-1Contents xxxvi Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Licensing Requirements for TCP State Bypass 51-2 Guidelines and Limitations 51-2 Default Settings 51-3 Configuring TCP State Bypass 51-3 Monitoring TCP State Bypass 51-4 Configuration Examples for TCP State Bypass 51-4 Feature History for TCP State Bypass 51-5 C H A P T E R 52 Configuring TCP Normalization 52-1 Information About TCP Normalization 52-1 Customizing the TCP Normalizer 52-1 Configuration Examples for TCP Normalization 52-6 C H A P T E R 53 Configuring Connection Limits and Timeouts 53-1 Information About Connection Limits 53-1 TCP Intercept 53-1 Disabling TCP Intercept for Management Packets for Clientless SSL Compatibility 53-2 Dead Connection Detection (DCD) 53-2 TCP Sequence Randomization 53-2 Configuring Connection Limits and Timeouts 53-3 Configuration Examples for Connection Limits and Timeouts 53-5 C H A P T E R 54 Configuring the Botnet Traffic Filter 54-1 Information About the Botnet Traffic Filter 54-1 Botnet Traffic Filter Address Categories 54-2 Botnet Traffic Filter Actions for Known Addresses 54-2 Botnet Traffic Filter Databases 54-2 Information About the Dynamic Database 54-2 Information About the Static Database 54-3 Information About the DNS Reverse Lookup Cache and DNS Host Cache 54-3 How the Botnet Traffic Filter Works 54-4 Licensing Requirements for the Botnet Traffic Filter 54-5 Guidelines and Limitations 54-5 Default Settings 54-6 Configuring the Botnet Traffic Filter 54-6 Task Flow for Configuring the Botnet Traffic Filter 54-6 Configuring the Dynamic Database 54-7Contents xxxvii Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Adding Entries to the Static Database 54-8 Enabling DNS Snooping 54-9 Enabling Traffic Classification and Actions for the Botnet Traffic Filter 54-11 Blocking Botnet Traffic Manually 54-14 Searching the Dynamic Database 54-15 Monitoring the Botnet Traffic Filter 54-16 Botnet Traffic Filter Syslog Messaging 54-16 Botnet Traffic Filter Commands 54-16 Configuration Examples for the Botnet Traffic Filter 54-18 Recommended Configuration Example 54-18 Other Configuration Examples 54-19 Where to Go Next 54-20 Feature History for the Botnet Traffic Filter 54-21 C H A P T E R 55 Configuring QoS 55-1 Information About QoS 55-1 Supported QoS Features 55-2 What is a Token Bucket? 55-2 Information About Policing 55-3 Information About Priority Queuing 55-3 Information About Traffic Shaping 55-4 How QoS Features Interact 55-4 DSCP and DiffServ Preservation 55-5 Licensing Requirements for QoS 55-5 Guidelines and Limitations 55-5 Configuring QoS 55-6 Determining the Queue and TX Ring Limits for a Standard Priority Queue 55-6 Configuring the Standard Priority Queue for an Interface 55-7 Configuring a Service Rule for Standard Priority Queuing and Policing 55-9 Configuring a Service Rule for Traffic Shaping and Hierarchical Priority Queuing 55-12 (Optional) Configuring the Hierarchical Priority Queuing Policy 55-12 Configuring the Service Rule 55-13 Monitoring QoS 55-15 Viewing QoS Police Statistics 55-15 Viewing QoS Standard Priority Statistics 55-16 Viewing QoS Shaping Statistics 55-16 Viewing QoS Standard Priority Queue Statistics 55-17 Feature History for QoS 55-18Contents xxxviii Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 C H A P T E R 56 Configuring Web Cache Services Using WCCP 56-1 Information About WCCP 56-1 Guidelines and Limitations 56-1 Enabling WCCP Redirection 56-2 Feature History for WCCP 56-3 C H A P T E R 57 Preventing Network Attacks 57-1 Preventing IP Spoofing 57-1 Configuring the Fragment Size 57-2 Blocking Unwanted Connections 57-2 Configuring IP Audit for Basic IPS Support 57-3 P A R T 10 Configuring Applications on SSMs and SSCs C H A P T E R 58 Managing Services Modules 58-1 Information About Modules 58-1 Supported Applications 58-2 Information About Management Access 58-2 Sessioning to the Module 58-2 Using ASDM 58-2 Using SSH or Telnet 58-3 Other Uses for the Module Management Interface 58-3 Routing Considerations for Accessing the Management Interface 58-3 Guidelines and Limitations 58-3 Default Settings 58-4 Configuring the SSC Management Interface 58-4 Sessioning to the Module 58-6 Troubleshooting the Module 58-6 Installing an Image on the Module 58-7 Resetting the Password 58-8 Reloading or Resetting the Module 58-8 Shutting Down the Module 58-8 Monitoring SSMs and SSCs 58-9 Where to Go Next 58-11 Feature History for the Module 58-11Contents xxxix Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 C H A P T E R 59 Configuring the IPS Module 59-1 Information About the IPS Module 59-1 How the IPS Module Works with the Adaptive Security Appliance 59-2 Operating Modes 59-2 Using Virtual Sensors (ASA 5510 and Higher) 59-3 Differences Between Modules 59-4 Licensing Requirements for the IPS Module 59-4 Guidelines and Limitations 59-4 Configuring the IPS Module 59-5 IPS Module Task Overview 59-5 Configuring the Security Policy on the IPS Module 59-5 Assigning Virtual Sensors to a Security Context (ASA 5510 and Higher) 59-6 Diverting Traffic to the IPS Module 59-8 Monitoring the IPS Module 59-10 Configuration Examples for the IPS Module 59-10 Feature History for the IPS Module 59-11 C H A P T E R 60 Configuring the Content Security and Control Application on the CSC SSM 60-1 Information About the CSC SSM 60-1 Determining What Traffic to Scan 60-3 Licensing Requirements for the CSC SSM 60-4 Prerequisites for the CSC SSM 60-5 Guidelines and Limitations 60-5 Default Settings 60-6 Configuring the CSC SSM 60-6 Before Configuring the CSC SSM 60-6 Diverting Traffic to the CSC SSM 60-7 Monitoring the CSC SSM 60-10 Configuration Examples for the CSC SSM 60-10 Additional References 60-11 Feature History for the CSC SSM 60-12 P A R T 11 Configuring VPN C H A P T E R 61 Configuring IPsec and ISAKMP 61-1 Tunneling Overview 61-1 IPsec Overview 61-2Contents xl Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Configuring ISAKMP 61-2 ISAKMP Overview 61-2 Configuring ISAKMP Policies 61-5 Enabling ISAKMP on the Outside Interface 61-6 Disabling ISAKMP in Aggressive Mode 61-6 Determining an ID Method for ISAKMP Peers 61-6 Enabling IPsec over NAT-T 61-7 Using NAT-T 61-8 Enabling IPsec over TCP 61-8 Waiting for Active Sessions to Terminate Before Rebooting 61-9 Alerting Peers Before Disconnecting 61-9 Configuring Certificate Group Matching 61-9 Creating a Certificate Group Matching Rule and Policy 61-10 Using the Tunnel-group-map default-group Command 61-11 Configuring IPsec 61-11 Understanding IPsec Tunnels 61-11 Understanding Transform Sets 61-12 Defining Crypto Maps 61-12 Applying Crypto Maps to Interfaces 61-19 Using Interface Access Lists 61-19 Changing IPsec SA Lifetimes 61-22 Creating a Basic IPsec Configuration 61-22 Using Dynamic Crypto Maps 61-24 Providing Site-to-Site Redundancy 61-26 Viewing an IPsec Configuration 61-26 Clearing Security Associations 61-27 Clearing Crypto Map Configurations 61-27 Supporting the Nokia VPN Client 61-28 C H A P T E R 62 Configuring L2TP over IPsec 62-1 Information About L2TP over IPsec 62-1 IPsec Transport and Tunnel Modes 62-2 Licensing Requirements for L2TP over IPsec 62-3 Prerequisites for Configuring L2TP over IPsec 62-3 Guidelines and Limitations 62-4 Configuring L2TP over IPsec 62-4 Guidelines and Limitations 62-4 Configuration Examples for L2TP over IPsec 62-7Contents xli Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Feature History for L2TP over IPsec 62-7 C H A P T E R 63 Setting General IPsec or SSL VPN Parameters 63-1 Configuring VPNs in Single, Routed Mode 63-1 Configuring IPsec or SSL VPN to Bypass ACLs 63-1 Permitting Intra-Interface Traffic (Hairpinning) 63-2 NAT Considerations for Intra-Interface Traffic 63-3 Setting Maximum Active IPsec or SSL VPN Sessions 63-4 Using Client Update to Ensure Acceptable IPsec Client Revision Levels 63-4 Understanding Load Balancing 63-6 Comparing Load Balancing to Failover 63-7 Load Balancing 63-7 Failover 63-7 Implementing Load Balancing 63-8 Prerequisites 63-8 Eligible Platforms 63-8 Eligible Clients 63-8 VPN Load Balancing Algorithm 63-9 VPN Load-Balancing Cluster Configurations 63-9 Some Typical Mixed Cluster Scenarios 63-10 Scenario 1: Mixed Cluster with No SSL VPN Connections 63-10 Scenario 2: Mixed Cluster Handling SSL VPN Connections 63-10 Configuring Load Balancing 63-11 Configuring the Public and Private Interfaces for Load Balancing 63-11 Configuring the Load Balancing Cluster Attributes 63-12 Enabling Redirection Using a Fully-qualified Domain Name 63-13 Monitoring Load Balancing 63-14 Frequently Asked Questions About Load Balancing 63-15 IP Address Pool Exhaustion 63-15 Unique IP Address Pools 63-15 Using Load Balancing and Failover on the Same Device 63-15 Load Balancing on Multiple Interfaces 63-15 Maximum Simultaneous Sessions for Load Balancing Clusters 63-15 Configuring VPN Session Limits 63-16 General Considerations 63-17 C H A P T E R 64 Configuring Connection Profiles, Group Policies, and Users 64-1 Overview of Connection Profiles, Group Policies, and Users 64-1Contents xlii Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Connection Profiles 64-2 General Connection Profile Connection Parameters 64-3 IPSec Tunnel-Group Connection Parameters 64-4 Connection Profile Connection Parameters for SSL VPN Sessions 64-5 Configuring Connection Profiles 64-6 Maximum Connection Profiles 64-6 Default IPSec Remote Access Connection Profile Configuration 64-7 Configuring IPSec Tunnel-Group General Attributes 64-7 Configuring IPSec Remote-Access Connection Profiles 64-7 Specifying a Name and Type for the IPSec Remote Access Connection Profile 64-8 Configuring IPSec Remote-Access Connection Profile General Attributes 64-8 Configuring Double Authentication 64-12 Enabling IPv6 VPN Access 64-13 Configuring IPSec Remote-Access Connection Profile IPSec Attributes 64-14 Configuring IPSec Remote-Access Connection Profile PPP Attributes 64-16 Configuring LAN-to-LAN Connection Profiles 64-17 Default LAN-to-LAN Connection Profile Configuration 64-17 Specifying a Name and Type for a LAN-to-LAN Connection Profile 64-18 Configuring LAN-to-LAN Connection Profile General Attributes 64-18 Configuring LAN-to-LAN IPSec Attributes 64-19 Configuring Connection Profiles for Clientless SSL VPN Sessions 64-21 Specifying a Connection Profile Name and Type for Clientless SSL VPN Sessions 64-21 Configuring General Tunnel-Group Attributes for Clientless SSL VPN Sessions 64-21 Configuring Tunnel-Group Attributes for Clientless SSL VPN Sessions 64-24 Customizing Login Windows for Users of Clientless SSL VPN sessions 64-28 Configuring Microsoft Active Directory Settings for Password Management 64-29 Using Active Directory to Force the User to Change Password at Next Logon 64-30 Using Active Directory to Specify Maximum Password Age 64-31 Using Active Directory to Override an Account Disabled AAA Indicator 64-32 Using Active Directory to Enforce Minimum Password Length 64-33 Using Active Directory to Enforce Password Complexity 64-34 Configuring the Connection Profile for RADIUS/SDI Message Support for the AnyConnect Client 64-35 AnyConnect Client and RADIUS/SDI Server Interaction 64-35 Configuring the Security Appliance to Support RADIUS/SDI Messages 64-36 Group Policies 64-37 Default Group Policy 64-38 Configuring Group Policies 64-39 Configuring an External Group Policy 64-40 Configuring an Internal Group Policy 64-40Contents xliii Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Configuring Group Policy Attributes 64-41 Configuring WINS and DNS Servers 64-41 Configuring VPN-Specific Attributes 64-42 Configuring Security Attributes 64-46 Configuring the Banner Message 64-48 Configuring IPSec-UDP Attributes 64-49 Configuring Split-Tunneling Attributes 64-49 Configuring Domain Attributes for Tunneling 64-51 Configuring Attributes for VPN Hardware Clients 64-52 Configuring Backup Server Attributes 64-56 Configuring Microsoft Internet Explorer Client Parameters 64-57 Configuring Network Admission Control Parameters 64-59 Configuring Address Pools 64-62 Configuring Firewall Policies 64-63 Supporting a Zone Labs Integrity Server 64-64 Overview of Integrity Server and Security Appliance Interaction 64-64 Configuring Integrity Server Support 64-65 Setting Up Client Firewall Parameters 64-65 Configuring Client Access Rules 64-67 Configuring Group-Policy Attributes for Clientless SSL VPN Sessions 64-69 Configuring User Attributes 64-79 Viewing the Username Configuration 64-80 Configuring Attributes for Specific Users 64-80 Setting a User Password and Privilege Level 64-80 Configuring User Attributes 64-81 Configuring VPN User Attributes 64-81 Configuring Clientless SSL VPN Access for Specific Users 64-85 C H A P T E R 65 Configuring IP Addresses for VPNs 65-1 Configuring an IP Address Assignment Method 65-1 Configuring Local IP Address Pools 65-2 Configuring AAA Addressing 65-2 Configuring DHCP Addressing 65-3 C H A P T E R 66 Configuring Remote Access IPsec VPNs 66-1 Information About Remote Access IPsec VPNs 66-1 Licensing Requirements for Remote Access IPsec VPNs 66-2 Guidelines and Limitations 66-2 Configuring Remote Access IPsec VPNs 66-2Contents xliv Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Configuring Interfaces 66-3 Configuring ISAKMP Policy and Enabling ISAKMP on the Outside Interface 66-4 Configuring an Address Pool 66-5 Adding a User 66-5 Creating a Transform Set 66-6 Defining a Tunnel Group 66-6 Creating a Dynamic Crypto Map 66-7 Creating a Crypto Map Entry to Use the Dynamic Crypto Map 66-8 Saving the Security Appliance Configuration 66-9 Configuration Examples for Remote Access IPsec VPNs 66-9 Feature History for Remote Access IPsec VPNs 66-10 C H A P T E R 67 Configuring Network Admission Control 67-1 Overview 67-1 Uses, Requirements, and Limitations 67-2 Viewing the NAC Policies on the Security Appliance 67-2 Adding, Accessing, or Removing a NAC Policy 67-4 Configuring a NAC Policy 67-4 Specifying the Access Control Server Group 67-4 Setting the Query-for-Posture-Changes Timer 67-5 Setting the Revalidation Timer 67-5 Configuring the Default ACL for NAC 67-6 Configuring Exemptions from NAC 67-6 Assigning a NAC Policy to a Group Policy 67-7 Changing Global NAC Framework Settings 67-8 Changing Clientless Authentication Settings 67-8 Enabling and Disabling Clientless Authentication 67-8 Changing the Login Credentials Used for Clientless Authentication 67-9 Changing NAC Framework Session Attributes 67-10 C H A P T E R 68 Configuring Easy VPN Services on the ASA 5505 68-1 Specifying the Client/Server Role of the Cisco ASA 5505 68-1 Specifying the Primary and Secondary Servers 68-2 Specifying the Mode 68-3 NEM with Multiple Interfaces 68-3 Configuring Automatic Xauth Authentication 68-4 Configuring IPSec Over TCP 68-4 Comparing Tunneling Options 68-5Contents xlv Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Specifying the Tunnel Group or Trustpoint 68-6 Specifying the Tunnel Group 68-7 Specifying the Trustpoint 68-7 Configuring Split Tunneling 68-8 Configuring Device Pass-Through 68-8 Configuring Remote Management 68-9 Guidelines for Configuring the Easy VPN Server 68-10 Group Policy and User Attributes Pushed to the Client 68-10 Authentication Options 68-12 C H A P T E R 69 Configuring the PPPoE Client 69-1 PPPoE Client Overview 69-1 Configuring the PPPoE Client Username and Password 69-2 Enabling PPPoE 69-3 Using PPPoE with a Fixed IP Address 69-3 Monitoring and Debugging the PPPoE Client 69-4 Clearing the Configuration 69-5 Using Related Commands 69-5 C H A P T E R 70 Configuring LAN-to-LAN IPsec VPNs 70-1 Summary of the Configuration 70-1 Configuring Interfaces 70-2 Configuring ISAKMP Policy and Enabling ISAKMP on the Outside Interface 70-2 Creating a Transform Set 70-4 Configuring an ACL 70-4 Defining a Tunnel Group 70-5 Creating a Crypto Map and Applying It To an Interface 70-6 Applying Crypto Maps to Interfaces 70-7 C H A P T E R 71 Configuring Clientless SSL VPN 71-1 Getting Started 71-1 Observing Clientless SSL VPN Security Precautions 71-2 Understanding Clientless SSL VPN System Requirements 71-3 Understanding Features Not Supported in Clientless SSL VPN 71-4 Using SSL to Access the Central Site 71-5 Using HTTPS for Clientless SSL VPN Sessions 71-5 Configuring Clientless SSL VPN and ASDM Ports 71-5Contents xlvi Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Configuring Support for Proxy Servers 71-6 Configuring SSL/TLS Encryption Protocols 71-7 Authenticating with Digital Certificates 71-8 Enabling Cookies on Browsers for Clientless SSL VPN 71-8 Managing Passwords 71-8 Using Single Sign-on with Clientless SSL VPN 71-9 Configuring SSO with HTTP Basic or NTLM Authentication 71-10 Configuring SSO Authentication Using SiteMinder 71-11 Configuring SSO Authentication Using SAML Browser Post Profile 71-13 Configuring SSO with the HTTP Form Protocol 71-16 Configuring SSO for Plug-ins 71-23 Configuring SSO with Macro Substitution 71-23 Authenticating with Digital Certificates 71-24 Creating and Applying Clientless SSL VPN Policies for Accessing Resources 71-24 Assigning Users to Group Policies 71-24 Using the Security Appliance Authentication Server 71-24 Using a RADIUS Server 71-25 Configuring Connection Profile Attributes for Clientless SSL VPN 71-25 Configuring Group Policy and User Attributes for Clientless SSL VPN 71-26 Configuring Browser Access to Plug-ins 71-27 Introduction to Browser Plug-Ins 71-27 Plug-in Requirements and Restrictions 71-28 Single Sign-On for Plug-ins 71-28 Preparing the Security Appliance for a Plug-in 71-28 Installing Plug-ins Redistributed by Cisco 71-29 Providing Access to Third-Party Plug-ins 71-31 Example: Providing Access to a Citrix Java Presentation Server 71-31 Viewing the Plug-ins Installed on the Security Appliance 71-32 Configuring Application Access 71-33 Configuring Smart Tunnel Access 71-33 About Smart Tunnels 71-33 Why Smart Tunnels? 71-34 Smart Tunnel Requirements, Restrictions, and Limitations 71-34 Adding Applications to Be Eligible for Smart Tunnel Access 71-35 Assigning a Smart Tunnel List 71-38 Configuring Smart Tunnel Auto Sign-on 71-39 Automating Smart Tunnel Access 71-40 Enabling and Disabling Smart Tunnel Access 71-41 Configuring Port Forwarding 71-41Contents xlvii Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 About Port Forwarding 71-42 Why Port Forwarding? 71-42 Port Forwarding Requirements and Restrictions 71-42 Configuring DNS for Port Forwarding 71-43 Adding Applications to Be Eligible for Port Forwarding 71-44 Assigning a Port Forwarding List 71-45 Automating Port Forwarding 71-46 Enabling and Disabling Port Forwarding 71-46 Application Access User Notes 71-47 Using Application Access on Vista 71-47 Closing Application Access to Prevent hosts File Errors 71-47 Recovering from hosts File Errors When Using Application Access 71-47 Configuring File Access 71-50 CIFS File Access Requirement 71-51 Adding Support for File Access 71-51 Ensuring Clock Accuracy for SharePoint Access 71-52 Using Clientless SSL VPN with PDAs 71-52 Using E-Mail over Clientless SSL VPN 71-53 Configuring E-mail Proxies 71-53 E-mail Proxy Certificate Authentication 71-54 Configuring Web E-mail: MS Outlook Web Access 71-54 Configuring Portal Access Rules 71-55 Optimizing Clientless SSL VPN Performance 71-55 Configuring Caching 71-56 Configuring Content Transformation 71-56 Configuring a Certificate for Signing Rewritten Java Content 71-56 Disabling Content Rewrite 71-57 Using Proxy Bypass 71-57 Configuring Application Profile Customization Framework 71-57 APCF Syntax 71-58 Clientless SSL VPN End User Setup 71-61 Defining the End User Interface 71-61 Viewing the Clientless SSL VPN Home Page 71-61 Viewing the Clientless SSL VPN Application Access Panel 71-62 Viewing the Floating Toolbar 71-62 Customizing Clientless SSL VPN Pages 71-63 How Customization Works 71-64 Exporting a Customization Template 71-64 Editing the Customization Template 71-64Contents xlviii Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Importing a Customization Object 71-70 Applying Customizations to Connection Profiles, Group Policies and Users 71-70 Login Screen Advanced Customization 71-71 Customizing Help 71-75 Customizing a Help File Provided By Cisco 71-76 Creating Help Files for Languages Not Provided by Cisco 71-77 Importing a Help File to Flash Memory 71-77 Exporting a Previously Imported Help File from Flash Memory 71-78 Requiring Usernames and Passwords 71-78 Communicating Security Tips 71-78 Configuring Remote Systems to Use Clientless SSL VPN Features 71-79 Translating the Language of User Messages 71-83 Understanding Language Translation 71-84 Creating Translation Tables 71-85 Referencing the Language in a Customization Object 71-86 Changing a Group Policy or User Attributes to Use the Customization Object 71-88 Capturing Data 71-88 C H A P T E R 72 Configuring AnyConnect VPN Client Connections 72-1 Information About AnyConnect VPN Client Connections 72-1 Licensing Requirements for AnyConnect Connections 72-2 Guidelines and Limitations 72-3 Remote PC System Requirements 72-3 Remote HTTPS Certificates Limitation 72-4 Configuring AnyConnect Connections 72-4 Configuring the Security Appliance to Web-Deploy the Client 72-4 Enabling Permanent Client Installation 72-6 Configuring DTLS 72-6 Prompting Remote Users 72-7 Enabling AnyConnect Client Profile Downloads 72-8 Enabling Additional AnyConnect Client Features 72-10 Enabling Start Before Logon 72-10 Translating Languages for AnyConnect User Messages 72-11 Understanding Language Translation 72-11 Creating Translation Tables 72-11 Configuring Advanced SSL VPN Features 72-13 Enabling Rekey 72-13 Enabling and Adjusting Dead Peer Detection 72-14 Enabling Keepalive 72-14Contents xlix Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Using Compression 72-15 Adjusting MTU Size 72-16 Monitoring SSL VPN Sessions 72-16 Logging Off SVC Sessions 72-16 Updating SSL VPN Client Images 72-17 Monitoring AnyConnect Connections 72-18 Feature History for AnyConnect Connections 72-18 C H A P T E R 73 Configuring Digital Certificates 73-1 Information About Digital Certificates 73-1 Public Key Cryptography 73-2 Certificate Scalability 73-2 Key Pairs 73-2 Trustpoints 73-3 Certificate Enrollment 73-3 Revocation Checking 73-4 Supported CA Servers 73-4 CRLs 73-4 OCSP 73-5 The Local CA 73-6 The Local CA Server 73-6 Storage for Local CA Files 73-7 Licensing Requirements for Digital Certificates 73-7 Prerequisites for Certificates 73-7 Guidelines and Limitations 73-7 Configuring Digital Certificates 73-8 Configuring Key Pairs 73-9 Removing Key Pairs 73-9 Configuring Trustpoints 73-10 Configuring CRLs for a Trustpoint 73-13 Exporting a Trustpoint Configuration 73-15 Importing a Trustpoint Configuration 73-15 Configuring CA Certificate Map Rules 73-16 Obtaining Certificates Manually 73-17 Obtaining Certificates Automatically with SCEP 73-20 Enabling the Local CA Server 73-22 Configuring the Local CA Server 73-23 Customizing the Local CA Server 73-25 Debugging the Local CA Server 73-27Contents l Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Disabling the Local CA Server 73-27 Deleting the Local CA Server 73-28 Configuring Local CA Certificate Characteristics 73-28 Configuring the Issuer Name 73-29 Configuring the CA Certificate Lifetime 73-29 Configuring the User Certificate Lifetime 73-31 Configuring the CRL Lifetime 73-31 Configuring the Server Keysize 73-32 Setting Up External Local CA File Storage 73-33 Downloading CRLs 73-35 Storing CRLs 73-36 Setting Up Enrollment Parameters 73-37 Adding and Enrolling Users 73-38 Renewing Users 73-40 Restoring Users 73-41 Removing Users 73-41 Revoking Certificates 73-42 Maintaining the Local CA Certificate Database 73-42 Rolling Over Local CA Certificates 73-42 Archiving the Local CA Server Certificate and Keypair 73-43 Monitoring Digital Certificates 73-43 Feature History for Certificate Management 73-45 P A R T 12 Monitoring C H A P T E R 74 Configuring Logging 74-1 Information About Logging 74-1 Logging in Multiple Context Mode 74-2 Analyzing Syslog Messages 74-2 Syslog Message Format 74-2 Severity Levels 74-3 Message Classes and Range of Syslog IDs 74-3 Filtering Syslog Messages 74-3 Using Custom Message Lists 74-4 Licensing Requirements for Logging 74-5 Prerequisites for Logging 74-5 Guidelines and Limitations 74-5 Configuring Logging 74-5 Enabling Logging 74-6Contents li Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Sending Syslog Messages to an SNMP Server 74-6 Sending Syslog Messages to a Syslog Server 74-7 Sending Syslog Messages to the Console Port 74-8 Sending Syslog Messages to an E-mail Address 74-8 Sending Syslog Messages to ASDM 74-9 Sending Syslog Messages to a Telnet or SSH Session 74-9 Sending Syslog Messages to the Internal Log Buffer 74-10 Sending All Syslog Messages in a Class to a Specified Output Destination 74-11 Creating a Custom Message List 74-12 Enabling Secure Logging 74-13 Configuring the Logging Queue 74-13 Including the Device ID in Syslog Messages 74-14 Generating Syslog Messages in EMBLEM Format 74-15 Including the Date and Time in Syslog Messages 74-15 Disabling a Syslog Message 74-15 Changing the Severity Level of a Syslog Message 74-16 Limiting the Rate of Syslog Message Generation 74-16 Changing the Amount of Internal Flash Memory Available for Logs 74-17 Monitoring Logging 74-17 Configuration Examples for Logging 74-18 Feature History for Logging 74-18 C H A P T E R 75 Configuring NetFlow Secure Event Logging (NSEL) 75-1 Information About NSEL 75-1 Using NSEL and Syslog Messages 75-2 Licensing Requirements for NSEL 75-3 Prerequisites for NSEL 75-3 Guidelines and Limitations 75-3 Configuring NSEL 75-4 Configuring NSEL Collectors 75-4 Configuring Flow-Export Actions Through Modular Policy Framework 75-5 Configuring Template Timeout Intervals 75-6 Delaying Flow-Create Events 75-6 Disabling and Reenabling NetFlow-related Syslog Messages 75-7 Clearing Runtime Counters 75-7 Monitoring NSEL 75-7 Configuration Examples for NSEL 75-8 Additional References 75-9Contents lii Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Related Documents 75-10 RFCs 75-10 Feature History for NSEL 75-10 C H A P T E R 76 Configuring SNMP 76-1 Information about SNMP 76-1 SNMP Version 3 Overview 76-2 Security Models 76-2 SNMP Groups 76-2 SNMP Users 76-2 SNMP Hosts 76-2 Implementation Differences Between Adaptive Security Appliances and IOS 76-3 Licensing Requirements for SNMP 76-3 Prerequisites for SNMP 76-3 Guidelines and Limitations 76-3 Configuring SNMP 76-4 Enabling SNMP 76-5 Compiling Cisco Syslog MIB Files 76-7 Troubleshooting Tips 76-8 Interface Types and Examples 76-9 Monitoring SNMP 76-11 Configuration Examples for SNMP 76-12 Configuration Example for SNMP Versions 1 and 2c 76-12 Configuration Example for SNMP Version 3 76-12 Additional References 76-12 RFCs for SNMP Version 3 76-12 MIBs 76-13 Feature History for SNMP 76-14 C H A P T E R 77 Configuring Anonymous Reporting and Smart Call Home 77-1 Information About Anonymous Reporting and Smart Call Home 77-1 Information About Anonymous Reporting 77-2 What is Sent to Cisco? 77-2 DNS Requirement 77-3 Anonymous Reporting and Smart Call Home Prompt 77-3 Information About Smart Call Home 77-4 Licensing Requirements for Anonymous Reporting and Smart Call Home 77-4 Prerequisites for Smart Call Home and Anonymous Reporting 77-5Contents liii Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Guidelines and Limitations 77-5 Configuring Anonymous Reporting and Smart Call Home 77-6 Configuring Anonymous Reporting 77-6 Configuring Smart Call Home 77-7 Enabling Smart Call Home 77-7 Declaring and Authenticating a CA Trust Point 77-8 Configuring DNS 77-8 Subscribing to Alert Groups 77-9 Testing Call Home Communications 77-11 Optional Configuration Procedures 77-13 Monitoring Smart Call Home 77-19 Configuration Example for Smart Call Home 77-19 Feature History for Anonymous Reporting and Smart Call Home 77-20 P A R T 13 System Administration C H A P T E R 78 Managing Software and Configurations 78-1 Copying Files to a Local File System on a UNIX Server 78-1 Viewing Files in Flash Memory 78-1 Retrieving Files from Flash Memory 78-2 Removing Files from Flash Memory 78-2 Downloading Software or Configuration Files to Flash Memory 78-2 Downloading a File to a Specific Location 78-3 Downloading a File to the Startup or Running Configuration 78-4 Configuring the Application Image and ASDM Image to Boot 78-4 Configuring the File to Boot as the Startup Configuration 78-5 Performing Zero Downtime Upgrades for Failover Pairs 78-5 Upgrading an Active/Standby Failover Configuration 78-6 Upgrading and Active/Active Failover Configuration 78-7 Backing Up Configuration Files 78-7 Backing up the Single Mode Configuration or Multiple Mode System Configuration 78-8 Backing Up a Context Configuration in Flash Memory 78-8 Backing Up a Context Configuration within a Context 78-8 Copying the Configuration from the Terminal Display 78-9 Backing Up Additional Files Using the Export and Import Commands 78-9 Using a Script to Back Up and Restore Files 78-9 Prerequisites 78-10 Running the Script 78-10Contents liv Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Sample Script 78-10 Configuring Auto Update Support 78-19 Configuring Communication with an Auto Update Server 78-19 Configuring Client Updates as an Auto Update Server 78-21 Viewing Auto Update Status 78-22 C H A P T E R 79 Troubleshooting 79-1 Testing Your Configuration 79-1 Enabling ICMP Debug Messages and System Log Messages 79-2 Pinging Security Appliance Interfaces 79-2 Pinging Through the Security Appliance 79-4 Disabling the Test Configuration 79-6 Traceroute 79-6 Packet Tracer 79-6 Reloading the Security Appliance 79-7 Performing Password Recovery 79-7 Recovering Passwords for the ASA 5500 Series Adaptive Security Appliance 79-7 Recovering Passwords for the PIX 500 Series Security Appliance 79-8 Disabling Password Recovery 79-10 Resetting the Password on the SSM Hardware Module 79-10 Using the ROM Monitor to Load a Software Image 79-11 Erasing the Flash File System 79-12 Other Troubleshooting Tools 79-13 Viewing Debug Messages 79-13 Capturing Packets 79-13 Viewing the Crash Dump 79-13 Coredump 79-13 Common Problems 79-13 P A R T 14 Reference A P P E N D I X A Sample Configurations A-1 Example 1: Multiple Mode Firewall With Outside Access A-1 System Configuration for Example 1 A-3 Admin Context Configuration for Example 1 A-4 Customer A Context Configuration for Example 1 A-4 Customer B Context Configuration for Example 1 A-5 Customer C Context Configuration for Example 1 A-5Contents lv Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Example 2: Single Mode Firewall Using Same Security Level A-6 Example 3: Shared Resources for Multiple Contexts A-8 System Configuration for Example 3 A-9 Admin Context Configuration for Example 3 A-10 Department 1 Context Configuration for Example 3 A-11 Department 2 Context Configuration for Example 3 A-12 Example 4: Multiple Mode, Transparent Firewall with Outside Access A-13 System Configuration for Example 4 A-14 Admin Context Configuration for Example 4 A-15 Customer A Context Configuration for Example 4 A-16 Customer B Context Configuration for Example 4 A-16 Customer C Context Configuration for Example 4 A-17 Example 5: Single Mode, Transparent Firewall with NAT A-18 Example 6: IPv6 Configuration A-19 Example 7: Dual ISP Support Using Static Route Tracking A-20 Example 8: Multicast Routing A-21 For PIM Sparse Mode A-22 For PIM bidir Mode A-23 Example 9: LAN-Based Active/Standby Failover (Routed Mode) A-24 Primary Unit Configuration for Example 9 A-24 Secondary Unit Configuration for Example 9 A-25 Example 10: LAN-Based Active/Active Failover (Routed Mode) A-25 Primary Unit Configuration for Example 10 A-26 Primary System Configuration for Example 10 A-26 Primary admin Context Configuration for Example 10 A-27 Primary ctx1 Context Configuration for Example 10 A-28 Secondary Unit Configuration for Example 10 A-28 Example 11: LAN-Based Active/Standby Failover (Transparent Mode) A-28 Primary Unit Configuration for Example 11 A-29 Secondary Unit Configuration for Example 11 A-30 Example 12: LAN-Based Active/Active Failover (Transparent Mode) A-30 Primary Unit Configuration for Example 12 A-31 Primary System Configuration for Example 12 A-31 Primary admin Context Configuration for Example 12 A-32 Primary ctx1 Context Configuration for Example 12 A-33 Secondary Unit Configuration for Example 12 A-33 Example 13: Cable-Based Active/Standby Failover (Routed Mode) A-34 Example 14: Cable-Based Active/Standby Failover (Transparent Mode) A-35Contents lvi Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Example 15: ASA 5505 Base License A-36 Example 16: ASA 5505 Security Plus License with Failover and Dual-ISP Backup A-38 Primary Unit Configuration for Example 16 A-38 Secondary Unit Configuration for Example 16 A-40 Example 17: AIP SSM in Multiple Context Mode A-40 System Configuration for Example 17 A-41 Context 1 Configuration for Example 17 A-42 Context 2 Configuration for Example 17 A-42 Context 3 Configuration for Example 17 A-43 A P P E N D I X B Using the Command-Line Interface B-1 Firewall Mode and Security Context Mode B-1 Command Modes and Prompts B-2 Syntax Formatting B-3 Abbreviating Commands B-3 Command-Line Editing B-3 Command Completion B-4 Command Help B-4 Filtering show Command Output B-4 Command Output Paging B-6 Adding Comments B-7 Text Configuration Files B-7 How Commands Correspond with Lines in the Text File B-7 Command-Specific Configuration Mode Commands B-7 Automatic Text Entries B-8 Line Order B-8 Commands Not Included in the Text Configuration B-8 Passwords B-8 Multiple Security Context Files B-8 Supported Character Sets B-9 A P P E N D I X C Addresses, Protocols, and Ports C-1 IPv4 Addresses and Subnet Masks C-1 Classes C-1 Private Networks C-2 Subnet Masks C-2 Determining the Subnet Mask C-3 Determining the Address to Use with the Subnet Mask C-3Contents lvii Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 IPv6 Addresses C-5 IPv6 Address Format C-5 IPv6 Address Types C-6 Unicast Addresses C-6 Multicast Address C-8 Anycast Address C-9 Required Addresses C-10 IPv6 Address Prefixes C-10 Protocols and Applications C-11 TCP and UDP Ports C-11 Local Ports and Protocols C-14 ICMP Types C-15 A P P E N D I X D Configuring an External Server for Authorization and Authentication D-1 Understanding Policy Enforcement of Permissions and Attributes D-2 Configuring an External LDAP Server D-3 Organizing the Security Appliance for LDAP Operations D-3 Searching the Hierarchy D-4 Binding the Security Appliance to the LDAP Server D-5 Login DN Example for Active Directory D-5 Defining the Security Appliance LDAP Configuration D-6 Supported Cisco Attributes for LDAP Authorization D-6 Cisco AV Pair Attribute Syntax D-13 Cisco AV Pairs ACL Examples D-15 Active Directory/LDAP VPN Remote Access Authorization Use Cases D-16 User-Based Attributes Policy Enforcement D-18 Placing LDAP users in a specific Group-Policy D-20 Enforcing Static IP Address Assignment for AnyConnect Tunnels D-22 Enforcing Dial-in Allow or Deny Access D-25 Enforcing Logon Hours and Time-of-Day Rules D-28 Configuring an External RADIUS Server D-30 Reviewing the RADIUS Configuration Procedure D-30 Security Appliance RADIUS Authorization Attributes D-30 Security Appliance IETF RADIUS Authorization Attributes D-38 Configuring an External TACACS+ Server D-39 A P P E N D I X E Configuring the Adaptive Security Appliance for Use with MARS E-1 Taskflow for Configuring MARS to Monitor Adaptive Security Appliances E-1 Enabling Administrative Access to MARS on the Adaptive Security Appliance E-2Contents lviii Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Adding an Adaptive Security Appliance to Monitor E-3 Adding Security Contexts E-4 Adding Discovered Contexts E-4 Editing Discovered Contexts E-5 Setting the Logging Severity Level for Syslog Messages E-5 Syslog Messages That Are Processed by MARS E-5 Configuring Specific Features E-7 GL O S S A R Y IN D E Xlix Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 About This Guide This preface introduce the Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI, and includes the following sections: • Document Objectives, page lix • Audience, page lix • Related Documentation, page lx • Document Conventions, page lx • Obtaining Documentation, Obtaining Support, and Security Guidelines, page lx Document Objectives The purpose of this guide is to help you configure the ASA using the command-line interface. This guide does not cover every feature, but describes only the most common configuration scenarios. You can also configure and monitor the ASA by using ASDM, a web-based GUI application. ASDM includes configuration wizards to guide you through some common configuration scenarios, and online Help for less common scenarios. For more information, see: http://www.cisco.com/en/US/products/ps6121/tsd_products_support_series_home.html This guide applies to the Cisco ASA 5500 series ASAs. Throughout this guide, the term “ASA” applies generically to all supported models, unless specified otherwise. The PIX 500 security appliances are not supported. Audience This guide is for network managers who perform any of the following tasks: • Manage network security • Install and configure firewalls/ASAs • Configure VPNs • Configure intrusion detection softwarelx Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 About This Guide Related Documentation For more information, refer to Navigating the Cisco ASA 5500 Series Documentation at http://www.cisco.com/en/US/docs/security/asa/roadmap/asaroadmap.html. Document Conventions Command descriptions use these conventions: • Braces ({ }) indicate a required choice. • Square brackets ([ ]) indicate optional elements. • Vertical bars ( | ) separate alternative, mutually exclusive elements. • Boldface indicates commands and keywords that are entered literally as shown. • Italics indicate arguments for which you supply values. Examples use these conventions: • Examples depict screen displays and the command line in screen font. • Information you need to enter in examples is shown in boldface screen font. • Variables for which you must supply a value are shown in italic screen font. Note Means reader take note. Notes contain helpful suggestions or references to material not covered in the manual. Obtaining Documentation, Obtaining Support, and Security Guidelines For information on obtaining documentation, obtaining support, providing documentation feedback, security guidelines, and also recommended aliases and general Cisco documents, see the monthly What’s New in Cisco Product Documentation, which also lists all new and revised Cisco technical documentation, at: http://www.cisco.com/en/US/docs/general/whatsnew/whatsnew.htmlP A R T 1 Getting Started and General InformationC H A P T E R 1-1 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 1 Introduction to the ASA The ASA combines advanced stateful firewall and VPN concentrator functionality in one device, and for some models, an integrated intrusion prevention module called the AIP SSM/SSC or an integrated content security and control module called the CSC SSM. The ASA includes many advanced features, such as multiple security contexts (similar to virtualized firewalls), transparent (Layer 2) firewall or routed (Layer6 3) firewall operation, advanced inspection engines, IPSec VPN, SSL VPN, and clientless SSL VPN support, and many more features. This chapter includes the following sections: • Supported Software, Models, and Modules, page 1-1 • VPN Specifications, page 1-1 • New Features, page 1-1 • Firewall Functional Overview, page 1-10 • VPN Functional Overview, page 1-14 • Security Context Overview, page 1-15 Supported Software, Models, and Modules For a complete list of supported ASA software, models, and modules, see Cisco ASA 5500 Series Hardware and Software Compatibility: http://www.cisco.com/en/US/docs/security/asa/compatibility/asamatrx.html VPN Specifications See the Supported VPN Platforms, Cisco ASA 5500 Series at http://www.cisco.com/en/US/docs/security/asa/compatibility/asa-vpn-compatibility.html New Features This section includes the following topics: • New Features in Version 8.2(5), page 1-2 • New Features in Version 8.2(4.4), page 1-21-2 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 1 Introduction to the ASA New Features • New Features in Version 8.2(4.1), page 1-2 • New Features in Version 8.2(4), page 1-2 • New Features in Version 8.2(3.9), page 1-2 • New Features in Version 8.2(3), page 1-2 • New Features in Version 8.2(2), page 1-2 • New Features in Version 8.2(1), page 1-5 Note New, changed, and deprecated syslog messages are listed in Cisco ASA 5500 Series System Log Messages. New Features in Version 8.2(5) New Features in Version 8.2(4.4) New Features in Version 8.2(4.1) New Features in Version 8.2(4) New Features in Version 8.2(3.9) New Features in Version 8.2(3) New Features in Version 8.2(2) Released: January 11, 20101-3 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 1 Introduction to the ASA New Features Table 1-1 lists the new features forASA Version 8.2(2). Table 1-1 New Features for ASA Version 8.2(2) Feature Description Remote Access Features Scalable Solutions for Waiting-to-Resume VPN Sessions An administrator can now keep track of the number of users in the active state and can look at the statistics. The sessions that have been inactive for the longest time are marked as idle (and are automatically logged off) so that license capacity is not reached and new users can log in. Also available in Version 8.0(5). Application Inspection Features Inspection for IP Options You can now control which IP packets with specific IP options should be allowed through the ASA. You can also clear IP options from an IP packet, and then allow it through the ASA. Previously, all IP options were denied by default, except for some special cases. Note This inspection is enabled by default. The following command is added to the default global service policy: inspect ip-options. Therefore, the ASA allows RSVP traffic that contains packets with the Router Alert option (option 20) when the ASA is in routed mode. The following commands were introduced: policy-map type inspect ip-options, inspect ip-options, eool, nop. Enabling Call Set up Between H.323 Endpoints You can enable call setup between H.323 endpoints when the Gatekeeper is inside the network. The ASA includes options to open pinholes for calls based on the RegistrationRequest/RegistrationConfirm (RRQ/RCF) messages. Because these RRQ/RCF messages are sent to and from the Gatekeeper, the calling endpoint IP address is unknown and the ASA opens a pinhole through source IP address/port 0/0. By default, this option is disabled. The following command was introduced: ras-rcf-pinholes enable (under the policy-map type inspect h323 > parameters commands). Also available in Version 8.0(5). Unified Communication Features Mobility Proxy application no longer requires Unified Communications Proxy license The Mobility Proxy no longer requires the UC Proxy license. Interface Features In multiple context mode, auto-generated MAC addresses now use a user-configurable prefix, and other enhancements The MAC address format was changed to allow use of a prefix, to use a fixed starting value (A2), and to use a different scheme for the primary and secondary unit MAC addresses in a failover pair. The MAC addresess are also now persistent accross reloads. The command parser now checks if auto-generation is enabled; if you want to also manually assign a MAC address, you cannot start the manual MAC address with A2. The following command was modified: mac-address auto prefix prefix. Also available in Version 8.0(5).1-4 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 1 Introduction to the ASA New Features Support for Pause Frames for Flow Control on the ASA 5580 10 Gigabit Ethernet Interfaces You can now enable pause (XOFF) frames for flow control. The following command was introduced: flowcontrol. Firewall Features Botnet Traffic Filter Enhancements The Botnet Traffic Filter now supports automatic blocking of blacklisted traffic based on the threat level. You can also view the category and threat level of malware sites in statistics and reports. Reporting was enhanced to show infected hosts. The 1 hour timeout for reports for top hosts was removed; there is now no timeout. The following commands were introduced or modified: dynamic-filter ambiguous-is-black, dynamic-filter drop blacklist, show dynamic-filter statistics, show dynamic-filter reports infected-hosts, and show dynamic-filter reports top. Connection timeouts for all protocols The idle timeout was changed to apply to all protocols, not just TCP. The following command was modified: set connection timeout. Routing Features DHCP RFC compatibility (rfc3011, rfc3527) to resolve routing issues This enhancement introduces ASA support for DHCP RFCs 3011 (The IPv4 Subnet Selection Option) and 3527 (Link Selection Sub-option for the Relay Agent Information Option). For each DHCP server configured for VPN clients, you can now configure the ASA to send the Subnet Selection option or the Link Selection option. The following command was modified: dhcp-server [subnet-selection | link-selection]. Also available in Version 8.0(5). High Availablility Features IPv6 Support in Failover Configurations IPv6 is now supported in failover configurations. You can assign active and standby IPv6 addresses to interfaces and use IPv6 addresses for the failover and Stateful Failover interfaces. The following commands were modified: failover interface ip, ipv6 address. No notifications when interfaces are brought up or brought down during a switchover event To distinguish between link up/down transitions during normal operation from link up/down transitions during failover, no link up/link down traps are sent during a failover. Also, no syslog messages about link up/down transitions during failover are sent. Also available in Version 8.0(5). AAA Features 100 AAA Server Groups You can now configure up to 100 AAA server groups; the previous limit was 15 server groups. The following command was modified: aaa-server. Table 1-1 New Features for ASA Version 8.2(2) (continued) Feature Description1-5 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 1 Introduction to the ASA New Features New Features in Version 8.2(1) Released: May 6, 2009 Hi Table 1-2 lists the new features for ASA Version 8.2(1). Monitoring Features Smart Call Home Smart Call Home offers proactive diagnostics and real-time alerts on the ASA and provides higher network availability and increased operational efficiency. Customers and TAC engineers get what they need to resolve problems quickly when an issue is detected. Note Smart Call Home server Version 3.0(1) has limited support for the ASA. See the “Important Notes” for more information. The following commands were introduced: call-home, call-home send alert-group, call-home test, call-home send, service call-home, show call-home, show call-home registered-module status. Table 1-1 New Features for ASA Version 8.2(2) (continued) Feature Description Table 1-2 New Features for ASA Version 8.2(1) Feature Description Remote Access Features One Time Password Support for ASDM Authentication ASDM now supports administrator authentication using one time passwords (OTPs) supported by RSA SecurID (SDI). This feature addresses security concerns about administrators authenticating with static passwords. New session controls for ASDM users include the ability to limit the session time and the idle time. When the password used by the ASDM administrator times out, ASDM prompts the administrator to re-authenticate. The following commands were introduced: http server idle-timeout and http server session-timeout. The http server idle-timeout default is 20 minutes, and can be increased up to a maximum of 1440 minutes.1-6 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 1 Introduction to the ASA New Features Pre-fill Username from Certificate The pre-fill username feature enables the use of a username extracted from a certificate for username/password authentication. With this feature enabled, the username is “pre-filled” on the login screen, with the user being prompted only for the password. To use this feature, you must configure both the pre-fill username and the username-from-certificate commands in tunnel-group configuration mode. The double-authentication feature is compatible with the pre-fill username feature, as the pre-fill username feature can support extracting a primary username and a secondary username from the certificate to serve as the usernames for double authentication when two usernames are required. When configuring the pre-fill username feature for double authentication, the administrator uses the following new tunnel-group general-attributes configuration mode commands: • secondary-pre-fill-username—Enables username extraction for Clientless or AnyConnect client connection. • secondary-username-from-certificate—Allows for extraction of a few standard DN fields from a certificate for use as a username. Double Authentication The double authentication feature implements two-factor authentication for remote access to the network, in accordance with the Payment Card Industry Standards Council Data Security Standard. This feature requires that the user enter two separate sets of login credentials at the login page. For example, the primary authentication might be a one-time password, and the secondary authentication might be a domain (Active Directory) credential. If either authentication fails, the connection is denied. Both the AnyConnect VPN client and Clientless SSL VPN support double authentication. The AnyConnect client supports double authentication on Windows computers (including supported Windows Mobile devices and Start Before Logon), Mac computers, and Linux computers. The IPsec VPN client, SVC client, cut-through-proxy authentication, hardware client authentication, and management authentication do not support double authentication. Double authentication requires the following new tunnel-group general-attributes configuration mode commands: • secondary-authentication-server-group—Specifies the secondary AAA server group, which cannot be an SDI server group. • secondary-username-from-certificate—Allows for extraction of a few standard DN fields from a certificate for use as a username. • secondary-pre-fill-username—Enables username extraction for Clientless or AnyConnect client connection. • authentication-attr-from-server—Specifies which authentication server authorization attributes are applied to the connection. • authenticated-session-username—Specifies which authentication username is associated with the session. Note The RSA/SDI authentication server type cannot be used as the secondary username/password credential. It can only be used for primary authentication. Table 1-2 New Features for ASA Version 8.2(1) (continued) Feature Description1-7 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 1 Introduction to the ASA New Features AnyConnect Essentials AnyConnect Essentials is a separately licensed SSL VPN client, entirely configured on the ASA, that provides the full AnyConnect capability, with the following exceptions: • No CSD (including HostScan/Vault/Cache Cleaner) • No clientless SSL VPN • Optional Windows Mobile Support The AnyConnect Essentials client provides remote end users running Microsoft Windows Vista, Windows Mobile, Windows XP or Windows 2000, Linux, or Macintosh OS X, with the benefits of a Cisco SSL VPN client. To configure AnyConnect Essentials, the administrator uses the following command: anyconnect-essentials—Enables the AnyConnect Essentials feature. If this feature is disabled (using the no form of this command), the SSL Premium license is used. This feature is enabled by default. Note This license cannot be used at the same time as the shared SSL VPN premium license. Disabling Cisco Secure Desktop per Connection Profile When enabled, Cisco Secure Desktop automatically runs on all computers that make SSL VPN connections to the ASA. This new feature lets you exempt certain users from running Cisco Secure Desktop on a per connection profile basis. It prevents the detection of endpoint attributes for these sessions, so you might need to adjust the Dynamic Access Policy (DAP) configuration. CLI: [no] without-csd command Note “Connect Profile” in ASDM is also known as “Tunnel Group” in the CLI. Additionally, the group-url command is required for this feature. If the SSL VPN session uses connection-alias, this feature will not take effect. Certificate Authentication Per Connection Profile Previous versions supported certificate authentication for each ASA interface, so users received certificate prompts even if they did not need a certificate. With this new feature, users receive a certificate prompt only if the connection profile configuration requires a certificate. This feature is automatic; the ssl certificate authentication command is no longer needed, but the ASA retains it for backward compatibility. EKU Extensions for Certificate Mapping This feature adds the ability to create certificate maps that look at the Extended Key Usage extension of a client certificate and use these values in determining what connection profile the client should use. If the client does not match that profile, it uses the default group. The outcome of the connection then depends on whether or not the certificate is valid and the authentication settings of the connection profile. The following command was introduced: extended-key-usage. SSL VPN SharePoint Support for Win 2007 Server Clientless SSL VPN sessions now support Microsoft Office SharePoint Server 2007. Table 1-2 New Features for ASA Version 8.2(1) (continued) Feature Description1-8 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 1 Introduction to the ASA New Features Shared license for SSL VPN sessions You can purchase a shared license with a large number of SSL VPN sessions and share the sessions as needed among a group of ASAs by configuring one of the ASAs as a shared license server, and the rest as clients. The following commands were introduced: license-server commands (various), show shared license. Note This license cannot be used at the same time as the AnyConnect Essentials license. Firewall Features TCP state bypass If you have asymmetric routing configured on upstream routers, and traffic alternates between two ASAs, then you can configure TCP state bypass for specific traffic. The following command was introduced: set connection advanced tcp-state-bypass. Per-Interface IP Addresses for the Media-Termination Instance Used by the Phone Proxy In Version 8.0(4), you configured a global media-termination address (MTA) on the ASA. In Version 8.2, you can now configure MTAs for individual interfaces (with a minimum of two MTAs). As a result of this enhancement, the old CLI has been deprecated. You can continue to use the old configuration if desired. However, if you need to change the configuration at all, only the new configuration method is accepted; you cannot later restore the old configuration. Displaying the CTL File for the Phone Proxy The Cisco Phone Proxy feature includes the show ctl-file command, which shows the contents of the CTL file used by the phone proxy. Using the show ctl-file command is useful for debugging when configuring the phone proxy instance. This command is not supported in ASDM. Clearing Secure-phone Entries from the Phone Proxy Database The Cisco Phone Proxy feature includes the clear phone-proxy secure-phones command, which clears the secure-phone entries in the phone proxy database. Because secure IP phones always request a CTL file upon bootup, the phone proxy creates a database that marks the IP phones as secure. The entries in the secure phone database are removed after a specified configured timeout (via the timeout secure-phones command). Alternatively, you can use the clear phone-proxy secure-phones command to clear the phone proxy database without waiting for the configured timeout. This command is not supported in ASDM. H.239 Message Support in H.323 Application Inspection In this release, the ASA supports the H.239 standard as part of H.323 application inspection. H.239 is a standard that provides the ability for H.300 series endpoints to open an additional video channel in a single call. In a call, an endpoint (such as a video phone), sends a channel for video and a channel for data presentation. The H.239 negotiation occurs on the H.245 channel. The ASA opens a pinhole for the additional media channel. The endpoints use open logical channel message (OLC) to signal a new channel creation. The message extension is part of H.245 version 13. The decoding and encoding of the telepresentation session is enabled by default. H.239 encoding and decoding is preformed by ASN.1 coder. Table 1-2 New Features for ASA Version 8.2(1) (continued) Feature Description1-9 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 1 Introduction to the ASA New Features Processing H.323 Endpoints When the Endpoints Do Not Send OLCAck H.323 application inspection has been enhanced to process common H.323 endpoints. The enhancement affects endpoints using the extendedVideoCapability OLC with the H.239 protocol identifier. Even when an H.323 endpoint does not send OLCAck after receiving an OLC message from a peer, the ASA propagates OLC media proposal information into the media array and opens a pinhole for the media channel (extendedVideoCapability). IPv6 in transparent firewall mode Transparent firewall mode now participates in IPv6 routing. Prior to this release, the ASA could not pass IPv6 traffic in transparent mode. You can now configure an IPv6 management address in transparent mode, create IPv6 access lists, and configure other IPv6 features; the ASA recognizes and passes IPv6 packets. All IPv6 functionality is supported unless specifically noted. Botnet Traffic Filter Malware is malicious software that is installed on an unknowing host. Malware that attempts network activity such as sending private data (passwords, credit card numbers, key strokes, or proprietary data) can be detected by the Botnet Traffic Filter when the malware starts a connection to a known bad IP address. The Botnet Traffic Filter checks incoming and outgoing connections against a dynamic database of known bad domain names and IP addresses, and then logs any suspicious activity. You can also supplement the dynamic database with a static database by entering IP addresses or domain names in a local “blacklist” or “whitelist.” Note This feature requires the Botnet Traffic Filter license. See the following licensing document for more information: http://www.cisco.com/en/US/docs/security/asa/asa82/license/license82.html The following commands were introduced: dynamic-filter commands (various), and the inspect dns dynamic-filter-snoop keyword. AIP SSC card for the ASA 5505 The AIP SSC offers IPS for the ASA 5505 ASA. Note that the AIP SSM does not support virtual sensors. The following commands were introduced: allow-ssc-mgmt, hw-module module ip, and hw-module module allow-ip. IPv6 support for IPS You can now send IPv6 traffic to the AIP SSM or SSC when your traffic class uses the match any command, and the policy map specifies the ips command. Management Features Table 1-2 New Features for ASA Version 8.2(1) (continued) Feature Description1-10 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 1 Introduction to the ASA Firewall Functional Overview Firewall Functional Overview Firewalls protect inside networks from unauthorized access by users on an outside network. A firewall can also protect inside networks from each other, for example, by keeping a human resources network separate from a user network. If you have network resources that need to be available to an outside user, such as a web or FTP server, you can place these resources on a separate network behind the firewall, called a demilitarized zone (DMZ). The firewall allows limited access to the DMZ, but because the DMZ only includes the public servers, an attack there only affects the servers and does not affect the other inside networks. You can also control when inside users access outside networks (for example, access to the Internet), by allowing only certain addresses out, by requiring authentication or authorization, or by coordinating with an external URL filtering server. SNMP version 3 and encryption This release provides DES, 3DES, or AES encryption and support for SNMP Version 3, the most secure form of the supported security models. This version allows you to configure authentication characteristics by using the User-based Security Model (USM). The following commands were introduced: • show snmp engineid • show snmp group • show snmp-server group • show snmp-server user • snmp-server group • snmp-server user The following command was modified: • snmp-server host NetFlow This feature was introduced in Version 8.1(1) for the ASA 5580; this version introduces the feature to the other platforms. The new NetFlow feature enhances the ASA logging capabilities by logging flow-based events through the NetFlow protocol. Routing Features Multicast NAT The ASA now offers Multicast NAT support for group addresses. Troubleshooting Features Coredump functionality A coredump is a snapshot of the running program when the program has terminated abnormally. Coredumps are used to diagnose or debug errors and save a crash for later or off-site analysis. Cisco TAC may request that users enable the coredump feature to troubleshoot application or system crashes on the ASA. To enable coredump, use the coredump enable command. Table 1-2 New Features for ASA Version 8.2(1) (continued) Feature Description1-11 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 1 Introduction to the ASA Firewall Functional Overview When discussing networks connected to a firewall, the outside network is in front of the firewall, the inside network is protected and behind the firewall, and a DMZ, while behind the firewall, allows limited access to outside users. Because the ASA lets you configure many interfaces with varied security policies, including many inside interfaces, many DMZs, and even many outside interfaces if desired, these terms are used in a general sense only. This section includes the following topics: • Security Policy Overview, page 1-11 • Firewall Mode Overview, page 1-13 • Stateful Inspection Overview, page 1-13 Security Policy Overview A security policy determines which traffic is allowed to pass through the firewall to access another network. By default, the ASA allows traffic to flow freely from an inside network (higher security level) to an outside network (lower security level). You can apply actions to traffic to customize the security policy. This section includes the following topics: • Permitting or Denying Traffic with Access Lists, page 1-11 • Applying NAT, page 1-11 • Protecting from IP Fragments, page 1-12 • Using AAA for Through Traffic, page 1-12 • Applying HTTP, HTTPS, or FTP Filtering, page 1-12 • Applying Application Inspection, page 1-12 • Sending Traffic to the Advanced Inspection and Prevention Security Services Module, page 1-12 • Sending Traffic to the Content Security and Control Security Services Module, page 1-12 • Applying QoS Policies, page 1-12 • Applying Connection Limits and TCP Normalization, page 1-13 Permitting or Denying Traffic with Access Lists You can apply an access list to limit traffic from inside to outside, or allow traffic from outside to inside. For transparent firewall mode, you can also apply an EtherType access list to allow non-IP traffic. Applying NAT Some of the benefits of NAT include the following: • You can use private addresses on your inside networks. Private addresses are not routable on the Internet. • NAT hides the local addresses from other networks, so attackers cannot learn the real address of a host. • NAT can resolve IP routing problems by supporting overlapping IP addresses. 1-12 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 1 Introduction to the ASA Firewall Functional Overview Protecting from IP Fragments The ASA provides IP fragment protection. This feature performs full reassembly of all ICMP error messages and virtual reassembly of the remaining IP fragments that are routed through the ASA. Fragments that fail the security check are dropped and logged. Virtual reassembly cannot be disabled. Using AAA for Through Traffic You can require authentication and/or authorization for certain types of traffic, for example, for HTTP. The ASA also sends accounting information to a RADIUS or TACACS+ server. Applying HTTP, HTTPS, or FTP Filtering Although you can use access lists to prevent outbound access to specific websites or FTP servers, configuring and managing web usage this way is not practical because of the size and dynamic nature of the Internet. We recommend that you use the ASA in conjunction with a separate server running one of the following Internet filtering products: • Websense Enterprise • Secure Computing SmartFilter Applying Application Inspection Inspection engines are required for services that embed IP addressing information in the user data packet or that open secondary channels on dynamically assigned ports. These protocols require the ASA to do a deep packet inspection. Sending Traffic to the Advanced Inspection and Prevention Security Services Module If your model supports the AIP SSM for intrusion prevention, then you can send traffic to the AIP SSM for inspection. The AIP SSM is an intrusion prevention services module that monitors and performs real-time analysis of network traffic by looking for anomalies and misuse based on an extensive, embedded signature library. When the system detects unauthorized activity, it can terminate the specific connection, permanently block the attacking host, log the incident, and send an alert to the device manager. Other legitimate connections continue to operate independently without interruption. For more information, see Configuring the Cisco Intrusion Prevention System Sensor Using the Command Line Interface. Sending Traffic to the Content Security and Control Security Services Module If your model supports it, the CSC SSM provides protection against viruses, spyware, spam, and other unwanted traffic. It accomplishes this by scanning the FTP, HTTP, POP3, and SMTP traffic that you configure the adaptive ASA to send to it. Applying QoS Policies Some network traffic, such as voice and streaming video, cannot tolerate long latency times. QoS is a network feature that lets you give priority to these types of traffic. QoS refers to the capability of a network to provide better service to selected network traffic.1-13 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 1 Introduction to the ASA Firewall Functional Overview Applying Connection Limits and TCP Normalization You can limit TCP and UDP connections and embryonic connections. Limiting the number of connections and embryonic connections protects you from a DoS attack. The ASA uses the embryonic limit to trigger TCP Intercept, which protects inside systems from a DoS attack perpetrated by flooding an interface with TCP SYN packets. An embryonic connection is a connection request that has not finished the necessary handshake between source and destination. TCP normalization is a feature consisting of advanced TCP connection settings designed to drop packets that do not appear normal. Enabling Threat Detection You can configure scanning threat detection and basic threat detection, and also how to use statistics to analyze threats. Basic threat detection detects activity that might be related to an attack, such as a DoS attack, and automatically sends a system log message. A typical scanning attack consists of a host that tests the accessibility of every IP address in a subnet (by scanning through many hosts in the subnet or sweeping through many ports in a host or subnet). The scanning threat detection feature determines when a host is performing a scan. Unlike IPS scan detection that is based on traffic signatures, the ASA scanning threat detection feature maintains an extensive database that contains host statistics that can be analyzed for scanning activity. The host database tracks suspicious activity such as connections with no return activity, access of closed service ports, vulnerable TCP behaviors such as non-random IPID, and many more behaviors. You can configure the ASA to send system log messages about an attacker or you can automatically shun the host. Firewall Mode Overview The ASA runs in two different firewall modes: • Routed • Transparent In routed mode, the ASA is considered to be a router hop in the network. In transparent mode, the ASA acts like a “bump in the wire,” or a “stealth firewall,” and is not considered a router hop. The ASA connects to the same network on its inside and outside interfaces. You might use a transparent firewall to simplify your network configuration. Transparent mode is also useful if you want the firewall to be invisible to attackers. You can also use a transparent firewall for traffic that would otherwise be blocked in routed mode. For example, a transparent firewall can allow multicast streams using an EtherType access list. Stateful Inspection Overview All traffic that goes through the ASA is inspected using the Adaptive Security Algorithm and either allowed through or dropped. A simple packet filter can check for the correct source address, destination address, and ports, but it does not check that the packet sequence or flags are correct. A filter also checks every packet against the filter, which can be a slow process.1-14 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 1 Introduction to the ASA VPN Functional Overview A stateful firewall like the ASA, however, takes into consideration the state of a packet: • Is this a new connection? If it is a new connection, the ASA has to check the packet against access lists and perform other tasks to determine if the packet is allowed or denied. To perform this check, the first packet of the session goes through the “session management path,” and depending on the type of traffic, it might also pass through the “control plane path.” The session management path is responsible for the following tasks: – Performing the access list checks – Performing route lookups – Allocating NAT translations (xlates) – Establishing sessions in the “fast path” Some packets that require Layer 7 inspection (the packet payload must be inspected or altered) are passed on to the control plane path. Layer 7 inspection engines are required for protocols that have two or more channels: a data channel, which uses well-known port numbers, and a control channel, which uses different port numbers for each session. These protocols include FTP, H.323, and SNMP. • Is this an established connection? If the connection is already established, the ASA does not need to re-check packets; most matching packets can go through the “fast” path in both directions. The fast path is responsible for the following tasks: – IP checksum verification – Session lookup – TCP sequence number check – NAT translations based on existing sessions – Layer 3 and Layer 4 header adjustments For UDP or other connectionless protocols, the ASA creates connection state information so that it can also use the fast path. Data packets for protocols that require Layer 7 inspection can also go through the fast path. Some established session packets must continue to go through the session management path or the control plane path. Packets that go through the session management path include HTTP packets that require inspection or content filtering. Packets that go through the control plane path include the control packets for protocols that require Layer 7 inspection. VPN Functional Overview A VPN is a secure connection across a TCP/IP network (such as the Internet) that appears as a private connection. This secure connection is called a tunnel. The ASA uses tunneling protocols to negotiate security parameters, create and manage tunnels, encapsulate packets, transmit or receive them through the tunnel, and unencapsulate them. The ASA functions as a bidirectional tunnel endpoint: it can receive plain packets, encapsulate them, and send them to the other end of the tunnel where they are unencapsulated and sent to their final destination. It can also receive encapsulated packets, unencapsulate them, and send them to their final destination. The ASA invokes various standard protocols to accomplish these functions. The ASA performs the following functions: 1-15 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 1 Introduction to the ASA Security Context Overview • Establishes tunnels • Negotiates tunnel parameters • Authenticates users • Assigns user addresses • Encrypts and decrypts data • Manages security keys • Manages data transfer across the tunnel • Manages data transfer inbound and outbound as a tunnel endpoint or router The ASA invokes various standard protocols to accomplish these functions. Security Context Overview You can partition a single ASA into multiple virtual devices, known as security contexts. Each context is an independent device, with its own security policy, interfaces, and administrators. Multiple contexts are similar to having multiple standalone devices. Many features are supported in multiple context mode, including routing tables, firewall features, IPS, and management. Some features are not supported, including VPN and dynamic routing protocols. In multiple context mode, the ASA includes a configuration for each context that identifies the security policy, interfaces, and almost all the options you can configure on a standalone device. The system administrator adds and manages contexts by configuring them in the system configuration, which, like a single mode configuration, is the startup configuration. The system configuration identifies basic settings for the ASA. The system configuration does not include any network interfaces or network settings for itself; rather, when the system needs to access network resources (such as downloading the contexts from the server), it uses one of the contexts that is designated as the admin context. The admin context is just like any other context, except that when a user logs into the admin context, then that user has system administrator rights and can access the system and all other contexts. Note You can run all your contexts in routed mode or transparent mode; you cannot run some contexts in one mode and others in another. Multiple context mode supports static routing only.1-16 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 1 Introduction to the ASA Security Context OverviewC H A P T E R 2-1 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 2 Getting Started This chapter describes how to get started with your ASA. This chapter includes the following sections: • Factory Default Configurations, page 2-1 • Accessing the Command-Line Interface, page 2-4 • Working with the Configuration, page 2-5 • Applying Configuration Changes to Connections, page 2-9 Factory Default Configurations The factory default configuration is the configuration applied by Cisco to new ASAs. For the ASA 5510 and higher ASAs, the factory default configuration configures an interface for management so you can connect to it using ASDM, with which you can then complete your configuration. For the ASA 5505 adaptive security appliance, the factory default configuration configures interfaces and NAT so that the ASA is ready to use in your network immediately. The factory default configuration is available only for routed firewall mode and single context mode. See Chapter 5, “Managing Multiple Context Mode,” for more information about multiple context mode. See Chapter 4, “Configuring the Transparent or Routed Firewall,” for more information about routed and transparent firewall mode. Note In addition to the image files and the (hidden) default configuration, the following folders and files are standard in flash memory: log/, crypto_archive/, and coredumpinfo/coredump.cfg. The date on these files may not match the date of the image files in flash memory. These files aid in potential troubleshooting; they do not indicate that a failure has occurred. This section includes the following topics: • Restoring the Factory Default Configuration, page 2-2 • ASA 5505 Default Configuration, page 2-2 • ASA 5510 and Higher Default Configuration, page 2-32-2 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 2 Getting Started Factory Default Configurations Restoring the Factory Default Configuration This section describes how to restore the factory default configuration. Detailed Steps What to Do Next To configure additional settings that are useful for a full configuration, see the setup command. ASA 5505 Default Configuration The default factory configuration for the ASA 5505 adaptive security appliance configures the following: • An inside VLAN 1 interface that includes the Ethernet 0/1 through 0/7 switch ports. If you did not set the IP address in the configure factory-default command, then the VLAN 1 IP address and mask are 192.168.1.1 and 255.255.255.0. • An outside VLAN 2 interface that includes the Ethernet 0/0 switch port. VLAN 2 derives its IP address using DHCP. • The default route is also derived from DHCP. • All inside IP addresses are translated when accessing the outside using interface PAT. • By default, inside users can access the outside, and outside users are prevented from accessing the inside. Command Purpose Step 1 configure factory-default [ip_address [mask]] Example: hostname(config)# configure factory-default 10.1.1.1 255.255.255.0 Restores the factory default configuration. If you specify the ip_address, then you set the inside or management interface IP address, depending on your model, instead of using the default IP address of 192.168.1.1. The http command uses the subnet you specify. Similarly, the dhcpd address command range consists of addresses within the subnet that you specify. Note This command also clears the boot system command, if present, along with the rest of the configuration. The boot system command lets you boot from a specific image, including an image on the external Flash memory card. The next time you reload the ASA after restoring the factory configuration, it boots from the first image in internal Flash memory; if you do not have an image in internal Flash memory, the ASA does not boot. Step 2 write memory Example: active(config)# write memory Saves the default configuration to Flash memory. This command saves the running configuration to the default location for the startup configuration, even if you previously configured the boot config command to set a different location; when the configuration was cleared, this path was also cleared.2-3 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 2 Getting Started Factory Default Configurations • The DHCP server is enabled on the ASA, so a PC connecting to the VLAN 1 interface receives an address between 192.168.1.2 and 192.168.1.254. • The HTTP server is enabled for ASDM and is accessible to users on the 192.168.1.0 network. The configuration consists of the following commands: interface Ethernet 0/0 switchport access vlan 2 interface Ethernet 0/1 switchport access vlan 1 interface Ethernet 0/2 switchport access vlan 1 interface Ethernet 0/3 switchport access vlan 1 interface Ethernet 0/4 switchport access vlan 1 interface Ethernet 0/5 switchport access vlan 1 interface Ethernet 0/6 switchport access vlan 1 interface Ethernet 0/7 switchport access vlan 1 interface vlan2 nameif outside ip address dhcp setroute interface vlan1 nameif inside ip address 192.168.1.1 255.255.255.0 security-level 100 global (outside) 1 interface nat (inside) 1 0 0 http server enable http 192.168.1.0 255.255.255.0 inside dhcpd address 192.168.1.2-192.168.1.254 inside dhcpd auto_config outside dhcpd enable inside logging asdm informational ASA 5510 and Higher Default Configuration The default factory configuration for the ASA 5510 and higher adaptive security appliance configures the following: • The management interface, Management 0/0. If you did not set the IP address in the configure factory-default command, then the IP address and mask are 192.168.1.1 and 255.255.255.0. • The DHCP server is enabled on the ASA, so a PC connecting to the interface receives an address between 192.168.1.2 and 192.168.1.254. • The HTTP server is enabled for ASDM and is accessible to users on the 192.168.1.0 network. The configuration consists of the following commands: interface management 0/0 ip address 192.168.1.1 255.255.255.0 nameif management security-level 100 asdm logging informational 100 asdm history enable http server enable http 192.168.1.0 255.255.255.0 management2-4 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 2 Getting Started Accessing the Command-Line Interface dhcpd address 192.168.1.2-192.168.1.254 management dhcpd lease 3600 dhcpd ping_timeout 750 dhcpd enable management Accessing the Command-Line Interface For initial configuration, access the command-line interface directly from the console port. Later, you can configure remote access using Telnet or SSH according to Chapter 37, “Configuring Management Access.” If your system is already in multiple context mode, then accessing the console port places you in the system execution space. See Chapter 5, “Managing Multiple Context Mode,” for more information about multiple context mode. Note If you want to use ASDM to configure the ASA instead of the command-line interface, you can connect to the default management address of 192.168.1.1 (if your ASA includes a factory default configuration. See the “Factory Default Configurations” section on page 2-1.). On the ASA 5510 and higher adaptive security appliances, the interface to which you connect with ASDM is Management 0/0. For the ASA 5505 adaptive security appliance, the switch port to which you connect with ASDM is any port, except for Ethernet 0/0. If you do not have a factory default configuration, follow the steps in this section to access the command-line interface. You can then configure the minimum parameters to access ASDM by entering the setup command. To access the command-line interface, perform the following steps: Step 1 Connect a PC to the console port using the provided console cable, and connect to the console using a terminal emulator set for 9600 baud, 8 data bits, no parity, 1 stop bit, no flow control. See the hardware guide that came with your ASA for more information about the console cable. Step 2 Press the Enter key to see the following prompt: hostname> This prompt indicates that you are in user EXEC mode. Step 3 To access privileged EXEC mode, enter the following command: hostname> enable The following prompt appears: Password: Step 4 Enter the enable password at the prompt. By default, the password is blank, and you can press the Enter key to continue. See the “Changing the Enable Password” section on page 8-2 to change the enable password. The prompt changes to: hostname# To exit privileged mode, enter the disable, exit, or quit command. Step 5 To access global configuration mode, enter the following command: hostname# configure terminal2-5 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 2 Getting Started Working with the Configuration The prompt changes to the following: hostname(config)# To exit global configuration mode, enter the exit, quit, or end command. Working with the Configuration This section describes how to work with the configuration. The ASA loads the configuration from a text file, called the startup configuration. This file resides by default as a hidden file in internal Flash memory. You can, however, specify a different path for the startup configuration. (For more information, see Chapter 78, “Managing Software and Configurations.”) When you enter a command, the change is made only to the running configuration in memory. You must manually save the running configuration to the startup configuration for your changes to remain after a reboot. The information in this section applies to both single and multiple security contexts, except where noted. Additional information about contexts is in Chapter 5, “Managing Multiple Context Mode.” This section includes the following topics: • Saving Configuration Changes, page 2-5 • Copying the Startup Configuration to the Running Configuration, page 2-7 • Viewing the Configuration, page 2-7 • Clearing and Removing Configuration Settings, page 2-8 • Creating Text Configuration Files Offline, page 2-8 Saving Configuration Changes This section describes how to save your configuration, and includes the following topics: • Saving Configuration Changes in Single Context Mode, page 2-5 • Saving Configuration Changes in Multiple Context Mode, page 2-6 Saving Configuration Changes in Single Context Mode To save the running configuration to the startup configuration, enter the following command: Command Purpose write memory Example: hostname# write memory Saves the running configuration to the startup configuration. Note The copy running-config startup-config command is equivalent to the write memory command.2-6 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 2 Getting Started Working with the Configuration Saving Configuration Changes in Multiple Context Mode You can save each context (and system) configuration separately, or you can save all context configurations at the same time. This section includes the following topics: • Saving Each Context and System Separately, page 2-6 • Saving All Context Configurations at the Same Time, page 2-6 Saving Each Context and System Separately To save the system or context configuration, enter the following command within the system or context: Saving All Context Configurations at the Same Time To save all context configurations at the same time, as well as the system configuration, enter the following command in the system execution space: After the ASA saves each context, the following message appears: ‘Saving context ‘b’ ... ( 1/3 contexts saved ) ’ Sometimes, a context is not saved because of an error. See the following information for errors: • For contexts that are not saved because of low memory, the following message appears: The context 'context a' could not be saved due to Unavailability of resources • For contexts that are not saved because the remote destination is unreachable, the following message appears: The context 'context a' could not be saved due to non-reachability of destination Command Purpose write memory Example: hostname# write memory Saves the running configuration to the startup configuration. For multiple context mode, context startup configurations can reside on external servers. In this case, the ASA saves the configuration back to the server you identified in the context URL, except for an HTTP or HTTPS URL, which do not let you save the configuration to the server. Note The copy running-config startup-config command is equivalent to the write memory command. Command Purpose write memory all [/noconfirm] Example: hostname# write memory all /noconfirm Saves the running configuration to the startup configuration for all contexts and the system configuration. If you do not enter the /noconfirm keyword, you see the following prompt: Are you sure [Y/N]: After you enter Y, the ASA saves the system configuration and each context. Context startup configurations can reside on external servers. In this case, the ASA saves the configuration back to the server you identified in the context URL, except for an HTTP or HTTPS URL, which do not let you save the configuration to the server.2-7 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 2 Getting Started Working with the Configuration • For contexts that are not saved because the context is locked, the following message appears: Unable to save the configuration for the following contexts as these contexts are locked. context ‘a’ , context ‘x’ , context ‘z’ . A context is only locked if another user is already saving the configuration or in the process of deleting the context. • For contexts that are not saved because the startup configuration is read-only (for example, on an HTTP server), the following message report is printed at the end of all other messages: Unable to save the configuration for the following contexts as these contexts have read-only config-urls: context ‘a’ , context ‘b’ , context ‘c’ . • For contexts that are not saved because of bad sectors in the Flash memory, the following message appears: The context 'context a' could not be saved due to Unknown errors Copying the Startup Configuration to the Running Configuration Copy a new startup configuration to the running configuration using one of the following options. Viewing the Configuration The following commands let you view the running and startup configurations. Command Purpose copy startup-config running-config Merges the startup configuration with the running configuration. A merge adds any new commands from the new configuration to the running configuration. If the configurations are the same, no changes occur. If commands conflict or if commands affect the running of the context, then the effect of the merge depends on the command. You might get errors, or you might have unexpected results. reload Reloads the ASA, which loads the startup configuration and discards the running configuration. clear configure all copy startup-config running-config Loads the startup configuration and discards the running configuration without requiring a reload. Command Purpose show running-config Views the running configuration. show running-config command Views the running configuration of a specific command. show startup-config Views the startup configuration.2-8 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 2 Getting Started Working with the Configuration Clearing and Removing Configuration Settings To erase settings, enter one of the following commands. Creating Text Configuration Files Offline This guide describes how to use the CLI to configure the ASA; when you save commands, the changes are written to a text file. Instead of using the CLI, however, you can edit a text file directly on your PC and paste a configuration at the configuration mode command-line prompt in its entirety, or line by line. Alternatively, you can download a text file to the ASA internal Flash memory. See Chapter 78, “Managing Software and Configurations,” for information on downloading the configuration file to the ASA. In most cases, commands described in this guide are preceded by a CLI prompt. The prompt in the following example is “hostname(config)#”: hostname(config)# context a In the text configuration file you are not prompted to enter commands, so the prompt is omitted as follows: context a For additional information about formatting the file, see Appendix B, “Using the Command-Line Interface.” Command Purpose clear configure configurationcommand [level2configurationcommand] Clears all the configuration for a specified command. If you only want to clear the configuration for a specific version of the command, you can enter a value for level2configurationcommand. For example, to clear the configuration for all aaa commands, enter the following command: hostname(config)# clear configure aaa To clear the configuration for only aaa authentication commands, enter the following command: hostname(config)# clear configure aaa authentication no configurationcommand [level2configurationcommand] qualifier Disables the specific parameters or options of a command. In this case, you use the no command to remove the specific configuration identified by qualifier. For example, to remove a specific nat command, enter enough of the command to identify it uniquely as follows: hostname(config)# no nat (inside) 1 write erase Erases the startup configuration. clear configure all Erases the running configuration. Note In multiple context mode, if you enter clear configure all from the system configuration, you also remove all contexts and stop them from running. The context configuration files are not erased, and remain in their original location.2-9 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 2 Getting Started Applying Configuration Changes to Connections Applying Configuration Changes to Connections When you make security policy changes to the configuration, all new connections use the new security policy. Existing connections continue to use the policy that was configured at the time of the connection establishment. To ensure that all connections use the new policy, you need to disconnect the current connections so they can reconnect using the new policy. To disconnect connections, enter one of the following commands: Command Purpose clear local-host [ip_address] [all] This command reinitalizes per-client run-time states such as connection limits and embryonic limits. As a result, this command removes any connection that uses those limits. See the show local-host all command to view all current connections per host. With no arguments, this command clears all affected through-the-box connections. To also clear to-the-box connections (including your current management session), use the all keyword. To clear connections to and from a particular IP address, use the ip_address argument. clear conn [all] [protocol {tcp | udp}] [address src_ip[-src_ip] [netmask mask]] [port src_port[-src_port]] [address dest_ip[-dest_ip] [netmask mask]] [port dest_port[-dest_port]] This command terminates connections in any state. See the show conn command to view all current connections. With no arguments, this command clears all through-the-box connections. To also clear to-the-box connections (including your current management session), use the all keyword. To clear specific connections based on the source IP address, destination IP address, port, and/or protocol, you can specify the desired options. clear xlate [arguments] This command clears dynamic NAT sessions; static sessions are not affected. As a result, it removes any connections using those NAT sessions. With no arguments, this command clears all NAT sessions. See the Cisco ASA 5500 Series Command Reference for more information about the arguments available.2-10 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 2 Getting Started Applying Configuration Changes to ConnectionsC H A P T E R 3-1 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 3 Managing Feature Licenses A license specifies the options that are enabled on a given ASA. It is represented by an activation key which is a 160-bit (5 32-bit words or 20 bytes) value. This value encodes the serial number (an 11 character string) and the enabled features. This chapter describes how to obtain an activation key and activate it. It also describes the available licenses for each model. This chapter includes the following sections: • Supported Feature Licenses Per Model, page 3-1 • Information About Feature Licenses, page 3-10 • Guidelines and Limitations, page 3-18 • Viewing Your Current License, page 3-19 • Obtaining an Activation Key, page 3-21 • Entering a New Activation Key, page 3-21 • Upgrading the License for a Failover Pair, page 3-23 • Configuring a Shared License, page 3-25 • Feature History for Licensing, page 3-30 Supported Feature Licenses Per Model This section describes the licenses available for each model as well as important notes about licenses. This section includes the following topics: • Licenses Per Model, page 3-1 • License Notes, page 3-9 • VPN License and Feature Compatibility, page 3-10 Licenses Per Model This section lists the feature licenses available for each model: • ASA 5505, Table 3-1 on page 3-2 • ASA 5510, Table 3-2 on page 3-3 • ASA 5520, Table 3-3 on page 3-43-2 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 3 Managing Feature Licenses Supported Feature Licenses Per Model • ASA 5540, Table 3-4 on page 3-5 • ASA 5550, Table 3-5 on page 3-6 • ASA 5580, Table 3-6 on page 3-7 • ASA 5585-X, Table 3-7 on page 3-8 Items that are in italics are separate, optional licenses with which that you can replace the Base or Security Plus license. You can mix and match licenses, for example, the 10 security context license plus the Strong Encryption license; or the 500 Clientless SSL VPN license plus the GTP/GPRS license; or all four licenses together. Table 3-1 ASA 5505 Adaptive Security Appliance License Features ASA 5505 Base License Security Plus Firewall Licenses Botnet Traffic Filter 1 1. See the “License Notes” section. Disabled Optional temporary license: Available Disabled Optional temporary license: Available Firewall Conns, Concurrent 10 K 25 K GTP/GPRS No support No support Unified Comm. Sessions 1 2 Optional license: 24 2 Optional license: 24 VPN Licenses 2 2. See the “VPN License and Feature Compatibility” section. Adv. Endpoint Assessment Disabled Optional license: Available Disabled Optional license: Available AnyConnect Essentials 1 Disabled Optional license: Available Disabled Optional license: Available AnyConnect Mobile 1 Disabled Optional license: Available Disabled Optional license: Available AnyConnect Premium SSL VPN (sessions) 1 2 Optional Permanent licenses: 2 Optional Permanent licenses: 10 25 10 25 IPSec VPN (sessions) 1 10 (max. 25 combined IPSec and SSL VPN) 25 (max. 25 combined IPSec and SSL VPN) VPN Load Balancing No support No support General Licenses Encryption Base (DES) Opt. lic.: Strong (3DES/AES) Base (DES) Opt. lic.: Strong (3DES/AES) Failover No support Active/Standby (no stateful failover) Security Contexts No support No support Users, concurrent 3 3. In routed mode, hosts on the inside (Business and Home VLANs) count towards the limit when they communicate with the outside (Internet VLAN), including when the inside initiates a connection to the outside as well as when the outside initiates a connection to the inside. Note that even when the outside initiates a connection to the inside, outside hosts are not counted towards the limit; only the inside hosts count. Hosts that initiate traffic between Business and Home are also not counted towards the limit. The interface associated with the default route is considered to be the outside Internet interface. If there is no default route, hosts on all interfaces are counted toward the limit. In transparent mode, the interface with the lowest number of hosts is counted towards the host limit. See the show local-host command to view host limits. 10 4 4. For a 10-user license, the max. DHCP clients is 32. For 50 users, the max. is 128. For unlimited users, the max. is 250, which is the max. for other models. Optional licenses: 10 4 Optional licenses: 50 Unlimited 50 Unlimited VLANs/Zones, Maximum 3 (2 regular zones and 1 restricted zone) 20 VLAN Trunk, Maximum No support 8 trunks3-3 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 3 Managing Feature Licenses Supported Feature Licenses Per Model Table 3-2 ASA 5510 Adaptive Security Appliance License Features ASA 5510 Base License Security Plus Firewall Licenses Botnet Traffic Filter 1 1. See the “License Notes” section. Disabled Optional temporary license: Available Disabled Optional temporary license: Available Firewall Conns, Concurrent 50 K 130 K GTP/GPRS No support No support Unified Comm. Sessions 1 2 Optional licenses: 2 Optional licenses: 24 50 100 24 50 100 VPN Licenses 2 2. See the “VPN License and Feature Compatibility” section. Adv. Endpoint Assessment Disabled Optional license: Available Disabled Optional license: Available AnyConnect Essentials 1 Disabled Optional license: Available Disabled Optional license: Available AnyConnect Mobile 1 Disabled Optional license: Available Disabled Optional license: Available AnyConnect Premium SSL VPN (sessions) 2 Optional Permanent licenses: 2 Optional Permanent licenses: 10 25 50 100 250 10 25 50 100 250 Optional Shared licenses: Participant or Server. For the Server, these licenses are available: 1 Optional Shared licenses: Participant or Server. For the Server, these licenses are available: 1 500-50,000 in increments of 500 50,000-545,000 in increments of 1000 500-50,000 in increments of 500 50,000-545,000 in increments of 1000 Optional FLEX license: 250 Optional FLEX license: 250 IPSec VPN (sessions) 1 250 (max. 250 combined IPSec and SSL VPN) 250 (max. 250 combined IPSec and SSL VPN) VPN Load Balancing 1 No support Supported General Licenses Encryption Base (DES) Opt. lic.: Strong (3DES/AES) Base (DES) Opt. lic.: Strong (3DES/AES) Failover No support Active/Standby or Active/Active 1 Interface Speed All: Fast Ethernet Ethernet 0/0 and 0/1: Gigabit Ethernet 3 Ethernet 0/2, 0/3, and 0/4: Fast Ethernet 3. Although the Ethernet 0/0 and 0/1 ports are Gigabit Ethernet, they are still identified as “Ethernet” in the software. Security Contexts No support 2 Optional licenses: 5 VLANs, Maximum 50 1003-4 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 3 Managing Feature Licenses Supported Feature Licenses Per Model Table 3-3 ASA 5520 Adaptive Security Appliance License Features ASA 5520 Base License Firewall Licenses Botnet Traffic Filter 1 1. See the “License Notes” section. Disabled Optional temporary license: Available Firewall Conns, Concurrent 280 K GTP/GPRS Disabled Optional license: Available Unified Communications Proxy Sessions 1 2 Optional licenses: 24 50 100 250 500 750 1000 VPN Licenses 2 2. See the “VPN License and Feature Compatibility” section. Adv. Endpoint Assessment Disabled Optional license: Available AnyConnect Essentials 1 Disabled Optional license: Available AnyConnect Mobile 1 Disabled Optional license: Available AnyConnect Premium SSL VPN (sessions) 2 Optional Permanent licenses: 10 25 50 100 250 500 750 Optional Shared licenses: Participant or Server. For the Server, these licenses are available: 1 500-50,000 in increments of 500 50,000-545,000 in increments of 1000 Optional FLEX licenses: 250 750 IPSec VPN (sessions) 1 750 (max. 750 combined IPSec and SSL VPN) VPN Load Balancing 1 Supported General Licenses Encryption Base (DES) Optional license: Strong (3DES/AES) Failover Active/Standby or Active/Active 1 Security Contexts 2 Optional licenses: 5 10 20 VLANs, Maximum 1503-5 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 3 Managing Feature Licenses Supported Feature Licenses Per Model Table 3-4 ASA 5540 Adaptive Security Appliance License Features ASA 5540 Base License Firewall Licenses Botnet Traffic Filter 1 1. See the “License Notes” section. Disabled Optional temporary license: Available Firewall Conns, Concurrent 400 K GTP/GPRS Disabled Optional license: Available Unified Communications Proxy Sessions 1 2 Optional licenses: 24 50 100 250 500 750 1000 2000 VPN Licenses 2 2. See the “VPN License and Feature Compatibility” section. Adv. Endpoint Assessment Disabled Optional license: Available AnyConnect Essentials 1 Disabled Optional license: Available AnyConnect Mobile 1 Disabled Optional license: Available AnyConnect Premium SSL VPN (sessions) 2 Optional Permanent licenses: 10 25 50 100 250 500 750 1000 2500 Optional Shared licenses: Participant or Server. For the Server, these licenses are available: 1 500-50,000 in increments of 500 50,000-545,000 in increments of 1000 Optional FLEX licenses: 250 750 1000 2500 IPSec VPN (sessions) 1 5000 (max. 5000 combined IPSec and SSL VPN) VPN Load Balancing 1 Supported General Licenses Encryption Base (DES) Optional license: Strong (3DES/AES) Failover Active/Standby or Active/Active 1 Security Contexts 2 Optional licenses: 5 10 20 50 VLANs, Maximum 2003-6 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 3 Managing Feature Licenses Supported Feature Licenses Per Model Table 3-5 ASA 5550 Adaptive Security Appliance License Features ASA 5550 Base License Firewall Licenses Botnet Traffic Filter 1 1. See the “License Notes” section. Disabled Optional temporary license: Available Firewall Conns, Concurrent 650 K GTP/GPRS Disabled Optional license: Available Unified Communications Proxy Sessions 1 2 Optional licenses: 24 50 100 250 500 750 1000 2000 3000 VPN Licenses 2 2. See the “VPN License and Feature Compatibility” section. Adv. Endpoint Assessment Disabled Optional license: Available AnyConnect Essentials 1 Disabled Optional license: Available AnyConnect Mobile 1 Disabled Optional license: Available AnyConnect Premium SSL VPN (sessions) 2 Optional Permanent licenses: 10 25 50 100 250 500 750 1000 2500 5000 Optional Shared licenses: Participant or Server. For the Server, these licenses are available: 1 500-50,000 in increments of 500 50,000-545,000 in increments of 1000 Optional FLEX licenses: 250 750 1000 2500 5000 IPSec VPN (sessions) 1 5000 (max. 5000 combined IPSec and SSL VPN) VPN Load Balancing 1 Supported General Licenses Encryption Base (DES) Optional license: Strong (3DES/AES) Failover Active/Standby or Active/Active 1 Security Contexts 2 Optional licenses: 5 10 20 50 VLANs, Maximum 2503-7 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 3 Managing Feature Licenses Supported Feature Licenses Per Model Table 3-6 ASA 5580 Adaptive Security Appliance License Features ASA 5580 Base License Firewall Licenses Botnet Traffic Filter 1 1. See the “License Notes” section. Disabled Optional temporary license: Available Firewall Conns, Concurrent 5580-20: 1,000 K 5580-40: 2,000 K GTP/GPRS Disabled Optional license: Available Unified Communications Proxy Sessions 1 2 Optional licenses: 24 50 100 250 500 750 1000 2000 3000 5000 10000 2 2. With the 10,000-session license, the total combined sessions can be 10,000, but the maximum number of Phone Proxy sessions is 5000. VPN Licenses 3 3. See the “VPN License and Feature Compatibility” section. Adv. Endpoint Assessment Disabled Optional license: Available AnyConnect Essentials 1 Disabled Optional license: Available AnyConnect Mobile 1 Disabled Optional license: Available AnyConnect Premium SSL VPN (sessions) 2 Optional Permanent licenses: 10 25 50 100 250 500 750 1000 2500 5000 Optional Shared licenses: Participant or Server. For the Server, these licenses are available: 1 500-50,000 in increments of 500 50,000-545,000 in increments of 1000 Optional FLEX licenses: 250 750 1000 2500 5000 IPSec VPN (sessions) 1 5000 (max. 5000 combined IPSec and SSL VPN) VPN Load Balancing 1 Supported General Licenses Encryption Base (DES) Optional license: Strong (3DES/AES) Failover Active/Standby or Active/Active 1 Security Contexts 2 Optional licenses: 5 10 20 50 VLANs, Maximum 2503-8 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 3 Managing Feature Licenses Supported Feature Licenses Per Model Table 3-7 ASA 5585-X Adaptive Security Appliance License Features ASA 5585-X Base License Firewall Licenses Botnet Traffic Filter 1 1. See the “License Notes” section. Disabled Optional temporary license: Available Firewall Conns, Concurrent 5585-X with SSP-10: 750 K 5585-X with SSP-20: 1,000 K 5585-X with SSP-40: 2,000 K 5585-X with SSP-60: 2,000 K GTP/GPRS Disabled Optional license: Available Unified Communications Proxy Sessions 1 2 Optional licenses: 24 50 100 250 500 750 1000 2000 3000 5000 10000 2 2. With the 10,000-session license, the total combined sessions can be 10,000, but the maximum number of Phone Proxy sessions is 5000. VPN Licenses 3 3. See the “VPN License and Feature Compatibility” section. Adv. Endpoint Assessment Disabled Optional license: Available AnyConnect Essentials 1 Disabled Optional license: Available AnyConnect Mobile 1 Disabled Optional license: Available AnyConnect Premium SSL VPN (sessions) 2 Optional Permanent licenses: 10 25 50 100 250 500 750 1000 2500 5000 10000 Optional Shared licenses: Participant or Server. For the Server, these licenses are available: 1 500-50,000 in increments of 500 50,000-545,000 in increments of 1000 Optional FLEX licenses: 250 750 1000 2500 5000 IPSec VPN (sessions) 1 5000 (max. 5000 combined IPSec and SSL VPN) VPN Load Balancing 1 Supported General Licenses Encryption Base (DES) Optional license: Strong (3DES/AES) Failover Active/Standby or Active/Active 1 10 GE I/O for SSP-10 and SSP-20 4 4. The ASA 5585-X with SSP-40 and -60 support 10-Gigabit Ethernet speeds by default. Disabled; fiber ifcs run at 1 GE Optional license: Available; fiber ifcs run at 10 GE Security Contexts 2 Optional licenses: 5 10 20 50 VLANs, Maximum 2503-9 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 3 Managing Feature Licenses Supported Feature Licenses Per Model License Notes Table 3-8 lists footnotes for the tables in the “Licenses Per Model” section on page 3-1. Table 3-8 License Notes License Notes Active/Active failover You cannot use Active/Active failover and VPN; if you want to use VPN, use Active/Standby failover. AnyConnect Essentials This license enables AnyConnect VPN client access to the adaptive security appliance. This license does not support deploy browser-based SSL VPN access or Cisco Secure Desktop. For these features, activate an AnyConnect Premium SSL VPN license instead of the AnyConnect Essentials license. Note With the AnyConnect Essentials license, VPN users can use a Web browser to log in, and download and start (WebLaunch) the AnyConnect client. The AnyConnect client software offers the same set of client features, whether it is enabled by this license or an AnyConnect Premium SSL VPN license. The AnyConnect Essentials license cannot be active at the same time as the following licenses on a given adaptive security appliance: AnyConnect Premium SSL VPN license (all types) or the Advanced Endpoint Assessment license. You can, however, run AnyConnect Essentials and AnyConnect Premium SSL VPN licenses on different adaptive security appliances in the same network. By default, the ASA uses the AnyConnect Essentials license, but you can disable it to use other licenses by using the no anyconnect-essentials command. AnyConnect Mobile This license provides access to the AnyConnect Client for touch-screen mobile devices running Windows Mobile 5.0, 6.0, and 6.1. We recommend using this license if you want to support mobile access to AnyConnect 2.3 and later versions. This license requires activation of one of the following licenses to specify the total number SSL VPN sessions permitted: AnyConnect Essentials or AnyConnect Premium SSL VPN. AnyConnect Premium SSL VPN Shared A shared license lets the ASA act as a shared license server for multiple client ASAs. The shared license pool is large, but the maximum number of sessions used by each individual ASA cannot exceed the maximum number listed for permanent licenses. Botnet Traffic Filter Requires a Strong Encryption (3DES/AES) License to download the dynamic database. Combined IPSec and SSL VPN sessions • Although the maximum IPSec and SSL VPN sessions add up to more than the maximum VPN sessions, the combined sessions should not exceed the VPN session limit. If you exceed the maximum VPN sessions, you can overload the ASA, so be sure to size your network appropriately. • If you start a clientless SSL VPN session and then start an AnyConnect client session from the portal, 1 session is used in total. However, if you start the AnyConnect client first (from a standalone client, for example) and then log into the clientless SSL VPN portal, then 2 sessions are used.3-10 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 3 Managing Feature Licenses Information About Feature Licenses VPN License and Feature Compatibility Table 3-9 shows how the VPN licenses and features can combine. Information About Feature Licenses A license specifies the options that are enabled on a given ASA. It is represented by an activation key that is a 160-bit (5 32-bit words or 20 bytes) value. This value encodes the serial number (an 11 character string) and the enabled features. This section includes the following topics: • Preinstalled License, page 3-11 • Temporary, VPN Flex, and Evaluation Licenses, page 3-11 Unified Communications Proxy sessions Phone Proxy, Mobility Advantage Proxy, Presence Federation Proxy, and TLS Proxy are all licensed under the UC Proxy umbrella, and can be mixed and matched. For example, if you configure a phone with a primary and backup Cisco Unified Communications Manager, there are 2 TLS/SRTP connections, so 2 UC Proxy sessions are used. Note In Version 8.2(2) and later, Mobility Advantage Proxy no longer requires the UC Proxy license. VPN load balancing Requires a Strong Encryption (3DES/AES) License. Table 3-8 License Notes License Notes Table 3-9 VPN License and Feature Compatibility Supported with: Enable one of the following licenses: 1 1. You can only have one license type active, either the AnyConnect Essentials license or the AnyConnect Premium license. By default, the ASA includes an AnyConnect Premium license for 2 sessions. If you install the AnyConnect Essentials license, then it is used by default. See the no anyconnect-essentials command to enable the Premium license instead. AnyConnect Essentials AnyConnect Premium SSL VPN AnyConnect Mobile Ye s Yes Advanced Endpoint Assessment No Yes AnyConnect Premium SSL VPN Shared No Yes Client-based SSL VPN Ye s Yes Browser-based (clientless) SSL VPN No Yes IPsec VPN Ye s Yes VPN Load Balancing Ye s Yes Cisco Secure Desktop No Yes3-11 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 3 Managing Feature Licenses Information About Feature Licenses • Shared Licenses, page 3-13 • Licenses FAQ, page 3-17 Preinstalled License By default, your ASA ships with a license already installed. This license might be the Base License, to which you want to add more licenses, or it might already have all of your licenses installed, depending on what you ordered and what your vendor installed for you. See the “Viewing Your Current License” section on page 3-19 section to determine which licenses you have installed. Temporary, VPN Flex, and Evaluation Licenses In addition to permanent licenses, you can purchase a temporary license or receive an evaluation license that has a time-limit. For example, you might buy a VPN Flex license to handle short-term surges in the number of concurrent SSL VPN users, or you might order a Botnet Traffic Filter temporary license that is valid for 1 year. This section includes the following topics: • How the Temporary License Timer Works, page 3-11 • How Multiple Licenses Interact, page 3-11 • Failover and Temporary Licenses, page 3-13 How the Temporary License Timer Works • The timer for the temporary license starts counting down when you activate it on the ASA. • If you stop using the temporary license before it times out, for example you activate a permanent license or a different temporary license, then the timer halts. The timer only starts again when you reactivate the temporary license. • If the temporary license is active, and you shut down the ASA, then the timer continues to count down. If you intend to leave the ASA in a shut down state for an extended period of time, then you should activate the permanent license before you shut down to preserve the temporary license. • When a temporary license expires, the next time you reload the ASA, the permanent license is used; you are not forced to perform a reload immediately when the license expires. Note We suggest you do not change the system clock after you install the temporary license. If you set the clock to be a later date, then if you reload, the ASA checks the system clock against the original installation time, and assumes that more time has passed than has actually been used. If you set the clock back, and the actual running time is greater than the time between the original installation time and the system clock, then the license immediately expires after a reload. How Multiple Licenses Interact • When you activate a temporary license, then features from both permanent and temporary licenses are merged to form the running license. Note that the ASA only uses the highest value from each license for each feature; the values are not added together. The ASA displays any resolved conflicts 3-12 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 3 Managing Feature Licenses Information About Feature Licenses between the licenses when you enter a temporary activation key. In the rare circumstance that a temporary license has lower capability than the permanent license, the permanent license values are used. • When you activate a permanent license, it overwrites the currently-running permanent and temporary licenses and becomes the running license. Note If you install a new permanent license, and it is a downgrade from the temporary license, then you need to reload the ASA to disable the temporary license and restore the permanent license. Until you reload, the temporary license continues to count down. If you reactivate the already installed permanent license, you do not need to reload the ASA; the temporary license does not continue to count down, and there is no disruption of traffic. • To reenable the features of the temporary license if you later activate a permanent license, simply reenter the temporary activation key. For a license upgrade, you do not need to reload. • To switch to a different temporary license, enter the new activation key; the new license is used instead of the old temporary license and combines with the permanent license to create a new running license. The ASA can have multiple temporary licenses installed; but only one is active at any given time. See the following figure for examples of permanent and VPN Flex activation keys, and how they interact. Figure 3-1 Permanent and VPN Flex Activation Keys 1. In example 1 in the above figure, you apply a temporary key with 25 SSL sessions; because the VPN Flex value is greater than the permanent key value of 10 sessions, the resulting running key is a merged key that uses the VPN Flex value of 25 sessions, and not a combined total of 35 sessions. 2. In example 2 above, the merged key from example 1 is replaced by the permanent key, and the VPN Flex license is disabled. The running key defaults to the permanent key value of 10 sessions. 3. In example 3 above, an evaluation license including 50 contexts is applied to the permanent key, so the resulting running key is a merged key that includes all the features of the permanent key plus the 50 context license. 4. In example 4 above, the merged key from example 3 has the VPN Flex key applied. Because the ASA can only use one temporary key at a time, the VPN flex key replaces the evaluation key, so the end result is the same as the merged key from example 1. Permanent Key Permanent Key VPN Flex Key Merged Key Merged Key + = = = Base + 10 SSL conns 1. 2. 3. 4. Base + 25 SSL conns Base + 25 SSL conns Base + 10 SSL conns 25 SSL conns Evaluation Key + 50 contexts Merged Key Base + 10 SSL conns + 50 contexts Merged Key Base + 10 SSL conns + 50 contexts Permanent Key + Base + 10 SSL conns Permanent Key Base + 10 SSL conns = VPN Flex Key + 25 SSL conns New Merged Key Base + 25 SSL conns 2511373-13 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 3 Managing Feature Licenses Information About Feature Licenses Failover and Temporary Licenses With failover, identical licenses are required. For failover purposes, temporary and permanent licenses appear to be identical, so you can have a permanent license on one unit and a temporary license on the other unit. This functionality is useful in an emergency situation; for example, if one of your units fails, and you have an extra unit, you can install the extra unit while the other one is repaired. If you do not normally use the extra unit for SSL VPN, then a VPN Flex license is a perfect solution while the other unit is being repaired. Because the temporary license continues to count down for as long as it is activated on a failover unit, we do not recommend using a temporary license in a permanent failover installation; when the temporary license expires, failover will no longer work. Shared Licenses A shared license lets you purchase a large number of SSL VPN sessions and share the sessions as needed amongst a group of ASAs by configuring one of the ASAs as a shared licensing server, and the rest as shared licensing participants. This section describes how a shared license works, and includes the following topics: • Information About the Shared Licensing Server and Participants, page 3-13 • Communication Issues Between Participant and Server, page 3-14 • Information About the Shared Licensing Backup Server, page 3-14 • Failover and Shared Licenses, page 3-15 • Maximum Number of Participants, page 3-16 Information About the Shared Licensing Server and Participants The following steps describe how shared licenses operate: 1. Decide which ASA should be the shared licensing server, and purchase the shared licensing server license using that device serial number. 2. Decide which ASAs should be shared licensing participants, including the shared licensing backup server, and obtain a shared licensing participant license for each device, using each device serial number. 3. (Optional) Designate a second ASA as a shared licensing backup server. You can only specify one backup server. Note The shared licensing backup server only needs a participant license. 4. Configure a shared secret on the shared licensing server; any participants with the shared secret can use the shared license. 5. When you configure the ASA as a participant, it registers with the shared licensing server by sending information about itself, including the local license and model information. Note The participant needs to be able to communicate with the server over the IP network; it does not have to be on the same subnet.3-14 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 3 Managing Feature Licenses Information About Feature Licenses 6. The shared licensing server responds with information about how often the participant should poll the server. 7. When a participant uses up the sessions of the local license, it sends a request to the shared licensing server for additional sessions in 50-session increments. 8. The shared licensing server responds with a shared license. The total sessions used by a participant cannot exceed the maximum sessions for the platform model. Note The shared licensing server can also participate in the shared license pool. It does not need a participant license as well as the server license to participate. a. If there are not enough sessions left in the shared license pool for the participant, then the server responds with as many sessions as available. b. The participant continues to send refresh messages requesting more sessions until the server can adequately fulfill the request. 9. When the load is reduced on a participant, it sends a message to the server to release the shared sessions. Note The ASA uses SSL between the server and participant to encrypt all communications. Communication Issues Between Participant and Server See the following guidelines for communication issues between the participant and server: • If a participant fails to send a refresh after 3 times the refresh interval, then the server releases the sessions back into the shared license pool. • If the participant cannot reach the license server to send the refresh, then the participant can continue to use the shared license it received from the server for up to 24 hours. • If the participant is still not able to communicate with a license server after 24 hours, then the participant releases the shared license, even if it still needs the sessions. The participant leaves existing connections established, but cannot accept new connections beyond the license limit. • If a participant reconnects with the server before 24 hours expires, but after the server expired the participant sessions, then the participant needs to send a new request for the sessions; the server responds with as many sessions as can be reassigned to that participant. Information About the Shared Licensing Backup Server The shared licensing backup server must register successfully with the main shared licensing server before it can take on the backup role. When it registers, the main shared licensing server syncs server settings as well as the shared license information with the backup, including a list of registered participants and the current license usage. The main server and backup server sync the data at 10 second intervals. After the initial sync, the backup server can successfully perform backup duties, even after a reload. When the main server goes down, the backup server takes over server operation. The backup server can operate for up to 30 continuous days, after which the backup server stops issuing sessions to participants, and existing sessions time out. Be sure to reinstate the main server within that 30-day period. Critical-level syslog messages are sent at 15 days, and again at 30 days.3-15 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 3 Managing Feature Licenses Information About Feature Licenses When the main server comes back up, it syncs with the backup server, and then takes over server operation. When the backup server is not active, it acts as a regular participant of the main shared licensing server. Note When you first launch the main shared licensing server, the backup server can only operate independently for 5 days. The operational limit increases day-by-day, until 30 days is reached. Also, if the main server later goes down for any length of time, the backup server operational limit decrements day-by-day. When the main server comes back up, the backup server starts to increment again day-by-day. For example, if the main server is down for 20 days, with the backup server active during that time, then the backup server will only have a 10-day limit left over. The backup server “recharges” up to the maximum 30 days after 20 more days as an inactive backup. This recharging function is implemented to discourage misuse of the shared license. Failover and Shared Licenses This section describes how shared licenses interact with failover, and includes the following topics: • “Failover and Shared License Servers” section on page 3-15 • “Failover and Shared License Participants” section on page 3-16 Failover and Shared License Servers This section describes how the main server and backup server interact with failover. Because the shared licensing server is also performing normal duties as the ASA, including performing functions such as being a VPN gateway and firewall, then you might need to configure failover for the main and backup shared licensing servers for increased reliability. Note The backup server mechanism is separate from, but compatible with, failover. Shared licenses are supported only in single context mode, so Active/Active failover is not supported. Both main shared licensing server units in the failover pair need to have the same license. So if you purchase a 10,000 session shared license for the primary main server unit, you must also purchase a 10,000 session shared license for the standby main server unit. Because the standby unit does not pass traffic when it is in a standby state, the total number of sessions remains at 10,000 in this example, not a combined 20,000 sessions. For Active/Standby failover, the primary unit acts as the main shared licensing server, and the standby unit acts as the main shared licensing server after failover; because both units need to have the same license, both units can act as the main licensing server. The standby unit does not act as the backup shared licensing server. Instead, you can have a second pair of units acting as the backup server, if desired. For example, you have a network with 2 failover pairs. Pair #1 includes the main licensing server. Pair #2 includes the backup server. When the primary unit from Pair #1 goes down, the standby unit immediately becomes the new main licensing server. The backup server from Pair #2 never gets used. Only if both units in Pair #1 go down does the backup server in Pair #2 come into use as the shared licensing server. If Pair #1 remains down, and the primary unit in Pair #2 goes down, then the standby unit in Pair #2 comes into use as the shared licensing server (see Figure 3-2).3-16 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 3 Managing Feature Licenses Information About Feature Licenses Figure 3-2 Failover and Shared License Servers The standby backup server shares the same operating limits as the primary backup server; if the standby unit becomes active, it continues counting down where the primary unit left off. See the “Information About the Shared Licensing Backup Server” section on page 3-14 for more information. Failover and Shared License Participants For participant pairs, both units register with the shared licensing server using separate participant IDs. The active unit syncs its participant ID with the standby unit. The standby unit uses this ID to generate a transfer request when it switches to the active role. This transfer request is used to move the shared sessions from the previously active unit to the new active unit. Maximum Number of Participants The ASA does not limit the number of participants for the shared license; however, a very large shared network could potentially affect the performance on the licensing server. In this case, you can increase the delay between participant refreshes, or you can create two shared networks. Failover Pair #1 Main (Active) Main (Standby) Failover Pair #2 Backup (Active) Backup (Standby) 1. Normal operation: Blue=Shared license server in use (Active)=Active failover unit Failover Pair #1 Main (Failed) Main (Active) Failover Pair #2 Backup (Active) Backup (Standby) 2. Primary main server fails over: Failover Pair #1 Main (Failed) Main (Failed) Failover Pair #2 3. Both main Backup (Active) Backup (Standby) servers fail: Failover Pair #1 Main (Failed) Main (Failed) Failover Pair #2 4. Both main servers and Backup (Failed) Backup (Active) primary backup fail: Key 2513563-17 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 3 Managing Feature Licenses Information About Feature Licenses Licenses FAQ Q. Can I activate multiple temporary licenses, for example, VPN Flex and Botnet Traffic Filter? A. No. You can only use one temporary license at a time. The last license you activate is the one in use. In the case of evaluation licenses that group multiple features into one activation key, then multiple features are supported at the same time. But temporary licenses for sale by Cisco are limited to one feature per activation key. Q. Can I “stack” temporary licenses so that when the time limit runs out, it will automatically use the next license? A. No. You can install multiple temporary licenses, but only the last activated license is active. When the active license expires, you need to manually activate the new one. Be sure to activate it shortly before the old one expires so you do not lose functionality. (Any remaining time on the old license remains unused; for example, if you use 10 months of a 12-month license, and activate a new 12-month license, then the remaining 2 months of the first license goes unused unless you later reactivate it. We recommend that you activate the new license as close as possible to the end of the old license to maximize the license usage.) Q. Can I install a new permanent license while maintaining an active temporary license? A. No. The temporary license will be deactivated when you apply a permanent license. You have to activate the permanent license, and then reactivate the temporary license to be able to use the new permanent license along with the temporary license. This will cause temporary loss of functionality for the features reliant on the temporary license. Q. For failover, can I use a shared licensing server as the primary unit, and the shared licensing backup server as the secondary unit? A. No. The secondary unit must also have a shared licensing server license. The backup server, which has a participant license, can be in a separate failover pair of two backup servers. Q. Do I need to buy the same licenses for the secondary unit in a failover pair? Even for a shared licensing server? A. Yes. Both units need the same licenses. For a shared licensing server, you need to buy the same shared licensing server license for both units. Note: In Active/Standby failover, for licenses that specify the number of sessions, the sessions for both units are not added to each other; only the active unit sessions can be used. For example, for a shared SSL VPN license, you need to purchase a 10,000 user session for both the active and the standby unit; the total number of sessions is 10,000, not 20,000 combined. Q. Can I use a VPN Flex or permanent SSL VPN license in addition to a shared SSL VPN license? A. Yes. The shared license is used only after the sessions from the locally installed license (VPN Flex or permanent) are used up. Note: On the shared licensing server, the permanent SSL VPN license is not used; you can however use a VPN Flex license at the same time as the shared licensing server license. In this case, the VPN Flex license sessions are available for local SSL VPN sessions only; they cannot be added to the shared licensing pool for use by participants.3-18 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 3 Managing Feature Licenses Guidelines and Limitations Guidelines and Limitations See the following guidelines for activation keys. Context Mode Guidelines • In multiple context mode, apply the activation key in the system execution space. • Shared licenses are not supported in multiple context mode. Firewall Mode Guidelines All license types are available in both routed and transparent mode. Failover Guidelines • You must have the same licenses activated on the primary and secondary units. Note For failover purposes, there is no distinction between permanent and temporary licenses as long as the feature set is the same between the two units. See the “Failover and Temporary Licenses” section on page 3-13 for more information. • Shared licenses are not supported in Active/Active mode. See the “Failover and Shared Licenses” section on page 3-15 for more information. Upgrade Guidelines Your activation key remains compatible if you upgrade to Version 8.2 or later, and also if you later downgrade. After you upgrade, if you activate additional feature licenses that were introduced before 8.2, then the activation key continues to be compatible with earlier versions if you downgrade. However if you activate feature licenses that were introduced in 8.2 or later, then the activation key is not backwards compatible. If you have an incompatible license key, then see the following guidelines: • If you previously entered an activation key in an earlier version, then the ASA uses that key (without any of the new licenses you activated in Version 8.2 or later). • If you have a new system and do not have an earlier activation key, then you need to request a new activation key compatible with the earlier version. Additional Guidelines and Limitations • The activation key is not stored in your configuration file; it is stored as a hidden file in Flash memory. • The activation key is tied to the serial number of the device. Feature licenses cannot be transferred between devices (except in the case of a hardware failure). If you have to replace your device due to a hardware failure, contact the Cisco Licensing Team to have your existing license transferred to the new serial number. The Cisco Licensing Team will ask for the Product Authorization Key reference number and existing serial number. • Once purchased, you cannot return a license for a refund or for an upgraded license. • You cannot add two separate licenses for the same feature together; for example, if you purchase a 25-session SSL VPN license, and later purchase a 50-session license, you cannot use 75 sessions; you can use a maximum of 50 sessions. (You may be able to purchase a larger license at an upgrade price, for example from 25 sessions to 75 sessions; this kind of upgrade should be distinguished from adding two separate licenses together).3-19 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 3 Managing Feature Licenses Viewing Your Current License • Although you can activate all license types, some features are incompatible with each other; for example, multiple context mode and VPN. In the case of the AnyConnect Essentials license, the license is incompatible with the following licenses: full SSL VPN license, shared SSL VPN license, and Advanced Endpoint Assessment license. By default, the AnyConnect Essentials license is used instead of the above licenses, but you can disable the AnyConnect Essentials license in the configuration to restore use of the other licenses using the no anyconnect-essentials command. Viewing Your Current License This section describes how to view your current license, and for temporary activation keys, how much time the license has left. Detailed Steps Examples The following is sample output from the show activation-key detail command that shows a permanent activation license with 2 SSL VPN peers (in bold), an active temporary license with 5000 SSL VPN peers (in bold), the merged running license with the SSL VPN peers taken from the temporary license (in bold), and also the activation keys for inactive temporary licenses: hostname# show activation-key detail Serial Number: JMX0916L0Z4 Permanent Flash Activation Key: 0xf412675d 0x48a446bc 0x8c532580 0xb000b8c4 0xcc21f48e Licensed features for this platform: Maximum Physical Interfaces : Unlimited Maximum VLANs : 200 Inside Hosts : Unlimited Failover : Active/Active VPN-DES : Enabled VPN-3DES-AES : Enabled Security Contexts : 2 GTP/GPRS : Disabled VPN Peers : 2 SSL VPN Peers : 2 Total VPN Peers : 250 Shared License : Enabled Shared SSL VPN Peers : 5000 AnyConnect for Mobile : Disabled AnyConnect for Linksys phone : Disabled AnyConnect Essentials : Disabled Advanced Endpoint Assessment : Disabled UC Phone Proxy Sessions : 24 Total UC Proxy Sessions : 24 Botnet Traffic Filter : Enabled Command Purpose show activation-key detail Example: hostname# show activation-key detail Shows the installed licenses, including information about temporary licenses.3-20 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 3 Managing Feature Licenses Viewing Your Current License Temporary Flash Activation Key: 0xcb0367ce 0x700dd51d 0xd57b98e3 0x6ebcf553 0x0b058aac Licensed features for this platform: Maximum Physical Interfaces : Unlimited Maximum VLANs : 200 Inside Hosts : Unlimited Failover : Active/Active VPN-DES : Enabled VPN-3DES-AES : Enabled Security Contexts : 2 GTP/GPRS : Disabled SSL VPN Peers : 5000 Total VPN Peers : 250 Shared License : Enabled Shared SSL VPN Peers : 10000 AnyConnect for Mobile : Disabled AnyConnect for Linksys phone : Disabled AnyConnect Essentials : Disabled Advanced Endpoint Assessment : Disabled UC Phone Proxy Sessions : 24 Total UC Proxy Sessions : 24 Botnet Traffic Filter : Enabled This is a time-based license that will expire in 27 day(s). Running Activation Key: 0xcb0367ce 0x700dd51d 0xd57b98e3 0x6ebcf553 0x0b058aac Licensed features for this platform: Maximum Physical Interfaces : Unlimited Maximum VLANs : 200 Inside Hosts : Unlimited Failover : Active/Active VPN-DES : Enabled VPN-3DES-AES : Enabled Security Contexts : 2 GTP/GPRS : Disabled SSL VPN Peers : 5000 Total VPN Peers : 250 Shared License : Enabled Shared SSL VPN Peers : 10000 AnyConnect for Mobile : Disabled AnyConnect for Linksys phone : Disabled AnyConnect Essentials : Disabled Advanced Endpoint Assessment : Disabled UC Phone Proxy Sessions : 24 Total UC Proxy Sessions : 24 Botnet Traffic Filter : Enabled This platform has an ASA 5540 VPN Premium license. This is a Shared SSL VPN License server. This is a time-based license that will expire in 27 day(s). The flash activation key is the SAME as the running key. Non-active temporary keys: Time left ------------------------------------------------------------------ 0x2a53d6 0xfc087bfe 0x691b94fb 0x73dc8bf3 0xcc028ca2 28 day(s) 0xa13a46c2 0x7c10ec8d 0xad8a2257 0x5ec0ab7f 0x86221397 27 day(s)3-21 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 3 Managing Feature Licenses Obtaining an Activation Key Obtaining an Activation Key To obtain an activation key, you need a Product Authorization Key, which you can purchase from your Cisco account representative. You need to purchase a separate Product Activation Key for each feature license. For example, if you have the Base License, you can purchase separate keys for Advanced Endpoint Assessment and for additional SSL VPN sessions. Note For a failover pair, you need separate activation keys for each unit. Make sure the licenses included in the keys are the same for both units. After obtaining the Product Authorization Keys, register them on Cisco.com by performing the following steps: Step 1 Obtain the serial number for your ASA by entering the following command. hostname# show activation-key Step 2 If you are not already registered with Cisco.com, create an account. Step 3 Go to the following licensing website: http://www.cisco.com/go/license Step 4 Enter the following information, when prompted: • Product Authorization Key (if you have multiple keys, enter one of the keys first. You have to enter each key as a separate process.) • The serial number of your ASA • Your email address An activation key is automatically generated and sent to the email address that you provide. This key includes all features you have registered so far for permanent licenses. For VPN Flex licenses, each license has a separate activation key. Step 5 If you have additional Product Authorization Keys, repeat Step 4 for each Product Authorization Key. After you enter all of the Product Authorization Keys, the final activation key provided includes all of the permanent features you registered. Entering a New Activation Key This section describes how to enter a new activation key. Prerequisites • Before entering the activation key, ensure that the image in Flash memory and the running image are the same by entering the show activation-key command. You can do this by reloading the ASA before entering the new activation key. • If you are already in multiple context mode, enter the activation key in the system execution space. • Some licenses require you to reload the ASA after you activate them. Table 3- 10 lists the licenses that require reloading.3-22 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 3 Managing Feature Licenses Entering a New Activation Key Limitations and Restrictions Your activation key remains compatible if you upgrade to Version 8.2 or later, and also if you later downgrade. After you upgrade, if you activate additional feature licenses that were introduced before 8.2, then the activation key continues to be compatible with earlier versions if you downgrade. However if you activate feature licenses that were introduced in 8.2 or later, then the activation key is not backwards compatible. If you have an incompatible license key, then see the following guidelines: • If you previously entered an activation key in an earlier version, then the ASA uses that key (without any of the new licenses you activated in Version 8.2 or later). • If you have a new system and do not have an earlier activation key, then you need to request a new activation key compatible with the earlier version. Detailed Steps Table 3-10 License Reloading Requirements Model License Action Requiring Reload ASA 5505 and ASA 5510 Changing between the Base and Security Plus license. All models Changing the Encryption license. All models Downgrading any license (for example, going from 10 contexts to 2 contexts). Note If a temporary license expires, and the permanent license is a downgrade, then you do not need to immediately reload the ASA; the next time you reload, the permanent license is restored. Command Purpose Step 1 activation-key key Example: hostname# activation-key 0xd11b3d48 0xa80a4c0a 0x48e0fd1c 0xb0443480 0x843fc490 Applies an activation key to the ASA. The key is a five-element hexadecimal string with one space between each element. The leading 0x specifier is optional; all values are assumed to be hexadecimal. You can enter one permanent key, and multiple temporary keys. The last temporary key entered is the active one. See the “Temporary, VPN Flex, and Evaluation Licenses” section on page 3-11 for more information. To change the running activation key, enter the activation-key command with a new key value. Step 2 reload Example: hostname# reload (Might be required.) Reloads the ASA. Some licenses require you to reload the ASA after entering the new activation key. See Table 3-10 on page 3-22 for a list of licenses that need reloading. If you need to reload, you will see the following message: WARNING: The running activation key was not updated with the requested key. The flash activation key was updated with the requested key, and will become active after the next reload.3-23 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 3 Managing Feature Licenses Upgrading the License for a Failover Pair Upgrading the License for a Failover Pair If you need to upgrade the license on a failover pair, you might have some amount of downtime depending on whether the license requires a reload. See Table 3-10 on page 3-22 for more information about licenses requiring a reload. This section includes the following topics: • Upgrading the License for a Failover (No Reload Required), page 3-23 • Upgrading the License for a Failover (Reload Required), page 3-24 Upgrading the License for a Failover (No Reload Required) Use the following procedure if your new license does not require you to reload. See Table 3-10 on page 3-22 for more information about licenses requiring a reload. This procedure ensures that there is no downtime. Prerequisites Before you upgrade the license, be sure that both units are operating correctly, the Failover LAN interface is up, and there is not an imminent failover event; for example, monitored interfaces are operating normally. On each unit, enter the show failover command to view the failover status and the monitored interface status. Detailed Steps Command Purpose On the active unit: Step 1 no failover Example: active(config)# no failover Disables failover on the active unit. The standby unit remains in a pseudo-standby state. Deactivating failover on the active unit prevents the standby unit from attempting to become active during the period when the licenses do not match. Step 2 activation-key key Example: active(config)# activation-key 0xd11b3d48 0xa80a4c0a 0x48e0fd1c 0xb0443480 0x843fc490 Installs the new license on the active unit. Make sure this license is for the active unit serial number. On the standby unit: Step 3 activation-key key Example: standby# activation-key 0xc125727f 0x903de1ee 0x8c838928 0x92dc84d4 0x003a2ba0 Installs the new license on the standby unit. Make sure this license is for the standby unit serial number. On the active unit: Step 4 failover Example: active(config)# failover Reenables failover.3-24 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 3 Managing Feature Licenses Upgrading the License for a Failover Pair Upgrading the License for a Failover (Reload Required) Use the following procedure if your new license requires you to reload. See Table 3-10 on page 3-22 for more information about licenses requiring a reload. Reloading the failover pair causes a loss of connectivity during the reload. Prerequisites Before you upgrade the license, be sure that both units are operating correctly, the Failover LAN interface is up, and there is not an imminent failover event; for example, monitored interfaces are operating normally. On each unit, enter the show failover command to view the failover status and the monitored interface status. Detailed Steps Command Purpose On the active unit: Step 1 no failover Example: active(config)# no failover Disables failover on the active unit. The standby unit remains in a pseudo-standby state. Deactivating failover on the active unit prevents the standby unit from attempting to become active during the period when the licenses do not match. Step 2 activation-key key Example: active(config)# activation-key 0xd11b3d48 0xa80a4c0a 0x48e0fd1c 0xb0443480 0x843fc490 Installs the new license on the active unit. If you need to reload, you will see the following message: WARNING: The running activation key was not updated with the requested key. The flash activation key was updated with the requested key, and will become active after the next reload. If you do not need to reload, then follow the “Upgrading the License for a Failover (No Reload Required)” section on page 3-23 instead of this procedure. On the standby unit: Step 3 activation-key key Example: standby# activation-key 0xc125727f 0x903de1ee 0x8c838928 0x92dc84d4 0x003a2ba0 Installs the new license on the standby unit. Step 4 reload Example: standby# reload Reloads the standby unit. On the active unit: Step 5 reload Example: active(config)# reload Reloads the active unit. When you are prompted to save the configuration before reloading, answer No. This means that when the active unit comes back up, failover will still be enabled.3-25 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 3 Managing Feature Licenses Configuring a Shared License Configuring a Shared License This section describes how to configure the shared licensing server and participants. For more information about shared licenses, see the “Shared Licenses” section on page 3-13. This section includes the following topics: • Configuring the Shared Licensing Server, page 3-25 • Configuring the Shared Licensing Backup Server (Optional), page 3-26 • Configuring the Shared Licensing Participant, page 3-27 • Monitoring the Shared License, page 3-28 Configuring the Shared Licensing Server This section describes how to configure the ASA to be a shared licensing server. Prerequisites The server must have a shared licensing server key. Detailed Steps Command Purpose Step 1 license-server secret secret Example: hostname(config)# license-server secret farscape Sets the shared secret, a string between 4 and 128 ASCII characters. Any participant with this secret can use the licensing server. Step 2 (Optional) license-server refresh-interval seconds Example: hostname(config)# license-server refresh-interval 100 Sets the refresh interval between 10 and 300 seconds; this value is provided to participants to set how often they should communicate with the server. The default is 30 seconds. Step 3 (Optional) license-server port port Example: hostname(config)# license-server port 40000 Sets the port on which the server listens for SSL connections from participants, between 1 and 65535. The default is TCP port 50554.3-26 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 3 Managing Feature Licenses Configuring a Shared License Examples The following example sets the shared secret, changes the refresh interval and port, configures a backup server, and enables this unit as the shared licensing server on the inside interface and dmz interface. hostname(config)# license-server secret farscape hostname(config)# license-server refresh-interval 100 hostname(config)# license-server port 40000 hostname(config)# license-server backup 10.1.1.2 backup-id JMX0916L0Z4 ha-backup-id JMX1378N0W3 hostname(config)# license-server enable inside hostname(config)# license-server enable dmz What to Do Next See the “Configuring the Shared Licensing Backup Server (Optional)” section on page 3-26 , or the “Configuring the Shared Licensing Participant” section on page 3-27. Configuring the Shared Licensing Backup Server (Optional) This section enables a shared license participant to act as the backup server if the main server goes down. Prerequisites The backup server must have a shared licensing participant key. Step 4 (Optional) license-server backup address backup-id serial_number [ha-backup-id ha_serial_number] Example: hostname(config)# license-server backup 10.1.1.2 backup-id JMX0916L0Z4 ha-backup-id JMX1378N0W3 Identifies the backup server IP address and serial number. If the backup server is part of a failover pair, identify the standby unit serial number as well. You can only identify 1 backup server and its optional standby unit. Step 5 license-server enable interface_name Example: hostname(config)# license-server enable inside Enables this unit to be the shared licensing server. Specify the interface on which participants contact the server. You can repeat this command for as many interfaces as desired. Command Purpose3-27 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 3 Managing Feature Licenses Configuring a Shared License Detailed Steps Examples The following example identifies the license server and shared secret, and enables this unit as the backup shared license server on the inside interface and dmz interface. hostname(config)# license-server address 10.1.1.1 secret farscape hostname(config)# license-server backup enable inside hostname(config)# license-server backup enable dmz What to Do Next See the “Configuring the Shared Licensing Participant” section on page 3-27. Configuring the Shared Licensing Participant This section configures a shared licensing participant to communicate with the shared licensing server . Prerequisites The participant must have a shared licensing participant key. Command Purpose Step 1 license-server address address secret secret [port port] Example: hostname(config)# license-server address 10.1.1.1 secret farscape Identifies the shared licensing server IP address and shared secret. If you changed the default port in the server configuration, set the port for the backup server to match. Step 2 license-server backup enable interface_name Example: hostname(config)# license-server backup enable inside Enables this unit to be the shared licensing backup server. Specify the interface on which participants contact the server. You can repeat this command for as many interfaces as desired.3-28 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 3 Managing Feature Licenses Configuring a Shared License Detailed Steps Examples The following example sets the license server IP address and shared secret, as well as the backup license server IP address: hostname(config)# license-server address 10.1.1.1 secret farscape hostname(config)# license-server backup address 10.1.1.2 Monitoring the Shared License To monitor the shared license, enter one of the following commands. Examples The following is sample output from the show shared license command on the license participant: hostname> show shared license Primary License Server : 10.3.32.20 Version : 1 Status : Inactive Shared license utilization: SSLVPN: Command Purpose Step 1 license-server address address secret secret [port port] Example: hostname(config)# license-server address 10.1.1.1 secret farscape Identifies the shared licensing server IP address and shared secret. If you changed the default port in the server configuration, set the port for the participant to match. Step 2 (Optional) license-server backup address address Example: hostname(config)# license-server backup address 10.1.1.2 If you configured a backup server, enter the backup server address. Command Purpose show shared license [detail | client [hostname] | backup] Shows shared license statistics. Optional keywords ar available only for the licensing server: the detail keyword shows statistics per participant. To limit the display to one participant, use the client keyword. The backup keyword shows information about the backup server. To clear the shared license statistics, enter the clear shared license command. show activation-key Shows the licenses installed on the ASA. The show version command also shows license information. show vpn-sessiondb Shows license information about VPN sessions.3-29 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 3 Managing Feature Licenses Configuring a Shared License Total for network : 5000 Available : 5000 Utilized : 0 This device: Platform limit : 250 Current usage : 0 High usage : 0 Messages Tx/Rx/Error: Registration : 0 / 0 / 0 Get : 0 / 0 / 0 Release : 0 / 0 / 0 Transfer : 0 / 0 / 0 The following is sample output from the show shared license detail command on the license server: hostname> show shared license detail Backup License Server Info: Device ID : ABCD Address : 10.1.1.2 Registered : NO HA peer ID : EFGH Registered : NO Messages Tx/Rx/Error: Hello : 0 / 0 / 0 Sync : 0 / 0 / 0 Update : 0 / 0 / 0 Shared license utilization: SSLVPN: Total for network : 500 Available : 500 Utilized : 0 This device: Platform limit : 250 Current usage : 0 High usage : 0 Messages Tx/Rx/Error: Registration : 0 / 0 / 0 Get : 0 / 0 / 0 Release : 0 / 0 / 0 Transfer : 0 / 0 / 0 Client Info: Hostname : 5540-A Device ID : XXXXXXXXXXX SSLVPN: Current usage : 0 High : 0 Messages Tx/Rx/Error: Registration : 1 / 1 / 0 Get : 0 / 0 / 0 Release : 0 / 0 / 0 Transfer : 0 / 0 / 0 ...3-30 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 3 Managing Feature Licenses Feature History for Licensing Feature History for Licensing Table 3-11 lists the release history for this feature. Table 3-11 Feature History for Licensing Feature Name Releases Feature Information Increased Connections and VLANs 7.0(5) Increased the following limits: • ASA5510 Base license connections from 32000 to 5000; VLANs from 0 to 10. • ASA5510 Security Plus license connections from 64000 to 130000; VLANs from 10 to 25. • ASA5520 connections from 130000 to 280000; VLANs from 25 to 100. • ASA5540 connections from 280000 to 400000; VLANs from 100 to 200. SSL VPN Licenses 7.1(1) SSL VPN licenses were introduced. Increased SSL VPN Licenses 7.2(1) A 5000-user SSL VPN license was introduced for the ASA 5550 and above. Increased interfaces for the Base license on the ASA 5510 7.2(2) For the Base license on the ASA 5510, the maximum number of interfaces was increased from 3 plus a management interface to unlimited interfaces. Increased VLANs 7.2(2) The maximum number of VLANs for the Security Plus license on the ASA 5505 ASA was increased from 5 (3 fully functional; 1 failover; one restricted to a backup interface) to 20 fully functional interfaces. In addition, the number of trunk ports was increased from 1 to 8. Now there are 20 fully functional interfaces, you do not need to use the backup interface command to cripple a backup ISP interface; you can use a fully-functional interface for it. The backup interface command is still useful for an Easy VPN configuration. VLAN limits were also increased for the ASA 5510 ASA (from 10 to 50 for the Base license, and from 25 to 100 for the Security Plus license), the ASA 5520 adaptive security appliance (from 100 to 150), the ASA 5550 adaptive security appliance (from 200 to 250). Gigabit Ethernet Support for the ASA 5510 Security Plus License 7.2(3) The ASA 5510 ASA now supports Gigabit Ethernet (1000 Mbps) for the Ethernet 0/0 and 0/1 ports with the Security Plus license. In the Base license, they continue to be used as Fast Ethernet (100 Mbps) ports. Ethernet 0/2, 0/3, and 0/4 remain as Fast Ethernet ports for both licenses. Note The interface names remain Ethernet 0/0 and Ethernet 0/1. Use the speed command to change the speed on the interface and use the show interface command to see what speed is currently configured for each interface.3-31 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 3 Managing Feature Licenses Feature History for Licensing Advanced Endpoint Assessment License 8.0(2) The Advanced Endpoint Assessment license was introduced. As a condition for the completion of a Cisco AnyConnect or clientless SSL VPN connections, the remote computer scans for a greatly expanded collection of antivirus and antispyware applications, firewalls, operating systems, and associated updates. It also scans for any registry entries, filenames, and process names that you specify. It sends the scan results to the adaptive security appliance. The ASA uses both the user login credentials and the computer scan results to assign a Dynamic Access Policy (DAP). With an Advanced Endpoint Assessment License, you can enhance Host Scan by configuring an attempt to update noncompliant computers to meet version requirements. Cisco can provide timely updates to the list of applications and versions that Host Scan supports in a package that is separate from Cisco Secure Desktop. VPN Load Balancing for the ASA 5510 8.0(2) VPN load balancing is now supported on the ASA 5510 Security Plus license. AnyConnect for Mobile License 8.0(3) The AnyConnect for Mobile license lets Windows mobile devices connect to the ASA using the AnyConnect client. VPN Flex and Evaluation Licenses 8.0(4)/8.1(2) Support for temporary licenses was introduced. VPN Flex licenses provide temporary support for extra SSL VPN sessions. Increased VLANs for the ASA 5580 8.1(2) The number of VLANs supported on the ASA 5580 are increased from 100 to 250. Unified Communications Proxy Sessions license 8.0(4) The UC Proxy sessions license was introduced. This feature is not available in Version 8.1. Botnet Traffic Filter License 8.2(1) The Botnet Traffic Filter license was introduced. The Botnet Traffic Filter protects against malware network activity by tracking connections to known bad domains and IP addresses. Table 3-11 Feature History for Licensing (continued) Feature Name Releases Feature Information3-32 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 3 Managing Feature Licenses Feature History for Licensing AnyConnect Essentials License 8.2(1) This license enables AnyConnect VPN client access to the adaptive security appliance. This license does not support browser-based SSL VPN access or Cisco Secure Desktop. For these features, activate an AnyConnect Premium SSL VPN license instead of the AnyConnect Essentials license. Note With the AnyConnect Essentials license, VPN users can use a Web browser to log in, and download and start (WebLaunch) the AnyConnect client. The AnyConnect client software offers the same set of client features, whether it is enabled by this license or an AnyConnect Premium SSL VPN license. The AnyConnect Essentials license cannot be active at the same time as the following licenses on a given adaptive security appliance: AnyConnect Premium SSL VPN license (all types) or the Advanced Endpoint Assessment license. You can, however, run AnyConnect Essentials and AnyConnect Premium SSL VPN licenses on different adaptive security appliances in the same network. By default, the ASA uses the AnyConnect Essentials license, but you can disable it to use other licenses by using the no anyconnect-essentials command. Shared Licenses for SSL VPN 8.2(1) Shared licenses for SSL VPN were introduced. Multiple ASAs can share a pool of SSL VPN sessions on an as-needed basis. Mobility Proxy application no longer requires Unified Communications Proxy license 8.2(2) The Mobility Proxy no longer requires the UC Proxy license. 10 GE I/O license for the ASA 5585-X with SSP-20 8.2(3) We introduced the 10 GE I/O license for the ASA 5585-X with SSP-20 to enable 10-Gigabit Ethernet speeds for the fiber ports. The SSP-60 supports 10-Gigabit Ethernet speeds by default. 10 GE I/O license for the ASA 5585-X with SSP-10 8.2(4) We introduced the 10 GE I/O license for the ASA 5585-X with SSP-10 to enable 10-Gigabit Ethernet speeds for the fiber ports. The SSP-40 supports 10-Gigabit Ethernet speeds by default. Table 3-11 Feature History for Licensing (continued) Feature Name Releases Feature InformationC H A P T E R 4-1 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 4 Configuring the Transparent or Routed Firewall This chapter describes how to configure the firewall mode, routed or transparent, and how to customize transparent firewall operation. Note In multiple context mode, you cannot set the firewall mode separately for each context; you can only set the firewall mode for the entire ASA. This chapter includes the following sections: • Configuring the Firewall Mode, page 4-1 • Configuring ARP Inspection for the Transparent Firewall, page 4-8 • Customizing the MAC Address Table for the Transparent Firewall, page 4-11 • Firewall Mode Examples, page 4-15 Configuring the Firewall Mode This section describes routed and transparent firewall mode, and how to set the mode. This section includes the following topics: • Information About the Firewall Mode, page 4-1 • Licensing Requirements for the Firewall Mode, page 4-4 • Default Settings, page 4-4 • Guidelines and Limitations, page 4-5 • Setting the Firewall Mode, page 4-7 • Feature History for Firewall Mode, page 4-8 Information About the Firewall Mode This section describes routed and transparent firewall mode, and includes the following topics: • Information About Routed Firewall Mode, page 4-2 • Information About Transparent Firewall Mode, page 4-24-2 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 4 Configuring the Transparent or Routed Firewall Configuring the Firewall Mode Information About Routed Firewall Mode In routed mode, the ASA is considered to be a router hop in the network. It can use OSPF or RIP (in single context mode). Routed mode supports many interfaces. Each interface is on a different subnet. You can share interfaces between contexts. The ASA acts as a router between connected networks, and each interface requires an IP address on a different subnet. In single context mode, the routed firewall supports OSPF, EIGRP, and RIP. Multiple context mode supports static routes only. We recommend using the advanced routing capabilities of the upstream and downstream routers instead of relying on the ASA for extensive routing needs. Information About Transparent Firewall Mode Traditionally, a firewall is a routed hop and acts as a default gateway for hosts that connect to one of its screened subnets. A transparent firewall, on the other hand, is a Layer 2 firewall that acts like a “bump in the wire,” or a “stealth firewall,” and is not seen as a router hop to connected devices. This section describes transparent firewall mode, and includes the following topics: • Transparent Firewall Network, page 4-2 • Allowing Layer 3 Traffic, page 4-2 • Allowed MAC Addresses, page 4-2 • Passing Traffic Not Allowed in Routed Mode, page 4-3 • BPDU Handling, page 4-3 • MAC Address vs. Route Lookups, page 4-3 • Using the Transparent Firewall in Your Network, page 4-4 Transparent Firewall Network The ASA connects the same network on its inside and outside interfaces. Because the firewall is not a routed hop, you can easily introduce a transparent firewall into an existing network. Allowing Layer 3 Traffic IPv4 and IPv6 traffic is allowed through the transparent firewall automatically from a higher security interface to a lower security interface, without an access list. ARPs are allowed through the transparent firewall in both directions without an access list. ARP traffic can be controlled by ARP inspection. For Layer 3 traffic travelling from a low to a high security interface, an extended access list is required on the low security interface. See Chapter 11, “Adding an Extended Access List,” or Chapter 15, “Adding an IPv6 Access List,” for more information. Allowed MAC Addresses The following destination MAC addresses are allowed through the transparent firewall. Any MAC address not on this list is dropped. • TRUE broadcast destination MAC address equal to FFFF.FFFF.FFFF • IPv4 multicast MAC addresses from 0100.5E00.0000 to 0100.5EFE.FFFF • IPv6 multicast MAC addresses from 3333.0000.0000 to 3333.FFFF.FFFF • BPDU multicast address equal to 0100.0CCC.CCCD4-3 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 4 Configuring the Transparent or Routed Firewall Configuring the Firewall Mode • Appletalk multicast MAC addresses from 0900.0700.0000 to 0900.07FF.FFFF Passing Traffic Not Allowed in Routed Mode In routed mode, some types of traffic cannot pass through the ASA even if you allow it in an access list. The transparent firewall, however, can allow almost any traffic through using either an extended access list (for IP traffic) or an EtherType access list (for non-IP traffic). Note The transparent mode ASA does not pass CDP packets packets, or any packets that do not have a valid EtherType greater than or equal to 0x600. For example, you cannot pass IS-IS packets. An exception is made for BPDUs, which are supported. For example, you can establish routing protocol adjacencies through a transparent firewall; you can allow OSPF, RIP, EIGRP, or BGP traffic through based on an extended access list. Likewise, protocols like HSRP or VRRP can pass through the ASA. Non-IP traffic (for example AppleTalk, IPX, BPDUs, and MPLS) can be configured to go through using an EtherType access list. For features that are not directly supported on the transparent firewall, you can allow traffic to pass through so that upstream and downstream routers can support the functionality. For example, by using an extended access list, you can allow DHCP traffic (instead of the unsupported DHCP relay feature) or multicast traffic such as that created by IP/TV. BPDU Handling To prevent loops using the spanning tree protocol, BPDUs are passed by default. To block BPDUs, you need to configure an EtherType access list to deny them. If you are using failover, you might want to block BPDUs to prevent the switch port from going into a blocking state when the topology changes. See the “Transparent Firewall Mode Requirements” section on page 32-11 for more information. MAC Address vs. Route Lookups When the ASA runs in transparent mode, the outgoing interface of a packet is determined by performing a MAC address lookup instead of a route lookup. Route lookups, however, are necessary for the following traffic types: • Traffic originating on the ASA—For example, if your syslog server is located on a remote network, you must use a static route so the ASA can reach that subnet. • Voice over IP (VoIP) traffic with inspection enabled, and the endpoint is at least one hop away from the ASA—For example, if you use the transparent firewall between a CCM and an H.323 gateway, and there is a router between the transparent firewall and the H.323 gateway, then you need to add a static route on the ASA for the H.323 gateway for successful call completion. • VoIP or DNS traffic with NAT and inspection enabled—To successfully translate the IP address inside VoIP and DNS packets, the ASA needs to perform a route lookup. Unless the host is on a directly-connected network, then you need to add a static route on the ASA for the real host address that is embedded in the packet.4-4 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 4 Configuring the Transparent or Routed Firewall Configuring the Firewall Mode Using the Transparent Firewall in Your Network Figure 4-1 shows a typical transparent firewall network where the outside devices are on the same subnet as the inside devices. The inside router and hosts appear to be directly connected to the outside router. Figure 4-1 Transparent Firewall Network Licensing Requirements for the Firewall Mode The following table shows the licensing requirements for this feature. Default Settings The default mode is routed mode. 10.1.1.1 10.1.1.2 Management IP 10.1.1.3 192.168.1.2 Network A Network B Internet 92411 Model License Requirement All models Base License.4-5 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 4 Configuring the Transparent or Routed Firewall Configuring the Firewall Mode Guidelines and Limitations This section includes the guidelines and limitations for this feature. Context Mode Guidelines • The firewall mode is set for the entire system and all contexts; you cannot set the mode individually for each context. • For multiple context mode, set the mode in the system execution space. • When you change modes, the ASA clears the running configuration because many commands are not supported for both modes. This action removes any contexts from running. If you then re-add a context that has an existing configuration that was created for the wrong mode, the context configuration might not work correctly. Be sure to recreate your context configurations for the correct mode before you re-add them, or add new contexts with new paths for the new configurations. Transparent Firewall Guidelines Follow these guidelines when planning your transparent firewall network: • For IPv4, a management IP address is required for both management traffic and for traffic to pass through the ASA. For multiple context mode, an IP address is required for each context. Unlike routed mode, which requires an IP address for each interface, a transparent firewall has an IP address assigned to the entire device. The ASA uses this IP address as the source address for packets originating on the ASA, such as system messages or AAA communications. The management IP address must be on the same subnet as the connected network. You cannot set the subnet to a host subnet (255.255.255.255). For IPv6, at a minimum you need to configure link-local addresses for each interface for through traffic. For full functionality, including the ability to manage the ASA, you need to configure a global IP address for the device. You can configure an IP address (both IPv4 and IPv6) for the Management 0/0 or Management 0/1 management-only interface. This IP address can be on a separate subnet from the main management IP address. • The transparent ASA uses an inside interface and an outside interface only. If your platform includes a dedicated management interface, you can also configure the management interface or subinterface for management traffic only. In single mode, you can only use two data interfaces (and the dedicated management interface, if available) even if your security appliance includes more than two interfaces. Note In transparent firewall mode, the management interface updates the MAC address table in the same manner as a data interface; therefore you should not connect both a management and a data interface to the same switch unless you configure one of the switch ports as a routed port (by default Cisco Catalyst switches share a MAC address for all VLAN switch ports). Otherwise, if traffic arrives on the management interface from the physically-connected switch, then the ASA updates the MAC address table to use the management interface to access the switch, instead of the data interface. This action causes a temporary traffic interruption; the ASA will not re-update the MAC address table for packets from the switch to the data interface for at least 30 seconds for security reasons. • Each directly connected network must be on the same subnet.4-6 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 4 Configuring the Transparent or Routed Firewall Configuring the Firewall Mode • Do not specify the ASA management IP address as the default gateway for connected devices; devices need to specify the router on the other side of the ASA as the default gateway. • For multiple context mode, each context must use different interfaces; you cannot share an interface across contexts. • For multiple context mode, each context typically uses a different subnet. You can use overlapping subnets, but your network topology requires router and NAT configuration to make it possible from a routing standpoint. IPv6 Guidelines Supports IPv6. Additional Guidelines and Limitations • When you change modes, the ASA clears the running configuration because many commands are not supported for both modes. The startup configuration remains unchanged. If you reload without saving, then the startup configuration is loaded, and the mode reverts back to the original setting. See the “Setting the Firewall Mode” section on page 4-7 for information about backing up your configuration file. • If you download a text configuration to the ASA that changes the mode with the firewall transparent command, be sure to put the command at the top of the configuration; the ASA changes the mode as soon as it reads the command and then continues reading the configuration you downloaded. If the command appears later in the configuration, the ASA clears all the preceding lines in the configuration. See the “Downloading Software or Configuration Files to Flash Memory” section on page 78-2 for information about downloading text files. Unsupported Features in Transparent Mode Table 4-1 lists the features are not supported in transparent mode. Table 4-1 Unsupported Features in Transparent Mode Feature Description Dynamic DNS — DHCP relay The transparent firewall can act as a DHCP server, but it does not support the DHCP relay commands. DHCP relay is not required because you can allow DHCP traffic to pass through using two extended access lists: one that allows DCHP requests from the inside interface to the outside, and one that allows the replies from the server in the other direction. Dynamic routing protocols You can, however, add static routes for traffic originating on the ASA. You can also allow dynamic routing protocols through the ASA using an extended access list. Multicast IP routing You can allow multicast traffic through the ASA by allowing it in an extended access list.4-7 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 4 Configuring the Transparent or Routed Firewall Configuring the Firewall Mode Setting the Firewall Mode This section describes how to change the firewall mode. Note We recommend that you set the firewall mode before you perform any other configuration because changing the firewall mode clears the running configuration. Prerequisites When you change modes, the ASA clears the running configuration (see the “Guidelines and Limitations” section on page 4-5 for more information). • If you already have a populated configuration, be sure to back up your configuration before changing the mode; you can use this backup for reference when creating your new configuration. See the “Backing Up Configuration Files” section on page 78-7. • Use the CLI at the console port to change the mode. If you use any other type of session, including the ASDM Command Line Interface tool or SSH, you will be disconnected when the configuration is cleared, and you will have to reconnect to the ASA using the console port in any case. Detailed Steps QoS — VPN termination for through traffic The transparent firewall supports site-to-site VPN tunnels for management connections only. It does not terminate VPN connections for traffic through the ASA. You can pass VPN traffic through the security appliance using an extended access list, but it does not terminate non-management connections. SSL VPN is also not supported. Table 4-1 Unsupported Features in Transparent Mode Feature Description Command Purpose firewall transparent Example: hostname(config)# firewall transparent Sets the firewall mode to transparent. Enter this command in the system execution space for multiple context mode. To change the mode to routed, enter the no firewall transparent command. This command also appears in each context configuration for informational purposes only; you cannot enter this command in a context. Note You are not prompted to confirm the firewall mode change; the change occurs immediately.4-8 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 4 Configuring the Transparent or Routed Firewall Configuring ARP Inspection for the Transparent Firewall Feature History for Firewall Mode Table 4-2 lists the release history for this feature. Configuring ARP Inspection for the Transparent Firewall This section describes ARP inspection and how to enable it, and includes the following topics: • Information About ARP Inspection, page 4-8 • Licensing Requirements for ARP Inspection, page 4-9 • Default Settings, page 4-9 • Guidelines and Limitations, page 4-9 • Configuring ARP Inspection, page 4-9 • Monitoring ARP Inspection, page 4-11 • Feature History for ARP Inspection, page 4-11 Information About ARP Inspection By default, all ARP packets are allowed through the ASA. You can control the flow of ARP packets by enabling ARP inspection. When you enable ARP inspection, the ASA compares the MAC address, IP address, and source interface in all ARP packets to static entries in the ARP table, and takes the following actions: • If the IP address, MAC address, and source interface match an ARP entry, the packet is passed through. • If there is a mismatch between the MAC address, the IP address, or the interface, then the ASA drops the packet. • If the ARP packet does not match any entries in the static ARP table, then you can set the ASA to either forward the packet out all interfaces (flood), or to drop the packet. Note The dedicated management interface, if present, never floods packets even if this parameter is set to flood. ARP inspection prevents malicious users from impersonating other hosts or routers (known as ARP spoofing). ARP spoofing can enable a “man-in-the-middle” attack. For example, a host sends an ARP request to the gateway router; the gateway router responds with the gateway router MAC address. Table 4-2 Feature History for Firewall Mode Feature Name Releases Feature Information Transparent firewall mode 7.0(1) A transparent firewall is a Layer 2 firewall that acts like a “bump in the wire,” or a “stealth firewall,” and is not seen as a router hop to connected devices. The following commands were introduced: firewall transparent, show firewall.4-9 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 4 Configuring the Transparent or Routed Firewall Configuring ARP Inspection for the Transparent Firewall The attacker, however, sends another ARP response to the host with the attacker MAC address instead of the router MAC address. The attacker can now intercept all the host traffic before forwarding it on to the router. ARP inspection ensures that an attacker cannot send an ARP response with the attacker MAC address, so long as the correct MAC address and the associated IP address are in the static ARP table. Licensing Requirements for ARP Inspection The following table shows the licensing requirements for this feature. Default Settings By default, all ARP packets are allowed through the ASA. If you enable ARP inspection, the default setting is to flood non-matching packets. Guidelines and Limitations Context Mode Guidelines • Supported in single and multiple context mode. • In multiple context mode, configure ARP inspection within each context. Firewall Mode Guidelines Supported only in transparent firewall mode. Routed mode is not supported. Configuring ARP Inspection This section describes how to configure ARP inspection, and includes the following topics: • Task Flow for Configuring ARP Inspection, page 4-9 • Adding a Static ARP Entry, page 4-10 • Enabling ARP Inspection, page 4-10 Task Flow for Configuring ARP Inspection Follow these steps to configure ARP Inspection: Step 1 Add static ARP entries according to the “Adding a Static ARP Entry” section on page 4-10. ARP inspection compares ARP packets with static ARP entries in the ARP table, so static ARP entries are required for this feature. Model License Requirement All models Base License.4-10 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 4 Configuring the Transparent or Routed Firewall Configuring ARP Inspection for the Transparent Firewall Step 2 Enable ARP inspection according to the “Enabling ARP Inspection” section on page 4-10. Adding a Static ARP Entry ARP inspection compares ARP packets with static ARP entries in the ARP table. Although hosts identify a packet destination by an IP address, the actual delivery of the packet on Ethernet relies on the Ethernet MAC address. When a router or host wants to deliver a packet on a directly connected network, it sends an ARP request asking for the MAC address associated with the IP address, and then delivers the packet to the MAC address according to the ARP response. The host or router keeps an ARP table so it does not have to send ARP requests for every packet it needs to deliver. The ARP table is dynamically updated whenever ARP responses are sent on the network, and if an entry is not used for a period of time, it times out. If an entry is incorrect (for example, the MAC address changes for a given IP address), the entry times out before it can be updated. Note The transparent firewall uses dynamic ARP entries in the ARP table for traffic to and from the ASA, such as management traffic. Detailed Steps Examples For example, to allow ARP responses from the router at 10.1.1.1 with the MAC address 0009.7cbe.2100 on the outside interface, enter the following command: hostname(config)# arp outside 10.1.1.1 0009.7cbe.2100 What to Do Next Enable ARP inspection according to the “Enabling ARP Inspection” section on page 4-10. Enabling ARP Inspection This section describes how to enable ARP inspection. Command Purpose arp interface_name ip_address mac_address Example: hostname(config)# arp outside 10.1.1.1 0009.7cbe.2100 Adds a static ARP entry.4-11 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 4 Configuring the Transparent or Routed Firewall Customizing the MAC Address Table for the Transparent Firewall Detailed Steps Examples For example, to enable ARP inspection on the outside interface, and to drop all non-matching ARP packets, enter the following command: hostname(config)# arp-inspection outside enable no-flood Monitoring ARP Inspection To monitor ARP inspection, perform the following task: Feature History for ARP Inspection Table 4-2 lists the release history for this feature. Customizing the MAC Address Table for the Transparent Firewall This section describes the MAC address table, and includes the following topics: • Information About the MAC Address Table, page 4-12 Command Purpose arp-inspection interface_name enable [flood | no-flood] Example: hostname(config)# arp-inspection outside enable no-flood Enables ARP inspection. The flood keyword forwards non-matching ARP packets out all interfaces, and no-flood drops non-matching packets. Note The default setting is to flood non-matching packets. To restrict ARP through the ASA to only static entries, then set this command to no-flood. Command Purpose show arp-inspection Shows the current settings for ARP inspection on all interfaces. Table 4-3 Feature History for ARP Inspection Feature Name Releases Feature Information ARP inspection 7.0(1) ARP inspection compares the MAC address, IP address, and source interface in all ARP packets to static entries in the ARP table. The following commands were introduced: arp, arp-inspection, and show arp-inspection.4-12 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 4 Configuring the Transparent or Routed Firewall Customizing the MAC Address Table for the Transparent Firewall • Licensing Requirements for the MAC Address Table, page 4-12 • Default Settings, page 4-12 • Guidelines and Limitations, page 4-13 • Configuring the MAC Address Table, page 4-13 • Monitoring the MAC Address Table, page 4-14 • Feature History for the MAC Address Table, page 4-15 Information About the MAC Address Table The ASA learns and builds a MAC address table in a similar way as a normal bridge or switch: when a device sends a packet through the ASA, the ASA adds the MAC address to its table. The table associates the MAC address with the source interface so that the ASA knows to send any packets addressed to the device out the correct interface. The ASA 5505 adaptive security appliance includes a built-in switch; the switch MAC address table maintains the MAC address-to-switch port mapping for traffic within each VLAN. This section discusses the bridge MAC address table, which maintains the MAC address-to-VLAN interface mapping for traffic that passes between VLANs. Because the ASA is a firewall, if the destination MAC address of a packet is not in the table, the ASA does not flood the original packet on all interfaces as a normal bridge does. Instead, it generates the following packets for directly connected devices or for remote devices: • Packets for directly connected devices—The ASA generates an ARP request for the destination IP address, so that the ASA can learn which interface receives the ARP response. • Packets for remote devices—The ASA generates a ping to the destination IP address so that the ASA can learn which interface receives the ping reply. The original packet is dropped. Licensing Requirements for the MAC Address Table The following table shows the licensing requirements for this feature. Default Settings The default timeout value for dynamic MAC address table entries is 5 minutes. By default, each interface automatically learns the MAC addresses of entering traffic, and the ASA adds corresponding entries to the MAC address table. Model License Requirement All models Base License.4-13 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 4 Configuring the Transparent or Routed Firewall Customizing the MAC Address Table for the Transparent Firewall Guidelines and Limitations Context Mode Guidelines • Supported in single and multiple context mode. • In multiple context mode, configure the MAC address table within each context. Firewall Mode Guidelines Supported only in transparent firewall mode. Routed mode is not supported. Additional Guidelines In transparent firewall mode, the management interface updates the MAC address table in the same manner as a data interface; therefore you should not connect both a management and a data interface to the same switch unless you configure one of the switch ports as a routed port (by default Cisco Catalyst switches share a MAC address for all VLAN switch ports). Otherwise, if traffic arrives on the management interface from the physically-connected switch, then the ASA updates the MAC address table to use the management interface to access the switch, instead of the data interface. This action causes a temporary traffic interruption; the ASA will not re-update the MAC address table for packets from the switch to the data interface for at least 30 seconds for security reasons. Configuring the MAC Address Table This section describes how you can customize the MAC address table, and includes the following sections: • Adding a Static MAC Address, page 4-13 • Setting the MAC Address Timeout, page 4-14 • Disabling MAC Address Learning, page 4-14 Adding a Static MAC Address Normally, MAC addresses are added to the MAC address table dynamically as traffic from a particular MAC address enters an interface. You can add static MAC addresses to the MAC address table if desired. One benefit to adding static entries is to guard against MAC spoofing. If a client with the same MAC address as a static entry attempts to send traffic to an interface that does not match the static entry, then the ASA drops the traffic and generates a system message. When you add a static ARP entry (see the “Adding a Static ARP Entry” section on page 4-10), a static MAC address entry is automatically added to the MAC address table. To add a static MAC address to the MAC address table, enter the following command: Command Purpose mac-address-table static interface_name mac_address Example: hostname(config)# mac-address-table static inside 0009.7cbe.2100 Adds a static MAC address entry. The interface_name is the source interface.4-14 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 4 Configuring the Transparent or Routed Firewall Customizing the MAC Address Table for the Transparent Firewall Setting the MAC Address Timeout The default timeout value for dynamic MAC address table entries is 5 minutes, but you can change the timeout. To change the timeout, enter the following command: Disabling MAC Address Learning By default, each interface automatically learns the MAC addresses of entering traffic, and the ASA adds corresponding entries to the MAC address table. You can disable MAC address learning if desired, however, unless you statically add MAC addresses to the table, no traffic can pass through the ASA. To disable MAC address learning, enter the following command: Monitoring the MAC Address Table You can view the entire MAC address table (including static and dynamic entries for both interfaces), or you can view the MAC address table for an interface. To view the MAC address table, enter the following command: Examples The following is sample output from the show mac-address-table command that shows the entire table: hostname# show mac-address-table interface mac address type Time Left ----------------------------------------------------------------------- outside 0009.7cbe.2100 static - inside 0010.7cbe.6101 static - inside 0009.7cbe.5101 dynamic 10 The following is sample output from the show mac-address-table command that shows the table for the inside interface: hostname# show mac-address-table inside interface mac address type Time Left Command Purpose mac-address-table aging-time timeout_value Example: hostname(config)# mac-address-table aging-time 10 Sets the MAC address entry timeout. The timeout_value (in minutes) is between 5 and 720 (12 hours). 5 minutes is the default. Command Purpose mac-learn interface_name disable Example: hostname(config)# mac-learn inside disable Disables MAC address learning. The no form of this command reenables MAC address learning. The clear configure mac-learn command reenables MAC address learning on all interfaces. Command Purpose show mac-address-table [interface_name] Shows the MAC address table.4-15 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 4 Configuring the Transparent or Routed Firewall Firewall Mode Examples ----------------------------------------------------------------------- inside 0010.7cbe.6101 static - inside 0009.7cbe.5101 dynamic 10 Feature History for the MAC Address Table Table 4-2 lists the release history for this feature. Firewall Mode Examples This section includes examples of how traffic moves through the ASA, and includes the following topics: • How Data Moves Through the Security Appliance in Routed Firewall Mode, page 4-15 • How Data Moves Through the Transparent Firewall, page 4-21 How Data Moves Through the Security Appliance in Routed Firewall Mode This section describes how data moves through the ASA in routed firewall mode, and includes the following topics: • An Inside User Visits a Web Server, page 4-16 • An Outside User Visits a Web Server on the DMZ, page 4-17 • An Inside User Visits a Web Server on the DMZ, page 4-18 • An Outside User Attempts to Access an Inside Host, page 4-19 • A DMZ User Attempts to Access an Inside Host, page 4-20 Table 4-4 Feature History for the MAC Address Table Feature Name Releases Feature Information MAC address table 7.0(1) Transparent firewall mode uses a MAC address table. The following commands were introduced: mac-address-table static, mac-address-table aging-time, mac-learn disable, and show mac-address-table.4-16 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 4 Configuring the Transparent or Routed Firewall Firewall Mode Examples An Inside User Visits a Web Server Figure 4-2 shows an inside user accessing an outside web server. Figure 4-2 Inside to Outside The following steps describe how data moves through the ASA (see Figure 4-2): 1. The user on the inside network requests a web page from www.example.com. 2. The ASA receives the packet and because it is a new session, the ASA verifies that the packet is allowed according to the terms of the security policy (access lists, filters, AAA). For multiple context mode, the ASA first classifies the packet according to either a unique interface or a unique destination address associated with a context; the destination address is associated by matching an address translation in a context. In this case, the interface would be unique; the www.example.com IP address does not have a current address translation in a context. 3. The ASA translates the local source address (10.1.2.27) to the global address 209.165.201.10, which is on the outside interface subnet. The global address could be on any subnet, but routing is simplified when it is on the outside interface subnet. 4. The ASA then records that a session is established and forwards the packet from the outside interface. Web Server 10.1.1.3 www.example.com User 10.1.2.27 209.165.201.2 10.1.2.1 10.1.1.1 Source Addr Translation 10.1.2.27 209.165.201.10 Outside Inside DMZ 924044-17 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 4 Configuring the Transparent or Routed Firewall Firewall Mode Examples 5. When www.example.com responds to the request, the packet goes through the ASA, and because the session is already established, the packet bypasses the many lookups associated with a new connection. The ASA performs NAT by translating the global destination address to the local user address, 10.1.2.27. 6. The ASA forwards the packet to the inside user. An Outside User Visits a Web Server on the DMZ Figure 4-3 shows an outside user accessing the DMZ web server. Figure 4-3 Outside to DMZ The following steps describe how data moves through the ASA (see Figure 4-3): 1. A user on the outside network requests a web page from the DMZ web server using the global destination address of 209.165.201.3, which is on the outside interface subnet. 2. The ASA receives the packet and because it is a new session, the ASA verifies that the packet is allowed according to the terms of the security policy (access lists, filters, AAA). For multiple context mode, the ASA first classifies the packet according to either a unique interface or a unique destination address associated with a context; the destination address is associated by matching an address translation in a context. In this case, the classifier “knows” that the DMZ web server address belongs to a certain context because of the server address translation. 3. The ASA translates the destination address to the local address 10.1.1.3. 4. The ASA then adds a session entry to the fast path and forwards the packet from the DMZ interface. Web Server 10.1.1.3 User 209.165.201.2 10.1.2.1 10.1.1.1 Dest Addr Translation 209.165.201.3 10.1.1.13 Outside Inside DMZ 924064-18 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 4 Configuring the Transparent or Routed Firewall Firewall Mode Examples 5. When the DMZ web server responds to the request, the packet goes through the ASA and because the session is already established, the packet bypasses the many lookups associated with a new connection. The ASA performs NAT by translating the local source address to 209.165.201.3. 6. The ASA forwards the packet to the outside user. An Inside User Visits a Web Server on the DMZ Figure 4-4 shows an inside user accessing the DMZ web server. Figure 4-4 Inside to DMZ The following steps describe how data moves through the ASA (see Figure 4-4): 1. A user on the inside network requests a web page from the DMZ web server using the destination address of 10.1.1.3. 2. The ASA receives the packet and because it is a new session, the ASA verifies that the packet is allowed according to the terms of the security policy (access lists, filters, AAA). For multiple context mode, the ASA first classifies the packet according to either a unique interface or a unique destination address associated with a context; the destination address is associated by matching an address translation in a context. In this case, the interface is unique; the web server IP address does not have a current address translation. 3. The ASA then records that a session is established and forwards the packet out of the DMZ interface. 4. When the DMZ web server responds to the request, the packet goes through the fast path, which lets the packet bypass the many lookups associated with a new connection. Web Server 10.1.1.3 User 10.1.2.27 209.165.201.2 10.1.2.1 10.1.1.1 Inside DMZ Outside 924034-19 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 4 Configuring the Transparent or Routed Firewall Firewall Mode Examples 5. The ASA forwards the packet to the inside user. An Outside User Attempts to Access an Inside Host Figure 4-5 shows an outside user attempting to access the inside network. Figure 4-5 Outside to Inside The following steps describe how data moves through the ASA (see Figure 4-5): 1. A user on the outside network attempts to reach an inside host (assuming the host has a routable IP address). If the inside network uses private addresses, no outside user can reach the inside network without NAT. The outside user might attempt to reach an inside user by using an existing NAT session. 2. The ASA receives the packet and because it is a new session, the ASA verifies if the packet is allowed according to the security policy (access lists, filters, AAA). 3. The packet is denied, and the ASA drops the packet and logs the connection attempt. If the outside user is attempting to attack the inside network, the ASA employs many technologies to determine if a packet is valid for an already established session. www.example.com User 10.1.2.27 209.165.201.2 10.1.2.1 10.1.1.1 Outside Inside DMZ 924074-20 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 4 Configuring the Transparent or Routed Firewall Firewall Mode Examples A DMZ User Attempts to Access an Inside Host Figure 4-6 shows a user in the DMZ attempting to access the inside network. Figure 4-6 DMZ to Inside The following steps describe how data moves through the ASA (see Figure 4-6): 1. A user on the DMZ network attempts to reach an inside host. Because the DMZ does not have to route the traffic on the Internet, the private addressing scheme does not prevent routing. 2. The ASA receives the packet and because it is a new session, the ASA verifies if the packet is allowed according to the security policy (access lists, filters, AAA). The packet is denied, and the ASA drops the packet and logs the connection attempt. Web Server 10.1.1.3 User 10.1.2.27 209.165.201.2 10.1.2.1 10.1.1.1 Outside Inside DMZ 924024-21 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 4 Configuring the Transparent or Routed Firewall Firewall Mode Examples How Data Moves Through the Transparent Firewall Figure 4-7 shows a typical transparent firewall implementation with an inside network that contains a public web server. The ASA has an access list so that the inside users can access Internet resources. Another access list lets the outside users access only the web server on the inside network. Figure 4-7 Typical Transparent Firewall Data Path This section describes how data moves through the ASA, and includes the following topics: • An Inside User Visits a Web Server, page 4-22 • An Inside User Visits a Web Server Using NAT, page 4-23 • An Outside User Visits a Web Server on the Inside Network, page 4-24 • An Outside User Attempts to Access an Inside Host, page 4-25 www.example.com 209.165.201.2 Management IP 209.165.201.6 209.165.200.230 Web Server 209.165.200.225 Host 209.165.201.3 Internet 924124-22 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 4 Configuring the Transparent or Routed Firewall Firewall Mode Examples An Inside User Visits a Web Server Figure 4-8 shows an inside user accessing an outside web server. Figure 4-8 Inside to Outside The following steps describe how data moves through the ASA (see Figure 4-8): 1. The user on the inside network requests a web page from www.example.com. 2. The ASA receives the packet and adds the source MAC address to the MAC address table, if required. Because it is a new session, it verifies that the packet is allowed according to the terms of the security policy (access lists, filters, AAA). For multiple context mode, the ASA first classifies the packet according to a unique interface. 3. The ASA records that a session is established. 4. If the destination MAC address is in its table, the ASA forwards the packet out of the outside interface. The destination MAC address is that of the upstream router, 209.186.201.2. If the destination MAC address is not in the ASA table, the ASA attempts to discover the MAC address by sending an ARP request or a ping. The first packet is dropped. 5. The web server responds to the request; because the session is already established, the packet bypasses the many lookups associated with a new connection. 6. The ASA forwards the packet to the inside user. Management IP 209.165.201.6 www.example.com 209.165.201.2 Host 209.165.201.3 Internet 924084-23 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 4 Configuring the Transparent or Routed Firewall Firewall Mode Examples An Inside User Visits a Web Server Using NAT Figure 4-8 shows an inside user accessing an outside web server. Figure 4-9 Inside to Outside with NAT The following steps describe how data moves through the ASA (see Figure 4-8): 1. The user on the inside network requests a web page from www.example.com. 2. The ASA receives the packet and adds the source MAC address to the MAC address table, if required. Because it is a new session, it verifies that the packet is allowed according to the terms of the security policy (access lists, filters, AAA). For multiple context mode, the ASA first classifies the packet according to a unique interface. 3. The ASA translates the real address (10.1.2.27) to the mapped address 209.165.201.10. Because the mapped address is not on the same network as the outside interface, then be sure the upstream router has a static route to the mapped network that points to the ASA. 4. The ASA then records that a session is established and forwards the packet from the outside interface. 5. If the destination MAC address is in its table, the ASA forwards the packet out of the outside interface. The destination MAC address is that of the upstream router, 10.1.2.1. If the destination MAC address is not in the ASA table, the ASA attempts to discover the MAC address by sending an ARP request and a ping. The first packet is dropped. 6. The web server responds to the request; because the session is already established, the packet bypasses the many lookups associated with a new connection. 7. The ASA performs NAT by translating the mapped address to the real address, 10.1.2.27. Management IP 10.1.2.2 www.example.com 10.1.2.1 Host 10.1.2.27 Internet Source Addr Translation 10.1.2.27 209.165.201.10 Static route on router to 209.165.201.0/27 through security appliance 191243 Security appliance4-24 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 4 Configuring the Transparent or Routed Firewall Firewall Mode Examples An Outside User Visits a Web Server on the Inside Network Figure 4-10 shows an outside user accessing the inside web server. Figure 4-10 Outside to Inside The following steps describe how data moves through the ASA (see Figure 4-10): 1. A user on the outside network requests a web page from the inside web server. 2. The ASA receives the packet and adds the source MAC address to the MAC address table, if required. Because it is a new session, it verifies that the packet is allowed according to the terms of the security policy (access lists, filters, AAA). For multiple context mode, the ASA first classifies the packet according to a unique interface. 3. The ASA records that a session is established. 4. If the destination MAC address is in its table, the ASA forwards the packet out of the inside interface. The destination MAC address is that of the downstream router, 209.165.201.1. If the destination MAC address is not in the ASA table, the ASA attempts to discover the MAC address by sending an ARP request and a ping. The first packet is dropped. 5. The web server responds to the request; because the session is already established, the packet bypasses the many lookups associated with a new connection. 6. The ASA forwards the packet to the outside user. Host 209.165.201.2 209.165.201.1 209.165.200.230 Web Server 209.165.200.225 Management IP 209.165.201.6 Internet 924094-25 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 4 Configuring the Transparent or Routed Firewall Firewall Mode Examples An Outside User Attempts to Access an Inside Host Figure 4-11 shows an outside user attempting to access a host on the inside network. Figure 4-11 Outside to Inside The following steps describe how data moves through the ASA (see Figure 4-11): 1. A user on the outside network attempts to reach an inside host. 2. The ASA receives the packet and adds the source MAC address to the MAC address table, if required. Because it is a new session, it verifies if the packet is allowed according to the terms of the security policy (access lists, filters, AAA). For multiple context mode, the ASA first classifies the packet according to a unique interface. 3. The packet is denied because there is no access list permitting the outside host, and the ASA drops the packet. 4. If the outside user is attempting to attack the inside network, the ASA employs many technologies to determine if a packet is valid for an already established session. Management IP 209.165.201.6 Host 209.165.201.2 Host 209.165.201.3 Internet 924104-26 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 4 Configuring the Transparent or Routed Firewall Firewall Mode ExamplesC H A P T E R 5-1 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 5 Managing Multiple Context Mode This chapter describes how to configure multiple security contexts on the ASA, and includes the following sections: • Information About Security Contexts, page 5-1 • Enabling or Disabling Multiple Context Mode, page 5-10 • Configuring Resource Management, page 5-11 • Configuring a Security Context, page 5-16 • Automatically Assigning MAC Addresses to Context Interfaces, page 5-20 • Changing Between Contexts and the System Execution Space, page 5-25 • Managing Security Contexts, page 5-25 • Monitoring Security Contexts, page 5-28 Information About Security Contexts You can partition a single ASA into multiple virtual devices, known as security contexts. Each context is an independent device, with its own security policy, interfaces, and administrators. Multiple contexts are similar to having multiple standalone devices. Many features are supported in multiple context mode, including routing tables, firewall features, IPS, and management. Some features are not supported, including VPN and dynamic routing protocols. Note When the ASA is configured for security contexts (also called firewall multmode) or Active/Active stateful failover, IPSec or SSL VPN cannot be enabled. Therefore, these features are unavailable. This section provides an overview of security contexts, and includes the following topics: • Common Uses for Security Contexts, page 5-2 • Unsupported Features, page 5-2 • Context Configuration Files, page 5-2 • How the Security Appliance Classifies Packets, page 5-3 • Cascading Security Contexts, page 5-8 • Management Access to Security Contexts, page 5-95-2 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 5 Managing Multiple Context Mode Information About Security Contexts Common Uses for Security Contexts You might want to use multiple security contexts in the following situations: • You are a service provider and want to sell security services to many customers. By enabling multiple security contexts on the ASA, you can implement a cost-effective, space-saving solution that keeps all customer traffic separate and secure, and also eases configuration. • You are a large enterprise or a college campus and want to keep departments completely separate. • You are an enterprise that wants to provide distinct security policies to different departments. • You have any network that requires more than one ASA. Unsupported Features Multiple context mode does not support the following features: • Dynamic routing protocols Security contexts support only static routes. You cannot enable OSPF, RIP, or EIGRP in multiple context mode. • VPN • Multicast routing. Multicast bridging is supported. • Threat Detection • Phone Proxy • QoS Context Configuration Files This section describes how the ASA implements multiple context mode configurations and includes the following sections: • Context Configurations, page 5-2 • System Configuration, page 5-2 • Admin Context Configuration, page 5-3 Context Configurations The ASA includes a configuration for each context that identifies the security policy, interfaces, and almost all the options you can configure on a standalone device. You can store context configurations on the internal Flash memory or the external Flash memory card, or you can download them from a TFTP, FTP, or HTTP(S) server. System Configuration The system administrator adds and manages contexts by configuring each context configuration location, allocated interfaces, and other context operating parameters in the system configuration, which, like a single mode configuration, is the startup configuration. The system configuration identifies basic 5-3 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 5 Managing Multiple Context Mode Information About Security Contexts settings for the ASA. The system configuration does not include any network interfaces or network settings for itself; rather, when the system needs to access network resources (such as downloading the contexts from the server), it uses one of the contexts that is designated as the admin context. The system configuration does include a specialized failover interface for failover traffic only. Admin Context Configuration The admin context is just like any other context, except that when a user logs in to the admin context, then that user has system administrator rights and can access the system and all other contexts. The admin context is not restricted in any way, and can be used as a regular context. However, because logging into the admin context grants you administrator privileges over all contexts, you might need to restrict access to the admin context to appropriate users. The admin context must reside on Flash memory, and not remotely. If your system is already in multiple context mode, or if you convert from single mode, the admin context is created automatically as a file on the internal Flash memory called admin.cfg. This context is named “admin.” If you do not want to use admin.cfg as the admin context, you can change the admin context. How the Security Appliance Classifies Packets Each packet that enters the ASA must be classified, so that the ASA can determine to which context to send a packet. This section includes the following topics: • Valid Classifier Criteria, page 5-3 • Invalid Classifier Criteria, page 5-4 • Classification Examples, page 5-5 Note If the destination MAC address is a multicast or broadcast MAC address, the packet is duplicated and delivered to each context. Valid Classifier Criteria This section describes the criteria used by the classifier, and includes the following topics: • Unique Interfaces, page 5-3 • Unique MAC Addresses, page 5-3 • NAT Configuration, page 5-4 Unique Interfaces If only one context is associated with the ingress interface, the ASA classifies the packet into that context. In transparent firewall mode, unique interfaces for contexts are required, so this method is used to classify packets at all times. Unique MAC Addresses If multiple contexts share an interface, then the classifier uses the interface MAC address. The ASA lets you assign a different MAC address in each context to the same shared interface, whether it is a shared physical interface or a shared subinterface. By default, shared interfaces do not have unique MAC addresses; the interface uses the physical interface burned-in MAC address in every context. An 5-4 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 5 Managing Multiple Context Mode Information About Security Contexts upstream router cannot route directly to a context without unique MAC addresses. You can set the MAC addresses manually when you configure each interface (see the “Configuring the MAC Address” section on page 6-26), or you can automatically generate MAC addresses (see the “Automatically Assigning MAC Addresses to Context Interfaces” section on page 5-20). NAT Configuration If you do not have unique MAC addresses, then the classifier intercepts the packet and performs a destination IP address lookup. All other fields are ignored; only the destination IP address is used. To use the destination address for classification, the classifier must have knowledge about the subnets located behind each security context. The classifier relies on the NAT configuration to determine the subnets in each context. The classifier matches the destination IP address to either a static command or a global command. In the case of the global command, the classifier does not need a matching nat command or an active NAT session to classify the packet. Whether the packet can communicate with the destination IP address after classification depends on how you configure NAT and NAT control. For example, the classifier gains knowledge about subnets 10.10.10.0, 10.20.10.0 and 10.30.10.0 when the context administrators configure static commands in each context: • Context A: static (inside,shared) 10.10.10.0 10.10.10.0 netmask 255.255.255.0 • Context B: static (inside,shared) 10.20.10.0 10.20.10.0 netmask 255.255.255.0 • Context C: static (inside,shared) 10.30.10.0 10.30.10.0 netmask 255.255.255.0 Note For management traffic destined for an interface, the interface IP address is used for classification. Invalid Classifier Criteria The following configurations are not used for packet classification: • NAT exemption—The classifier does not use a NAT exemption configuration for classification purposes because NAT exemption does not identify a mapped interface. • Routing table—If a context includes a static route that points to an external router as the next-hop to a subnet, and a different context includes a static command for the same subnet, then the classifier uses the static command to classify packets destined for that subnet and ignores the static route.5-5 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 5 Managing Multiple Context Mode Information About Security Contexts Classification Examples Figure 5-1 shows multiple contexts sharing an outside interface. The classifier assigns the packet to Context B because Context B includes the MAC address to which the router sends the packet. Figure 5-1 Packet Classification with a Shared Interface using MAC Addresses Classifier Context A Context B MAC 000C.F142.4CDA MAC 000C.F142.4CDB MAC 000C.F142.4CDC GE 0/1.2 GE 0/1.3 GE 0/0.1 (Shared Interface) Admin Context GE 0/1.1 Host 209.165.201.1 Host 209.165.200.225 Host 209.165.202.129 Packet Destination: 209.165.201.1 via MAC 000C.F142.4CDC Internet Inside Customer A Inside Customer B Admin Network 1533675-6 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 5 Managing Multiple Context Mode Information About Security Contexts Figure 5-2 shows multiple contexts sharing an outside interface without MAC addresses assigned. The classifier assigns the packet to Context B because Context B includes the address translation that matches the destination address. Figure 5-2 Packet Classification with a Shared Interface using NAT Note that all new incoming traffic must be classified, even from inside networks. Figure 5-3 shows a host on the Context B inside network accessing the Internet. The classifier assigns the packet to Context B because the ingress interface is Gigabit Ethernet 0/1.3, which is assigned to Context B. Note If you share an inside interface and do not use unique MAC addresses, the classifier imposes some major restrictions. The classifier relies on the address translation configuration to classify the packet within a context, and you must translate the destination addresses of the traffic. Because you do not usually perform NAT on outside addresses, sending packets from inside to outside on a shared interface is not always possible; the outside network is large, (the Web, for example), and addresses are not predictable for an outside NAT configuration. If you share an inside interface, we suggest you use unique MAC addresses. Classifier Context A Context B GE 0/1.2 GE 0/1.3 GE 0/0.1 (Shared Interface) Admin Context GE 0/1.1 Host 10.1.1.13 Host 10.1.1.13 Host 10.1.1.13 Dest Addr Translation 209.165.201.3 Packet Destination: 209.165.201.3 10.1.1.13 Internet Inside Customer A Inside Customer B Admin Network 923995-7 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 5 Managing Multiple Context Mode Information About Security Contexts Figure 5-3 Incoming Traffic from Inside Networks Host 10.1.1.13 Host 10.1.1.13 Host 10.1.1.13 Classifier Context A Context B GE 0/1.2 GE 0/1.3 GE 0/0.1 Admin Context GE 0/1.1 Inside Customer A Inside Customer B Internet Admin Network 923955-8 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 5 Managing Multiple Context Mode Information About Security Contexts For transparent firewalls, you must use unique interfaces. Figure 5-4 shows a host on the Context B inside network accessing the Internet. The classifier assigns the packet to Context B because the ingress interface is Gigabit Ethernet 1/0.3, which is assigned to Context B. Figure 5-4 Transparent Firewall Contexts Cascading Security Contexts Placing a context directly in front of another context is called cascading contexts; the outside interface of one context is the same interface as the inside interface of another context. You might want to cascade contexts if you want to simplify the configuration of some contexts by configuring shared parameters in the top context. Note Cascading contexts requires that you configure unique MAC addresses for each context interface. Because of the limitations of classifying packets on shared interfaces without MAC addresses, we do not recommend using cascading contexts without unique MAC addresses. Host 10.1.3.13 Host 10.1.2.13 Host 10.1.1.13 Context A Context B GE 1/0.2 GE 1/0.3 Admin Context GE 1/0.1 GE 0/0.1 GE 0/0.3 GE 0/0.2 Classifier Inside Customer A Inside Customer B Internet Admin Network 924015-9 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 5 Managing Multiple Context Mode Information About Security Contexts Figure 5-5 shows a gateway context with two contexts behind the gateway. Figure 5-5 Cascading Contexts Management Access to Security Contexts The ASA provides system administrator access in multiple context mode as well as access for individual context administrators. The following sections describe logging in as a system administrator or as a a context administrator: • System Administrator Access, page 5-9 • Context Administrator Access, page 5-10 System Administrator Access You can access the ASA as a system administrator in two ways: • Access the ASA console. From the console, you access the system execution space, which means that any commands you enter affect only the system configuration or the running of the system (for run-time commands). • Access the admin context using Telnet, SSH, or ASDM. See Chapter 37, “Configuring Management Access,” to enable Telnet, SSH, and SDM access. As the system administrator, you can access all contexts. When you change to a context from admin or the system, your username changes to the default “enable_15” username. If you configured command authorization in that context, you need to either configure authorization privileges for the “enable_15” user, or you can log in as a different name for which you provide sufficient privileges in the command authorization configuration for the context. To Admin Context Context A Gateway Context GE 1/1.43 GE 0/0.2 Outside GE 1/1.8 GE 0/0.1 (Shared Interface) Internet Inside Inside Outside Inside Outside 1533665-10 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 5 Managing Multiple Context Mode Enabling or Disabling Multiple Context Mode log in with a username, enter the login command. For example, you log in to the admin context with the username “admin.” The admin context does not have any command authorization configuration, but all other contexts include command authorization. For convenience, each context configuration includes a user “admin” with maximum privileges. When you change from the admin context to context A, your username is altered, so you must log in again as “admin” by entering the login command. When you change to context B, you must again enter the login command to log in as “admin.” The system execution space does not support any AAA commands, but you can configure its own enable password, as well as usernames in the local database to provide individual logins. Context Administrator Access You can access a context using Telnet, SSH, or ASDM. If you log in to a non-admin context, you can only access the configuration for that context. You can provide individual logins to the context. See See Chapter 37, “Configuring Management Access,” to enable Telnet, SSH, and SDM access and to configure management authentication. Enabling or Disabling Multiple Context Mode Your ASA might already be configured for multiple security contexts depending on how you ordered it from Cisco. If you are upgrading, however, you might need to convert from single mode to multiple mode by following the procedures in this section. This section includes the following topics: • Backing Up the Single Mode Configuration, page 5-10 • Enabling Multiple Context Mode, page 5-10 • Restoring Single Context Mode, page 5-11 Backing Up the Single Mode Configuration When you convert from single mode to multiple mode, the ASA converts the running configuration into two files. The original startup configuration is not saved, so if it differs from the running configuration, you should back it up before proceeding. Enabling Multiple Context Mode The context mode (single or multiple) is not stored in the configuration file, even though it does endure reboots. If you need to copy your configuration to another device, set the mode on the new device to match using the mode command. When you convert from single mode to multiple mode, the ASA converts the running configuration into two files: a new startup configuration that comprises the system configuration, and admin.cfg that comprises the admin context (in the root directory of the internal Flash memory). The original running configuration is saved as old_running.cfg (in the root directory of the internal Flash memory). The original startup configuration is not saved. The ASA automatically adds an entry for the admin context to the system configuration with the name “admin.” To enable multiple mode, enter the following command: hostname(config)# mode multiple5-11 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 5 Managing Multiple Context Mode Configuring Resource Management You are prompted to reboot the ASA. Restoring Single Context Mode If you convert from multiple mode to single mode, you might want to first copy a full startup configuration (if available) to the ASA; the system configuration inherited from multiple mode is not a complete functioning configuration for a single mode device. Because the system configuration does not have any network interfaces as part of its configuration, you must access the ASA from the console to perform the copy. To copy the old running configuration to the startup configuration and to change the mode to single mode, perform the following steps in the system execution space: Step 1 To copy the backup version of your original running configuration to the current startup configuration, enter the following command in the system execution space: hostname(config)# copy flash:old_running.cfg startup-config Step 2 To set the mode to single mode, enter the following command in the system execution space: hostname(config)# mode single The ASA reboots. Configuring Resource Management By default, all security contexts have unlimited access to the resources of the ASA, except where maximum limits per context are enforced. However, if you find that one or more contexts use too many resources, and they cause other contexts to be denied connections, for example, then you can configure resource management to limit the use of resources per context. This section includes the following topics: • Classes and Class Members Overview, page 5-11 • Configuring a Class, page 5-14 Classes and Class Members Overview The ASA manages resources by assigning contexts to resource classes. Each context uses the resource limits set by the class. This section includes the following topics: • Resource Limits, page 5-12 • Default Class, page 5-13 • Class Members, page 5-145-12 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 5 Managing Multiple Context Mode Configuring Resource Management Resource Limits When you create a class, the ASA does not set aside a portion of the resources for each context assigned to the class; rather, the ASA sets the maximum limit for a context. If you oversubscribe resources, or allow some resources to be unlimited, a few contexts can “use up” those resources, potentially affecting service to other contexts. You can set the limit for individual resources, as a percentage (if there is a hard system limit) or as an absolute value. You can oversubscribe the ASA by assigning more than 100 percent of a resource across all contexts. For example, you can set the Bronze class to limit connections to 20 percent per context, and then assign 10 contexts to the class for a total of 200 percent. If contexts concurrently use more than the system limit, then each context gets less than the 20 percent you intended. (See Figure 5-6.) Figure 5-6 Resource Oversubscription If you assign an absolute value to a resource across all contexts that exceeds the practical limit of the ASA, then the performance of the ASA might be impaired. The ASA lets you assign unlimited access to one or more resources in a class, instead of a percentage or absolute number. When a resource is unlimited, contexts can use as much of the resource as the system has available or that is practically available. For example, Context A, B, and C are in the Silver Class, which limits each class member to 1 percent of the connections, for a total of 3 percent; but the three contexts are currently only using 2 percent combined. Gold Class has unlimited access to connections. The contexts in the Gold Class can use more than the 97 percent of “unassigned” connections; they can also use the 1 percent of connections not currently in use by Context A, B, and C, even if that means that Context A, B, and C are unable to reach their 3 percent combined limit. (See Figure 5-7.) Setting unlimited access is similar to oversubscribing the ASA, except that you have less control over how much you oversubscribe the system. Total Number of System Connections = 999,900 Maximum connections allowed. Connections denied because system limit was reached. Connections in use. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Max. 20% (199,800) 16% (159,984) 12% (119,988) 8% (79,992) 4% (39,996) Contexts in Class 1048955-13 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 5 Managing Multiple Context Mode Configuring Resource Management Figure 5-7 Unlimited Resources Default Class All contexts belong to the default class if they are not assigned to another class; you do not have to actively assign a context to the default class. If a context belongs to a class other than the default class, those class settings always override the default class settings. However, if the other class has any settings that are not defined, then the member context uses the default class for those limits. For example, if you create a class with a 2 percent limit for all concurrent connections, but no other limits, then all other limits are inherited from the default class. Conversely, if you create a class with a limit for all resources, the class uses no settings from the default class. By default, the default class provides unlimited access to resources for all contexts, except for the following limits, which are by default set to the maximum allowed per context: • Telnet sessions—5 sessions. • SSH sessions—5 sessions. • IPSec sessions—5 sessions. • MAC addresses—65,535 entries. Maximum connections allowed. Connections denied because system limit was reached. Connections in use. A B C 1 2 3 1% 2% 3% 5% 4% Contexts Silver Class Contexts Gold Class 50% 43% 1532115-14 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 5 Managing Multiple Context Mode Configuring Resource Management Figure 5-8 shows the relationship between the default class and other classes. Contexts A and C belong to classes with some limits set; other limits are inherited from the default class. Context B inherits no limits from default because all limits are set in its class, the Gold class. Context D was not assigned to a class, and is by default a member of the default class. Figure 5-8 Resource Classes Class Members To use the settings of a class, assign the context to the class when you define the context. All contexts belong to the default class if they are not assigned to another class; you do not have to actively assign a context to default. You can only assign a context to one resource class. The exception to this rule is that limits that are undefined in the member class are inherited from the default class; so in effect, a context could be a member of default plus another class. Configuring a Class To configure a class in the system configuration, perform the following steps. You can change the value of a particular resource limit by reentering the command with a new value. Guidelines Table 5-1 lists the resource types and the limits. See also the show resource types command. Default Class Class Gold (All Limits Set) Class Silver (Some Limits Set) Class Bronze (Some Limits Set) Context A Context B Context C Context D 1046895-15 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 5 Managing Multiple Context Mode Configuring Resource Management Detailed Steps Step 1 To specify the class name and enter the class configuration mode, enter the following command in the system execution space: hostname(config)# class name The name is a string up to 20 characters long. To set the limits for the default class, enter default for the name. Step 2 To set the resource limits, see the following options: • To set all resource limits (shown in Table 5-1) to be unlimited, enter the following command: Table 5-1 Resource Names and Limits Resource Name Rate or Concurrent Minimum and Maximum Number per Context System Limit 1 1. If this column value is N/A, then you cannot set a percentage of the resource because there is no hard system limit for the resource. Description mac-addresses Concurrent N/A 65,535 For transparent firewall mode, the number of MAC addresses allowed in the MAC address table. conns Concurrent or Rate N/A Concurrent connections: See the “Supported Feature Licenses Per Model” section on page 3-1 for the connection limit for your platform. Rate: N/A TCP or UDP connections between any two hosts, including connections between one host and multiple other hosts. inspects Rate N/A N/A Application inspections. hosts Concurrent N/A N/A Hosts that can connect through the ASA. asdm Concurrent 1 minimum 5 maximum 32 ASDM management sessions. Note ASDM sessions use two HTTPS connections: one for monitoring that is always present, and one for making configuration changes that is present only when you make changes. For example, the system limit of 32 ASDM sessions represents a limit of 64 HTTPS sessions. ssh Concurrent 1 minimum 5 maximum 100 SSH sessions. syslogs Rate N/A N/A System log messages. telnet Concurrent 1 minimum 5 maximum 100 Telnet sessions. xlates Concurrent N/A N/A Address translations.5-16 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 5 Managing Multiple Context Mode Configuring a Security Context hostname(config-resmgmt)# limit-resource all 0 For example, you might want to create a class that includes the admin context that has no limitations. The default class has all resources set to unlimited by default. • To set a particular resource limit, enter the following command: hostname(config-resmgmt)# limit-resource [rate] resource_name number[%] For this particular resource, the limit overrides the limit set for all. Enter the rate argument to set the rate per second for certain resources. For resources that do not have a system limit, you cannot set the percentage (%) between 1 and 100; you can only set an absolute value. See Table 5-1 for resources for which you can set the rate per second and which to not have a system limit. Examples For example, to set the default class limit for conns to 10 percent instead of unlimited, enter the following commands: hostname(config)# class default hostname(config-class)# limit-resource conns 10% All other resources remain at unlimited. To add a class called gold, enter the following commands: hostname(config)# class gold hostname(config-class)# limit-resource mac-addresses 10000 hostname(config-class)# limit-resource conns 15% hostname(config-class)# limit-resource rate conns 1000 hostname(config-class)# limit-resource rate inspects 500 hostname(config-class)# limit-resource hosts 9000 hostname(config-class)# limit-resource asdm 5 hostname(config-class)# limit-resource ssh 5 hostname(config-class)# limit-resource rate syslogs 5000 hostname(config-class)# limit-resource telnet 5 hostname(config-class)# limit-resource xlates 36000 Configuring a Security Context The security context definition in the system configuration identifies the context name, configuration file URL, and interfaces that a context can use. Prerequisites • Configure physical interface parameters, VLAN subinterfaces, and redundant interfaces according to the “Starting Interface Configuration (ASA 5510 and Higher)” section on page 6-8. • If you do not have an admin context (for example, if you clear the configuration) then you must first specify the admin context name by entering the following command: hostname(config)# admin-context name Although this context name does not exist yet in your configuration, you can subsequently enter the context name command to match the specified name to continue the admin context configuration.5-17 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 5 Managing Multiple Context Mode Configuring a Security Context Detailed Steps Step 1 To add or modify a context, enter the following command in the system execution space: hostname(config)# context name The name is a string up to 32 characters long. This name is case sensitive, so you can have two contexts named “customerA” and “CustomerA,” for example. You can use letters, digits, or hyphens, but you cannot start or end the name with a hyphen. “System” or “Null” (in upper or lower case letters) are reserved names, and cannot be used. Step 2 (Optional) To add a description for this context, enter the following command: hostname(config-ctx)# description text Step 3 To specify the interfaces you can use in the context, enter the command appropriate for a physical interface or for one or more subinterfaces. • To allocate a physical interface, enter the following command: hostname(config-ctx)# allocate-interface physical_interface [mapped_name] [visible | invisible] • To allocate one or more subinterfaces, enter the following command: hostname(config-ctx)# allocate-interface physical_interface.subinterface[-physical_interface.subinterface] [mapped_name[-mapped_name]] [visible | invisible] Note Do not include a space between the interface type and the port number. You can enter these commands multiple times to specify different ranges. If you remove an allocation with the no form of this command, then any context commands that include this interface are removed from the running configuration. Transparent firewall mode allows only two interfaces to pass through traffic; however, on the ASA adaptive security appliance, you can use the dedicated management interface, Management 0/0, (either the physical interface or a subinterface) as a third interface for management traffic. Note The management interface for transparent mode does not flood a packet out the interface when that packet is not in the MAC address table. You can assign the same interfaces to multiple contexts in routed mode, if desired. Transparent mode does not allow shared interfaces. The mapped_name is an alphanumeric alias for the interface that can be used within the context instead of the interface ID. If you do not specify a mapped name, the interface ID is used within the context. For security purposes, you might not want the context administrator to know which interfaces are being used by the context. A mapped name must start with a letter, end with a letter or digit, and have as interior characters only letters, digits, or an underscore. For example, you can use the following names: int0 inta int_05-18 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 5 Managing Multiple Context Mode Configuring a Security Context For subinterfaces, you can specify a range of mapped names. If you specify a range of subinterfaces, you can specify a matching range of mapped names. Follow these guidelines for ranges: • The mapped name must consist of an alphabetic portion followed by a numeric portion. The alphabetic portion of the mapped name must match for both ends of the range. For example, enter the following range: int0-int10 If you enter gigabitethernet0/1.1-gigabitethernet0/1.5 happy1-sad5, for example, the command fails. • The numeric portion of the mapped name must include the same quantity of numbers as the subinterface range. For example, both ranges include 100 interfaces: gigabitethernet0/0.100-gigabitethernet0/0.199 int1-int100 If you enter gigabitethernet0/0.100-gigabitethernet0/0.199 int1-int15, for example, the command fails. Specify visible to see physical interface properties in the show interface command even if you set a mapped name. The default invisible keyword specifies to only show the mapped name. The following example shows gigabitethernet0/1.100, gigabitethernet0/1.200, and gigabitethernet0/2.300 through gigabitethernet0/1.305 assigned to the context. The mapped names are int1 through int8. hostname(config-ctx)# allocate-interface gigabitethernet0/1.100 int1 hostname(config-ctx)# allocate-interface gigabitethernet0/1.200 int2 hostname(config-ctx)# allocate-interface gigabitethernet0/2.300-gigabitethernet0/2.305 int3-int8 Step 4 To identify the URL from which the system downloads the context configuration, enter the following command: hostname(config-ctx)# config-url url When you add a context URL, the system immediately loads the context so that it is running, if the configuration is available. Note Enter the allocate-interface command(s) before you enter the config-url command. The ASA must assign interfaces to the context before it loads the context configuration; the context configuration might include commands that refer to interfaces (interface, nat, global...). If you enter the config-url command first, the ASA loads the context configuration immediately. If the context contains any commands that refer to interfaces, those commands fail. See the following URL syntax: • disk:/[path/]filename This URL indicates the internal Flash memory. The filename does not require a file extension, although we recommend using “.cfg”. If the configuration file is not available, you see the following message: WARNING: Could not fetch the URL disk:/url INFO: Creating context with default config5-19 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 5 Managing Multiple Context Mode Configuring a Security Context You can then change to the context, configure it at the CLI, and enter the write memory command to write the file to Flash memory. Note The admin context file must be stored on the internal Flash memory. • ftp://[user[:password]@]server[:port]/[path/]filename[;type=xx] The type can be one of the following keywords: – ap—ASCII passive mode – an—ASCII normal mode – ip—(Default) Binary passive mode – in—Binary normal mode The server must be accessible from the admin context. The filename does not require a file extension, although we recommend using “.cfg”. If the configuration file is not available, you see the following message: WARNING: Could not fetch the URL ftp://url INFO: Creating context with default config You can then change to the context, configure it at the CLI, and enter the write memory command to write the file to the FTP server. • http[s]://[user[:password]@]server[:port]/[path/]filename The server must be accessible from the admin context. The filename does not require a file extension, although we recommend using “.cfg”. If the configuration file is not available, you see the following message: WARNING: Could not fetch the URL http://url INFO: Creating context with default config If you change to the context and configure the context at the CLI, you cannot save changes back to HTTP or HTTPS servers using the write memory command. You can, however, use the copy tftp command to copy the running configuration to a TFTP server. • tftp://[user[:password]@]server[:port]/[path/]filename[;int=interface_name] The server must be accessible from the admin context. Specify the interface name if you want to override the route to the server address. The filename does not require a file extension, although we recommend using “.cfg”. If the configuration file is not available, you see the following message: WARNING: Could not fetch the URL tftp://url INFO: Creating context with default config You can then change to the context, configure it at the CLI, and enter the write memory command to write the file to the TFTP server. To change the URL, reenter the config-url command with a new URL. See the “Changing the Security Context URL” section on page 5-26 for more information about changing the URL. For example, enter the following command: hostname(config-ctx)# config-url ftp://joe:passw0rd1@10.1.1.1/configlets/test.cfg Step 5 (Optional) To assign the context to a resource class, enter the following command: hostname(config-ctx)# member class_name5-20 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 5 Managing Multiple Context Mode Automatically Assigning MAC Addresses to Context Interfaces If you do not specify a class, the context belongs to the default class. You can only assign a context to one resource class. For example, to assign the context to the gold class, enter the following command: hostname(config-ctx)# member gold Step 6 (Optional) To assign an IPS virtual sensor to this context if you have the AIP SSM installed, use the allocate-ips command. See the “Assigning Virtual Sensors to a Security Context (ASA 5510 and Higher)” section on page 59-6 for detailed information about virtual sensors Examples The following example sets the admin context to be “administrator,” creates a context called “administrator” on the internal Flash memory, and then adds two contexts from an FTP server: hostname(config)# admin-context administrator hostname(config)# context administrator hostname(config-ctx)# allocate-interface gigabitethernet0/0.1 hostname(config-ctx)# allocate-interface gigabitethernet0/1.1 hostname(config-ctx)# config-url flash:/admin.cfg hostname(config-ctx)# context test hostname(config-ctx)# allocate-interface gigabitethernet0/0.100 int1 hostname(config-ctx)# allocate-interface gigabitethernet0/0.102 int2 hostname(config-ctx)# allocate-interface gigabitethernet0/0.110-gigabitethernet0/0.115 int3-int8 hostname(config-ctx)# config-url ftp://user1:passw0rd@10.1.1.1/configlets/test.cfg hostname(config-ctx)# member gold hostname(config-ctx)# context sample hostname(config-ctx)# allocate-interface gigabitethernet0/1.200 int1 hostname(config-ctx)# allocate-interface gigabitethernet0/1.212 int2 hostname(config-ctx)# allocate-interface gigabitethernet0/1.230-gigabitethernet0/1.235 int3-int8 hostname(config-ctx)# config-url ftp://user1:passw0rd@10.1.1.1/configlets/sample.cfg hostname(config-ctx)# member silver Automatically Assigning MAC Addresses to Context Interfaces This section tells how to configure auto-generation of MAC addresses, and includes the following sections: • Information About MAC Addresses, page 5-21 • Default MAC Address, page 5-21 • Failover MAC Addresses, page 5-21 • MAC Address Format, page 5-21 • Enabling Auto-Generation of MAC Addresses, page 5-22 • Viewing Assigned MAC Addresses, page 5-225-21 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 5 Managing Multiple Context Mode Automatically Assigning MAC Addresses to Context Interfaces Information About MAC Addresses To allow contexts to share interfaces, we suggest that you assign unique MAC addresses to each shared context interface. The MAC address is used to classify packets within a context. If you share an interface, but do not have unique MAC addresses for the interface in each context, then the destination IP address is used to classify packets. The destination address is matched with the context NAT configuration, and this method has some limitations compared to the MAC address method. See the “How the Security Appliance Classifies Packets” section on page 5-3 for information about classifying packets. In the rare circumstance that the generated MAC address conflicts with another private MAC address in your network, you can manually set the MAC address for the interface within the context. See the “Configuring the MAC Address” section on page 6-26 to manually set the MAC address. Default MAC Address By default, the physical interface uses the burned-in MAC address, and all subinterfaces of a physical interface use the same burned-in MAC address. All auto-generated MAC addresses start with A2. The auto-generated MAC addresses are persistent across reloads. Interaction with Manual MAC Addresses If you manually assign a MAC address and also enable auto-generation, then the manually assigned MAC address is used. If you later remove the manual MAC address, the auto-generated address is used. Because auto-generated addresses start with A2, you cannot start manual MAC addresses with A2 if you also want to use auto-generation. Failover MAC Addresses For use with failover, the ASA generates both an active and standby MAC address for each interface. If the active unit fails over and the standby unit becomes active, the new active unit starts using the active MAC addresses to minimize network disruption. See the “MAC Address Format” section for more information. For upgrading failover units with the legacy version of the mac-address auto command before the prefix keyword was introduced, see the mac-address auto command in the Cisco ASA 5500 Series Command Reference. MAC Address Format The ASA generates the MAC address using the following format: A2xx.yyzz.zzzz Where xx.yy is a user-defined prefix, and zz.zzzz is an internal counter generated by the ASA. For the standby MAC address, the address is identical except that the internal counter is increased by 1. For an example of how the prefix is used, if you set a prefix of 77, then the ASA converts 77 into the hexadecimal value 004D (yyxx). When used in the MAC address, the prefix is reversed (xxyy) to match the ASA native form:5-22 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 5 Managing Multiple Context Mode Automatically Assigning MAC Addresses to Context Interfaces A24D.00zz.zzzz For a prefix of 1009 (03F1), the MAC address is: A2F1.03zz.zzzz Enabling Auto-Generation of MAC Addresses You can automatically assign private MAC addresses to each context interface. Guidelines When you configure a nameif command for the interface in a context, the new MAC address is generated immediately. If you enable this command after you configure context interfaces, then MAC addresses are generated for all interfaces immediately after you enter the command. If you use the no mac-address auto command, the MAC address for each interface reverts to the default MAC address. For example, subinterfaces of GigabitEthernet 0/1 revert to using the MAC address of GigabitEthernet 0/1. Note For the MAC address generation method when not using a prefix (not recommended), see the mac-address auto command in the Cisco ASA 5500 Series Command Reference. Detailed Steps Viewing Assigned MAC Addresses You can view auto-generated MAC addresses within the system configuration or within the context. This section includes the following topics: • Viewing MAC Addresses in the System Configuration, page 5-22 • Viewing MAC Addresses Within a Context, page 5-24 Viewing MAC Addresses in the System Configuration This section describes how to view MAC addresses in the system configuration. Command Purpose mac-address auto prefix prefix Example: hostname(config)# mac-address auto prefix 19 Automatically assign private MAC addresses to each context interface. The prefix is a decimal value between 0 and 65535. This prefix is converted to a 4-digit hexadecimal number, and used as part of the MAC address. The prefix ensures that each ASA uses unique MAC addresses, so you can have multiple ASAs on a network segment, for example. See the “MAC Address Format” section for more information about how the prefix is used.5-23 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 5 Managing Multiple Context Mode Automatically Assigning MAC Addresses to Context Interfaces Guidelines If you manually assign a MAC address to an interface, but also have auto-generation enabled, the auto-generated address continues to show in the configuration even though the manual MAC address is the one that is in use. If you later remove the manual MAC address, the auto-generated one shown will be used. Detailed Steps Examples The following output from the show running-config all context admin command shows the primary and standby MAC address assigned to the Management0/0 interface: hostname# show running-config all context admin context admin allocate-interface Management0/0 mac-address auto Management0/0 a24d.0000.1440 a24d.0000.1441 config-url disk0:/admin.cfg The following output from the show running-config all context command shows all the MAC addresses (primary and standby) for all context interfaces. Note that because the GigabitEthernet0/0 and GigabitEthernet0/1 main interfaces are not configured with a nameif command inside the contexts, no MAC addresses have been generated for them. hostname# show running-config all context admin-context admin context admin allocate-interface Management0/0 mac-address auto Management0/0 a2d2.0400.125a a2d2.0400.125b config-url disk0:/admin.cfg ! context CTX1 allocate-interface GigabitEthernet0/0 allocate-interface GigabitEthernet0/0.1-GigabitEthernet0/0.5 mac-address auto GigabitEthernet0/0.1 a2d2.0400.11bc a2d2.0400.11bd mac-address auto GigabitEthernet0/0.2 a2d2.0400.11c0 a2d2.0400.11c1 mac-address auto GigabitEthernet0/0.3 a2d2.0400.11c4 a2d2.0400.11c5 mac-address auto GigabitEthernet0/0.4 a2d2.0400.11c8 a2d2.0400.11c9 mac-address auto GigabitEthernet0/0.5 a2d2.0400.11cc a2d2.0400.11cd allocate-interface GigabitEthernet0/1 allocate-interface GigabitEthernet0/1.1-GigabitEthernet0/1.3 mac-address auto GigabitEthernet0/1.1 a2d2.0400.120c a2d2.0400.120d mac-address auto GigabitEthernet0/1.2 a2d2.0400.1210 a2d2.0400.1211 Command Purpose show running-config all context [name] Shows the assigned MAC addresses from the system execution space. The all option is required to view the assigned MAC addresses. Although this command is user-configurable in global configuration mode only, the mac-address auto command appears as a read-only entry in the configuration for each context along with the assigned MAC address. Only allocated interfaces that are configured with a nameif command within the context have a MAC address assigned.5-24 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 5 Managing Multiple Context Mode Automatically Assigning MAC Addresses to Context Interfaces mac-address auto GigabitEthernet0/1.3 a2d2.0400.1214 a2d2.0400.1215 config-url disk0:/CTX1.cfg ! context CTX2 allocate-interface GigabitEthernet0/0 allocate-interface GigabitEthernet0/0.1-GigabitEthernet0/0.5 mac-address auto GigabitEthernet0/0.1 a2d2.0400.11ba a2d2.0400.11bb mac-address auto GigabitEthernet0/0.2 a2d2.0400.11be a2d2.0400.11bf mac-address auto GigabitEthernet0/0.3 a2d2.0400.11c2 a2d2.0400.11c3 mac-address auto GigabitEthernet0/0.4 a2d2.0400.11c6 a2d2.0400.11c7 mac-address auto GigabitEthernet0/0.5 a2d2.0400.11ca a2d2.0400.11cb allocate-interface GigabitEthernet0/1 allocate-interface GigabitEthernet0/1.1-GigabitEthernet0/1.3 mac-address auto GigabitEthernet0/1.1 a2d2.0400.120a a2d2.0400.120b mac-address auto GigabitEthernet0/1.2 a2d2.0400.120e a2d2.0400.120f mac-address auto GigabitEthernet0/1.3 a2d2.0400.1212 a2d2.0400.1213 config-url disk0:/CTX2.cfg ! Viewing MAC Addresses Within a Context This section describes how to view MAC addresses within a context. Detailed Steps Examples For example: hostname/context# show interface | include (Interface)|(MAC) Interface GigabitEthernet1/1.1 "g1/1.1", is down, line protocol is down MAC address a201.0101.0600, MTU 1500 Interface GigabitEthernet1/1.2 "g1/1.2", is down, line protocol is down MAC address a201.0102.0600, MTU 1500 Interface GigabitEthernet1/1.3 "g1/1.3", is down, line protocol is down MAC address a201.0103.0600, MTU 1500 ... Note The show interface command shows the MAC address in use; if you manually assign a MAC address and also have auto-generation enabled, then you can only view the unused auto-generated address from within the system configuration. Command Purpose show interface | include (Interface)|(MAC) Shows the MAC address in use by each interface within the context.5-25 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 5 Managing Multiple Context Mode Changing Between Contexts and the System Execution Space Changing Between Contexts and the System Execution Space If you log in to the system execution space (or the admin context using Telnet or SSH), you can change between contexts and perform configuration and monitoring tasks within each context. The running configuration that you edit in a configuration mode, or that is used in the copy or write commands, depends on your location. When you are in the system execution space, the running configuration consists only of the system configuration; when you are in a context, the running configuration consists only of that context. For example, you cannot view all running configurations (system plus all contexts) by entering the show running-config command. Only the current configuration displays. To change between the system execution space and a context, or between contexts, see the following commands: • To change to a context, enter the following command: hostname# changeto context name The prompt changes to the following: hostname/name# • To change to the system execution space, enter the following command: hostname/admin# changeto system The prompt changes to the following: hostname# Managing Security Contexts This section describes how to manage security contexts, and includes the following topics: • Removing a Security Context, page 5-25 • Changing the Admin Context, page 5-26 • Changing the Security Context URL, page 5-26 • Reloading a Security Context, page 5-27 Removing a Security Context You can only remove a context by editing the system configuration. You cannot remove the current admin context, unless you remove all contexts using the clear context command. Note If you use failover, there is a delay between when you remove the context on the active unit and when the context is removed on the standby unit. You might see an error message indicating that the number of interfaces on the active and standby units are not consistent; this error is temporary and can be ignored. Use the following commands for removing contexts: • To remove a single context, enter the following command in the system execution space: hostname(config)# no context name5-26 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 5 Managing Multiple Context Mode Managing Security Contexts All context commands are also removed. • To remove all contexts (including the admin context), enter the following command in the system execution space: hostname(config)# clear context Changing the Admin Context The system configuration does not include any network interfaces or network settings for itself; rather, when the system needs to access network resources (such as downloading the contexts from the server), it uses one of the contexts that is designated as the admin context. The admin context is just like any other context, except that when a user logs in to the admin context, then that user has system administrator rights and can access the system and all other contexts. The admin context is not restricted in any way, and can be used as a regular context. However, because logging into the admin context grants you administrator privileges over all contexts, you might need to restrict access to the admin context to appropriate users. You can set any context to be the admin context, as long as the configuration file is stored in the internal Flash memory. To set the admin context, enter the following command in the system execution space: hostname(config)# admin-context context_name Any remote management sessions, such as Telnet, SSH, or HTTPS, that are connected to the admin context are terminated. You must reconnect to the new admin context. Note A few system commands, including ntp server, identify an interface name that belongs to the admin context. If you change the admin context, and that interface name does not exist in the new admin context, be sure to update any system commands that refer to the interface. Changing the Security Context URL You cannot change the security context URL without reloading the configuration from the new URL. The ASA merges the new configuration with the current running configuration. Reentering the same URL also merges the saved configuration with the running configuration. A merge adds any new commands from the new configuration to the running configuration. If the configurations are the same, no changes occur. If commands conflict or if commands affect the running of the context, then the effect of the merge depends on the command. You might get errors, or you might have unexpected results. If the running configuration is blank (for example, if the server was unavailable and the configuration was never downloaded), then the new configuration is used. If you do not want to merge the configurations, you can clear the running configuration, which disrupts any communications through the context, and then reload the configuration from the new URL. To change the URL for a context, perform the following steps: Step 1 If you do not want to merge the configuration, change to the context and clear its configuration by entering the following commands. If you want to perform a merge, skip to Step 2. hostname# changeto context name hostname/name# configure terminal hostname/name(config)# clear configure all5-27 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 5 Managing Multiple Context Mode Managing Security Contexts Step 2 If required, change to the system execution space by entering the following command: hostname/name(config)# changeto system Step 3 To enter the context configuration mode for the context you want to change, enter the following command: hostname(config)# context name Step 4 To enter the new URL, enter the following command: hostname(config)# config-url new_url The system immediately loads the context so that it is running. Reloading a Security Context You can reload the context in two ways: • Clear the running configuration and then import the startup configuration. This action clears most attributes associated with the context, such as connections and NAT tables. • Remove the context from the system configuration. This action clears additional attributes, such as memory allocation, which might be useful for troubleshooting. However, to add the context back to the system requires you to respecify the URL and interfaces. This section includes the following topics: • Reloading by Clearing the Configuration, page 5-27 • Reloading by Removing and Re-adding the Context, page 5-28 Reloading by Clearing the Configuration To reload the context by clearing the context configuration, and reloading the configuration from the URL, perform the following steps: Step 1 To change to the context that you want to reload, enter the following command: hostname# changeto context name Step 2 To access configuration mode, enter the following command: hostname/name# configure terminal Step 3 To clear the running configuration, enter the following command: hostname/name(config)# clear configure all This command clears all connections. Step 4 To reload the configuration, enter the following command: hostname/name(config)# copy startup-config running-config5-28 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 5 Managing Multiple Context Mode Monitoring Security Contexts The ASA copies the configuration from the URL specified in the system configuration. You cannot change the URL from within a context. Reloading by Removing and Re-adding the Context To reload the context by removing the context and then re-adding it, perform the steps in the following sections: 1. “Automatically Assigning MAC Addresses to Context Interfaces” section on page 5-20 2. “Configuring a Security Context” section on page 5-16 Monitoring Security Contexts This section describes how to view and monitor context information, and includes the following topics: • Viewing Context Information, page 5-28 • Viewing Context Information, page 5-28 • Viewing Resource Allocation, page 5-29 • Viewing Resource Usage, page 5-32 • Monitoring SYN Attacks in Contexts, page 5-33 Viewing Context Information From the system execution space, you can view a list of contexts including the name, allocated interfaces, and configuration file URL. From the system execution space, view all contexts by entering the following command: hostname# show context [name | detail| count] The detail option shows additional information. See the following sample displays below for more information. If you want to show information for a particular context, specify the name. The count option shows the total number of contexts. The following is sample output from the show context command. The following sample display shows three contexts: hostname# show context Context Name Interfaces URL *admin GigabitEthernet0/1.100 disk0:/admin.cfg GigabitEthernet0/1.101 contexta GigabitEthernet0/1.200 disk0:/contexta.cfg GigabitEthernet0/1.201 contextb GigabitEthernet0/1.300 disk0:/contextb.cfg GigabitEthernet0/1.301 Total active Security Contexts: 3 Table 5-2 shows each field description.5-29 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 5 Managing Multiple Context Mode Monitoring Security Contexts The following is sample output from the show context detail command: hostname# show context detail Context "admin", has been created, but initial ACL rules not complete Config URL: disk0:/admin.cfg Real Interfaces: Management0/0 Mapped Interfaces: Management0/0 Flags: 0x00000013, ID: 1 Context "ctx", has been created, but initial ACL rules not complete Config URL: ctx.cfg Real Interfaces: GigabitEthernet0/0.10, GigabitEthernet0/1.20, GigabitEthernet0/2.30 Mapped Interfaces: int1, int2, int3 Flags: 0x00000011, ID: 2 Context "system", is a system resource Config URL: startup-config Real Interfaces: Mapped Interfaces: Control0/0, GigabitEthernet0/0, GigabitEthernet0/0.10, GigabitEthernet0/1, GigabitEthernet0/1.10, GigabitEthernet0/1.20, GigabitEthernet0/2, GigabitEthernet0/2.30, GigabitEthernet0/3, Management0/0, Management0/0.1 Flags: 0x00000019, ID: 257 Context "null", is a system resource Config URL: ... null ... Real Interfaces: Mapped Interfaces: Flags: 0x00000009, ID: 258 See the Cisco ASA 5500 Series Command Reference for more information about the detail output. The following is sample output from the show context count command: hostname# show context count Total active contexts: 2 Viewing Resource Allocation From the system execution space, you can view the allocation for each resource across all classes and class members. To view the resource allocation, enter the following command: hostname# show resource allocation [detail] This command shows the resource allocation, but does not show the actual resources being used. See the “Viewing Resource Usage” section on page 5-32 for more information about actual resource usage. Table 5-2 show context Fields Field Description Context Name Lists all context names. The context name with the asterisk (*) is the admin context. Interfaces The interfaces assigned to the context. URL The URL from which the ASA loads the context configuration.5-30 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 5 Managing Multiple Context Mode Monitoring Security Contexts The detail argument shows additional information. See the following sample displays for more information. The following sample display shows the total allocation of each resource as an absolute value and as a percentage of the available system resources: hostname# show resource allocation Resource Total % of Avail Conns [rate] 35000 N/A Inspects [rate] 35000 N/A Syslogs [rate] 10500 N/A Conns 305000 30.50% Hosts 78842 N/A SSH 35 35.00% Telnet 35 35.00% Xlates 91749 N/A All unlimited Table 5-3 shows each field description. The following is sample output from the show resource allocation detail command: hostname# show resource allocation detail Resource Origin: A Value was derived from the resource 'all' C Value set in the definition of this class D Value set in default class Resource Class Mmbrs Origin Limit Total Total % Conns [rate] default all CA unlimited gold 1 C 34000 34000 N/A silver 1 CA 17000 17000 N/A bronze 0 CA 8500 All Contexts: 3 51000 N/A Inspects [rate] default all CA unlimited gold 1 DA unlimited silver 1 CA 10000 10000 N/A bronze 0 CA 5000 All Contexts: 3 10000 N/A Syslogs [rate] default all CA unlimited gold 1 C 6000 6000 N/A silver 1 CA 3000 3000 N/A bronze 0 CA 1500 All Contexts: 3 9000 N/A Conns default all CA unlimited Table 5-3 show resource allocation Fields Field Description Resource The name of the resource that you can limit. Total The total amount of the resource that is allocated across all contexts. The amount is an absolute number of concurrent instances or instances per second. If you specified a percentage in the class definition, the ASA converts the percentage to an absolute number for this display. % of Avail The percentage of the total system resources that is allocated across all contexts, if the resource has a hard system limit. If a resource does not have a system limit, this column shows N/A.5-31 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 5 Managing Multiple Context Mode Monitoring Security Contexts gold 1 C 200000 200000 20.00% silver 1 CA 100000 100000 10.00% bronze 0 CA 50000 All Contexts: 3 300000 30.00% Hosts default all CA unlimited gold 1 DA unlimited silver 1 CA 26214 26214 N/A bronze 0 CA 13107 All Contexts: 3 26214 N/A SSH default all C 5 gold 1 D 5 5 5.00% silver 1 CA 10 10 10.00% bronze 0 CA 5 All Contexts: 3 20 20.00% Telnet default all C 5 gold 1 D 5 5 5.00% silver 1 CA 10 10 10.00% bronze 0 CA 5 All Contexts: 3 20 20.00% Xlates default all CA unlimited gold 1 DA unlimited silver 1 CA 23040 23040 N/A bronze 0 CA 11520 All Contexts: 3 23040 N/A mac-addresses default all C 65535 gold 1 D 65535 65535 100.00% silver 1 CA 6553 6553 9.99% bronze 0 CA 3276 All Contexts: 3 137623 209.99% Table 5-4 shows each field description. Table 5-4 show resource allocation detail Fields Field Description Resource The name of the resource that you can limit. Class The name of each class, including the default class. The All contexts field shows the total values across all classes. Mmbrs The number of contexts assigned to each class. Origin The origin of the resource limit, as follows: • A—You set this limit with the all option, instead of as an individual resource. • C—This limit is derived from the member class. • D—This limit was not defined in the member class, but was derived from the default class. For a context assigned to the default class, the value will be “C” instead of “D.” The ASA can combine “A” with “C” or “D.” Limit The limit of the resource per context, as an absolute number. If you specified a percentage in the class definition, the ASA converts the percentage to an absolute number for this display.5-32 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 5 Managing Multiple Context Mode Monitoring Security Contexts Viewing Resource Usage From the system execution space, you can view the resource usage for each context and display the system resource usage. From the system execution space, view the resource usage for each context by entering the following command: hostname# show resource usage [context context_name | top n | all | summary | system] [resource {resource_name | all} | detail] [counter counter_name [count_threshold]] By default, all context usage is displayed; each context is listed separately. Enter the top n keyword to show the contexts that are the top n users of the specified resource. You must specify a single resource type, and not resource all, with this option. The summary option shows all context usage combined. The system option shows all context usage combined, but shows the system limits for resources instead of the combined context limits. For the resource resource_name, see Table 5-1 for available resource names. See also the show resource type command. Specify all (the default) for all types. The detail option shows the resource usage of all resources, including those you cannot manage. For example, you can view the number of TCP intercepts. The counter counter_name is one of the following keywords: • current—Shows the active concurrent instances or the current rate of the resource. • denied—Shows the number of instances that were denied because they exceeded the resource limit shown in the Limit column. • peak—Shows the peak concurrent instances, or the peak rate of the resource since the statistics were last cleared, either using the clear resource usage command or because the device rebooted. • all—(Default) Shows all statistics. The count_threshold sets the number above which resources are shown. The default is 1. If the usage of the resource is below the number you set, then the resource is not shown. If you specify all for the counter name, then the count_threshold applies to the current usage. Note To show all resources, set the count_threshold to 0. The following is sample output from the show resource usage context command, which shows the resource usage for the admin context: hostname# show resource usage context admin Total The total amount of the resource that is allocated across all contexts in the class. The amount is an absolute number of concurrent instances or instances per second. If the resource is unlimited, this display is blank. % of Avail The percentage of the total system resources that is allocated across all contexts in the class. If the resource is unlimited, this display is blank. If the resource does not have a system limit, then this column shows N/A. Table 5-4 show resource allocation detail Fields Field Description5-33 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 5 Managing Multiple Context Mode Monitoring Security Contexts Resource Current Peak Limit Denied Context Telnet 1 1 5 0 admin Conns 44 55 N/A 0 admin Hosts 45 56 N/A 0 admin The following is sample output from the show resource usage summary command, which shows the resource usage for all contexts and all resources. This sample shows the limits for 6 contexts. hostname# show resource usage summary Resource Current Peak Limit Denied Context Syslogs [rate] 1743 2132 N/A 0 Summary Conns 584 763 280000(S) 0 Summary Xlates 8526 8966 N/A 0 Summary Hosts 254 254 N/A 0 Summary Conns [rate] 270 535 N/A 1704 Summary Inspects [rate] 270 535 N/A 0 Summary S = System: Combined context limits exceed the system limit; the system limit is shown. The following is sample output from the show resource usage summary command, which shows the limits for 25 contexts. Because the context limit for Telnet and SSH connections is 5 per context, then the combined limit is 125. The system limit is only 100, so the system limit is shown. hostname# show resource usage summary Resource Current Peak Limit Denied Context Telnet 1 1 100[S] 0 Summary SSH 2 2 100[S] 0 Summary Conns 56 90 N/A 0 Summary Hosts 89 102 N/A 0 Summary S = System: Combined context limits exceed the system limit; the system limit is shown. The following is sample output from the show resource usage system command, which shows the resource usage for all contexts, but it shows the system limit instead of the combined context limits. The counter all 0 option is used to show resources that are not currently in use. The Denied statistics indicate how many times the resource was denied due to the system limit, if available. hostname# show resource usage system counter all 0 Resource Current Peak Limit Denied Context Telnet 0 0 100 0 System SSH 0 0 100 0 System ASDM 0 0 32 0 System Syslogs [rate] 1 18 N/A 0 System Conns 0 1 280000 0 System Xlates 0 0 N/A 0 System Hosts 0 2 N/A 0 System Conns [rate] 1 1 N/A 0 System Inspects [rate] 0 0 N/A 0 System Monitoring SYN Attacks in Contexts The ASA prevents SYN attacks using TCP Intercept. TCP Intercept uses the SYN cookies algorithm to prevent TCP SYN-flooding attacks. A SYN-flooding attack consists of a series of SYN packets usually originating from spoofed IP addresses. The constant flood of SYN packets keeps the server SYN queue full, which prevents it from servicing connection requests. When the embryonic connection threshold of 5-34 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 5 Managing Multiple Context Mode Monitoring Security Contexts a connection is crossed, the ASA acts as a proxy for the server and generates a SYN-ACK response to the client SYN request. When the ASA receives an ACK back from the client, it can then authenticate the client and allow the connection to the server. You can monitor the rate of attacks for individual contexts using the show perfmon command; you can monitor the amount of resources being used by TCP intercept for individual contexts using the show resource usage detail command; you can monitor the resources being used by TCP intercept for the entire system using the show resource usage summary detail command. The following is sample output from the show perfmon command that shows the rate of TCP intercepts for a context called admin. hostname/admin# show perfmon Context:admin PERFMON STATS: Current Average Xlates 0/s 0/s Connections 0/s 0/s TCP Conns 0/s 0/s UDP Conns 0/s 0/s URL Access 0/s 0/s URL Server Req 0/s 0/s WebSns Req 0/s 0/s TCP Fixup 0/s 0/s HTTP Fixup 0/s 0/s FTP Fixup 0/s 0/s AAA Authen 0/s 0/s AAA Author 0/s 0/s AAA Account 0/s 0/s TCP Intercept 322779/s 322779/s The following is sample output from the show resource usage detail command that shows the amount of resources being used by TCP Intercept for individual contexts. (Sample text in italics shows the TCP intercept information.) hostname(config)# show resource usage detail Resource Current Peak Limit Denied Context memory 843732 847288 unlimited 0 admin chunk:channels 14 15 unlimited 0 admin chunk:fixup 15 15 unlimited 0 admin chunk:hole 1 1 unlimited 0 admin chunk:ip-users 10 10 unlimited 0 admin chunk:list-elem 21 21 unlimited 0 admin chunk:list-hdr 3 4 unlimited 0 admin chunk:route 2 2 unlimited 0 admin chunk:static 1 1 unlimited 0 admin tcp-intercepts 328787 803610 unlimited 0 admin np-statics 3 3 unlimited 0 admin statics 1 1 unlimited 0 admin ace-rules 1 1 unlimited 0 admin console-access-rul 2 2 unlimited 0 admin fixup-rules 14 15 unlimited 0 admin memory 959872 960000 unlimited 0 c1 chunk:channels 15 16 unlimited 0 c1 chunk:dbgtrace 1 1 unlimited 0 c1 chunk:fixup 15 15 unlimited 0 c1 chunk:global 1 1 unlimited 0 c1 chunk:hole 2 2 unlimited 0 c1 chunk:ip-users 10 10 unlimited 0 c1 chunk:udp-ctrl-blk 1 1 unlimited 0 c1 chunk:list-elem 24 24 unlimited 0 c1 chunk:list-hdr 5 6 unlimited 0 c1 chunk:nat 1 1 unlimited 0 c15-35 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 5 Managing Multiple Context Mode Monitoring Security Contexts chunk:route 2 2 unlimited 0 c1 chunk:static 1 1 unlimited 0 c1 tcp-intercept-rate 16056 16254 unlimited 0 c1 globals 1 1 unlimited 0 c1 np-statics 3 3 unlimited 0 c1 statics 1 1 unlimited 0 c1 nats 1 1 unlimited 0 c1 ace-rules 2 2 unlimited 0 c1 console-access-rul 2 2 unlimited 0 c1 fixup-rules 14 15 unlimited 0 c1 memory 232695716 232020648 unlimited 0 system chunk:channels 17 20 unlimited 0 system chunk:dbgtrace 3 3 unlimited 0 system chunk:fixup 15 15 unlimited 0 system chunk:ip-users 4 4 unlimited 0 system chunk:list-elem 1014 1014 unlimited 0 system chunk:list-hdr 1 1 unlimited 0 system chunk:route 1 1 unlimited 0 system block:16384 510 885 unlimited 0 system block:2048 32 34 unlimited 0 system The following sample output shows the resources being used by TCP intercept for the entire system. (Sample text in italics shows the TCP intercept information.) hostname(config)# show resource usage summary detail Resource Current Peak Limit Denied Context memory 238421312 238434336 unlimited 0 Summary chunk:channels 46 48 unlimited 0 Summary chunk:dbgtrace 4 4 unlimited 0 Summary chunk:fixup 45 45 unlimited 0 Summary chunk:global 1 1 unlimited 0 Summary chunk:hole 3 3 unlimited 0 Summary chunk:ip-users 24 24 unlimited 0 Summary chunk:udp-ctrl-blk 1 1 unlimited 0 Summary chunk:list-elem 1059 1059 unlimited 0 Summary chunk:list-hdr 10 11 unlimited 0 Summary chunk:nat 1 1 unlimited 0 Summary chunk:route 5 5 unlimited 0 Summary chunk:static 2 2 unlimited 0 Summary block:16384 510 885 unlimited 0 Summary block:2048 32 35 unlimited 0 Summary tcp-intercept-rate 341306 811579 unlimited 0 Summary globals 1 1 unlimited 0 Summary np-statics 6 6 unlimited 0 Summary statics 2 2 N/A 0 Summary nats 1 1 N/A 0 Summary ace-rules 3 3 N/A 0 Summary console-access-rul 4 4 N/A 0 Summary fixup-rules 43 44 N/A 0 Summary5-36 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 5 Managing Multiple Context Mode Monitoring Security ContextsC H A P T E R 6-1 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 6 Configuring Interfaces This chapter describes how to configure interfaces, including Ethernet parameters, switch ports (for the ASA 5505), VLAN subinterfaces, and IP addressing. The procedure to configure interfaces varies depending on several factors: the ASA 5505 vs. other models; routed vs. transparent mode; and single vs. multiple mode. This chapter describes how to configure interfaces for each of these variables. Note If your ASA has the default factory configuration, many interface parameters are already configured. This chapter assumes you do not have a factory default configuration, or that if you have a default configuration, that you need to change the configuration. For information about the factory default configurations, see the “Factory Default Configurations” section on page 2-1. This chapter includes the following sections: • Information About Interfaces, page 6-1 • Licensing Requirements for Interfaces, page 6-6 • Guidelines and Limitations, page 6-6 • Default Settings, page 6-7 • Starting Interface Configuration (ASA 5510 and Higher), page 6-8 • Starting Interface Configuration (ASA 5505), page 6-16 • Completing Interface Configuration (All Models), page 6-22 • Allowing Same Security Level Communication, page 6-30 • Enabling Jumbo Frame Support (ASA 5580 and 5585-X), page 6-31 • Monitoring Interfaces, page 6-32 • Configuration Examples for Interfaces, page 6-32 • Feature History for Interfaces, page 6-33 Information About Interfaces This section describes ASA interfaces, and includes the following topics: • ASA 5505 Interfaces, page 6-2 • Auto-MDI/MDIX Feature, page 6-46-2 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 6 Configuring Interfaces Information About Interfaces • Security Levels, page 6-5 • Dual IP Stack, page 6-5 • Management Interface (ASA 5510 and Higher), page 6-5 ASA 5505 Interfaces This section describes the ports and interfaces of the ASA 5505 ASA, and includes the following topics: • Understanding ASA 5505 Ports and Interfaces, page 6-2 • Maximum Active VLAN Interfaces for Your License, page 6-2 • VLAN MAC Addresses, page 6-4 • Power Over Ethernet, page 6-4 Understanding ASA 5505 Ports and Interfaces The ASA 5505 ASA supports a built-in switch. There are two kinds of ports and interfaces that you need to configure: • Physical switch ports—The ASA has 8 Fast Ethernet switch ports that forward traffic at Layer 2, using the switching function in hardware. Two of these ports are PoE ports. See the “Power Over Ethernet” section on page 6-4 for more information. You can connect these interfaces directly to user equipment such as PCs, IP phones, or a DSL modem. Or you can connect to another switch. • Logical VLAN interfaces—In routed mode, these interfaces forward traffic between VLAN networks at Layer 3, using the configured security policy to apply firewall and VPN services. In transparent mode, these interfaces forward traffic between the VLANs on the same network at Layer 2, using the configured security policy to apply firewall services. See the “Maximum Active VLAN Interfaces for Your License” section for more information about the maximum VLAN interfaces. VLAN interfaces let you divide your equipment into separate VLANs, for example, home, business, and Internet VLANs. To segregate the switch ports into separate VLANs, you assign each switch port to a VLAN interface. Switch ports on the same VLAN can communicate with each other using hardware switching. But when a switch port on VLAN 1 wants to communicate with a switch port on VLAN 2, then the ASA applies the security policy to the traffic and routes or bridges between the two VLANs. Maximum Active VLAN Interfaces for Your License In transparent firewall mode, you can configure the following VLANs depending on your license: • Base license—2 active VLANs. • Security Plus license—3 active VLANs, one of which must be for failover. In routed mode, you can configure the following VLANs depending on your license: Base license • Base license—3 active VLANs. The third VLAN can only be configured to initiate traffic to one other VLAN. See Figure 6-1 for more information. • Security Plus license—20 active VLANs. Note An active VLAN is a VLAN with a nameif command configured.6-3 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 6 Configuring Interfaces Information About Interfaces With the Base license, the third VLAN can only be configured to initiate traffic to one other VLAN. See Figure 6-1 for an example network where the Home VLAN can communicate with the Internet, but cannot initiate contact with Business. Figure 6-1 ASA 5505 Adaptive Security Appliance with Base License With the Security Plus license, you can configure 20 VLAN interfaces, including a VLAN interface for failover and a VLAN interface as a backup link to your ISP. You can configure the backup interface to not pass through traffic unless the route through the primary interface fails. You can configure trunk ports to accommodate multiple VLANs per port. Note The ASA 5505 ASA supports Active/Standby failover, but not Stateful failover. See Figure 6-2 for an example network. Figure 6-2 ASA 5505 Adaptive Security Appliance with Security Plus License ASA 5505 with Base License Business Internet Home 153364 ASA 5505 with Security Plus License Failover ASA 5505 Inside Backup ISP Primary ISP DMZ Failover Link 1533656-4 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 6 Configuring Interfaces Information About Interfaces VLAN MAC Addresses • Routed firewall mode—All VLAN interfaces share a MAC address. Ensure that any connected switches can support this scenario. If the connected switches require unique MAC addresses, you can manually assign MAC addresses. See the “Configuring the MAC Address” section on page 6-26. • Transparent firewall mode—Each VLAN has a unique MAC address. You can override the generated MAC addresses if desired by manually assigning MAC addresses. See the “Configuring the MAC Address” section on page 6-26. Power Over Ethernet Ethernet 0/6 and Ethernet 0/7 support PoE for devices such as IP phones or wireless access points. If you install a non-PoE device or do not connect to these switch ports, the ASA does not supply power to the switch ports. If you shut down the switch port using the shutdown command, you disable power to the device. Power is restored when you enable the port using the no shutdown command. See the “Configuring and Enabling Switch Ports as Access Ports” section on page 6-17 for more information about shutting down a switch port. To view the status of PoE switch ports, including the type of device connected (Cisco or IEEE 802.3af), use the show power inline command. Monitoring Traffic Using SPAN If you want to monitor traffic that enters or exits one or more switch ports, you can enable SPAN, also known as switch port monitoring. The port for which you enable SPAN (called the destination port) receives a copy of every packet transmitted or received on a specified source port. The SPAN feature lets you attach a sniffer to the destination port so you can monitor all traffic; without SPAN, you would have to attach a sniffer to every port you want to monitor. You can only enable SPAN for one destination port. See the switchport monitor command in the Cisco ASA 5500 Series Command Reference for more information. Auto-MDI/MDIX Feature For RJ-45 interfaces, the default auto-negotiation setting also includes the Auto-MDI/MDIX feature. Auto-MDI/MDIX eliminates the need for crossover cabling by performing an internal crossover when a straight cable is detected during the auto-negotiation phase. For the ASA 5510 and higher, either the speed or duplex must be set to auto-negotiate to enable Auto-MDI/MDIX for the interface. If you explicitly set both the speed and duplex to a fixed value, thus disabling auto-negotiation for both settings, then Auto-MDI/MDIX is also disabled. For Gigabit Ethernet, when the speed and duplex are set to 1000 and full, then the interface always auto-negotiates; therefore Auto-MDI/MDIX is always enabled and you cannot disable it. For the ASA 5505, you cannot disable Auto-MDI/MDIX.6-5 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 6 Configuring Interfaces Information About Interfaces Security Levels Each interface must have a security level from 0 (lowest) to 100 (highest). For example, you should assign your most secure network, such as the inside host network, to level 100. While the outside network connected to the Internet can be level 0. Other networks, such as DMZs can be in between. You can assign interfaces to the same security level. See the “Allowing Same Security Level Communication” section on page 6-30 for more information. The level controls the following behavior: • Network access—By default, there is an implicit permit from a higher security interface to a lower security interface (outbound). Hosts on the higher security interface can access any host on a lower security interface. You can limit access by applying an access list to the interface. If you enable communication for same security interfaces (see the “Allowing Same Security Level Communication” section on page 6-30), there is an implicit permit for interfaces to access other interfaces on the same security level or lower. • Inspection engines—Some application inspection engines are dependent on the security level. For same security interfaces, inspection engines apply to traffic in either direction. – NetBIOS inspection engine—Applied only for outbound connections. – SQL*Net inspection engine—If a control connection for the SQL*Net (formerly OraServ) port exists between a pair of hosts, then only an inbound data connection is permitted through the ASA. • Filtering—HTTP(S) and FTP filtering applies only for outbound connections (from a higher level to a lower level). If you enable communication for same security interfaces, you can filter traffic in either direction. • NAT control—When you enable NAT control, you must configure NAT for hosts on a higher security interface (inside) when they access hosts on a lower security interface (outside). Without NAT control, or for same security interfaces, you can choose to use NAT between any interface, or you can choose not to use NAT. Keep in mind that configuring NAT for an outside interface might require a special keyword. • established command—This command allows return connections from a lower security host to a higher security host if there is already an established connection from the higher level host to the lower level host. If you enable communication for same security interfaces, you can configure established commands for both directions. Dual IP Stack The ASA supports the configuration of both IPv6 and IPv4 on an interface. You do not need to enter any special commands to do so; simply enter the IPv4 configuration commands and IPv6 configuration commands as you normally would. Make sure you configure a default route for both IPv4 and IPv6. Management Interface (ASA 5510 and Higher) The management interface is a Fast Ethernet interface designed for management traffic only, and is specified as management slot/port in commands. You can, however, use it for through traffic if desired (see the management-only command). In transparent firewall mode, you can use the management 6-6 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 6 Configuring Interfaces Licensing Requirements for Interfaces interface (for management purposes) in addition to the two interfaces allowed for through traffic. You can also add subinterfaces to the management interface to provide management in each security context for multiple context mode. Note In transparent firewall mode, the management interface updates the MAC address table in the same manner as a data interface; therefore you should not connect both a management and a data interface to the same switch unless you configure one of the switch ports as a routed port (by default Cisco Catalyst switches share a MAC address for all VLAN switch ports). Otherwise, if traffic arrives on the management interface from the physically-connected switch, then the ASA updates the MAC address table to use the management interface to access the switch, instead of the data interface. This action causes a temporary traffic interruption; the ASA will not re-update the MAC address table for packets from the switch to the data interface for at least 30 seconds for security reasons. Licensing Requirements for Interfaces The following table shows the licensing requirements for VLANs: The following table shows the licensing requirements for VLAN trunks: Guidelines and Limitations This section includes the guidelines and limitations for this feature. Model License Requirement ASA 5505 Base License: 3 (2 regular zones and 1 restricted zone that can only communicate with 1 other zone) Security Plus License: 20 ASA 5510 Base License: 50 Security Plus License: 100 ASA 5520 Base License: 150 ASA 5540 Base License: 200 ASA 5550 Base License: 250 ASA 5580 Base License: 250 ASA 5585-X Base License: 250 Model License Requirement ASA 5505 Base License: None. Security Plus License: 8. All other models N/A6-7 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 6 Configuring Interfaces Default Settings Context Mode Guidelines In multiple context mode, configure the physical interfaces in the system execution space according to the “Starting Interface Configuration (ASA 5510 and Higher)” section on page 6-8. Then, configure the logical interface parameters in the context execution space according to the “Completing Interface Configuration (All Models)” section on page 6-22. Firewall Mode Guidelines • Transparent firewall mode allows only two interfaces to pass through traffic; however, on the ASA 5510 and higher ASA, you can use the Management 0/0 or 0/1 interface (either the physical interface or a subinterface) as a third interface for management traffic. The mode is not configurable in this case and must always be management-only. • Intra-interface communication is only available in routed firewall mode. Inter-interface communication is available for both routed and transparent mode. Failover Guidelines Do not finish configuring failover interfaces with the procedures in “Completing Interface Configuration (All Models)” section on page 6-22. See the “Configuring Active/Standby Failover” section on page 33-7 or the “Configuring Active/Active Failover” section on page 34-8 to configure the failover and state links. In multiple context mode, failover interfaces are configured in the system configuration. IPv6 Guidelines Supports IPv6. In transparent mode on a per interface basis, you can only configure the link-local address; you configure the global address as the management address for the entire unit, but not per interface. Because configuring the management global IP address automatically configures the link-local addresses per interface, the only IPv6 configuration you need to perform is to set the management IP address according to the “Configuring the IPv6 Address” section on page 8-9. Model Guidelines Subinterfaces are not available for the ASA 5505 ASA. Default Settings This section lists default settings for interfaces if you do not have a factory default configuration. For information about the factory default configurations, see the “Factory Default Configurations” section on page 2-1. Default Security Level The default security level is 0. If you name an interface “inside” and you do not set the security level explicitly, then the ASA sets the security level to 100. Note If you change the security level of an interface, and you do not want to wait for existing connections to time out before the new security information is used, you can clear the connections using the clear local-host command.6-8 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 6 Configuring Interfaces Starting Interface Configuration (ASA 5510 and Higher) Default State of Interfaces The default state of an interface depends on the type and the context mode. In multiple context mode, all allocated interfaces are enabled by default, no matter what the state of the interface is in the system execution space. However, for traffic to pass through the interface, the interface also has to be enabled in the system execution space. If you shut down an interface in the system execution space, then that interface is down in all contexts that share it. In single mode or in the system execution space, interfaces have the following default states: • Physical interfaces and switch ports—Disabled. • Redundant Interfaces—Enabled. However, for traffic to pass through the redundant interface, the member physical interfaces must also be enabled. • Subinterfaces or VLANs—Enabled. However, for traffic to pass through the subinterface, the physical interface must also be enabled. Default Speed and Duplex • By default, the speed and duplex for copper (RJ-45) interfaces are set to auto-negotiate. • The fiber interface for the ASA 5550 and the 4GE SSM has a fixed speed and does not support duplex, but you can set the interface to negotiate link parameters (the default) or not to negotiate. • For fiber interfaces for the ASA 5580 and ASA 5585-X, the speed is set for automatic link negotiation. Default Connector Type The ASA 5550 ASA and the 4GE SSM for the ASA 5510 and higher ASA include two connector types: copper RJ-45 and fiber SFP. RJ-45 is the default. You can configure the ASA to use the fiber SFP connectors. Default MAC Addresses By default, the physical interface uses the burned-in MAC address, and all subinterfaces of a physical interface use the same burned-in MAC address. Starting Interface Configuration (ASA 5510 and Higher) This section includes tasks for starting your interface configuration for the ASA 5510 and higher. Note For multiple context mode, complete all tasks in this section in the system execution space. To change from the context to the system execution space, enter the changeto system command. For ASA 5505 configuration, see the “Starting Interface Configuration (ASA 5505)” section on page 6-16. This section includes the following topics: • Task Flow for Starting Interface Configuration, page 6-9 • Configuring a Redundant Interface, page 6-11 • Enabling the Physical Interface and Configuring Ethernet Parameters, page 6-9 • Configuring VLAN Subinterfaces and 802.1Q Trunking, page 6-146-9 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 6 Configuring Interfaces Starting Interface Configuration (ASA 5510 and Higher) • Assigning Interfaces to Contexts and Automatically Assigning MAC Addresses (Multiple Context Mode), page 6-15 Task Flow for Starting Interface Configuration To start configuring interfaces, perform the following steps: Step 1 (Multiple context mode) Complete all tasks in this section in the system execution space. To change from the context to the system execution space, enter the changeto system command. Step 2 Enable the physical interface, and optionally change Ethernet parameters. See the “Enabling the Physical Interface and Configuring Ethernet Parameters” section on page 6-9. Physical interfaces are disabled by default. Step 3 (Optional) Configure redundant interface pairs. See the “Configuring a Redundant Interface” section on page 6-11. A logical redundant interface pairs an active and a standby physical interface. When the active interface fails, the standby interface becomes active and starts passing traffic. Step 4 (Optional) Configure VLAN subinterfaces. See the “Configuring VLAN Subinterfaces and 802.1Q Trunking” section on page 6-14. Step 5 (Multiple context mode only) Assign interfaces to contexts and automatically assign unique MAC addresses to context interfaces. See the “Assigning Interfaces to Contexts and Automatically Assigning MAC Addresses (Multiple Context Mode)” section on page 6-15. Step 6 Complete the interface configuration according to the “Completing Interface Configuration (All Models)” section on page 6-22. Enabling the Physical Interface and Configuring Ethernet Parameters This section describes how to: • Enable the physical interface • Set a specific speed and duplex (if available) • Enable pause frames for flow control. Prerequisites For multiple context mode, complete this procedure in the system execution space. To change from the context to the system execution space, enter the changeto system command. Detailed Steps Step 1 To specify the interface you want to configure, enter the following command: hostname(config)# interface physical_interface hostname(config-if)# where the physical_interface ID includes the type, slot, and port number as type[slot/]port.6-10 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 6 Configuring Interfaces Starting Interface Configuration (ASA 5510 and Higher) The physical interface types include the following: • ethernet • gigabitethernet • tengigabitethernet • management Enter the type followed by slot/port, for example, gigabitethernet0/1 or ethernet 0/1. To view the interfaces available on your ASA, enter the show interface command. Step 2 (Optional) To set the media type to SFP, if available for your model, enter the following command: hostname(config-if)# media-type sfp To restore the default RJ-45, enter the media-type rj45 command. Step 3 (Optional) To set the speed, enter the following command: hostname(config-if)# speed {auto | 10 | 100 | 1000 | nonegotiate} For copper interfaces, the default setting is auto. For SFP interfaces, the default setting is no speed nonegotiate, which sets the speed to the maximum speed and enables link negotiation for flow-control parameters and remote fault information. The nonegotiate keyword is the only keyword available for SFP interfaces. The speed nonegotiate command disables link negotiation. Step 4 (Optional) To set the duplex for copper interfaces, enter the following command: hostname(config-if)# duplex {auto | full | half} The auto setting is the default. Step 5 (Optional) To enable pause (XOFF) frames for flow control, enter the following command: hostname(config-if)# flowcontrol send on [low_water high_water pause_time] [noconfirm] If you have a traffic burst, dropped packets can occur if the burst exceeds the buffering capacity of the FIFO buffer on the NIC and the receive ring buffers. Enabling pause frames for flow control can alleviate this issue. Pause (XOFF) and XON frames are generated automatically by the NIC hardware based on the FIFO buffer usage. A pause frame is sent when the buffer usage exceeds the high-water mark. For 10 GigabitEthernet interfaces, the default high_water value is 128 KB; you can set it between 0 and 511. After a pause is sent, an XON frame can be sent when the buffer usage is reduced below the low-water mark. By default, the low_water value is 64 KB; you can set it between 0 and 511. The link partner can resume traffic after receiving an XON, or after the XOFF expires, as controlled by the timer value in the pause frame. (8.2(5) and later) For 1 GigabitEthernet interfaces, the default high_water value is 16 KB; you can set it between 0 and 47. By default, the low_water value is 24 KB; you can set it between 0 and 47. The default pause_time value is 26624; you can set it between 0 and 65535. Each pause time unit is the amount of time to transmit 64 bytes, so the time per unit depends on your link speed. If the buffer usage is consistently above the high-water mark, pause frames are sent repeatedly, controlled by the pause refresh threshold value. When you use this command, you see the following warning: Changing flow-control parameters will reset the interface. Packets may be lost during the reset. Proceed with flow-control changes? To change the parameters without being prompted, use the noconfirm keyword.6-11 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 6 Configuring Interfaces Starting Interface Configuration (ASA 5510 and Higher) Note Only flow control frames defined in 802.3x are supported. Priority-based flow control is not supported. Step 6 To enable the interface, enter the following command: hostname(config-if)# no shutdown To disable the interface, enter the shutdown command. If you enter the shutdown command, you also shut down all subinterfaces. If you shut down an interface in the system execution space, then that interface is shut down in all contexts that share it. What to Do Next Optional Tasks: • Configure redundant interface pairs. See the “Configuring a Redundant Interface” section on page 6-11. • Configure VLAN subinterfaces. See the “Configuring VLAN Subinterfaces and 802.1Q Trunking” section on page 6-14. Required Tasks: • For multiple context mode, assign interfaces to contexts and automatically assign unique MAC addresses to context interfaces. See the “Assigning Interfaces to Contexts and Automatically Assigning MAC Addresses (Multiple Context Mode)” section on page 6-15. • For single context mode, complete the interface configuration. See the “Completing Interface Configuration (All Models)” section on page 6-22. Configuring a Redundant Interface A logical redundant interface consists of a pair of physical interfaces: an active and a standby interface. When the active interface fails, the standby interface becomes active and starts passing traffic. You can configure a redundant interface to increase the ASA reliability. This feature is separate from device-level failover, but you can configure redundant interfaces as well as failover if desired. This section describes how to configure redundant interfaces, and includes the following topics: • Configuring a Redundant Interface, page 6-11 • Changing the Active Interface, page 6-14 Configuring a Redundant Interface This section describes how to create a redundant interface. By default, redundant interfaces are enabled. Guidelines and Limitations • You can configure up to 8 redundant interface pairs. • All ASA configuration refers to the logical redundant interface instead of the member physical interfaces.6-12 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 6 Configuring Interfaces Starting Interface Configuration (ASA 5510 and Higher) • Redundant interface delay values are configurable, but by default the ASA will inherit the default delay values based on the physical type of its member interfaces. • The only configuration available to physical interfaces that are part of a redundant interface pair are physical parameters (set in the “Enabling the Physical Interface and Configuring Ethernet Parameters” section on page 6-9), the description command, and the shutdown command. You can also enter run-time commands like default and help. • If you shut down the active interface, then the standby interface becomes active. For failover, follow these guidelines when adding member interfaces: • If you want to use a redundant interface for the failover or state link, then you must configure the redundant interface as part of the basic configuration on the secondary unit in addition to the primary unit. • If you use a redundant interface for the failover or state link, you must put a switch or hub between the two units; you cannot connect them directly. Without the switch or hub, you could have the active port on the primary unit connected directly to the standby port on the secondary unit. • You can monitor redundant interfaces for failover using the monitor-interface command; be sure to reference the logical redundant interface name. • When the active interface fails over to the standby interface, this activity does not cause the redundant interface to appear to be failed when being monitored for device-level failover. Only when both physical interfaces fail does the redundant interface appear to be failed. Redundant Interface MAC Address The redundant interface uses the MAC address of the first physical interface that you add. If you change the order of the member interfaces in the configuration, then the MAC address changes to match the MAC address of the interface that is now listed first. Alternatively, you can assign a MAC address to the redundant interface, which is used regardless of the member interface MAC addresses (see the “Configuring the MAC Address” section on page 6-26 or the “Assigning Interfaces to Contexts and Automatically Assigning MAC Addresses (Multiple Context Mode)” section on page 6-15). When the active interface fails over to the standby, the same MAC address is maintained so that traffic is not disrupted. Prerequisites • Both member interfaces must be of the same physical type. For example, both must be Ethernet. • You cannot add a physical interface to the redundant interface if you configured a name for it. You must first remove the name using the no nameif command. • For multiple context mode, complete this procedure in the system execution space. To change from the context to the system execution space, enter the changeto system command. Caution If you are using a physical interface already in your configuration, removing the name will clear any configuration that refers to the interface. Detailed Steps You can configure up to 8 redundant interface pairs. To configure a redundant interface, perform the following steps: Step 1 To add the logical redundant interface, enter the following command:6-13 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 6 Configuring Interfaces Starting Interface Configuration (ASA 5510 and Higher) hostname(config)# interface redundant number hostname(config-if)# where the number argument is an integer between 1 and 8. Step 2 To add the first member interface to the redundant interface, enter the following command: hostname(config-if)# member-interface physical_interface See the “Enabling the Physical Interface and Configuring Ethernet Parameters” section for a description of the physical interface ID. After you add the interface, any configuration for it (such as an IP address) is removed. Step 3 To add the second member interface to the redundant interface, enter the following command: hostname(config-if)# member-interface physical_interface Make sure the second interface is the same physical type as the first interface. To remove a member interface, enter the no member-interface physical_interface command. You cannot remove both member interfaces from the redundant interface; the redundant interface requires at least one member interface. The Add Redundant Interface dialog box appears. You return to the Interfaces pane. Examples The following example creates two redundant interfaces: hostname(config)# interface redundant 1 hostname(config-if)# member-interface gigabitethernet 0/0 hostname(config-if)# member-interface gigabitethernet 0/1 hostname(config-if)# interface redundant 2 hostname(config-if)# member-interface gigabitethernet 0/2 hostname(config-if)# member-interface gigabitethernet 0/3 What to Do Next Optional Task: • Configure VLAN subinterfaces. See the “Configuring VLAN Subinterfaces and 802.1Q Trunking” section on page 6-14. Required Tasks: • For multiple context mode, assign interfaces to contexts and automatically assign unique MAC addresses to context interfaces. See the “Assigning Interfaces to Contexts and Automatically Assigning MAC Addresses (Multiple Context Mode)” section on page 6-15. • For single context mode, complete the interface configuration. See the “Completing Interface Configuration (All Models)” section on page 6-22.6-14 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 6 Configuring Interfaces Starting Interface Configuration (ASA 5510 and Higher) Changing the Active Interface By default, the active interface is the first interface listed in the configuration, if it is available. To view which interface is active, enter the following command: hostname# show interface redundantnumber detail | grep Member For example: hostname# show interface redundant1 detail | grep Member Members GigabitEthernet0/3(Active), GigabitEthernet0/2 To change the active interface, enter the following command: hostname# redundant-interface redundantnumber active-member physical_interface where the redundantnumber argument is the redundant interface ID, such as redundant1. The physical_interface is the member interface ID that you want to be active. Configuring VLAN Subinterfaces and 802.1Q Trunking Subinterfaces let you divide a physical or redundant interface into multiple logical interfaces that are tagged with different VLAN IDs. An interface with one or more VLAN subinterfaces is automatically configured as an 802.1Q trunk. Because VLANs allow you to keep traffic separate on a given physical interface, you can increase the number of interfaces available to your network without adding additional physical interfaces or ASAs. This feature is particularly useful in multiple context mode so that you can assign unique interfaces to each context. Guidelines and Limitations • Maximum subinterfaces—To determine how many VLAN subinterfaces are allowed for your platform, see the “Licensing Requirements for Interfaces” section on page 6-6. • Preventing untagged packets on the physical interface—If you use subinterfaces, you typically do not also want the physical interface to pass traffic, because the physical interface passes untagged packets. This property is also true for the active physical interface in a redundant interface pair. Because the physical or redundant interface must be enabled for the subinterface to pass traffic, ensure that the physical or redundant interface does not pass traffic by leaving out the nameif command. If you want to let the physical or redundant interface pass untagged packets, you can configure the nameif command as usual. See the “Completing Interface Configuration (All Models)” section on page 6-22 for more information about completing the interface configuration. Prerequisites For multiple context mode, complete this procedure in the system execution space. To change from the context to the system execution space, enter the changeto system command. Detailed Steps To add a subinterface and assign a VLAN to it, perform the following steps: Step 1 To specify the new subinterface, enter the following command: hostname(config)# interface {physical_interface | redundant number}.subinterface hostname(config-subif)# 6-15 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 6 Configuring Interfaces Starting Interface Configuration (ASA 5510 and Higher) See the “Enabling Jumbo Frame Support (ASA 5580 and 5585-X)” section for a description of the physical interface ID. The redundant number argument is the redundant interface ID, such as redundant 1. The subinterface ID is an integer between 1 and 4294967293. The following command adds a subinterface to a Gigabit Ethernet interface: hostname(config)# interface gigabitethernet 0/1.100 The following command adds a subinterface to a redundant interface: hostname(config)# interface redundant 1.100 Step 2 To specify the VLAN for the subinterface, enter the following command: hostname(config-subif)# vlan vlan_id The vlan_id is an integer between 1 and 4094. Some VLAN IDs might be reserved on connected switches, so check the switch documentation for more information. You can only assign a single VLAN to a subinterface, and you cannot assign the same VLAN to multiple subinterfaces. You cannot assign a VLAN to the physical interface. Each subinterface must have a VLAN ID before it can pass traffic. To change a VLAN ID, you do not need to remove the old VLAN ID with the no option; you can enter the vlan command with a different VLAN ID, and the ASA changes the old ID. What to Do Next • For multiple context mode, assign interfaces to contexts and automatically assign unique MAC addresses to context interfaces. See the “Assigning Interfaces to Contexts and Automatically Assigning MAC Addresses (Multiple Context Mode)” section on page 6-15. • For single context mode, complete the interface configuration. See the “Completing Interface Configuration (All Models)” section on page 6-22. Assigning Interfaces to Contexts and Automatically Assigning MAC Addresses (Multiple Context Mode) To complete the configuration of interfaces in the system execution space, perform the following tasks that are documented in Chapter 5, “Managing Multiple Context Mode”: • To assign interfaces to contexts, see the “Configuring a Security Context” section on page 5-16 . • (Optional) To automatically assign unique MAC addresses to context interfaces, see the “Automatically Assigning MAC Addresses to Context Interfaces” section on page 5-20. The MAC address is used to classify packets within a context. If you share an interface, but do not have unique MAC addresses for the interface in each context, then the destination IP address is used to classify packets. Alternatively, you can manually assign MAC addresses within the context according to the “Configuring the MAC Address” section on page 6-26.6-16 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 6 Configuring Interfaces Starting Interface Configuration (ASA 5505) What to Do Next Complete the interface configuration. See the “Completing Interface Configuration (All Models)” section on page 6-22. Starting Interface Configuration (ASA 5505) This section includes tasks for starting your interface configuration for the ASA 5505 ASA, including creating VLAN interfaces and assigning them to switch ports. See the “Understanding ASA 5505 Ports and Interfaces” section on page 6-2 for more information. For ASA 5510 and higher configuration, see the “Starting Interface Configuration (ASA 5510 and Higher)” section on page 6-8. This section includes the following topics: • Task Flow for Starting Interface Configuration, page 6-16 • Configuring VLAN Interfaces, page 6-16 • Configuring and Enabling Switch Ports as Access Ports, page 6-17 • Configuring and Enabling Switch Ports as Trunk Ports, page 6-19 Task Flow for Starting Interface Configuration To configure interfaces in single mode, perform the following steps: Step 1 Configure VLAN interfaces. See the “Configuring VLAN Interfaces” section on page 6-16. Step 2 Configure and enable switch ports as access ports. See the “Configuring and Enabling Switch Ports as Access Ports” section on page 6-17. Step 3 (Optional for Security Plus licenses) Configure and enable switch ports as trunk ports. See the “Configuring and Enabling Switch Ports as Trunk Ports” section on page 6-19. Step 4 Complete the interface configuration according to the “Completing Interface Configuration (All Models)” section on page 6-22. Configuring VLAN Interfaces This section describes how to configure VLAN interfaces. For more information about ASA 5505 interfaces, see the “ASA 5505 Interfaces” section on page 6-2. Detailed Steps Step 1 To add a VLAN interface, enter the following command: hostname(config)# interface vlan number Where the number is between 1 and 4090. For example, enter the following command:6-17 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 6 Configuring Interfaces Starting Interface Configuration (ASA 5505) hostname(config)# interface vlan 100 To remove this VLAN interface and all associated configuration, enter the no interface vlan command. Because this interface also includes the interface name configuration, and the name is used in other commands, those commands are also removed. Step 2 (Optional for the Base license) To allow this interface to be the third VLAN by limiting it from initiating contact to one other VLAN, enter the following command: hostname(config-if)# no forward interface vlan number Where number specifies the VLAN ID to which this VLAN interface cannot initiate traffic. With the Base license, you can only configure a third VLAN if you use this command to limit it. For example, you have one VLAN assigned to the outside for Internet access, one VLAN assigned to an inside business network, and a third VLAN assigned to your home network. The home network does not need to access the business network, so you can use the no forward interface command on the home VLAN; the business network can access the home network, but the home network cannot access the business network. If you already have two VLAN interfaces configured with a nameif command, be sure to enter the no forward interface command before the nameif command on the third interface; the ASA does not allow three fully functioning VLAN interfaces with the Base license on the ASA 5505 ASA. Note If you upgrade to the Security Plus license, you can remove this command and achieve full functionality for this interface. If you leave this command in place, this interface continues to be limited even after upgrading. What to Do Next Configure the switch ports. See the “Configuring and Enabling Switch Ports as Access Ports” section on page 6-17 and the “Configuring and Enabling Switch Ports as Trunk Ports” section on page 6-19. Configuring and Enabling Switch Ports as Access Ports By default (with no configuration), all switch ports are shut down, and assigned to VLAN 1. To assign a switch port to a single VLAN, configure it as an access port. To create a trunk port to carry multiple VLANs, see the “Configuring and Enabling Switch Ports as Trunk Ports” section on page 6-19. If you have a factory default configuration, see the “ASA 5505 Default Configuration” section on page 2-2to check if you want to change the default interface settings according to this procedure. For more information about ASA 5505 interfaces, see the “ASA 5505 Interfaces” section on page 6-2. Caution The ASA 5505 ASA does not support Spanning Tree Protocol for loop detection in the network. Therefore you must ensure that any connection with the ASA does not end up in a network loop. Detailed Steps Step 1 To specify the switch port you want to configure, enter the following command:6-18 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 6 Configuring Interfaces Starting Interface Configuration (ASA 5505) hostname(config)# interface ethernet0/port Where port is 0 through 7. For example, enter the following command: hostname(config)# interface ethernet0/1 Step 2 To assign this switch port to a VLAN, enter the following command: hostname(config-if)# switchport access vlan number Where number is the VLAN ID, between 1 and 4090. See the “Configuring VLAN Interfaces” section on page 6-16 to configure the VLAN interface that you want to assign to this switch port. To view configured VLANs, Note You might assign multiple switch ports to the primary or backup VLANs if the Internet access device includes Layer 2 redundancy. Step 3 (Optional) To prevent the switch port from communicating with other protected switch ports on the same VLAN, enter the following command: hostname(config-if)# switchport protected You might want to prevent switch ports from communicating with each other if the devices on those switch ports are primarily accessed from other VLANs, you do not need to allow intra-VLAN access, and you want to isolate the devices from each other in case of infection or other security breach. For example, if you have a DMZ that hosts three web servers, you can isolate the web servers from each other if you apply the switchport protected command to each switch port. The inside and outside networks can both communicate with all three web servers, and vice versa, but the web servers cannot communicate with each other. Step 4 (Optional) To set the speed, enter the following command: hostname(config-if)# speed {auto | 10 | 100} The auto setting is the default. If you set the speed to anything other than auto on PoE ports Ethernet 0/6 or 0/7, then Cisco IP phones and Cisco wireless access points that do not support IEEE 802.3af will not be detected and supplied with power. Step 5 (Optional) To set the duplex, enter the following command: hostname(config-if)# duplex {auto | full | half} The auto setting is the default. If you set the duplex to anything other than auto on PoE ports Ethernet 0/6 or 0/7, then Cisco IP phones and Cisco wireless access points that do not support IEEE 802.3af will not be detected and supplied with power. Step 6 To enable the switch port, enter the following command: hostname(config-if)# no shutdown To disable the switch port, enter the shutdown command. Examples The following example configures five VLAN interfaces, including the failover interface which is configured using the failover lan command: hostname(config)# interface vlan 100 hostname(config-if)# nameif outside6-19 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 6 Configuring Interfaces Starting Interface Configuration (ASA 5505) hostname(config-if)# security-level 0 hostname(config-if)# ip address 10.1.1.1 255.255.255.0 hostname(config-if)# no shutdown hostname(config-if)# interface vlan 200 hostname(config-if)# nameif inside hostname(config-if)# security-level 100 hostname(config-if)# ip address 10.2.1.1 255.255.255.0 hostname(config-if)# no shutdown hostname(config-if)# interface vlan 300 hostname(config-if)# nameif dmz hostname(config-if)# security-level 50 hostname(config-if)# ip address 10.3.1.1 255.255.255.0 hostname(config-if)# no shutdown hostname(config-if)# interface vlan 400 hostname(config-if)# nameif backup-isp hostname(config-if)# security-level 50 hostname(config-if)# ip address 10.1.2.1 255.255.255.0 hostname(config-if)# no shutdown hostname(config-if)# failover lan faillink vlan500 hostname(config)# failover interface ip faillink 10.4.1.1 255.255.255.0 standby 10.4.1.2 255.255.255.0 hostname(config)# interface ethernet 0/0 hostname(config-if)# switchport access vlan 100 hostname(config-if)# no shutdown hostname(config-if)# interface ethernet 0/1 hostname(config-if)# switchport access vlan 200 hostname(config-if)# no shutdown hostname(config-if)# interface ethernet 0/2 hostname(config-if)# switchport access vlan 300 hostname(config-if)# no shutdown hostname(config-if)# interface ethernet 0/3 hostname(config-if)# switchport access vlan 400 hostname(config-if)# no shutdown hostname(config-if)# interface ethernet 0/4 hostname(config-if)# switchport access vlan 500 hostname(config-if)# no shutdown What to Do Next If you want to configure a switch port as a trunk port, see the “Configuring and Enabling Switch Ports as Trunk Ports” section on page 6-19. To complete the interface configuration, see the “Completing Interface Configuration (All Models)” section on page 6-22. Configuring and Enabling Switch Ports as Trunk Ports This procedure tells how to create a trunk port that can carry multiple VLANs using 802.1Q tagging. Trunk mode is available only with the Security Plus license.6-20 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 6 Configuring Interfaces Starting Interface Configuration (ASA 5505) To create an access port, where an interface is assigned to only one VLAN, see the “Configuring and Enabling Switch Ports as Access Ports” section on page 6-17. For more information about ASA 5505 interfaces, see the “ASA 5505 Interfaces” section on page 6-2. Detailed Steps Step 1 To specify the switch port you want to configure, enter the following command: hostname(config)# interface ethernet0/port Where port is 0 through 7. For example, enter the following command: hostname(config)# interface ethernet0/1 Step 2 To assign VLANs to this trunk, enter one or more of the following commands. • To assign native VLANs, enter the following command: hostname(config-if)# switchport trunk native vlan vlan_id where the vlan_id is a single VLAN ID between 1 and 4090. Packets on the native VLAN are not modified when sent over the trunk. For example, if a port has VLANs 2, 3 and 4 assigned to it, and VLAN 2 is the native VLAN, then packets on VLAN 2 that egress the port are not modified with an 802.1Q header. Frames which ingress (enter) this port and have no 802.1Q header are put into VLAN 2. Each port can only have one native VLAN, but every port can have either the same or a different native VLAN. • To assign VLANs, enter the following command: hostname(config-if)# switchport trunk allowed vlan vlan_range where the vlan_range (with VLANs between 1 and 4090) can be identified in one of the following ways: A single number (n) A range (n-x) Separate numbers and ranges by commas, for example: 5,7-10,13,45-100 You can enter spaces instead of commas, but the command is saved to the configuration with commas. You can include the native VLAN in this command, but it is not required; the native VLAN is passed whether it is included in this command or not. This switch port cannot pass traffic until you assign at least one VLAN to it, native or non-native. Step 3 To make this switch port a trunk port, enter the following command: hostname(config-if)# switchport mode trunk To restore this port to access mode, enter the switchport mode access command. Step 4 (Optional) To prevent the switch port from communicating with other protected switch ports on the same VLAN, enter the following command: hostname(config-if)# switchport protected6-21 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 6 Configuring Interfaces Starting Interface Configuration (ASA 5505) You might want to prevent switch ports from communicating with each other if the devices on those switch ports are primarily accessed from other VLANs, you do not need to allow intra-VLAN access, and you want to isolate the devices from each other in case of infection or other security breach. For example, if you have a DMZ that hosts three web servers, you can isolate the web servers from each other if you apply the switchport protected command to each switch port. The inside and outside networks can both communicate with all three web servers, and vice versa, but the web servers cannot communicate with each other. Step 5 (Optional) To set the speed, enter the following command: hostname(config-if)# speed {auto | 10 | 100} The auto setting is the default. Step 6 (Optional) To set the duplex, enter the following command: hostname(config-if)# duplex {auto | full | half} The auto setting is the default. Step 7 To enable the switch port, enter the following command: hostname(config-if)# no shutdown To disable the switch port, enter the shutdown command. Examples The following example configures seven VLAN interfaces, including the failover interface which is configured using the failover lan command. VLANs 200, 201, and 202 are trunked on Ethernet 0/1. hostname(config)# interface vlan 100 hostname(config-if)# nameif outside hostname(config-if)# security-level 0 hostname(config-if)# ip address 10.1.1.1 255.255.255.0 hostname(config-if)# no shutdown hostname(config-if)# interface vlan 200 hostname(config-if)# nameif inside hostname(config-if)# security-level 100 hostname(config-if)# ip address 10.2.1.1 255.255.255.0 hostname(config-if)# no shutdown hostname(config-if)# interface vlan 201 hostname(config-if)# nameif dept1 hostname(config-if)# security-level 90 hostname(config-if)# ip address 10.2.2.1 255.255.255.0 hostname(config-if)# no shutdown hostname(config-if)# interface vlan 202 hostname(config-if)# nameif dept2 hostname(config-if)# security-level 90 hostname(config-if)# ip address 10.2.3.1 255.255.255.0 hostname(config-if)# no shutdown hostname(config-if)# interface vlan 300 hostname(config-if)# nameif dmz hostname(config-if)# security-level 50 hostname(config-if)# ip address 10.3.1.1 255.255.255.0 hostname(config-if)# no shutdown hostname(config-if)# interface vlan 4006-22 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 6 Configuring Interfaces Completing Interface Configuration (All Models) hostname(config-if)# nameif backup-isp hostname(config-if)# security-level 50 hostname(config-if)# ip address 10.1.2.1 255.255.255.0 hostname(config-if)# no shutdown hostname(config-if)# failover lan faillink vlan500 hostname(config)# failover interface ip faillink 10.4.1.1 255.255.255.0 standby 10.4.1.2 255.255.255.0 hostname(config)# interface ethernet 0/0 hostname(config-if)# switchport access vlan 100 hostname(config-if)# no shutdown hostname(config-if)# interface ethernet 0/1 hostname(config-if)# switchport mode trunk hostname(config-if)# switchport trunk allowed vlan 200-202 hostname(config-if)# switchport trunk native vlan 5 hostname(config-if)# no shutdown hostname(config-if)# interface ethernet 0/2 hostname(config-if)# switchport access vlan 300 hostname(config-if)# no shutdown hostname(config-if)# interface ethernet 0/3 hostname(config-if)# switchport access vlan 400 hostname(config-if)# no shutdown hostname(config-if)# interface ethernet 0/4 hostname(config-if)# switchport access vlan 500 hostname(config-if)# no shutdown What to Do Next To complete the interface configuration, see the “Completing Interface Configuration (All Models)” section on page 6-22. Completing Interface Configuration (All Models) This section includes tasks to complete the interface configuration for all models. Note For multiple context mode, complete the tasks in this section in the context execution space. Enter the changeto context name command to change to the context you want to configure. This section includes the following topics: • Entering Interface Configuration Mode, page 6-23 • Configuring General Interface Parameters, page 6-24 • Configuring the MAC Address, page 6-26 • Configuring IPv6 Addressing, page 6-276-23 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 6 Configuring Interfaces Completing Interface Configuration (All Models) Task Flow for Completing Interface Configuration Step 1 Complete the procedures in the “Starting Interface Configuration (ASA 5510 and Higher)” section on page 6-8 or the “Starting Interface Configuration (ASA 5505)” section on page 6-16. Step 2 (Multiple context mode) Enter the changeto context name command to change to the context you want to configure. Step 3 Enter interface configuration mode. See the “Entering Interface Configuration Mode” section on page 6-23. Step 4 Configure general interface parameters, including the interface name, security level, and IPv4 address. See the “Configuring General Interface Parameters” section on page 6-24. For transparent mode, you do not configure IP addressing per interface, except for the management-only interface (see the “Information About the Management Interface” section on page 6-24). You do need to configure the other parameters in this section, however. To set the global management address for transparent mode, see the “Configuring the IPv4 Address” section on page 8-9. Step 5 (Optional) Configure the MAC address. See the “Configuring the MAC Address” section on page 6-26. Step 6 (Optional) Configure IPv6 addressing. See the “Configuring IPv6 Addressing” section on page 6-27 For transparent mode, you do not configure IP addressing per interface, except for the management-only interface (see the “Information About the Management Interface” section on page 6-24). To set the global management address for transparent mode, see the “Configuring the IPv6 Address” section on page 8-9 . Entering Interface Configuration Mode The procedures in this section are performed in interface configuration mode. Prerequisites For multiple context mode, complete this procedure in the context execution space. Enter the changeto context name command to change to the context you want to configure. Detailed Steps If you are not already in interface configuration mode, enter the mode by using the interface command. • For the ASA 5510 and higher: hostname(config)# interface {{redundant number| physical_interface}[.subinterface] | mapped_name} hostname(config-if)# The redundant number argument is the redundant interface ID, such as redundant 1. See the “Enabling Jumbo Frame Support (ASA 5580 and 5585-X)” section for a description of the physical interface ID. Append the subinterface ID to the physical or redundant interface ID separated by a period (.). In multiple context mode, enter the mapped_name if one was assigned using the allocate-interface command.6-24 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 6 Configuring Interfaces Completing Interface Configuration (All Models) • For the ASA 5505: hostname(config)# interface vlan number hostname(config-if)# Configuring General Interface Parameters This procedure describes how to set the name, security level, IPv4 address and other options. For the ASA 5510 and higher, you must configure interface parameters for the following interface types: • Physical interfaces • VLAN subinterfaces • Redundant interfaces For the ASA 5505, you must configure interface parameters for the following interface types: • VLAN interfaces Guidelines and Limitations • For the ASA 5550 ASA, for maximum throughput, be sure to balance your traffic over the two interface slots; for example, assign the inside interface to slot 1 and the outside interface to slot 0. • For information about security levels, see the “Security Levels” section on page 6-5. • If you are using failover, do not use this procedure to name interfaces that you are reserving for failover and Stateful Failover communications. See the “Configuring Active/Standby Failover” section on page 33-7 or the “Configuring Active/Active Failover” section on page 34-8 to configure the failover and state links. • In routed firewall mode, set the IP address for all interfaces. • In transparent firewall mode, do not set the IP address for each interface, but rather set it for the whole ASA or context. The exception is for the Management 0/0 or 0/1 management-only interface, which does not pass through traffic. To set the transparent firewall mode whole ASA or context management IP address, see the “Setting the Management IP Address for a Transparent Firewall” section on page 8-7. To set the IP address of the Management 0/0 or 0/1 interface or subinterface, use this procedure. Restrictions PPPoE is not supported in multiple context mode or transparent firewall mode. Information About the Management Interface The ASA 5510 and higher ASA includes a dedicated management interface called Management 0/0 or Management 0/1, depending on your model, which is meant to support traffic to the ASA. However, you can configure any interface to be a management-only interface. Also, for Management 0/0 or 0/1, you can disable management-only mode so the interface can pass through traffic just like any other interface. Transparent firewall mode allows only two interfaces to pass through traffic; however, on the ASA 5510 and higher ASA, you can use the Management 0/0 or 0/1 interface (either the physical interface or a subinterface) as a third interface for management traffic. The mode is not configurable in this case and must always be management-only.6-25 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 6 Configuring Interfaces Completing Interface Configuration (All Models) Prerequisites • Complete the procedures in the “Starting Interface Configuration (ASA 5510 and Higher)” section on page 6-8 or the “Starting Interface Configuration (ASA 5505)” section on page 6-16. • In multiple context mode, complete this procedure in the context execution space. To change from the system to a context configuration, enter the changeto context name command. • Enter interface configuration mode according to the “Entering Interface Configuration Mode” section on page 6-23. Detailed Steps Step 1 To name the interface, enter the following command: hostname(config-if)# nameif name The name is a text string up to 48 characters, and is not case-sensitive. You can change the name by reentering this command with a new value. Do not enter the no form, because that command causes all commands that refer to that name to be deleted. Step 2 To set the security level, enter the following command: hostname(config-if)# security-level number Where number is an integer between 0 (lowest) and 100 (highest). Step 3 To set the IP address, enter one of the following commands. Note For use with failover, you must set the IP address and standby address manually; DHCP and PPPoE are not supported. In transparent firewall mode, do not set the IP address for each interface, but rather set it for the whole ASA or context. The exception is for the Management 0/0 or 0/1 management-only interface, which does not pass through traffic. • To set the IP address manually, enter the following command: hostname(config-if)# ip address ip_address [mask] [standby ip_address] where the ip_address and mask arguments set the interface IP address and subnet mask. The standby ip_address argument is used for failover. See the “Configuring Active/Standby Failover” section on page 33-7 or the “Configuring Active/Active Failover” section on page 34-8 for more information. • To obtain an IP address from a DHCP server, enter the following command: hostname(config-if)# ip address dhcp [setroute] where the setroute keyword lets the ASA use the default route supplied by the DHCP server. Reenter this command to reset the DHCP lease and request a new lease. If you do not enable the interface using the no shutdown command before you enter the ip address dhcp command, some DHCP requests might not be sent. • To obtain an IP address from a PPPoE server, see Chapter 69, “Configuring the PPPoE Client.” PPPoE is not supported in multiple context mode.6-26 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 6 Configuring Interfaces Completing Interface Configuration (All Models) Step 4 (Optional) To set an interface to management-only mode so that it does not pass through traffic, enter the following command: hostname(config-if)# management-only See the “Information About the Management Interface” section on page 6-24 for more information. What to Do Next • (Optional) Configure the MAC address. See the “Configuring the MAC Address” section on page 6-26. • (Optional) Configure IPv6 addressing. See the “Configuring IPv6 Addressing” section on page 6-27 Configuring the MAC Address This section describes how to configure MAC addresses for interfaces. Information About MAC Addresses By default, the physical interface uses the burned-in MAC address, and all subinterfaces of a physical interface use the same burned-in MAC address. A redundant interface uses the MAC address of the first physical interface that you add. If you change the order of the member interfaces in the configuration, then the MAC address changes to match the MAC address of the interface that is now listed first. If you assign a MAC address to the redundant interface using this command, then it is used regardless of the member interface MAC addresses. In multiple context mode, if you share an interface between contexts, you can assign a unique MAC address to the interface in each context. This feature lets the ASA easily classify packets into the appropriate context. Using a shared interface without unique MAC addresses is possible, but has some limitations. See the “How the Security Appliance Classifies Packets” section on page 5-3 for more information. You can assign each MAC address manually, or you can automatically generate MAC addresses for shared interfaces in contexts. See the “Automatically Assigning MAC Addresses to Context Interfaces” section on page 5-20 to automatically generate MAC addresses. If you automatically generate MAC addresses, you can use this procedure to override the generated address. For single context mode, or for interfaces that are not shared in multiple context mode, you might want to assign unique MAC addresses to subinterfaces. For example, your service provider might perform access control based on the MAC address. Prerequisites Enter interface configuration mode according to the “Entering Interface Configuration Mode” section on page 6-23.6-27 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 6 Configuring Interfaces Completing Interface Configuration (All Models) Detailed Steps What to Do Next (Optional) Configure IPv6 addressing. See the “Configuring IPv6 Addressing” section on page 6-27 Configuring IPv6 Addressing This section describes how to configure IPv6 addressing. For more information about IPv6, see the “Information About IPv6 Support” section on page 18-8 and the “IPv6 Addresses” section on page C-5 . For transparent mode, use this section for the Management 0/0 or 0/1 interface. To configure the global IPv6 management address for transparent mode, see the “Configuring the IPv6 Address” section on page 8-9 . Information About IPv6 Addressing When you configure an IPv6 address on an interface, you can assign one or several IPv6 addresses to the interface at one time, such as an IPv6 link-local address and a global address. However, at a minimum, you must configure a link-local address. Every IPv6-enabled interface must include at least one link-local address. When you configure a global address, a link-local addresses is automatically configured on the interface, so you do not also need to specifically configure a link-local address. These link-local addresses can only be used to communicate with other hosts on the same physical link. Note If you want to only configure the link-local addresses, see the ipv6 enable (to auto-configure) or ipv6 address link-local (to manually configure) command in the Cisco ASA 5500 Series Command Reference. When IPv6 is used over Ethernet networks, the Ethernet MAC address can be used to generate the 64-bit interface ID for the host. This is called the EUI-64 address. Because MAC addresses use 48 bits, additional bits must be inserted to fill the 64 bits required. The last 64 bits are used for the interface ID. For example, FE80::/10 is a link-local unicast IPv6 address type in hexadecimal format. Command Purpose mac-address mac_address [standby mac_address] Example: hostname(config-if)# mac-address 000C.F142.4CDE standby 000C.F142.4CDF Assigns a private MAC address to this interface. The mac_address is in H.H.H format, where H is a 16-bit hexadecimal digit. For example, the MAC address 00-0C-F1-42-4C-DE is entered as 000C.F142.4CDE. The first two bytes of a manual MAC address cannot be A2 if you also want to use auto-generated MAC addresses. For use with failover, set the standby MAC address. If the active unit fails over and the standby unit becomes active, the new active unit starts using the active MAC addresses to minimize network disruption, while the old active unit uses the standby address.6-28 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 6 Configuring Interfaces Completing Interface Configuration (All Models) Information About Duplicate Address Detection During the stateless autoconfiguration process, duplicate address detection (DAD) verifies the uniqueness of new unicast IPv6 addresses before the addresses are assigned to interfaces (the new addresses remain in a tentative state while duplicate address detection is performed). Duplicate address detection is performed first on the new link-local address. When the link local address is verified as unique, then duplicate address detection is performed all the other IPv6 unicast addresses on the interface. Duplicate address detection is suspended on interfaces that are administratively down. While an interface is administratively down, the unicast IPv6 addresses assigned to the interface are set to a pending state. An interface returning to an administratively up state restarts duplicate address detection for all of the unicast IPv6 addresses on the interface. When a duplicate address is identified, the state of the address is set to DUPLICATE, the address is not used, and the following error message is generated: %PIX|ASA-4-325002: Duplicate address ipv6_address/MAC_address on interface If the duplicate address is the link-local address of the interface, the processing of IPv6 packets is disabled on the interface. If the duplicate address is a global address, the address is not used. However, all configuration commands associated with the duplicate address remain as configured while the state of the address is set to DUPLICATE. If the link-local address for an interface changes, duplicate address detection is performed on the new link-local address and all of the other IPv6 address associated with the interface are regenerated (duplicate address detection is performed only on the new link-local address). The ASA uses neighbor solicitation messages to perform duplicate address detection. By default, the number of times an interface performs duplicate address detection is 1. Information About Modified EUI-64 Interface IDs RFC 3513: Internet Protocol Version 6 (IPv6) Addressing Architecture requires that the interface identifier portion of all unicast IPv6 addresses, except those that start with binary value 000, be 64 bits long and be constructed in Modified EUI-64 format. The ASA can enforce this requirement for hosts attached to the local link. When this command is enabled on an interface, the source addresses of IPv6 packets received on that interface are verified against the source MAC addresses to ensure that the interface identifiers use the Modified EUI-64 format. If the IPv6 packets do not use the Modified EUI-64 format for the interface identifier, the packets are dropped and the following system log message is generated: %PIX|ASA-3-325003: EUI-64 source address check failed. The address format verification is only performed when a flow is created. Packets from an existing flow are not checked. Additionally, the address verification can only be performed for hosts on the local link. Packets received from hosts behind a router will fail the address format verification, and be dropped, because their source MAC address will be the router MAC address and not the host MAC address. Prerequisites Enter interface configuration mode according to the “Entering Interface Configuration Mode” section on page 6-23. Restrictions The ASA does not support IPv6 anycast addresses.6-29 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 6 Configuring Interfaces Completing Interface Configuration (All Models) Detailed Steps Command Purpose Step 1 Do one of the following: ipv6 address autoconfig Example: hostname(config-if)# ipv6 address autoconfig Enables stateless autoconfiguration on the interface. Enabling stateless autoconfiguration on the interface configures IPv6 addresses based on prefixes received in Router Advertisement messages. A link-local address, based on the Modified EUI-64 interface ID, is automatically generated for the interface when stateless autoconfiguration is enabled. ipv6 address ipv6-prefix/prefix-length [eui-64] Example: hostname(config-if)# ipv6 address 2001:0DB8::BA98:0:3210/48 Assigns a global address to the interface. When you assign a global address, the link-local address is automatically created for the interface. Use the optional eui-64 keyword to use the Modified EUI-64 interface ID in the low order 64 bits of the address. See the “IPv6 Addresses” section on page C-5 for more information about IPv6 addressing. Step 2 (Optional) ipv6 nd suppress-ra Example: hostname(config-if)# ipv6 nd suppress-ra Suppresses Router Advertisement messages on an interface. By default, Router Advertisement messages are automatically sent in response to router solicitation messages. You may want to disable these messages on any interface for which you do not want the ASA to supply the IPv6 prefix (for example, the outside interface). Step 3 (Optional) ipv6 nd dad attempts value Example: hostname(config-if)# ipv6 nd dad attempts 3 Changes the number of duplicate address detection attempts. The value argument can be any value from 0 to 600. Setting the value argument to 0 disables duplicate address detection on the interface. By default, the number of times an interface performs duplicate address detection is 1. See the “Information About Duplicate Address Detection” section on page 6-28 for more information. Step 4 (Optional) ipv6 nd ns-interval value Example: hostname(config-if)# ipv6 nd ns-interval 2000 Changes the neighbor solicitation message interval. When you configure an interface to send out more than one duplicate address detection attempt with the ipv6 nd dad attempts command, this command configures the interval at which the neighbor solicitation messages are sent out. By default, they are sent out once every 1000 milliseconds. The value argument can be from 1000 to 3600000 milliseconds. Note Changing this value changes it for all neighbor solicitation messages sent out on the interface, not just those used for duplicate address detection. Step 5 (Optional) ipv6 enforce-eui64 if_name Example: hostname(config)# ipv6 enforce-eui64 inside Enforces the use of Modified EUI-64 format interface identifiers in IPv6 addresses on a local link. The if_name argument is the name of the interface, as specified by the nameif command, on which you are enabling the address format enforcement. See the “Information About Modified EUI-64 Interface IDs” section on page 6-28 for more information.6-30 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 6 Configuring Interfaces Allowing Same Security Level Communication Allowing Same Security Level Communication By default, interfaces on the same security level cannot communicate with each other, and packets cannot enter and exit the same interface. This section describes how to enable inter-interface communication when interfaces are on the same security level, and how to enable intra-interface communication. Information About Inter-Interface Communication Allowing interfaces on the same security level to communicate with each other provides the following benefits: • You can configure more than 101 communicating interfaces. If you use different levels for each interface and do not assign any interfaces to the same security level, you can configure only one interface per level (0 to 100). • You want traffic to flow freely between all same security interfaces without access lists. If you enable same security interface communication, you can still configure interfaces at different security levels as usual. Note If you enable NAT control, you do not need to configure NAT between same security level interfaces. See the “NAT and Same Security Level Interfaces” section on page 26-8 for more information on NAT and same security level interfaces. Information About Intra-Interface Communication Intra-interface communication might be useful for VPN traffic that enters an interface, but is then routed out the same interface. The VPN traffic might be unencrypted in this case, or it might be reencrypted for another VPN connection. For example, if you have a hub and spoke VPN network, where the security appliance is the hub, and remote VPN networks are spokes, for one spoke to communicate with another spoke, traffic must go into the security appliance and then out again to the other spoke. Note All traffic allowed by this feature is still subject to firewall rules. Be careful not to create an asymmetric routing situation that can cause return traffic not to traverse the ASA. Restrictions Intra-interface communication is only available in routed firewall mode. Inter-interface communication is available for both routed and transparent mode. Detailed Steps To enable interfaces on the same security level so that they can communicate with each other, enter the following command: hostname(config)# same-security-traffic permit inter-interface (Routed mode only) To enable communication between hosts connected to the same interface, enter the following command: hostname(config)# same-security-traffic permit intra-interface6-31 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 6 Configuring Interfaces Enabling Jumbo Frame Support (ASA 5580 and 5585-X) To disable these settings, use the no form of the command. Enabling Jumbo Frame Support (ASA 5580 and 5585-X) A jumbo frame is an Ethernet packet larger than the standard maximum of 1518 bytes (including Layer 2 header and FCS), up to 9216 bytes. You can enable support for jumbo frames for all interfaces by increasing the amount of memory to process Ethernet frames. Assigning more memory for jumbo frames might limit the maximum use of other features, such as access lists. Note Other platform models do not support jumbo frames. Prerequisites In multiple context mode, set this option in the system execution space. Detailed Steps To enable jumbo frame support for the ASA 5580 and 5585-X ASA, enter the following command: hostname(config)# jumbo-frame reservation To disable jumbo frames, use the no form of this command. Note Changes in this setting require you to reboot the security appliance. Be sure to set the MTU for each interface that needs to transmit jumbo frames to a higher value than the default 1500; for example, set the value to 9000 using the mtu command. In multiple context mode, set the MTU within each context. Examples The following example enables jumbo frame reservation, saves the configuration, and reloads the ASA: hostname(config)# jumbo-frame reservation WARNING: this command will take effect after the running-config is saved and the system has been rebooted. Command accepted. hostname(config)# write memory Building configuration... Cryptochecksum: 718e3706 4edb11ea 69af58d0 0a6b7cb5 70291 bytes copied in 3.710 secs (23430 bytes/sec) [OK] hostname(config)# reload Proceed with reload? [confirm] Y6-32 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 6 Configuring Interfaces Monitoring Interfaces Monitoring Interfaces To monitor interfaces, enter one of the following commands: Configuration Examples for Interfaces The following example configures parameters for the physical interface in single mode: hostname(config)# interface gigabitethernet 0/1 hostname(config-if)# speed 1000 hostname(config-if)# duplex full hostname(config-if)# nameif inside hostname(config-if)# security-level 100 hostname(config-if)# ip address 10.1.1.1 255.255.255.0 hostname(config-if)# no shutdown The following example configures parameters for a subinterface in single mode: hostname(config)# interface gigabitethernet 0/1.1 hostname(config-subif)# vlan 101 hostname(config-subif)# nameif dmz1 hostname(config-subif)# security-level 50 hostname(config-subif)# ip address 10.1.2.1 255.255.255.0 hostname(config-subif)# mac-address 000C.F142.4CDE standby 020C.F142.4CDE hostname(config-subif)# no shutdown The following example configures interface parameters in multiple context mode for the system configuration, and allocates the gigabitethernet 0/1.1 subinterface to contextA: hostname(config)# interface gigabitethernet 0/1 hostname(config-if)# speed 1000 hostname(config-if)# duplex full hostname(config-if)# no shutdown hostname(config-if)# interface gigabitethernet 0/1.1 hostname(config-subif)# vlan 101 hostname(config-subif)# no shutdown hostname(config-subif)# context contextA hostname(config-ctx)# ... hostname(config-ctx)# allocate-interface gigabitethernet 0/1.1 The following example configures parameters in multiple context mode for the context configuration: hostname/contextA(config)# interface gigabitethernet 0/1.1 hostname/contextA(config-if)# nameif inside hostname/contextA(config-if)# security-level 100 hostname/contextA(config-if)# ip address 10.1.2.1 255.255.255.0 hostname/contextA(config-if)# mac-address 030C.F142.4CDE standby 040C.F142.4CDE hostname/contextA(config-if)# no shutdown The following example configures three VLAN interfaces for the Base license. The third home interface cannot forward traffic to the business interface. hostname(config)# interface vlan 100 hostname(config-if)# nameif outside Command Purpose show interface Displays interface statistics. show interface ip brief Displays interface IP addresses and status.6-33 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 6 Configuring Interfaces Feature History for Interfaces hostname(config-if)# security-level 0 hostname(config-if)# ip address dhcp hostname(config-if)# no shutdown hostname(config-if)# interface vlan 200 hostname(config-if)# nameif business hostname(config-if)# security-level 100 hostname(config-if)# ip address 10.1.1.1 255.255.255.0 hostname(config-if)# no shutdown hostname(config-if)# interface vlan 300 hostname(config-if)# no forward interface vlan 200 hostname(config-if)# nameif home hostname(config-if)# security-level 50 hostname(config-if)# ip address 10.2.1.1 255.255.255.0 hostname(config-if)# no shutdown Feature History for Interfaces Table 6-1 lists the release history for this feature. Table 6-1 Feature History for Interfaces Feature Name Releases Feature Information Increased VLANs 7.0(5) Increased the following limits: • ASA5510 Base license VLANs from 0 to 10. • ASA5510 Security Plus license VLANs from 10 to 25. • ASA5520 VLANs from 25 to 100. • ASA5540 VLANs from 100 to 200. Increased interfaces for the Base license on the ASA 5510 7.2(2) For the Base license on the ASA 5510, the maximum number of interfaces was increased from 3 plus a management interface to unlimited interfaces. Increased VLANs 7.2(2) The maximum number of VLANs for the Security Plus license on the ASA 5505 ASA was increased from 5 (3 fully functional; 1 failover; one restricted to a backup interface) to 20 fully functional interfaces. In addition, the number of trunk ports was increased from 1 to 8. Now there are 20 fully functional interfaces, you do not need to use the backup interface command to cripple a backup ISP interface; you can use a fully-functional interface for it. The backup interface command is still useful for an Easy VPN configuration. VLAN limits were also increased for the ASA 5510 ASA (from 10 to 50 for the Base license, and from 25 to 100 for the Security Plus license), the ASA 5520 ASA (from 100 to 150), the ASA 5550 ASA (from 200 to 250).6-34 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 6 Configuring Interfaces Feature History for Interfaces Gigabit Ethernet Support for the ASA 5510 Security Plus License 7.2(3) The ASA 5510 ASA now supports GE (Gigabit Ethernet) for port 0 and 1 with the Security Plus license. If you upgrade the license from Base to Security Plus, the capacity of the external Ethernet0/0 and Ethernet0/1 ports increases from the original FE (Fast Ethernet) (100 Mbps) to GE (1000 Mbps). The interface names will remain Ethernet 0/0 and Ethernet 0/1. Use the speed command to change the speed on the interface and use the show interface command to see what speed is currently configured for each interface. Native VLAN support for the ASA 5505 7.2(4)/8.0(4) You can now include the native VLAN in an ASA 5505 trunk port using the switchport trunk native vlan command. Gigabit Ethernet Support for the ASA 5510 Base License 7.2(4)/8.0(4) The ASA 5510 ASA now supports GE (Gigabit Ethernet) for port 0 and 1 in the Base license (support was previously added for the Security Plus license). The capacity of the external Ethernet0/0 and Ethernet0/1 ports increases from the original FE (Fast Ethernet) (100 Mbps) to GE (1000 Mbps). The interface names will remain Ethernet 0/0 and Ethernet 0/1. Use the speed command to change the speed on the interface and use the show interface command to see what speed is currently configured for each interface. Jumbo packet support for the ASA 5580 8.1(1) The Cisco ASA 5580 supports jumbo frames when you enter the jumbo-frame reservation command. A jumbo frame is an Ethernet packet larger than the standard maximum of 1518 bytes (including Layer 2 header and FCS), up to 9216 bytes. You can enable support for jumbo frames for all interfaces by increasing the amount of memory to process Ethernet frames. Assigning more memory for jumbo frames might limit the maximum use of other features, such as access lists. In ASDM, see Configuration > Device Setup > Interfaces > Add/Edit Interface > Advanced. Increased VLANs for the ASA 5580 8.1(2) The number of VLANs supported on the ASA 5580 are increased from 100 to 250. Support for Pause Frames for Flow Control on the ASA 5580 10 Gigabit Ethernet Interfaces 8.2(2) You can now enable pause (XOFF) frames for flow control. This feature is also supported for the ASA 5585-X. The following command was introduced: flowcontrol. Table 6-1 Feature History for Interfaces (continued) Feature Name Releases Feature InformationC H A P T E R 7-1 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 7 Configuring DHCP and Dynamic DNS Services This chapter describes how to configure the DHCP server and dynamic DNS (DDNS) update methods. This chapter includes the following topics: • Configuring DHCP Services, page 7-1 • Configuring DDNS Services, page 7-7 Configuring DHCP Services This section includes the following topics: • Information about DHCP, page 7-1 • Licensing Requirements for DHCP, page 7-1 • Guidelines and Limitations, page 7-2 • Configuring a DHCP Server, page 7-2 • Configuring DHCP Relay Services, page 7-6 Information about DHCP DHCP provides network configuration parameters, such as IP addresses, to DHCP clients. The ASA can provide a DHCP server or DHCP relay services to DHCP clients attached to ASA interfaces. The DHCP server provides network configuration parameters directly to DHCP clients. DHCP relay passes DHCP requests received on one interface to an external DHCP server located behind a different interface. Licensing Requirements for DHCP Table 7-1 lists the license requirements for DHCP. Table 7-1 License Requirements Model License Requirement All models Base License.7-2 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 7 Configuring DHCP and Dynamic DNS Services Configuring DHCP Services For the Cisco ASA 5505 Adaptive Security Appliance, the maximum number of DHCP client addresses varies depending on the license: • If the Host limit is 10 hosts, we limit the DHCP pool to 32 addresses. • If the Host limit is 50 hosts, we limit the DHCP pool to 128 addresses. • If the Host limit is unlimited, we limit the DHCP pool to 256 addresses. Note By default the Cisco ASA 5505 Adaptive Security Appliance comes with a 10-user license. Guidelines and Limitations Use the following guidelines to configure the DHCP server: • You can configure a DHCP server on each interface of the ASA. Each interface can have its own pool of addresses to draw from. However the other DHCP settings, such as DNS servers, domain name, options, ping timeout, and WINS servers, are configured globally and used by the DHCP server on all interfaces. • You cannot configure a DHCP client or DHCP Relay services on an interface on which the server is enabled. Additionally, DHCP clients must be directly connected to the interface on which the server is enabled. • The ASA does not support QIP DHCP servers for use with DHCP Proxy. • When it receives a DHCP request, the security appliance sends a discovery message to the DHCP server. This message includes the IP address (within a subnetwork) configured with the dhcp-network-scope command in the group policy. If the server has an address pool that falls within that subnetwork, it sends the offer message with the pool information to the IP address—not to the source IP address of the discovery message. • For example, if the server has a pool of the range 209.165.200.225 to 209.165.200.254, mask 255.255.255.0, and the IP address specified by the dhcp-network-scope command is 209.165.200.1, the server sends that pool in the offer message to the security appliance. • You can add up to four DHCP relay servers per interface; however, there is a limit of ten DHCP relay servers total that can be configured on the ASA. You must add at least one dhcprelay server command to the ASA configuration before you can enter the dhcprelay enable command. You cannot configure a DHCP client on an interface that has a DHCP relay server configured Configuring a DHCP Server This section describes how to configure DHCP server provided by the ASA. This section includes the following topics: • Enabling the DHCP Server, page 7-2 • Configuring DHCP Options, page 7-3 • Using Cisco IP Phones with a DHCP Server, page 7-5 Enabling the DHCP Server The ASA can act as a DHCP server. DHCP is a protocol that supplies network settings to hosts including the host IP address, the default gateway, and a DNS server.7-3 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 7 Configuring DHCP and Dynamic DNS Services Configuring DHCP Services Note The ASA DHCP server does not support BOOTP requests. In multiple context mode, you cannot enable the DHCP server or DHCP relay on an interface that is used by more than one context. To enable the DHCP server on a given ASA interface, perform the following steps: Enter the following command to define the address pool: Configuring DHCP Options You can configure the ASA to send information for the DHCP options listed in RFC 2132. The DHCP options fall into one of three categories: Command Purpose Step 1 dhcpd address ip_address-ip_address interface_name Example: hostname(config)# dhcpd address 10.0.1.101-10.0.1.110 inside Create a DHCP address pool. The ASA assigns a client one of the addresses from this pool to use for a given length of time. These addresses are the local, untranslated addresses for the directly connected network. The address pool must be on the same subnet as the ASA interface. Step 2 dhcpd dns dns1 [dns2] Example: hostname(config)# dhcpd dns 209.165.201.2 209.165.202.129 (Optional) Specifies the IP address(es) of the DNS server(s). Step 3 dhcpd wins wins1 [wins2] Example: hostname(config)# dhcpd wins 209.165.201.5 (Optional) Specifies the IP address(es) of the WINS server(s). You can specify up to two WINS servers. Step 4 dhcpd lease lease_length Example: hostname(config)# dhcpd lease 3000 (Optional) Change the lease length to be granted to the client. This lease equals the amount of time (in seconds) the client can use its allocated IP address before the lease expires. Enter a value between 0 to 1,048,575. The default value is 3600 seconds. Step 5 dhcpd domain domain_name Example: hostname(config)# dhcpd domain example.com (Optional) Configures the domain name. Step 6 dhcpd ping_timeout milliseconds (Optional) Configures the DHCP ping timeout value. To avoid address conflicts, the ASA sends two ICMP ping packets to an address before assigning that address to a DHCP client. This command specifies the timeout value for those packets. Step 7 dhcpd option 3 ip gateway_ip (Transparent Firewall Mode) Defines a default gateway that is sent to DHCP clients. If you do not use the DHCP option 3 to define the default gateway, DHCP clients use the IP address of the management interface. The management interface does not route traffic. Step 8 dhcpd enable interface_name Enables the DHCP daemon within the ASA to listen for DHCP client requests on the enabled interface7-4 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 7 Configuring DHCP and Dynamic DNS Services Configuring DHCP Services The ASA supports all three categories of DHCP options. To configure a DHCP option, do one of the following: Options that return an IP address Options that return a text string Options that return a hexadecimal value . Note The ASA does not verify that the option type and value that you provide match the expected type and value for the option code as defined in RFC 2132. For example, you can enter the dhcpd option 46 ascii hello command and the ASA accepts the configuration although option 46 is defined in RFC 2132 as expecting a single-digit, hexadecimal value. For more information about the option codes and their associated types and expected values, refer to RFC 2132. Table 7-2 shows the DHCP options that are not supported by the dhcpd option command. Command Purpose dhcpd option code ip addr_1 [addr_2] Configures a DHCP option that returns one or two IP addresses. Command Purpose dhcpd option code ascii text Configures a DHCP option that returns one or two IP addresses. Command Purpose dhcpd option code hex value Configures a DHCP option that returns a hexadecimal value. Table 7-2 Unsupported DHCP Options Option Code Description 0 DHCPOPT_PAD 1 HCPOPT_SUBNET_MASK 12 DHCPOPT_HOST_NAME 50 DHCPOPT_REQUESTED_ADDRESS 51 DHCPOPT_LEASE_TIME 52 DHCPOPT_OPTION_OVERLOAD 53 DHCPOPT_MESSAGE_TYPE 54 DHCPOPT_SERVER_IDENTIFIER 58 DHCPOPT_RENEWAL_TIME 59 DHCPOPT_REBINDING_TIME7-5 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 7 Configuring DHCP and Dynamic DNS Services Configuring DHCP Services Specific options, DHCP option 3, 66, and 150, are used to configure Cisco IP Phones. See the “Using Cisco IP Phones with a DHCP Server” section on page 7-5 topic for more information about configuring those options. Using Cisco IP Phones with a DHCP Server Enterprises with small branch offices that implement a Cisco IP Telephony Voice over IP solution typically implement Cisco CallManager at a central office to control Cisco IP Phones at small branch offices. This implementation allows centralized call processing, reduces the equipment required, and eliminates the administration of additional Cisco CallManager and other servers at branch offices. Cisco IP Phones download their configuration from a TFTP server. When a Cisco IP Phone starts, if it does not have both the IP address and TFTP server IP address preconfigured, it sends a request with option 150 or 66 to the DHCP server to obtain this information. • DHCP option 150 provides the IP addresses of a list of TFTP servers. • DHCP option 66 gives the IP address or the hostname of a single TFTP server. Cisco IP Phones might also include DHCP option 3 in their requests, which sets the default route. Cisco IP Phones might include both option 150 and 66 in a single request. In this case, the ASA DHCP server provides values for both options in the response if they are configured on the ASA. You can configure the ASA to send information for most options listed in RFC 2132. The following example shows the syntax for any option number, as well as the syntax for commonly-used options 66, 150, and 3: 61 DHCPOPT_CLIENT_IDENTIFIER 67 DHCPOPT_BOOT_FILE_NAME 82 DHCPOPT_RELAY_INFORMATION 255 DHCPOPT_END Table 7-2 Unsupported DHCP Options Option Code Description Command Purpose dhcpd option number value Provides information for DHCP requests that include an option number as specified in RFC-2132 Command Purpose dhcpd option 66 ascii server_name Provides the IP address or name of a TFTP server for option 66 Command Purpose dhcpd option 150 ip server_ip1 [server_ip2] Provides the IP address or names of one or two TFTP servers for option 1507-6 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 7 Configuring DHCP and Dynamic DNS Services Configuring DHCP Services The server_ip1 is the IP address or name of the primary TFTP server while server_ip2 is the IP address or name of the secondary TFTP server. A maximum of two TFTP servers can be identified using option 150. Configuring DHCP Relay Services A DHCP relay agent allows the ASA to forward DHCP requests from clients to a router connected to a different interface. The following restrictions apply to the use of the DHCP relay agent: • The relay agent cannot be enabled if the DHCP server feature is also enabled. • DHCP clients must be directly connected to the ASA and cannot send requests through another relay agent or a router. • For multiple context mode, you cannot enable DHCP relay on an interface that is used by more than one context. • DHCP Relay services are not available in transparent firewall mode. A ASA in transparent firewall mode only allows ARP traffic through; all other traffic requires an access list. To allow DHCP requests and replies through the ASA in transparent mode, you need to configure two access lists, one that allows DCHP requests from the inside interface to the outside, and one that allows the replies from the server in the other direction. • When DHCP relay is enabled and more than one DHCP relay server is defined, the security appliance forwards client requests to each defined DHCP relay server. Replies from the servers are also forwarded to the client until the client DHCP relay binding is removed. The binding is removed when the security appliance receives any of the following DHCP messages: ACK, NACK, or decline. Note You cannot enable DHCP Relay on an interface running DHCP Proxy. You must Remove VPN DHCP configuration first or you will see an error message. This error happens if both DHCP relay and DHCP proxy are enabled. Ensure that either DHCP relay or DHCP proxy are enabled, but not both. To enable DHCP relay, perform the following steps: Command Purpose dhcpd option 3 ip router_ip1 Sets the default route Command Purpose Step 1 dhcprelay server ip_address if_name Example: hostname(config)# dhcprelay server 201.168.200.4 Set the IP address of a DHCP server on a different interface from the DHCP client. You can use this command up to 4 times to identify up to 4 servers. Step 2 dhcprelay enable interface Example: hostname(config)# dhcprelay enable inside Enables DHCP relay on the interface connected to the clients.7-7 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 7 Configuring DHCP and Dynamic DNS Services Configuring DDNS Services Feature History for DHCP Table 7-3 lists the release history for this feature. Configuring DDNS Services This section includes the following topics: • Information about DDNS, page 7-7 • Licensing Requirements For DDNS, page 7-7 • Configuring DDNS, page 7-8 • Configuration Examples for DDNS, page 7-8 • Feature History for DDNS, page 7-11 Information about DDNS DDNS update integrates DNS with DHCP. The two protocols are complementary: DHCP centralizes and automates IP address allocation; DDNS update automatically records the association between assigned addresses and hostnames at pre-defined intervals. DDNS allows frequently changing address-hostname associations to be updated frequently. Mobile hosts, for example, can then move freely on a network without user or administrator intervention. DDNS provides the necessary dynamic updating and synchronizing of the name to address and address to name mappings on the DNS server. Licensing Requirements For DDNS Table 7-4 lists the license requirements for DDNS. Table 7-4 License Requirements Step 3 dhcprelay timeout seconds (Optional) Set the number of seconds allowed for relay address negotiation. Step 4 dhcprelay setroute interface_name Example: hostname(config)# dhcprelay setroute inside (Optional) Change the first default router address in the packet sent from the DHCP server to the address of the ASA interface. This action allows the client to set its default route to point to the ASA even if the DHCP server specifies a different router. If there is no default router option in the packet, the ASA adds one containing the interface address. Command Purpose Table 7-3 Feature History for DHCP Feature Name Releases Feature Information DHCP 7.0(1) This feature was introduced.7-8 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 7 Configuring DHCP and Dynamic DNS Services Configuring DDNS Services Configuring DDNS This section describes examples for configuring the ASA to support Dynamic DNS. DDNS update integrates DNS with DHCP. The two protocols are complementary—DHCP centralizes and automates IP address allocation, while dynamic DNS update automatically records the association between assigned addresses and hostnames. When you use DHCP and dynamic DNS update, this configures a host automatically for network access whenever it attaches to the IP network. You can locate and reach the host using its permanent, unique DNS hostname. Mobile hosts, for example, can move freely without user or administrator intervention. DDNS provides address and domain name mappings so hosts can find each other even though their DHCP-assigned IP addresses change frequently. The DDNS name and address mappings are held on the DHCP server in two resource records: the A RR contains the name to IP address mapping while the PTR RR maps addresses to names. Of the two methods for performing DDNS updates—the IETF standard defined by RFC 2136 and a generic HTTP method—the ASA supports the IETF method in this release. The two most common DDNS update configurations are: • The DHCP client updates the A RR while the DHCP server updates PTR RR. • The DHCP server updates both the A and PTR RRs. In general, the DHCP server maintains DNS PTR RRs on behalf of clients. Clients may be configured to perform all desired DNS updates. The server may be configured to honor these updates or not. To update the PTR RR, the DHCP server must know the Fully Qualified Domain Name of the client. The client provides an FQDN to the server using a DHCP option called Client FQDN. Configuration Examples for DDNS The following examples present these common scenarios: • Example 1: Client Updates Both A and PTR RRs for Static IP Addresses, page 7-8 • Example 2: Client Updates Both A and PTR RRs; DHCP Server Honors Client Update Request; FQDN Provided Through Configuration, page 7-9 • Example 3: Client Includes FQDN Option Instructing Server Not to Update Either RR; Server Overrides Client and Updates Both RRs., page 7-9 • Example 4: Client Asks Server To Perform Both Updates; Server Configured to Update PTR RR Only; Honors Client Request and Updates Both A and PTR RR, page 7-10 • Example 5: Client Updates A RR; Server Updates PTR RR, page 7-10 Example 1: Client Updates Both A and PTR RRs for Static IP Addresses The following example configures the client to request that it update both A and PTR resource records for static IP addresses. To configure this example, perform the following steps: Step 1 To define a DDNS update method called ddns-2 that requests that the client update both the A and PTR RRs, enter the following commands: Model License Requirement All models Base License.7-9 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 7 Configuring DHCP and Dynamic DNS Services Configuring DDNS Services hostname(config)# ddns update method ddns-2 hostname(DDNS-update-method)# ddns both Step 2 To associate the method ddns-2 with the eth1 interface, enter the following commands: hostname(DDNS-update-method)# interface eth1 hostname(config-if)# ddns update ddns-2 hostname(config-if)# ddns update hostname asa.example.com Step 3 To configure a static IP address for eth1, enter the following commands: hostname(config-if)# ip address 10.0.0.40 255.255.255.0 Example 2: Client Updates Both A and PTR RRs; DHCP Server Honors Client Update Request; FQDN Provided Through Configuration The following example configures 1) the DHCP client to request that it update both the A and PTR RRs, and 2) the DHCP server to honor the requests. To configure this example, perform the following steps: Step 1 To configure the DHCP client to request that the DHCP server perform no updates, enter the following command: hostname(config)# dhcp-client update dns server none Step 2 To create a DDNS update method named ddns-2 on the DHCP client that requests that the client perform both A and PTR updates, enter the following commands: hostname(config)# ddns update method ddns-2 hostname(DDNS-update-method)# ddns both Step 3 To associate the method named ddns-2 with the ASA interface named Ethernet0, and enable DHCP on the interface, enter the following commands: hostname(DDNS-update-method)# interface Ethernet0 hostname(if-config)# ddns update ddns-2 hostname(if-config)# ddns update hostname asa.example.com hostname(if-config)# ip address dhcp Step 4 To configure the DHCP server, enter the following command: hostname(if-config)# dhcpd update dns Example 3: Client Includes FQDN Option Instructing Server Not to Update Either RR; Server Overrides Client and Updates Both RRs. The following example configures the DHCP client to include the FQDN option instructing the DHCP server not to update either the A or PTR updates. The example also configures the server to override the client request. As a result, the client backs off without performing any updates. To configure this scenario, perform the following steps: Step 1 To configure the update method named ddns-2 to request that it make both A and PTR RR updates, enter the following commands: hostname(config)# ddns update method ddns-2 hostname(DDNS-update-method)# ddns both7-10 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 7 Configuring DHCP and Dynamic DNS Services Configuring DDNS Services Step 2 To assign the DDNS update method named ddns-2 on interface Ethernet0 and provide the client hostname (asa), enter the following commands: hostname(DDNS-update-method)# interface Ethernet0 hostname(if-config)# ddns update ddns-2 hostname(if-config)# ddns update hostname asa.example.com Step 3 To enable the DHCP client feature on the interface, enter the following commands: hostname(if-config)# dhcp client update dns server none hostname(if-config)# ip address dhcp Step 4 To configure the DHCP server to override the client update requests, enter the following command: hostname(if-config)# dhcpd update dns both override Example 4: Client Asks Server To Perform Both Updates; Server Configured to Update PTR RR Only; Honors Client Request and Updates Both A and PTR RR The following example configures the server to perform only PTR RR updates by default. However, the server honors the client request that it perform both A and PTR updates. The server also forms the FQDN by appending the domain name (example.com) to the hostname provided by the client (asa). To configure this scenario, perform the following steps: Step 1 To configure the DHCP client on interface Ethernet0, enter the following commands: hostname(config)# interface Ethernet0 hostname(config-if)# dhcp client update dns both hostname(config-if)# ddns update hostname asa Step 2 To configure the DHCP server, enter the following commands: hostname(config-if)# dhcpd update dns hostname(config-if)# dhcpd domain example.com Example 5: Client Updates A RR; Server Updates PTR RR The following example configures the client to update the A resource record and the server to update the PTR records. Also, the client uses the domain name from the DHCP server to form the FQDN. To configure this scenario, perform the following steps: Step 1 To define the DDNS update method named ddns-2, enter the following commands: hostname(config)# ddns update method ddns-2 hostname(DDNS-update-method)# ddns Step 2 To configure the DHCP client for interface Ethernet0 and assign the update method to the interface, enter the following commands: hostname(DDNS-update-method)# interface Ethernet0 hostname(config-if)# dhcp client update dns hostname(config-if)# ddns update ddns-2 hostname(config-if)# ddns update hostname asa7-11 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 7 Configuring DHCP and Dynamic DNS Services Configuring DDNS Services Step 3 To configure the DHCP server, enter the following commands: hostname(config-if)# dhcpd update dns hostname(config-if)# dhcpd domain example.com Feature History for DDNS Table 7-5 lists the release history for this feature. Table 7-5 Feature History for DDNS Feature Name Releases Feature Information DHCP 7.0(1) This feature was introduced. DDNS 7.0(1) This feature was introduced.7-12 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 7 Configuring DHCP and Dynamic DNS Services Configuring DDNS ServicesC H A P T E R 8-1 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 8 Configuring Basic Settings This chapter describes how to configure basic settings on your ASA that are typically required for a functioning configuration. This chapter includes the following sections: • Changing the Login Password, page 8-1 • Changing the Enable Password, page 8-2 • Setting the Hostname, page 8-2 • Setting the Domain Name, page 8-3 • Setting the Date and Time, page 8-3 • Configuring the DNS Server, page 8-6 • Setting the Management IP Address for a Transparent Firewall, page 8-7 Changing the Login Password The login password is used for Telnet and SSH connections. By default, the login password is “cisco.” To change the password, enter the following command: Command Purpose {passwd | password} password Changes the password. You can enter passwd or password. The password is a case-sensitive password of up to 16 alphanumeric and special characters. You can use any character in the password except a question mark or a space. The password is saved in the configuration in encrypted form, so you cannot view the original password after you enter it. Use the no password command to restore the password to the default setting.8-2 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 8 Configuring Basic Settings Changing the Enable Password Changing the Enable Password The enable password lets you enter privileged EXEC mode. By default, the enable password is blank. To change the enable password, enter the following command: Setting the Hostname When you set a hostname for the ASA, that name appears in the command line prompt. If you establish sessions to multiple devices, the hostname helps you keep track of where you enter commands. The default hostname depends on your platform. For multiple context mode, the hostname that you set in the system execution space appears in the command line prompt for all contexts. The hostname that you optionally set within a context does not appear in the command line, but can be used by the banner command $(hostname) token. Command Purpose enable password password Changes the enable password. The password is a case-sensitive password of up to 16 alphanumeric and special characters. You can use any character in the password except a question mark or a space. This command changes the password for the highest privilege level. If you configure local command authorization, you can set enable passwords for each privilege level from 0 to 15. The password is saved in the configuration in encrypted form, so you cannot view the original password after you enter it. Enter the enable password command without a password to set the password to the default, which is blank. Command Purpose hostname name Example: hostname(config)# hostname farscape farscape(config)# Specifies the hostname for the ASA or for a context. This name can be up to 63 characters. A hostname must start and end with a letter or digit, and have as interior characters only letters, digits, or a hyphen.8-3 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 8 Configuring Basic Settings Setting the Domain Name Setting the Domain Name The ASA appends the domain name as a suffix to unqualified names. For example, if you set the domain name to “example.com,” and specify a syslog server by the unqualified name of “jupiter,” then the security appliance qualifies the name to “jupiter.example.com.” The default domain name is default.domain.invalid. For multiple context mode, you can set the domain name for each context, as well as within the system execution space. Setting the Date and Time This section describes how to set the date and time, either manually or dynamically using an NTP server. Time derived from an NTP server overrides any time set manually. This section also describes how to set the time zone and daylight saving time date range. Note In multiple context mode, set the time in the system configuration only. This section includes the following topics: • Setting the Time Zone and Daylight Saving Time Date Range, page 8-4 • Setting the Date and Time Using an NTP Server, page 8-5 • Setting the Date and Time Manually, page 8-6 Command Purpose domain-name name Example: hostname(config)# domain-name example.com Specifies the domain name for the ASA. For example, to set the domain as example.com.8-4 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 8 Configuring Basic Settings Setting the Date and Time Setting the Time Zone and Daylight Saving Time Date Range By default, the time zone is UTC and the daylight saving time date range is from 2:00 a.m. on the first Sunday in April to 2:00 a.m. on the last Sunday in October. To change the time zone and daylight saving time date range, perform the following steps: Command Purpose Step 1 clock timezone zone [-]hours [minutes] Sets the time zone. Where zone specifies the time zone as a string, for example, PST for Pacific Standard Time. The [-]hours value sets the number of hours of offset from UTC. For example, PST is -8 hours. The minutes value sets the number of minutes of offset from UTC. Step 2 Do one of the following to change the date range for daylight saving time from the default, enter one of the following commands. The default recurring date range is from 2:00 a.m. on the second Sunday in March to 2:00 a.m. on the first Sunday in November: clock summer-time zone date {day month | month day} year hh:mm {day month | month day} year hh:mm [offset] Sets the start and end dates for daylight saving time as a specific date in a specific year. If you use this command, you need to reset the dates every year. The zone value specifies the time zone as a string, for example, PDT for Pacific Daylight Time. The day value sets the day of the month, from 1 to 31. You can enter the day and month as April 1 or as 1 April, for example, depending on your standard date format. The month value sets the month as a string. You can enter the day and month as April 1 or as 1 April, for example, depending on your standard date format. The year value sets the year using four digits, for example, 2004. The year range is 1993 to 2035. The hh:mm value sets the hour and minutes in 24-hour time. The offset value sets the number of minutes to change the time for daylight saving time. By default, the value is 60 minutes. clock summer-time zone recurring [week weekday month hh:mm week weekday month hh:mm] [offset] Specifies the start and end dates for daylight saving time, in the form of a day and time of the month, and not a specific date in a year. This command lets you set a recurring date range that you do not need to alter yearly. The zone value specifies the time zone as a string, for example, PDT for Pacific Daylight Time. The week value specifies the week of the month as an integer between 1 and 4 or as the words first or last. For example, if the day might fall in the partial fifth week, then specify last. The weekday value specifies the day of the week: Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, and so on. The month value sets the month as a string. The hh:mm value sets the hour and minutes in 24-hour time. The offset value sets the number of minutes to change the time for daylight saving time. By default, the value is 60 minutes.8-5 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 8 Configuring Basic Settings Setting the Date and Time Setting the Date and Time Using an NTP Server To obtain the date and time from an NTP server, perform the following steps:S Command Purpose Step 1 ntp authenticate Enables authentication with an NTP server. Step 2 ntp trusted-key key_id Specifies an authentication key ID to be a trusted key, which is required for authentication with an NTP server. Where the key_id is between 1 and 4294967295. You can enter multiple trusted keys for use with multiple servers. Step 3 ntp authentication-key key_id md5 key Sets a key to authenticate with an NTP server. Where key_id is the ID you set in Step 2 using the ntp trusted-key command, and key is a string up to 32 characters in length. Step 4 ntp server ip_address [key key_id] [source interface_name] [prefer] Identifies an NTP server. Where the key_id is the ID you set in Step 2 using the ntp trusted-key command. The source interface_name identifies the outgoing interface for NTP packets if you do not want to use the default interface in the routing table. Because the system does not include any interfaces in multiple context mode, specify an interface name defined in the admin context. The prefer keyword sets this NTP server as the preferred server if multiple servers have similar accuracy. NTP uses an algorithm to determine which server is the most accurate and synchronizes to that one. If servers are of similar accuracy, then the prefer keyword specifies which of those servers to use. However, if a server is significantly more accurate than the preferred one, the ASA uses the more accurate one. For example, the ASA uses a server of stratum 2 over a server of stratum 3 that is preferred. You can identify multiple servers; the ASA uses the most accurate server.8-6 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 8 Configuring Basic Settings Configuring the DNS Server Setting the Date and Time Manually Configuring the DNS Server Some ASA features require use of a DNS server to access external servers by domain name; for example, the Botnet Traffic Filter feature requires a DNS server to access the dynamic database server and to resolve entries in the static database. Other features, such as the ping or traceroute command, let you enter a name that you want to PING for traceroute, and the ASA can resolve the name by communicating with a DNS server. Many SSL VPN and certificate commands also support names. Note The ASA has limited support for using the DNS server, depending on the feature. For example, most commands require you to enter an IP address and can only use a name when you manually configure the name command to associate a name with an IP address and enable use of the names using the names command. For information about dynamic DNS, see the “Configuring DDNS” section on page 7-8. Prerequisites Make sure you configure the appropriate routing for any interface on which you enable DNS domain lookup so you can reach the DNS server. See the “Information About Routing” section on page 18-1 for more information about routing. Command Purpose clock set hh:mm:ss {month day | day month} year Sets the date time manually. Where hh:mm:ss sets the hour, minutes, and seconds in 24-hour time. For example, set 20:54:00 for 8:54 pm. The day value sets the day of the month, from 1 to 31. You can enter the day and month as april 1 or as 1 april, for example, depending on your standard date format. The month value sets the month. Depending on your standard date format, you can enter the day and month as april 1 or as 1 april. The year value sets the year using four digits, for example, 2004. The year range is 1993 to 2035. The default time zone is UTC. If you change the time zone after you enter the clock set command using the clock timezone command, the time automatically adjusts to the new time zone. This command sets the time in the hardware chip, and does not save the time in the configuration file. This time endures reboots. Unlike the other clock commands, this command is a privileged EXEC command. To reset the clock, you need to set a new time for the clock set command.8-7 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 8 Configuring Basic Settings Setting the Management IP Address for a Transparent Firewall Detailed Steps Setting the Management IP Address for a Transparent Firewall This section describes how to configure the management IP address for transparent firewall mode, and includes the following topics: • Information About the Management IP Address, page 8-7 • Licensing Requirements for the Management IP Address for a Transparent Firewall, page 8-8 • Guidelines and Limitations, page 8-8 • Configuring the IPv4 Address, page 8-9 • Configuring the IPv6 Address, page 8-9 • Configuration Examples for the Management IP Address for a Transparent Firewall, page 8-10 • Feature History for the Management IP Address for a Transparent Firewall, page 8-10 Information About the Management IP Address A transparent firewall does not participate in IP routing. The only IP configuration required for the ASA is to set the management IP address. This address is required because the ASA uses this address as the source address for traffic originating on the ASA, such as system messages or communications with AAA servers. You can also use this address for remote management access. For IPv4 traffic, the management IP address is required to pass any traffic. For IPv6 traffic, you must, at a minimum, configure the link-local addresses to pass traffic, but a global management address is recommended for full functionality, including remote management and other management operations. Command Purpose Step 1 dns domain-lookup interface_name Example: hostname(config)# dns domain-lookup inside Enables the ASA to send DNS requests to a DNS server to perform a name lookup for supported commands. Step 2 dns server-group DefaultDNS Example: hostname(config)# dns server-group DefaultDNS Specifies the DNS server group that the ASA uses for from-the-box requests. Other DNS server groups can be configured for VPN tunnel groups. See the tunnel-group command in the Cisco ASA 5500 Series Command Reference for more information. Step 3 name-server ip_address [ip_address2] [...] [ip_address6] Example: hostname(config-dns-server-group)# name-server 10.1.1.5 192.168.1.67 209.165.201.6 Specifies one or more DNS servers. You can enter all 6 IP addresses in the same command, separated by spaces, or you can enter each command separately. The security appliance tries each DNS server in order until it receives a response. 8-8 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 8 Configuring Basic Settings Setting the Management IP Address for a Transparent Firewall Note In addition to the management IP address for the device, you can configure an IP address for the Management 0/0 or 0/1 management-only interface. This IP address can be on a separate subnet from the main management IP address. See the “Configuring General Interface Parameters” section on page 6-24. Although you do not configure IPv4 or global IPv6 addresses for other interfaces, you still need to configure the security level and interface name according to the “Configuring General Interface Parameters” section on page 6-24. Licensing Requirements for the Management IP Address for a Transparent Firewall Guidelines and Limitations This section includes the guidelines and limitations for this feature. Context Mode Guidelines Supported in single and multiple context mode. For multiple context mode, set the management IP address within each context. Firewall Mode Guidelines Supported in transparent firewall mode. For routed mode, set the IP address for each interface according to the “Configuring General Interface Parameters” section on page 6-24. IPv6 Guidelines • Supports IPv6. • The following IPv6 address-related commands are not supported in transparent mode, because they require router capabilities: – ipv6 address autoconfig – ipv6 nd suppress-ra For a complete list of IPv6 commands that are not supported in transparent mode, see the “IPv6-Enabled Commands” section on page 18-9. • No support for IPv6 anycast addresses. • You can configure both IPv6 and IPv4 addresses. Model License Requirement All models Base License.8-9 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 8 Configuring Basic Settings Setting the Management IP Address for a Transparent Firewall Additional Guidelines and Limitations • In addition to the management IP address for the device, you can configure an IP address for the Management 0/0 or 0/1 management-only interface. This IP address can be on a separate subnet from the main management IP address. See the “Configuring General Interface Parameters” section on page 6-24. • Although you do not configure IP addresses for other interfaces, you still need to configure the security level and interface name according to the “Configuring General Interface Parameters” section on page 6-24. Configuring the IPv4 Address To set the management IPv4 address, enter the following command in global configuration mode: Configuring the IPv6 Address When you configure a global address, a link-local addresses is automatically configured on each interface, so you do not also need to specifically configure a link-local address. Note If you want to only configure the link-local addresses, see the ipv6 enable or ipv6 address link-local command in the Cisco ASA 5500 Series Command Reference. To set the global management IPv6 address, enter the following command in global configuration mode: Command Purpose ip address ip_address [mask] [standby ip_address] Example: hostname(config)# ip address 10.1.1.1 255.255.255.0 standby 10.1.1.2 This address must be on the same subnet as the upstream and downstream routers. You cannot set the subnet to a host subnet (255.255.255.255). The standby keyword and address is used for failover. See the “Configuring Active/Standby Failover” section on page 33-7 or the “Configuring Active/Active Failover” section on page 34-8 for more information. Command Purpose ipv6 address ipv6-prefix/prefix-length Example: hostname(config)# ipv6 address 2001:0DB8::BA98:0:3210/48 Assigns a global address. When you assign a global address, link-local addresses are automatically created for each interface. Note The eui keyword, which is available in routed mode, is not available in transparent mode. The EUI address ties the unicast address to the ASA interface MAC address; but because the transparent mode IP address is not tied to an interface, an interface MAC address cannot be used. See the “IPv6 Addresses” section on page C-5 for more information about IPv6 addressing.8-10 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 8 Configuring Basic Settings Setting the Management IP Address for a Transparent Firewall Configuration Examples for the Management IP Address for a Transparent Firewall The following example sets the IPv4 and IPv6 global management IP addresses, and configures the inside, outside, and management interfaces: hostname(config)# ip address 10.1.1.1 255.255.255.0 standby 10.1.1.2 hostname(config)# ipv6 address 2001:0DB8::BA98:0:3210/48 hostname(config)# interface gigabitethernet 0/0 hostname(config-if)# nameif inside hostname(config-if)# security-level 100 hostname(config-if)# no shutdown hostname(config-if)# interface gigabitethernet 0/1 hostname(config-if)# nameif outside hostname(config-if)# security-level 0 hostname(config-if)# no shutdown hostname(config-if)# interface management 0/0 hostname(config-if)# nameif management hostname(config-if)# security-level 50 hostname(config-if)# ip address 10.1.2.1 255.255.255.0 hostname(config-if)# ipv6 address 2001:0DB8::BA98:0:3211/48 hostname(config-if)# no shutdown Feature History for the Management IP Address for a Transparent Firewall Table 8-1 lists the release history for this feature. Table 8-1 Feature History for Transparent Mode Management Address Feature Name Releases Feature Information IPv6 support 8.2(1) IPv6 support was introduced for transparent firewall mode.C H A P T E R 9-1 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 9 Using Modular Policy Framework This chapter describes how to use Modular Policy Framework to create security policies for multiple features, including TCP and general connection settings, inspections, IPS, CSC, and QoS. This chapter includes the following sections: • Information About Modular Policy Framework, page 9-1 • Licensing Requirements for Modular Policy Framework, page 9-9 • Guidelines and Limitations, page 9-9 • Default Settings, page 9-10 • Configuring Modular Policy Framework, page 9-12 • Monitoring Modular Policy Framework, page 9-26 • Configuration Examples for Modular Policy Framework, page 9-26 • Feature History for Modular Policy Framework, page 9-30 Information About Modular Policy Framework Modular Policy Framework provides a consistent and flexible way to configure ASA features. For example, you can use Modular Policy Framework to create a timeout configuration that is specific to a particular TCP application, as opposed to one that applies to all TCP applications. This section includes the following topics: • Modular Policy Framework Supported Features, page 9-1 • Information About Configuring Modular Policy Framework, page 9-2 • Information About Inspection Policy Maps, page 9-4 • Information About Layer 3/4 Policy Maps, page 9-5 Modular Policy Framework Supported Features Features can be applied to through traffic or to management traffic. This section includes the following topics: • “Supported Features for Through Traffic” section on page 9-2 • “Supported Features for Management Traffic” section on page 9-29-2 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 9 Using Modular Policy Framework Information About Modular Policy Framework Supported Features for Through Traffic Table 9-1 lists the features supported by Modular Policy Framework. Supported Features for Management Traffic Modular Policy Framework supports the following features for management traffic: • Application inspection for RADIUS accounting traffic—See Chapter 44, “Configuring Inspection for Management Application Protocols.” • Connection limits—See Chapter 53, “Configuring Connection Limits and Timeouts.” Information About Configuring Modular Policy Framework Configuring Modular Policy Framework consists of the following tasks: 1. Identify the traffic on which you want to perform Modular Policy Framework actions by creating Layer 3/4 class maps. Table 9-1 Modular Policy Framework Features Feature See: Application inspection (multiple types) • Chapter 40, “Getting Started With Application Layer Protocol Inspection.” • Chapter 41, “Configuring Inspection of Basic Internet Protocols.” • Chapter 43, “Configuring Inspection of Database and Directory Protocols.” • Chapter 44, “Configuring Inspection for Management Application Protocols.” • Chapter 42, “Configuring Inspection for Voice and Video Protocols.” CSC Chapter 60, “Configuring the Content Security and Control Application on the CSC SSM.” IPS Chapter 59, “Configuring the IPS Module.” NetFlow Secure Event Logging filtering Chapter 75, “Configuring NetFlow Secure Event Logging (NSEL).” QoS input and output policing Chapter 55, “Configuring QoS.” QoS standard priority queue Chapter 55, “Configuring QoS.” QoS traffic shaping, hierarchical priority queue Chapter 55, “Configuring QoS.” TCP and UDP connection limits and timeouts, and TCP sequence number randomization Chapter 53, “Configuring Connection Limits and Timeouts.” TCP normalization Chapter 52, “Configuring TCP Normalization.” TCP state bypass Chapter 51, “Configuring TCP State Bypass.”9-3 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 9 Using Modular Policy Framework Information About Modular Policy Framework For example, you might want to perform actions on all traffic that passes through the ASA; or you might only want to perform certain actions on traffic from 10.1.1.0/24 to any destination address. See the “Identifying Traffic (Layer 3/4 Class Map)” section on page 9-13. 2. If one of the actions you want to perform is application inspection, and you want to perform additional actions on some inspection traffic, then create an inspection policy map. The inspection policy map identifies the traffic and specifies what to do with it. For example, you might want to drop all HTTP requests with a body length greater than 1000 bytes. You can create a self-contained inspection policy map that identifies the traffic directly with match commands, or you can create an inspection class map for reuse or for more complicated matching. See the “Defining Actions in an Inspection Policy Map” section on page 9-17 and the “Identifying Traffic in an Inspection Class Map” section on page 9-19. 3. If you want to match text with a regular expression within inspected packets, you can create a regular expression or a group of regular expressions (a regular expression class map). Then, when you define the traffic to match for the inspection policy map, you can call on an existing regular expression. For example, you might want to drop all HTTP requests with a URL including the text “example.com.” See the “Creating a Regular Expression” section on page 9-21 and the “Creating a Regular Expression Class Map” section on page 9-23. 4. Define the actions you want to perform on each Layer 3/4 class map by creating a Layer 3/4 policy map. Then, determine on which interfaces you want to apply the policy map using a service policy. Layer 3/4 Class Map Layer 3/4 Class Map 241506 Inspection Class Map/ Match Commands Inspection Policy Map Actions 241507 Regular Expression Statement/ Regular Expression Class Map Inspection Class Map/ Match Commands Inspection Policy Map Actions 2415099-4 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 9 Using Modular Policy Framework Information About Modular Policy Framework See the “Defining Actions (Layer 3/4 Policy Map)” section on page 9-24 and the “Applying Actions to an Interface (Service Policy)” section on page 9-25. Information About Inspection Policy Maps See the “Configuring Application Layer Protocol Inspection” section on page 40-6 for a list of applications that support inspection policy maps. An inspection policy map consists of one or more of the following elements. The exact options available for an inspection policy map depends on the application. • Traffic matching command—You can define a traffic matching command directly in the inspection policy map to match application traffic to criteria specific to the application, such as a URL string, for which you then enable actions. – Some traffic matching commands can specify regular expressions to match text inside a packet. Be sure to create and test the regular expressions before you configure the policy map, either singly or grouped together in a regular expression class map. • Inspection class map—(Not available for all applications. See the CLI help for a list of supported applications.) An inspection class map includes traffic matching commands that match application traffic with criteria specific to the application, such as a URL string. You then identify the class map in the policy map and enable actions. The difference between creating a class map and defining the traffic match directly in the inspection policy map is that you can create more complex match criteria and you can reuse class maps. Inspection Connection Limits Layer 3/4 Policy Map Service Policy IPS Inspection Connection Limits 2415089-5 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 9 Using Modular Policy Framework Information About Modular Policy Framework – Some traffic matching commands can specify regular expressions to match text inside a packet. Be sure to create and test the regular expressions before you configure the policy map, either singly or grouped together in a regular expression class map. • Parameters—Parameters affect the behavior of the inspection engine. Information About Layer 3/4 Policy Maps This section describes how Layer 3/4 policy maps work, and includes the following topics: • Feature Directionality, page 9-5 • Feature Matching Within a Policy Map, page 9-6 • Order in Which Multiple Feature Actions are Applied, page 9-6 • Incompatibility of Certain Feature Actions, page 9-8 • Feature Matching for Multiple Policy Maps, page 9-8 Feature Directionality Actions are applied to traffic bidirectionally or unidirectionally depending on the feature. For features that are applied bidirectionally, all traffic that enters or exits the interface to which you apply the policy map is affected if the traffic matches the class map for both directions. Note When you use a global policy, all features are unidirectional; features that are normally bidirectional when applied to a single interface only apply to the ingress of each interface when applied globally. Because the policy is applied to all interfaces, the policy will be applied in both directions so bidirectionality in this case is redundant. For features that are applied unidirectionally, for example QoS priority queue, only traffic that enters (or exits, depending on the feature) the interface to which you apply the policy map is affected. See Table 9-2 for the directionality of each feature. Table 9-2 Feature Directionality Feature Single Interface Direction Global Direction Application inspection (multiple types) Bidirectional Ingress CSC Bidirectional Ingress IPS Bidirectional Ingress NetFlow Secure Event Logging filtering N/A Ingress QoS input policing Ingress Ingress QoS output policing Egress Egress QoS standard priority queue Egress Egress QoS traffic shaping, hierarchical priority queue Egress Egress TCP and UDP connection limits and timeouts, and TCP sequence number randomization Bidirectional Ingress9-6 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 9 Using Modular Policy Framework Information About Modular Policy Framework Feature Matching Within a Policy Map See the following information for how a packet matches class maps in a policy map: 1. A packet can match only one class map in the policy map for each feature type. 2. When the packet matches a class map for a feature type, the ASA does not attempt to match it to any subsequent class maps for that feature type. 3. If the packet matches a subsequent class map for a different feature type, however, then the ASA also applies the actions for the subsequent class map, if supported. See the “Incompatibility of Certain Feature Actions” section on page 9-8 for more information about unsupported combinations. For example, if a packet matches a class map for connection limits, and also matches a class map for application inspection, then both class map actions are applied. If a packet matches a class map for HTTP inspection, but also matches another class map that includes HTTP inspection, then the second class map actions are not applied. Note Application inspection includes multiple inspection types, and each inspection type is a separate feature when you consider the matching guidelines above. Order in Which Multiple Feature Actions are Applied The order in which different types of actions in a policy map are performed is independent of the order in which the actions appear in the policy map. Note NetFlow Secure Event Logging filtering is order-independent. Actions are performed in the following order: 1. QoS input policing 2. TCP normalization, TCP and UDP connection limits and timeouts, TCP sequence number randomization, and TCP state bypass. Note When a the ASA performs a proxy service (such as AAA or CSC) or it modifies the TCP payload (such as FTP inspection), the TCP normalizer acts in dual mode, where it is applied before and after the proxy or payload modifying service. 3. CSC 4. Application inspection (multiple types) TCP normalization Bidirectional Ingress TCP state bypass Bidirectional Ingress Table 9-2 Feature Directionality Feature Single Interface Direction Global Direction9-7 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 9 Using Modular Policy Framework Information About Modular Policy Framework The order of application inspections applied when a class of traffic is classified for multiple inspections is as follows. Only one inspection type can be applied to the same traffic. WAAS inspection is an exception, because it can be applied along with other inspections for the same traffic. See the “Incompatibility of Certain Feature Actions” section on page 9-8 for more information. a. CTIQBE b. DNS c. FTP d. GTP e. H323 f. HTTP g. ICMP h. ICMP error i. ILS j. MGCP k. NetBIOS l. PPTP m. Sun RPC n. RSH o. RTSP p. SIP q. Skinny r. SMTP s. SNMP t. SQL*Net u. TFTP v. XDMCP w. DCERPC x. Instant Messaging Note RADIUS accounting is not listed because it is the only inspection allowed on management traffic. WAAS is not listed because it can be configured along with other inspections for the same traffic. 5. IPS 6. QoS output policing 7. QoS standard priority queue 8. QoS traffic shaping, hierarchical priority queue9-8 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 9 Using Modular Policy Framework Information About Modular Policy Framework Incompatibility of Certain Feature Actions Some features are not compatible with each other for the same traffic. For example, you cannot configure QoS priority queueing and QoS policing for the same set of traffic. Also, most inspections should not be combined with another inspection, so the ASA only applies one inspection if you configure multiple inspections for the same traffic. In this case, the feature that is applied is the higher priority feature in the list in the “Order in Which Multiple Feature Actions are Applied” section on page 9-6. For information about compatibility of each feature, see the chapter or section for your feature. Note The match default-inspection-traffic command, which is used in the default global policy, is a special CLI shortcut to match the default ports for all inspections. When used in a policy map, this class map ensures that the correct inspection is applied to each packet, based on the destination port of the traffic. For example, when UDP traffic for port 69 reaches the ASA, then the ASA applies the TFTP inspection; when TCP traffic for port 21 arrives, then the ASA applies the FTP inspection. So in this case only, you can configure multiple inspections for the same class map. Normally, the ASA does not use the port number to determine which inspection to apply, thus giving you the flexibility to apply inspections to non-standard ports, for example. An example of a misconfiguration is if you configure multiple inspections in the same policy map and do not use the default-inspection-traffic shortcut. In Example 9-1, traffic destined to port 21 is mistakenly configured for both FTP and HTTP inspection. In Example 9-2, traffic destined to port 80 is mistakenly configured for both FTP and HTTP inspection. In both cases of misconfiguration examples, only the FTP inspection is applied, because FTP comes before HTTP in the order of inspections applied. Example 9-1 Misconfiguration for FTP packets: HTTP Inspection Also Configured class-map ftp match port tcp eq 21 class-map http match port tcp eq 21 [it should be 80] policy-map test class ftp inspect ftp class http inspect http Example 9-2 Misconfiguration for HTTP packets: FTP Inspection Also Configured class-map ftp match port tcp eq 80 [it should be 21] class-map http match port tcp eq 80 policy-map test class http inspect http class ftp inspect ftp Feature Matching for Multiple Policy Maps For TCP and UDP traffic (and ICMP when you enable stateful ICMP inspection), Modular Policy Framework operates on traffic flows, and not just individual packets. If traffic is part of an existing connection that matches a feature in a policy on one interface, that traffic flow cannot also match the same feature in a policy on another interface; only the first policy is used.9-9 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 9 Using Modular Policy Framework Licensing Requirements for Modular Policy Framework For example, if HTTP traffic matches a policy on the inside interface to inspect HTTP traffic, and you have a separate policy on the outside interface for HTTP inspection, then that traffic is not also inspected on the egress of the outside interface. Similarly, the return traffic for that connection will not be inspected by the ingress policy of the outside interface, nor by the egress policy of the inside interface. For traffic that is not treated as a flow, for example ICMP when you do not enable stateful ICMP inspection, returning traffic can match a different policy map on the returning interface. For example, if you configure IPS on the inside and outside interfaces, but the inside policy uses virtual sensor 1 while the outside policy uses virtual sensor 2, then a non-stateful Ping will match virtual sensor 1 outbound, but will match virtual sensor 2 inbound. Licensing Requirements for Modular Policy Framework Guidelines and Limitations This section includes the guidelines and limitations for this feature. Context Mode Guidelines Supported in single and multiple context mode. Firewall Mode Guidelines Supported in routed and transparent firewall mode. IPv6 Guidelines Supports IPv6 for the following features: • Application inspection for FTP, HTTP, ICMP, SIP, SMTP and IPSec-pass-thru • IPS • NetFlow Secure Event Logging filtering • TCP and UDP connection limits and timeouts, TCP sequence number randomization • TCP normalization • TCP state bypass Class Map Guidelines The maximum number of class maps of all types is 255 in single mode or per context in multiple mode. Class maps include the following types: • Layer 3/4 class maps (for through traffic and management traffic) • Inspection class maps • Regular expression class maps • match commands used directly underneath an inspection policy map Model License Requirement All models Base License.9-10 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 9 Using Modular Policy Framework Default Settings This limit also includes default class maps of all types, limiting user-configured class maps to approximately 235. . See the “Default Class Maps” section on page 9-11. Policy Map Guidelines See the following guidelines for using policy maps: • You can only assign one policy map per interface. (However you can create up to 64 policy maps in the configuration.) • You can apply the same policy map to multiple interfaces. • You can identify up to 63 Layer 3/4 class maps in a Layer 3/4 policy map. • For each class map, you can assign multiple actions from one or more feature types, if supported. See the “Incompatibility of Certain Feature Actions” section on page 9-8. Service Policy Guidelines • Interface service policies take precedence over the global service policy for a given feature. For example, if you have a global policy with FTP inspection, and an interface policy with TCP normalization, then both FTP inspection and TCP normalization are applied to the interface. However, if you have a global policy with FTP inspection, and an interface policy with FTP inspection, then only the interface policy FTP inspection is applied to that interface. • You can only apply one global policy. For example, you cannot create a global policy that includes feature set 1, and a separate global policy that includes feature set 2. All features must be included in a single policy. Default Settings The following topics describe the default settings for Modular Policy Framework: • Default Configuration, page 9-10 • Default Class Maps, page 9-11 • Default Inspection Policy Maps, page 9-11 Default Configuration By default, the configuration includes a policy that matches all default application inspection traffic and applies certain inspections to the traffic on all interfaces (a global policy). Not all inspections are enabled by default. You can only apply one global policy, so if you want to alter the global policy, you need to either edit the default policy or disable it and apply a new one. (An interface policy overrides the global policy for a particular feature.) The default policy configuration includes the following commands: class-map inspection_default match default-inspection-traffic policy-map type inspect dns preset_dns_map parameters message-length maximum 512 policy-map global_policy class inspection_default inspect dns preset_dns_map inspect ftp inspect h323 h225 9-11 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 9 Using Modular Policy Framework Default Settings inspect h323 ras inspect rsh inspect rtsp inspect esmtp inspect sqlnet inspect skinny inspect sunrpc inspect xdmcp inspect sip inspect netbios inspect tftp service-policy global_policy global Note See the “Incompatibility of Certain Feature Actions” section on page 9-8 for more information about the special match default-inspection-traffic command used in the default class map. Default Class Maps The configuration includes a default Layer 3/4 class map that the ASA uses in the default global policy. It is called inspection_default and matches the default inspection traffic: class-map inspection_default match default-inspection-traffic The match default-inspection-traffic command, which is used in the default global policy, is a special CLI shortcut to match the default ports for all inspections. When used in a policy map, this class map ensures that the correct inspection is applied to each packet, based on the destination port of the traffic. For example, when UDP traffic for port 69 reaches the ASA, then the ASA applies the TFTP inspection; when TCP traffic for port 21 arrives, then the ASA applies the FTP inspection. So in this case only, you can configure multiple inspections for the same class map. Normally, the ASA does not use the port number to determine which inspection to apply, thus giving you the flexibility to apply inspections to non-standard ports, for example. Another class map that exists in the default configuration is called class-default, and it matches all traffic: class-map class-default match any This class map appears at the end of all Layer 3/4 policy maps and essentially tells the ASA to not perform any actions on all other traffic. You can use the class-default class map if desired, rather than making your own match any class map. In fact, some features are only available for class-default, such as QoS traffic shaping. Default Inspection Policy Maps The default inspection policy map configuration includes the following commands, which sets the maximum message length for DNS packets to be 512 bytes: policy-map type inspect dns preset_dns_map parameters message-length maximum 5129-12 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 9 Using Modular Policy Framework Configuring Modular Policy Framework Note There are other default inspection policy maps such as policy-map type inspect esmtp _default_esmtp_map. These default policy maps are created implicitly by the command inspect protocol. For example, inspect esmtp implicitly uses the policy map “_default_esmtp_map.” All the default policy maps can be shown by using the show running-config all policy-map command. Configuring Modular Policy Framework This section describes how to configure your security polcy using Modular Policy Framework, and includes the following topics: • Task Flow for Configuring Hierarchical Policy Maps, page 9-12 • Identifying Traffic (Layer 3/4 Class Map), page 9-13 • Configuring Special Actions for Application Inspections (Inspection Policy Map), page 9-16 • Defining Actions (Layer 3/4 Policy Map), page 9-24 • Applying Actions to an Interface (Service Policy), page 9-25 Task Flow for Configuring Hierarchical Policy Maps If you enable QoS traffic shaping for a class map, then you can optionally enable priority queueing for a subset of shaped traffic. To do so, you need to create a policy map for the priority queueing, and then within the traffic shaping policy map, you can call the priority class map. Only the traffic shaping class map is applied to an interface. See Chapter 55, “Information About QoS,” for more information about this feature. Hierarchical policy maps are only supported for traffic shaping and priority queueing. To implement a hierarchical policy map, perform the following steps: Step 1 Identify the prioritized traffic according to the “Identifying Traffic (Layer 3/4 Class Map)” section on page 9-13. You can create multiple class maps to be used in the hierarchical policy map. Step 2 Create a policy map according to the “Defining Actions (Layer 3/4 Policy Map)” section on page 9-24, and identify the sole action for each class map as priority. Step 3 Create a separate policy map according to the “Defining Actions (Layer 3/4 Policy Map)” section on page 9-24, and identify the shape action for the class-default class map. Traffic shaping can only be applied the to class-default class map. Step 4 For the same class map, identify the priority policy map that you created in Step 2 using the service-policy priority_policy_map command. Step 5 Apply the shaping policy map to the interface accrding to “Applying Actions to an Interface (Service Policy)” section on page 9-25.9-13 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 9 Using Modular Policy Framework Configuring Modular Policy Framework Identifying Traffic (Layer 3/4 Class Map) A Layer 3/4 class map identifies Layer 3 and 4 traffic to which you want to apply actions. You can create multiple Layer 3/4 class maps for each Layer 3/4 policy map. This section includes the following topics: • Creating a Layer 3/4 Class Map for Through Traffic, page 9-13 • Creating a Layer 3/4 Class Map for Management Traffic, page 9-15 Creating a Layer 3/4 Class Map for Through Traffic A Layer 3/4 class map matches traffic based on protocols, ports, IP addresses and other Layer 3 or 4 attributes. Detailed Steps Step 1 Create a Layer 3/4 class map by entering the following command: hostname(config)# class-map class_map_name hostname(config-cmap)# Where class_map_name is a string up to 40 characters in length. The name “class-default” is reserved. All types of class maps use the same name space, so you cannot reuse a name already used by another type of class map. The CLI enters class-map configuration mode. Step 2 (Optional) Add a description to the class map by entering the following command: hostname(config-cmap)# description string Step 3 Define the traffic to include in the class by matching one of the following characteristics. Unless otherwise specified, you can include only one match command in the class map. • Any traffic—The class map matches all traffic. hostname(config-cmap)# match any Note For features that support IPv6 (see the “Guidelines and Limitations” section on page 9-9), then the match any and match default-inspection-traffic commands are the only commands that match IPv6 traffic. For example, you cannot match an IPv6 access list. • Access list—The class map matches traffic specified by an extended access list. If the ASA is operating in transparent firewall mode, you can use an EtherType access list. hostname(config-cmap)# match access-list access_list_name For more information about creating access lists, see Chapter 11, “Adding an Extended Access List,” or Chapter 12, “Adding an EtherType Access List.”. For information about creating access lists with NAT, see the “IP Addresses Used for Access Lists When You Use NAT” section on page 10-3. • TCP or UDP destination ports—The class map matches a single port or a contiguous range of ports. hostname(config-cmap)# match port {tcp | udp} {eq port_num | range port_num port_num}9-14 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 9 Using Modular Policy Framework Configuring Modular Policy Framework Tip For applications that use multiple, non-contiguous ports, use the match access-list command and define an ACE to match each port. For a list of ports you can specify, see the “TCP and UDP Ports” section on page C-11. For example, enter the following command to match TCP packets on port 80 (HTTP): hostname(config-cmap)# match tcp eq 80 • Default traffic for inspection—The class map matches the default TCP and UDP ports used by all applications that the ASA can inspect. hostname(config-cmap)# match default-inspection-traffic This command, which is used in the default global policy, is a special CLI shortcut that when used in a policy map, ensures that the correct inspection is applied to each packet, based on the destination port of the traffic. For example, when UDP traffic for port 69 reaches the ASA, then the ASA applies the TFTP inspection; when TCP traffic for port 21 arrives, then the ASA applies the FTP inspection. So in this case only, you can configure multiple inspections for the same class map (with the exception of WAAS inspection, which can be configured with other inspections. See the “Incompatibility of Certain Feature Actions” section on page 9-8 for more information about combining actions). Normally, the ASA does not use the port number to determine the inspection applied, thus giving you the flexibility to apply inspections to non-standard ports, for example. See the “Default Settings” section on page 40-4 for a list of default ports. Not all applications whose ports are included in the match default-inspection-traffic command are enabled by default in the policy map. You can specify a match access-list command along with the match default-inspection-traffic command to narrow the matched traffic. Because the match default-inspection-traffic command specifies the ports and protocols to match, any ports and protocols in the access list are ignored. Tip We suggest that you only inspect traffic on ports on which you expect application traffic; if you inspect all traffic, for example using match any, the ASA performance can be impacted. Note For features that support IPv6 (see the “Guidelines and Limitations” section on page 9-9), then the match any and match default-inspection-traffic commands are the only commands that match IPv6 traffic. For example, you cannot match an IPv6 access list. • DSCP value in an IP header—The class map matches up to eight DSCP values. hostname(config-cmap)# match dscp value1 [value2] [...] [value8] For example, enter the following: hostname(config-cmap)# match dscp af43 cs1 ef • Precedence—The class map matches up to four precedence values, represented by the TOS byte in the IP header. hostname(config-cmap)# match precedence value1 [value2] [value3] [value4] where value1 through value4 can be 0 to 7, corresponding to the possible precedences. • RTP traffic—The class map matches RTP traffic.9-15 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 9 Using Modular Policy Framework Configuring Modular Policy Framework hostname(config-cmap)# match rtp starting_port range The starting_port specifies an even-numbered UDP destination port between 2000 and 65534. The range specifies the number of additional UDP ports to match above the starting_port, between 0 and 16383. • Tunnel group traffic—The class map matches traffic for a tunnel group to which you want to apply QoS. hostname(config-cmap)# match tunnel-group name You can also specify one other match command to refine the traffic match. You can specify any of the preceding commands, except for the match any, match access-list, or match default-inspection-traffic commands. Or you can enter the following command to police each flow: hostname(config-cmap)# match flow ip destination address All traffic going to a unique IP destination address is considered a flow. Examples The following is an example for the class-map command: hostname(config)# access-list udp permit udp any any hostname(config)# access-list tcp permit tcp any any hostname(config)# access-list host_foo permit ip any 10.1.1.1 255.255.255.255 hostname(config)# class-map all_udp hostname(config-cmap)# description "This class-map matches all UDP traffic" hostname(config-cmap)# match access-list udp hostname(config-cmap)# class-map all_tcp hostname(config-cmap)# description "This class-map matches all TCP traffic" hostname(config-cmap)# match access-list tcp hostname(config-cmap)# class-map all_http hostname(config-cmap)# description "This class-map matches all HTTP traffic" hostname(config-cmap)# match port tcp eq http hostname(config-cmap)# class-map to_server hostname(config-cmap)# description "This class-map matches all traffic to server 10.1.1.1" hostname(config-cmap)# match access-list host_foo Creating a Layer 3/4 Class Map for Management Traffic For management traffic to the ASA, you might want to perform actions specific to this kind of traffic. You can specify a management class map that can match an access list or TCP or UDP ports. The types of actions available for a management class map in the policy map are specialized for management traffic. See the “Supported Features for Management Traffic” section on page 9-2. Detailed Steps Step 1 Create a class map by entering the following command: hostname(config)# class-map type management class_map_name hostname(config-cmap)# 9-16 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 9 Using Modular Policy Framework Configuring Modular Policy Framework Where class_map_name is a string up to 40 characters in length. The name “class-default” is reserved. All types of class maps use the same name space, so you cannot reuse a name already used by another type of class map. The CLI enters class-map configuration mode. Step 2 (Optional) Add a description to the class map by entering the following command: hostname(config-cmap)# description string Step 3 Define the traffic to include in the class by matching one of the following characteristics. You can include only one match command in the class map. • Access list—The class map matches traffic specified by an extended access list. If the ASA is operating in transparent firewall mode, you can use an EtherType access list. hostname(config-cmap)# match access-list access_list_name For more information about creating access lists, see Chapter 11, “Adding an Extended Access List,” or Chapter 12, “Adding an EtherType Access List.” For information about creating access lists with NAT, see the “IP Addresses Used for Access Lists When You Use NAT” section on page 10-3. • TCP or UDP destination ports—The class map matches a single port or a contiguous range of ports. hostname(config-cmap)# match port {tcp | udp} {eq port_num | range port_num port_num} Tip For applications that use multiple, non-contiguous ports, use the match access-list command and define an ACE to match each port. For a list of ports you can specify, see the “TCP and UDP Ports” section on page C-11. For example, enter the following command to match TCP packets on port 80 (HTTP): hostname(config-cmap)# match tcp eq 80 Configuring Special Actions for Application Inspections (Inspection Policy Map) Modular Policy Framework lets you configure special actions for many application inspections. When you enable an inspection engine in the Layer 3/4 policy map, you can also optionally enable actions as defined in an inspection policy map. When the inspection policy map matches traffic within the Layer 3/4 class map for which you have defined an inspection action, then that subset of traffic will be acted upon as specified (for example, dropped or rate-limited). This section includes the following topics: • Defining Actions in an Inspection Policy Map, page 9-17 • Identifying Traffic in an Inspection Class Map, page 9-19 • Creating a Regular Expression, page 9-21 • Creating a Regular Expression Class Map, page 9-239-17 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 9 Using Modular Policy Framework Configuring Modular Policy Framework Defining Actions in an Inspection Policy Map When you enable an inspection engine in the Layer 3/4 policy map, you can also optionally enable actions as defined in an inspection policy map. Restrictions You can specify multiple class or match commands in the policy map. If a packet matches multiple different match or class commands, then the order in which the ASA applies the actions is determined by internal ASA rules, and not by the order they are added to the policy map. The internal rules are determined by the application type and the logical progression of parsing a packet, and are not user-configurable. For example for HTTP traffic, parsing a Request Method field precedes parsing the Header Host Length field; an action for the Request Method field occurs before the action for the Header Host Length field. For example, the following match commands can be entered in any order, but the match request method get command is matched first. match request header host length gt 100 reset match request method get log If an action drops a packet, then no further actions are performed in the inspection policy map. For example, if the first action is to reset the connection, then it will never match any further match or class commands. If the first action is to log the packet, then a second action, such as resetting the connection, can occur. (You can configure both the reset (or drop-connection, and so on.) and the log action for the same match or class command, in which case the packet is logged before it is reset for a given match.) If a packet matches multiple match or class commands that are the same, then they are matched in the order they appear in the policy map. For example, for a packet with the header length of 1001, it will match the first command below, and be logged, and then will match the second command and be reset. If you reverse the order of the two match commands, then the packet will be dropped and the connection reset before it can match the second match command; it will never be logged. match request header length gt 100 log match request header length gt 1000 reset A class map is determined to be the same type as another class map or match command based on the lowest priority match command in the class map (the priority is based on the internal rules). If a class map has the same type of lowest priority match command as another class map, then the class maps are matched according to the order they are added to the policy map. If the lowest priority command for each class map is different, then the class map with the higher priority match command is matched first. For example, the following three class maps contain two types of match commands: match request-cmd (higher priority) and match filename (lower priority). The ftp3 class map includes both commands, but it is ranked according to the lowest priority command, match filename. The ftp1 class map includes the highest priority command, so it is matched first, regardless of the order in the policy map. The ftp3 class map is ranked as being of the same priority as the ftp2 class map, which also contains the match filename command. They are matched according to the order in the policy map: ftp3 and then ftp2. class-map type inspect ftp match-all ftp1 match request-cmd get class-map type inspect ftp match-all ftp2 match filename regex abc class-map type inspect ftp match-all ftp3 match request-cmd get match filename regex abc9-18 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 9 Using Modular Policy Framework Configuring Modular Policy Framework policy-map type inspect ftp ftp class ftp3 log class ftp2 log class ftp1 log Detailed Steps Step 1 (Optional) Create an inspection class map according to the “Identifying Traffic in an Inspection Class Map” section on page 9-19. Alternatively, you can identify the traffic directly within the policy map. Step 2 To create the inspection policy map, enter the following command: hostname(config)# policy-map type inspect application policy_map_name hostname(config-pmap)# See the “Configuring Application Layer Protocol Inspection” section on page 40-6 for a list of applications that support inspection policy maps. The policy_map_name argument is the name of the policy map up to 40 characters in length. All types of policy maps use the same name space, so you cannot reuse a name already used by another type of policy map. The CLI enters policy-map configuration mode. Step 3 To apply actions to matching traffic, perform the following steps. Note For information about including multiple class or match commands, see the “Restrictions” section on page 9-17. a. Specify the traffic on which you want to perform actions using one of the following methods: • Specify the inspection class map that you created in the “Identifying Traffic in an Inspection Class Map” section on page 9-19 by entering the following command: hostname(config-pmap)# class class_map_name hostname(config-pmap-c)# Not all applications support inspection class maps. • Specify traffic directly in the policy map using one of the match commands described for each application in the applicable inspection chapter. If you use a match not command, then any traffic that matches the criterion in the match not command does not have the action applied. b. Specify the action you want to perform on the matching traffic by entering the following command: hostname(config-pmap-c)# {[drop [send-protocol-error] | drop-connection [send-protocol-error]| mask | reset] [log] | rate-limit message_rate} Not all options are available for each application. Other actions specific to the application might also be available. See the appropriate inspection chapter for the exact options available. The drop keyword drops all packets that match. The send-protocol-error keyword sends a protocol error message. The drop-connection keyword drops the packet and closes the connection. The mask keyword masks out the matching portion of the packet.9-19 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 9 Using Modular Policy Framework Configuring Modular Policy Framework The reset keyword drops the packet, closes the connection, and sends a TCP reset to the server and/or client. The log keyword, which you can use alone or with one of the other keywords, sends a system log message. The rate-limit message_rate argument limits the rate of messages. Step 4 To configure parameters that affect the inspection engine, enter the following command: hostname(config-pmap)# parameters hostname(config-pmap-p)# The CLI enters parameters configuration mode. For the parameters available for each application, see the appropriate inspection chapter. Examples The following is an example of an HTTP inspection policy map and the related class maps. This policy map is activated by the Layer 3/4 policy map, which is enabled by the service policy. hostname(config)# regex url_example example\.com hostname(config)# regex url_example2 example2\.com hostname(config)# class-map type regex match-any URLs hostname(config-cmap)# match regex url_example hostname(config-cmap)# match regex url_example2 hostname(config-cmap)# class-map type inspect http match-all http-traffic hostname(config-cmap)# match req-resp content-type mismatch hostname(config-cmap)# match request body length gt 1000 hostname(config-cmap)# match not request uri regex class URLs hostname(config-cmap)# policy-map type inspect http http-map1 hostname(config-pmap)# class http-traffic hostname(config-pmap-c)# drop-connection log hostname(config-pmap-c)# match req-resp content-type mismatch hostname(config-pmap-c)# reset log hostname(config-pmap-c)# parameters hostname(config-pmap-p)# protocol-violation action log hostname(config-pmap-p)# policy-map test hostname(config-pmap)# class test (a Layer 3/4 class map not shown) hostname(config-pmap-c)# inspect http http-map1 hostname(config-pmap-c)# service-policy test interface outside Identifying Traffic in an Inspection Class Map This type of class map allows you to match criteria that is specific to an application. For example, for DNS traffic, you can match the domain name in a DNS query. A class map groups multiple traffic matches (in a match-all class map), or lets you match any of a list of matches (in a match-any class map). The difference between creating a class map and defining the traffic match directly in the inspection policy map is that the class map lets you group multiple match commands, and you can reuse class maps. For the traffic that you identify in this class map, you can specify actions such as dropping, resetting, and/or logging the connection in the inspection policy map. If you want to perform different actions on different types of traffic, you should identify the traffic directly in the policy map.9-20 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 9 Using Modular Policy Framework Configuring Modular Policy Framework Restrictions Not all applications support inspection class maps. See the CLI help for class-map type inspect for a list of supported applications. Detailed Steps Step 1 (Optional) If you want to match based on a regular expression, see the “Creating a Regular Expression” section on page 9-21 and the “Creating a Regular Expression Class Map” section on page 9-23. Step 2 Create a class map by entering the following command: hostname(config)# class-map type inspect application [match-all | match-any] class_map_name hostname(config-cmap)# Where the application is the application you want to inspect. For supported applications, see the CLI help for a list of supported applications or see Chapter 40, “Getting Started With Application Layer Protocol Inspection.” The class_map_name argument is the name of the class map up to 40 characters in length. The match-all keyword is the default, and specifies that traffic must match all criteria to match the class map. The match-any keyword specifies that the traffic matches the class map if it matches at least one of the criteria. The CLI enters class-map configuration mode, where you can enter one or more match commands. Step 3 (Optional) To add a description to the class map, enter the following command: hostname(config-cmap)# description string Step 4 Define the traffic to include in the class by entering one or more match commands available for your application. To specify traffic that should not match the class map, use the match not command. For example, if the match not command specifies the string “example.com,” then any traffic that includes “example.com” does not match the class map. To see the match commands available for each application, see the appropriate inspection chapter. Examples The following example creates an HTTP class map that must match all criteria: hostname(config-cmap)# class-map type inspect http match-all http-traffic hostname(config-cmap)# match req-resp content-type mismatch hostname(config-cmap)# match request body length gt 1000 hostname(config-cmap)# match not request uri regex class URLs The following example creates an HTTP class map that can match any of the criteria: hostname(config-cmap)# class-map type inspect http match-any monitor-http hostname(config-cmap)# match request method get hostname(config-cmap)# match request method put hostname(config-cmap)# match request method post9-21 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 9 Using Modular Policy Framework Configuring Modular Policy Framework Creating a Regular Expression A regular expression matches text strings either literally as an exact string, or by using metacharacters so you can match multiple variants of a text string. You can use a regular expression to match the content of certain application traffic; for example, you can match a URL string inside an HTTP packet. Guidelines Use Ctrl+V to escape all of the special characters in the CLI, such as question mark (?) or a tab. For example, type d[Ctrl+V]?g to enter d?g in the configuration. See the regex command in the Cisco ASA 5500 Series Command Reference for performance impact information when matching a regular expression to packets. Note As an optimization, the ASA searches on the deobfuscated URL. Deobfuscation compresses multiple forward slashes (/) into a single slash. For strings that commonly use double slashes, like “http://”, be sure to search for “http:/” instead. Table 9-3 lists the metacharacters that have special meanings. Table 9-3 regex Metacharacters Character Description Notes . Dot Matches any single character. For example, d.g matches dog, dag, dtg, and any word that contains those characters, such as doggonnit. (exp) Subexpression A subexpression segregates characters from surrounding characters, so that you can use other metacharacters on the subexpression. For example, d(o|a)g matches dog and dag, but do|ag matches do and ag. A subexpression can also be used with repeat quantifiers to differentiate the characters meant for repetition. For example, ab(xy){3}z matches abxyxyxyz. | Alternation Matches either expression it separates. For example, dog|cat matches dog or cat. ? Question mark A quantifier that indicates that there are 0 or 1 of the previous expression. For example, lo?se matches lse or lose. Note Yo u mu s t e n te r Ctrl+V and then the question mark or else the help function is invoked. * Asterisk A quantifier that indicates that there are 0, 1 or any number of the previous expression. For example, lo*se matches lse, lose, loose, and so on. + Plus A quantifier that indicates that there is at least 1 of the previous expression. For example, lo+se matches lose and loose, but not lse. {x} or {x,} Minimum repeat quantifier Repeat at least x times. For example, ab(xy){2,}z matches abxyxyz, abxyxyxyz, and so on.9-22 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 9 Using Modular Policy Framework Configuring Modular Policy Framework Detailed Steps Step 1 To test a regular expression to make sure it matches what you think it will match, enter the following command: hostname(config)# test regex input_text regular_expression Where the input_text argument is a string you want to match using the regular expression, up to 201 characters in length. The regular_expression argument can be up to 100 characters in length. Use Ctrl+V to escape all of the special characters in the CLI. For example, to enter a tab in the input text in the test regex command, you must enter test regex "test[Ctrl+V Tab]" "test\t". [abc] Character class Matches any character in the brackets. For example, [abc] matches a, b, or c. [^abc] Negated character class Matches a single character that is not contained within the brackets. For example, [^abc] matches any character other than a, b, or c. [^A-Z] matches any single character that is not an uppercase letter. [a-c] Character range class Matches any character in the range. [a-z] matches any lowercase letter. You can mix characters and ranges: [abcq-z] matches a, b, c, q, r, s, t, u, v, w, x, y, z, and so does [a-cq-z]. The dash (-) character is literal only if it is the last or the first character within the brackets: [abc-] or [-abc]. "" Quotation marks Preserves trailing or leading spaces in the string. For example, " test" preserves the leading space when it looks for a match. ^ Caret Specifies the beginning of a line. \ Escape character When used with a metacharacter, matches a literal character. For example, \[ matches the left square bracket. char Character When character is not a metacharacter, matches the literal character. \r Carriage return Matches a carriage return 0x0d. \n Newline Matches a new line 0x0a. \t Tab Matches a tab 0x09. \f Formfeed Matches a form feed 0x0c. \xNN Escaped hexadecimal number Matches an ASCII character using hexadecimal (exactly two digits). \NNN Escaped octal number Matches an ASCII character as octal (exactly three digits). For example, the character 040 represents a space. Table 9-3 regex Metacharacters (continued) Character Description Notes9-23 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 9 Using Modular Policy Framework Configuring Modular Policy Framework If the regular expression matches the input text, you see the following message: INFO: Regular expression match succeeded. If the regular expression does not match the input text, you see the following message: INFO: Regular expression match failed. Step 2 To add a regular expression after you tested it, enter the following command: hostname(config)# regex name regular_expression Where the name argument can be up to 40 characters in length. The regular_expression argument can be up to 100 characters in length. Examples The following example creates two regular expressions for use in an inspection policy map: hostname(config)# regex url_example example\.com hostname(config)# regex url_example2 example2\.com Creating a Regular Expression Class Map A regular expression class map identifies one or more regular expressions. You can use a regular expression class map to match the content of certain traffic; for example, you can match URL strings inside HTTP packets. Detailed Steps Step 1 Create one or more regular expressions according to the “Creating a Regular Expression” section. Step 2 Create a class map by entering the following command: hostname(config)# class-map type regex match-any class_map_name hostname(config-cmap)# Where class_map_name is a string up to 40 characters in length. The name “class-default” is reserved. All types of class maps use the same name space, so you cannot reuse a name already used by another type of class map. The match-any keyword specifies that the traffic matches the class map if it matches at least one of the regular expressions. The CLI enters class-map configuration mode. Step 3 (Optional) Add a description to the class map by entering the following command: hostname(config-cmap)# description string Step 4 Identify the regular expressions you want to include by entering the following command for each regular expression: hostname(config-cmap)# match regex regex_name9-24 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 9 Using Modular Policy Framework Configuring Modular Policy Framework Examples The following example creates two regular expressions, and adds them to a regular expression class map. Traffic matches the class map if it includes the string “example.com” or “example2.com.” hostname(config)# regex url_example example\.com hostname(config)# regex url_example2 example2\.com hostname(config)# class-map type regex match-any URLs hostname(config-cmap)# match regex url_example hostname(config-cmap)# match regex url_example2 Defining Actions (Layer 3/4 Policy Map) This section describes how to associate actions with Layer 3/4 class maps by creating a Layer 3/4 policy map. Restrictions The maximum number of policy maps is 64, but you can only apply one policy map per interface. Detailed Steps Step 1 Add the policy map by entering the following command: hostname(config)# policy-map policy_map_name The policy_map_name argument is the name of the policy map up to 40 characters in length. All types of policy maps use the same name space, so you cannot reuse a name already used by another type of policy map. The CLI enters policy-map configuration mode. Step 2 (Optional) Specify a description for the policy map: hostname(config-pmap)# description text Step 3 Specify a previously configured Layer 3/4 class map using the following command: hostname(config-pmap)# class class_map_name where the class_map_name is the name of the class map you created earlier. See the “Identifying Traffic (Layer 3/4 Class Map)” section on page 9-13 to add a class map. Step 4 Specify one or more actions for this class map. See the “Supported Features for Through Traffic” section on page 9-2. Note If there is no match default_inspection_traffic command in a class map, then at most one inspect command is allowed to be configured under the class. For QoS, you can configure a hierarchical policy map for the traffic shaping and priority queue features. See the “Task Flow for Configuring Hierarchical Policy Maps” section on page 9-12 for more information. Step 5 Repeat Step 3 and Step 4 for each class map you want to include in this policy map.9-25 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 9 Using Modular Policy Framework Configuring Modular Policy Framework Examples The following is an example of a policy-map command for connection policy. It limits the number of connections allowed to the web server 10.1.1.1: hostname(config)# access-list http-server permit tcp any host 10.1.1.1 hostname(config)# class-map http-server hostname(config-cmap)# match access-list http-server hostname(config)# policy-map global-policy hostname(config-pmap)# description This policy map defines a policy concerning connection to http server. hostname(config-pmap)# class http-server hostname(config-pmap-c)# set connection conn-max 256 The following example shows how multi-match works in a policy map: hostname(config)# class-map inspection_default hostname(config-cmap)# match default-inspection-traffic hostname(config)# class-map http_traffic hostname(config-cmap)# match port tcp eq 80 hostname(config)# policy-map outside_policy hostname(config-pmap)# class inspection_default hostname(config-pmap-c)# inspect http http_map hostname(config-pmap-c)# inspect sip hostname(config-pmap)# class http_traffic hostname(config-pmap-c)# set connection timeout tcp 0:10:0 The following example shows how traffic matches the first available class map, and will not match any subsequent class maps that specify actions in the same feature domain: hostname(config)# class-map telnet_traffic hostname(config-cmap)# match port tcp eq 23 hostname(config)# class-map ftp_traffic hostname(config-cmap)# match port tcp eq 21 hostname(config)# class-map tcp_traffic hostname(config-cmap)# match port tcp range 1 65535 hostname(config)# class-map udp_traffic hostname(config-cmap)# match port udp range 0 65535 hostname(config)# policy-map global_policy hostname(config-pmap)# class telnet_traffic hostname(config-pmap-c)# set connection timeout tcp 0:0:0 hostname(config-pmap-c)# set connection conn-max 100 hostname(config-pmap)# class ftp_traffic hostname(config-pmap-c)# set connection timeout tcp 0:5:0 hostname(config-pmap-c)# set connection conn-max 50 hostname(config-pmap)# class tcp_traffic hostname(config-pmap-c)# set connection timeout tcp 2:0:0 hostname(config-pmap-c)# set connection conn-max 2000 When a Telnet connection is initiated, it matches class telnet_traffic. Similarly, if an FTP connection is initiated, it matches class ftp_traffic. For any TCP connection other than Telnet and FTP, it will match class tcp_traffic. Even though a Telnet or FTP connection can match class tcp_traffic, the ASA does not make this match because they previously matched other classes. Applying Actions to an Interface (Service Policy) To activate the Layer 3/4 policy map, create a service policy that applies it to one or more interfaces or that applies it globally to all interfaces. 9-26 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 9 Using Modular Policy Framework Monitoring Modular Policy Framework Restrictions You can only apply one global policy. Detailed Steps • To create a service policy by associating a policy map with an interface, enter the following command: hostname(config)# service-policy policy_map_name interface interface_name • To create a service policy that applies to all interfaces that do not have a specific policy, enter the following command: hostname(config)# service-policy policy_map_name global By default, the configuration includes a global policy that matches all default application inspection traffic and applies inspection to the traffic globally. You can only apply one global policy, so if you want to alter the global policy, you need to either edit the default policy or disable it and apply a new one. The default service policy includes the following command: service-policy global_policy global Examples For example, the following command enables the inbound_policy policy map on the outside interface: hostname(config)# service-policy inbound_policy interface outside The following commands disable the default global policy, and enables a new one called new_global_policy on all other ASA interfaces: hostname(config)# no service-policy global_policy global hostname(config)# service-policy new_global_policy global Monitoring Modular Policy Framework To monitor Modular Policy Framework, enter the following command: Configuration Examples for Modular Policy Framework This section includes several Modular Policy Framework examples, and includes the following topics: • Applying Inspection and QoS Policing to HTTP Traffic, page 9-27 • Applying Inspection to HTTP Traffic Globally, page 9-27 • Applying Inspection and Connection Limits to HTTP Traffic to Specific Servers, page 9-28 Command Purpose show service-policy Displays the service policy statistics.9-27 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 9 Using Modular Policy Framework Configuration Examples for Modular Policy Framework • Applying Inspection to HTTP Traffic with NAT, page 9-29 Applying Inspection and QoS Policing to HTTP Traffic In this example (see Figure 9-1), any HTTP connection (TCP traffic on port 80) that enters or exits the ASA through the outside interface is classified for HTTP inspection. Any HTTP traffic that exits the outside interface is classified for policing. Figure 9-1 HTTP Inspection and QoS Policing See the following commands for this example: hostname(config)# class-map http_traffic hostname(config-cmap)# match port tcp eq 80 hostname(config)# policy-map http_traffic_policy hostname(config-pmap)# class http_traffic hostname(config-pmap-c)# inspect http hostname(config-pmap-c)# police output 250000 hostname(config)# service-policy http_traffic_policy interface outside Applying Inspection to HTTP Traffic Globally In this example (see Figure 9-2), any HTTP connection (TCP traffic on port 80) that enters the ASA through any interface is classified for HTTP inspection. Because the policy is a global policy, inspection occurs only as the traffic enters each interface. Figure 9-2 Global HTTP Inspection 143356 inside port 80 outside A Host A Host B port 80 Security appliance insp. insp. police inside port 80 outside A Host A Host B port 80 insp. insp. Security appliance 1434149-28 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 9 Using Modular Policy Framework Configuration Examples for Modular Policy Framework See the following commands for this example: hostname(config)# class-map http_traffic hostname(config-cmap)# match port tcp eq 80 hostname(config)# policy-map http_traffic_policy hostname(config-pmap)# class http_traffic hostname(config-pmap-c)# inspect http hostname(config)# service-policy http_traffic_policy global Applying Inspection and Connection Limits to HTTP Traffic to Specific Servers In this example (see Figure 9-3), any HTTP connection destined for Server A (TCP traffic on port 80) that enters the ASA through the outside interface is classified for HTTP inspection and maximum connection limits. Connections initiated from server A to Host A does not match the access list in the class map, so it is not affected. Any HTTP connection destined for Server B that enters the ASA through the inside interface is classified for HTTP inspection. Connections initiated from server B to Host B does not match the access list in the class map, so it is not affected. Figure 9-3 HTTP Inspection and Connection Limits to Specific Servers See the following commands for this example: hostname(config)# static (inside,outside) 209.165.201.1 192.168.1.2 hostname(config)# nat (inside) 1 192.168.1.0 255.255.255.0 hostname(config)# global (outside) 1 209.165.201.2 hostname(config)# access-list serverA extended permit tcp any host 209.165.201.1 eq 80 hostname(config)# access-list ServerB extended permit tcp any host 209.165.200.227 eq 80 hostname(config)# class-map http_serverA hostname(config-cmap)# match access-list serverA hostname(config)# class-map http_serverB hostname(config-cmap)# match access-list serverB hostname(config)# policy-map policy_serverA hostname(config-pmap)# class http_serverA hostname(config-pmap-c)# inspect http hostname(config-pmap-c)# set connection conn-max 100 hostname(config)# policy-map policy_serverB hostname(config-pmap)# class http_serverB inside outside Server A Real Address: 192.168.1.2 Mapped Address: 209.165.201.1 Host B Real Address: 192.168.1.1 Mapped Address: 209.165.201.2:port Host A 209.165.200.226 Server B 209.165.200.227 port 80 port 80 insp. insp. set conns 143357 Security appliance9-29 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 9 Using Modular Policy Framework Configuration Examples for Modular Policy Framework hostname(config-pmap-c)# inspect http hostname(config)# service-policy policy_serverB interface inside hostname(config)# service-policy policy_serverA interface outside Applying Inspection to HTTP Traffic with NAT In this example, the Host on the inside network has two addresses: one is the real IP address 192.168.1.1, and the other is a mapped IP address used on the outside network, 209.165.200.225. Because the policy is applied to the inside interface, where the real address is used, then you must use the real IP address in the access list in the class map. If you applied it to the outside interface, you would use the mapped address. Figure 9-4 HTTP Inspection with NAT See the following commands for this example: hostname(config)# static (inside,outside) 209.165.200.225 192.168.1.1 hostname(config)# access-list http_client extended permit tcp host 192.168.1.1 any eq 80 hostname(config)# class-map http_client hostname(config-cmap)# match access-list http_client hostname(config)# policy-map http_client hostname(config-pmap)# class http_client hostname(config-pmap-c)# inspect http hostname(config)# service-policy http_client interface inside inside outside Host Real IP: 192.168.1.1 Mapped IP: 209.165.200.225 Server 209.165.201.1 port 80 insp. Security appliance 1434169-30 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 9 Using Modular Policy Framework Feature History for Modular Policy Framework Feature History for Modular Policy Framework Table 9-4 lists the release history for this feature. Table 9-4 Feature History for Feature-1 Feature Name Releases Feature Information Modular Policy Framework 7.0(1) Modular Policy Framework was introduced. Management class map for use with RADIUS accounting traffic 7.2(1) The management class map was introduced for use with RADIUS accounting traffic. The following commands were introduced: class-map type management, and inspect radius-accounting. Inspection policy maps 7.2(1) The inspection policy map was introduced. The following command was introduced: class-map type inspect. Regular expressions and policy maps 7.2(1) Regular expressions and policy maps were introduced to be used under inspection policy maps. The following commands were introduced: class-map type regex, regex, match regex. Match any for inspection policy maps 8.0(2) The match any keyword was introduced for use with inspection policy maps: traffic can match one or more criteria to match the class map. Formerly, only match all was available. Maximum connections and embryonic connections for management traffic 8.0(2) The set connection command is now available for a Layer 3/4 management class map, for to-the-security appliance management traffic. Only the conn-max and embryonic-conn-max keywords are available. P A R T 2 Configuring Access ListsC H A P T E R 10-1 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 10 Information About Access Lists Cisco ASA 5500 Series Adaptive Security Appliances provide basic traffic filtering capabilities with access lists, which control access in your network by preventing certain traffic from entering or exiting. This chapter describes access lists and shows how to add them to your network configuration. Access lists are made up of one or more access control entries (ACEs). An ACE is a single entry in an access list that specifies a permit or deny rule (to forward or drop the packet) and is applied to a protocol, to a source and destination IP address or network, and, optionally, to the source and destination ports. Access lists can be configured for all routed and network protocols (IP, AppleTalk, and so on) to filter the packets of those protocols as the packets pass through a router. Access lists are used in a variety of features. If your feature uses Modular Policy Framework, you can use an access list to identify traffic within a traffic class map. For more information on Modular Policy Framework, see Chapter 9, “Using Modular Policy Framework.” This chapter includes the following sections: • Access List Types, page 10-1 • Access Control Entry Order, page 10-2 • Access Control Implicit Deny, page 10-3 • IP Addresses Used for Access Lists When You Use NAT, page 10-3 Access List Types The adaptive security appliance uses five types of access control lists: • Standard access lists—Identify the destination IP addresses of OSPF routes and can be used in a route map for OSPF redistribution. Standard access lists cannot be applied to interfaces to control traffic. For more information, see Chapter 13, “Adding a Standard Access List.” • Extended access lists—Use one or more access control entries (ACE) in which you can specify the line number to insert the ACE, the source and destination addresses, and, depending upon the ACE type, the protocol, the ports (for TCP or UDP), or the IPCMP type (for ICMP). For more information, see Chapter 11, “Adding an Extended Access List.” • EtherType access lists—Use one or more ACEs that specify an EtherType. For more information, see Chapter 12, “Adding an EtherType Access List.” • Webtype access lists—Used in a configuration that supports filtering for clientless SSL VPN. For more information, see Chapter 14, “Adding a Webtype Access List.”10-2 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 10 Information About Access Lists Access Control Entry Order • IPv6 access lists—Determine which IPv6 traffic to block and which traffic to forward at router interfaces. For more information, see Chapter 15, “Adding an IPv6 Access List.” Table 10-1 lists the types of access lists and some common uses for them. Access Control Entry Order An access list is made up of one or more Access Control Entry (ACE). Each ACE that you enter for a given access list name is appended to the end of the access list. Depending on the access list type, you can specify the source and destination addresses, the protocol, the ports (for TCP or UDP), the ICMP type (for ICMP), or the EtherType. Table 10-1 Access List Types and Common Uses Access List Use Access List Type Description Control network access for IP traffic (routed and transparent mode) Extended The ASA does not allow any traffic from a lower security interface to a higher security interface unless it is explicitly permitted by an extended access list. Note To access the ASA interface for management access, you do not also need an access list allowing the host IP address. You only need to configure management access according to Chapter 37, “Configuring Management Access.” Identify traffic for AAA rules Extended AAA rules use access lists to identify traffic. Control network access for IP traffic for a given user Extended, downloaded from a AAA server per user You can configure the RADIUS server to download a dynamic access list to be applied to the user, or the server can send the name of an access list that you already configured on the ASA. Identify addresses for NAT (policy NAT and NAT exemption) Extended Policy NAT lets you identify local traffic for address translation by specifying the source and destination addresses in an extended access list. Establish VPN access Extended You can use an extended access list in VPN commands. Identify traffic in a traffic class map for Modular Policy Framework Extended EtherType Access lists can be used to identify traffic in a class map, which is used for features that support Modular Policy Framework. Features that support Modular Policy Framework include TCP and general connection settings, and inspection. For transparent firewall mode, control network access for non-IP traffic EtherType You can configure an access list that controls traffic based on its EtherType. Identify OSPF route redistribution Standard Standard access lists include only the destination address. You can use a standard access list to control the redistribution of OSPF routes. Filtering for WebVPN Webtype You can configure a Webtype access list to filter URLs. Control network access for IPV6 networks IPv6 You can add and apply access lists to control traffic in IPv6 networks.10-3 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 10 Information About Access Lists Access Control Implicit Deny The order of ACEs is important. When the ASA decides whether to forward or to drop a packet, the ASA tests the packet against each ACE in the order in which the entries are listed. After a match is found, no more ACEs are checked. For example, if you create an ACE at the beginning of an access list that explicitly permits all traffic, no further statements are checked, and the packet is forwarded. Access Control Implicit Deny Each access list has an implicit deny statement at the end, so unless you explicitly permit traffic to pass, it will be denied. For example, if you want to allow all users to access a network through the ASA except for one or more particular addresses, then you need to deny those particular addresses and then permit all others. For EtherType access lists, the implicit deny at the end of the access list does not affect IP traffic or ARPs; for example, if you allow EtherType 8037, the implicit deny at the end of the access list does not now block any IP traffic that you previously allowed with an extended access list (or implicitly allowed from a high security interface to a low security interface). However, if you explicitly deny all traffic with an EtherType ACE, then IP and ARP traffic is denied. IP Addresses Used for Access Lists When You Use NAT When you use NAT, the IP addresses that you specify for an access list depend on the interface to which the access list is attached; you need to use addresses that are valid on the network connected to the interface. This guideline applies for both inbound and outbound access lists: the direction does not determine the address used, only the interface does.10-4 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 10 Information About Access Lists IP Addresses Used for Access Lists When You Use NAT For example, if you want to apply an access list to the inbound direction of the inside interface, you configure the ASA to perform NAT on the inside source addresses when they access outside addresses. Because the access list is applied to the inside interface, the source addresses are the original untranslated addresses. Because the outside addresses are not translated, the destination address used in the access list is the real address. (See Figure 10-1.) Figure 10-1 IP Addresses in Access Lists: NAT Used for Source Addresses See the following commands for this example: hostname(config)# access-list INSIDE extended permit ip 10.1.1.0 255.255.255.0 host 209.165.200.225 hostname(config)# access-group INSIDE in interface inside 209.165.200.225 Inside Outside Inbound ACL Permit from 10.1.1.0/24 to 209.165.200.225 10.1.1.0/24 PAT 10.1.1.0/24 209.165.201.4:port 10463410-5 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 10 Information About Access Lists IP Addresses Used for Access Lists When You Use NAT If you want to allow an outside host to access an inside host, you can apply an inbound access list on the outside interface. You need to specify the translated address of the inside host in the access list because that address is the address that can be used on the outside network. (See Figure 10-2.) Figure 10-2 IP Addresses in Access Lists: NAT Used for Destination Addresses See the following commands for this example: hostname(config)# access-list OUTSIDE extended permit ip host 209.165.200.225 host 209.165.201.5 hostname(config)# access-group OUTSIDE in interface outside 209.165.200.225 Inside Outside Static NAT 10.1.1.34 209.165.201.5 ACL Permit from 209.165.200.225 to 209.165.201.5 10463610-6 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 10 Information About Access Lists Where to Go Next If you perform NAT on both interfaces, keep in mind the addresses that are visible to a given interface. Figure 10-3 shows an outside server that uses static NAT so that a translated address appears on the inside network. Figure 10-3 IP Addresses in Access Lists: NAT used for Source and Destination Addresses See the following commands for this example: hostname(config)# access-list INSIDE extended permit ip 10.1.1.0 255.255.255.0 host 10.1.1.56 hostname(config)# access-group INSIDE in interface inside Where to Go Next For information about implementing access lists, see the following chapters in this guide: • Chapter 11, “Adding an Extended Access List” • Chapter 12, “Adding an EtherType Access List” • Chapter 13, “Adding a Standard Access List” • Chapter 14, “Adding a Webtype Access List” • Chapter 15, “Adding an IPv6 Access List” 209.165.200.225 10.1.1.0/24 Inside Outside Static NAT 10.1.1.56 ACL Permit from 10.1.1.0/24 to 10.1.1.56 PAT 10.1.1.0/24 209.165.201.4:port 104635C H A P T E R 11-1 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 11 Adding an Extended Access List This chapter describes how to configure extended access lists (also known as access control lists), and it includes the following topics: • Information About Extended Access Lists, page 11-1 • Licensing Requirements for Extended Access Lists, page 11-2 • Guidelines and Limitations, page 11-2 • Default Settings, page 11-4 • Configuring Extended Access Lists, page 11-4 • What to Do Next, page 11-7 • Monitoring Extended Access Lists, page 11-7 • Configuration Examples for Extended Access Lists, page 11-7 • Feature History for Extended Access Lists, page 11-8 Information About Extended Access Lists Access lists are used to control network access or to specify traffic for many features to act upon. An extended access list is made up of one or more access control entries (ACE) in which you can specify the line number to insert the ACE, the source and destination addresses, and, depending upon the ACE type, the protocol, the ports (for TCP or UDP), or the IPCMP type (for ICMP). You can identify all of these parameters within the access-list command, or you can use object groups for each parameter. This section describes how to identify the parameters within the command. To simplify access lists with object groups, see Chapter 16, “Configuring Object Groups.” For TCP and UDP connections for both routed and transparent mode, you do not need an access list to allow returning traffic because the security appliance allows all returning traffic for established bidirectional connections. For connectionless protocols such as ICMP, however, the security appliance establishes unidirectional sessions, so you either need access lists to allow ICMP in both directions (by applying access lists to the source and destination interfaces), or you need to enable the ICMP inspection engine. The ICMP inspection engine treats ICMP sessions as bidirectional connections. You can apply only one access list of each type (extended and EtherType) to each direction of an interface. You can apply the same access lists on multiple interfaces. 11-2 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 11 Adding an Extended Access List Licensing Requirements for Extended Access Lists Allowing Broadcast and Multicast Traffic through the Transparent Firewall In routed firewall mode, broadcast and multicast traffic is blocked even if you allow it in an access list, including unsupported dynamic routing protocols and DHCP (unless you configure DHCP relay). Transparent firewall mode can allow any IP traffic through. This feature is especially useful in multiple context mode, which does not allow dynamic routing, for example. Note Because these special types of traffic are connectionless, you need to apply an extended access list to both interfaces so that returning traffic is allowed through. Table 11-1 lists common traffic types that you can allow through the transparent firewall. Licensing Requirements for Extended Access Lists The following table shows the licensing requirements for this feature: Guidelines and Limitations This section includes the guidelines and limitations for this feature: • Context Mode Guidelines, page 11-2 • Firewall Mode Guidelines, page 11-2 • Additional Guidelines and Limitations, page 11-3 Context Mode Guidelines Supported in single and multiple context mode. Firewall Mode Guidelines Supported only in routed and transparent firewall modes. Table 11-1 Transparent Firewall Special Traffic Traffic Type Protocol or Port Notes DHCP UDP ports 67 and 68 If you enable the DHCP server, then the ASA does not pass DHCP packets. EIGRP Protocol 88 — OSPF Protocol 89 — Multicast streams The UDP ports vary depending on the application. Multicast streams are always destined to a Class D address (224.0.0.0 to 239.x.x.x). RIP (v1 or v2) UDP port 520 — Model License Requirement All models Base License.11-3 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 11 Adding an Extended Access List Guidelines and Limitations IPv6 Guidelines IPv6 is supported. Additional Guidelines and Limitations The following guidelines and limitations apply to creating an extended access list: • When you enter the access-list command for a given access list name, the ACE is added to the end of the access list unless you specify the line number. • Enter the access list name in uppercase letters so that the name is easy to see in the configuration. You might want to name the access list for the interface (for example, INSIDE), or you can name it for the purpose for which it is created (for example, NO_NAT or VPN). • Typically, you identify the ip keyword for the protocol, but other protocols are accepted. For a list of protocol names, see the “Protocols and Applications” section on page C-11. • Enter the host keyword before the IP address to specify a single address. In this case, do not enter a mask. Enter the any keyword instead of the address and mask to specify any address. • You can specify the source and destination ports only for the tcp or udp protocols. For a list of permitted keywords and well-known port assignments, see the “TCP and UDP Ports” section on page C-11. DNS, Discard, Echo, Ident, NTP, RPC, SUNRPC, and Talk each require one definition for TCP and one for UDP. TACACS+ requires one definition for port 49 on TCP. • You can specify the ICMP type only for the icmp protocol. Because ICMP is a connectionless protocol, you either need access lists to allow ICMP in both directions (by applying access lists to the source and destination interfaces), or you need to enable the ICMP inspection engine. (See the “Adding an ICMP Type Object Group” section on page 16-7.) The ICMP inspection engine treats ICMP sessions as stateful connections. To control ping, specify echo-reply (0) (ASA to host) or echo (8) (host to ASA). See the “Adding an ICMP Type Object Group” section on page 16-7 for a list of ICMP types. • When you specify a network mask, the method is different from the Cisco IOS software access-list command. The ASA uses a network mask (for example, 255.255.255.0 for a Class C mask). The Cisco IOS mask uses wildcard bits (for example, 0.0.0.255). • To make an ACE inactive, use the inactive keyword. To reenable it, enter the entire ACE without the inactive keyword. This feature enables you to keep a record of an inactive ACE in your configuration to make reenabling easier. • Use the disable option to disable logging for a specified ACE.11-4 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 11 Adding an Extended Access List Default Settings Default Settings Table 11-2 lists the default settings for extended access list parameters. Configuring Extended Access Lists This section shows how to add and delete an access control entry and access list, and it includes the following topics: • Task Flow for Configuring Extended Access Lists, page 11-4 • Adding an Extended Access List, page 11-5 • Adding Remarks to Access Lists, page 11-6 • Deleting an Extended Access List Entry, page 11-6 Task Flow for Configuring Extended Access Lists Use the following guidelines to create and implement an access list: • Create an access list by adding an ACE and applying an access list name. (See the “Adding an Extended Access List” section on page 11-5.) • Apply the access list to an interface. (See the “Applying an Access List to an Interface” section on page 35-4 for more information.) Table 11-2 Default Extended Access List Parameters Parameters Default ACE logging ACE logging generates system log message 106023 for denied packets. A deny ACE must be present to log denied packets. log When the log keyword is specified, the default level for system log message 106100 is 6 (informational), and the default interval is 300 seconds. 11-5 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 11 Adding an Extended Access List Configuring Extended Access Lists Adding an Extended Access List An access list is made up of one or more access control entries (ACEs) with the same access list ID. To create an access list you start by creating an ACE and applying a list name. An access list with one entry is still considered a list, although you can add multiple entries to the list. To add an extended access list or an ACE, enter the following command: Command Purpose access-list access_list_name [line line_number] [extended] {deny | permit} protocol source_address mask [operator port] dest_address mask [operator port | icmp_type] [inactive] Example: hostname(config)# access-list ACL_IN extended permit ip any any Adds an extended access control entry. The line line_number options specify the line number at which insert the ACE. If you do not specify a line number, the ACE is added to the end of the access list. The line number is not saved in the configuration; it only specifies where to insert the ACE. The extended option adds an ACE. The deny keyword denies a packet if the conditions are matched. Some features do not allow deny ACEs, such as NAT. See the command documentation for each feature that uses an access list for more information. The permit keyword permits a packet if the conditions are matched. The protocol argument specifies the IP protocol name or number. For example UDP is 17, TCP is 6, and EGP is 47. The source_address specifies the IP address of the network or host from which the packet is being sent. Enter the host keyword before the IP address to specify a single address. In this case, do not enter a mask. Enter the any keyword instead of the address and mask to specify any address. The operator port option matches the port numbers used by the source or destination. The permitted operators are as follows: • lt—less than. • gt—greater than. • dq—equal to. • neq—not equal to. • range—an inclusive range of values. When you use this operator, specify two port numbers, for example: range 100 200. The dest_address argument specifies the IP address of the network or host to which the packet is being sent. Enter the host keyword before the IP address to specify a single address. In this case, do not enter a mask. Enter the any keyword instead of the address and mask to specify any address. The icmp_type argument specifies the ICMP type if the protocol is ICMP. The inactive keyword disables an ACE. To reenable it, enter the entire ACE without the inactive keyword. This feature enables you to keep a record of an inactive ACE in your configuration to make reenabling easier. (See the access-list extended command in the Cisco Security Appliance Command Reference for more information about command options.)11-6 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 11 Adding an Extended Access List Configuring Extended Access Lists Adding Remarks to Access Lists You can include remarks about entries in any access list, including extended, EtherType, IPv6, standard, and Webtype access lists. The remarks make the access list easier to understand. To add a remark after the last access-list command you entered, enter the following command: Example You can add remarks before each ACE, and the remark appears in the access list in this location. Entering a dash (-) at the beginning of the remark helps set it apart from the ACEs. hostname(config)# access-list OUT remark - this is the inside admin address hostname(config)# access-list OUT extended permit ip host 209.168.200.3 any hostname(config)# access-list OUT remark - this is the hr admin address hostname(config)# access-list OUT extended permit ip host 209.168.200.4 any Deleting an Extended Access List Entry This section shows how to remove an ACE. If the deleted entry is the only entry in the list, then the list and listname are deleted. To delete an extended ACE, enter the following command: Command Purpose access-list access_list_name remark text Example: hostname(config)# access-list OUT remark - this is the inside admin address Adds a remark after the last access-list command you entered. The text can be up to 100 characters in length. You can enter leading spaces at the beginning of the text. Trailing spaces are ignored. If you enter the remark before any access-list command, then the remark is the first line in the access list. If you delete an access list using the no access-list access_list_name command, then all the remarks are also removed. Command Purpose hostname(config)# no access-list access_list_name [line line_number] [extended] {deny | permit} protocol source_address mask [operator port] dest_address mask [operator port | icmp_type] [inactive] Example: hostname(config)# access-list ACL_IN extended permit ip any any Deletes and extended access list entry. Enter the no access-list command with the entire command syntax string as it appears in the configuration. Note To remove the entire access list, use the clear configure access-list command. (See the “Adding an Extended Access List” section on page 11-5 or the Cisco Security Appliance Command Reference for more information about command options.)11-7 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 11 Adding an Extended Access List What to Do Next What to Do Next Apply the access list to an interface. See the “Applying an Access List to an Interface” section on page 35-4 for more information. Monitoring Extended Access Lists To monitor extended access lists, enter one of the following commands: Configuration Examples for Extended Access Lists The following access list allows all hosts (on the interface to which you apply the access list) to go through the adaptive security appliance: hostname(config)# access-list ACL_IN extended permit ip any any The following sample access list prevents hosts on 192.168.1.0/24 from accessing the 209.165.201.0/27 network. All other addresses are permitted. hostname(config)# access-list ACL_IN extended deny tcp 192.168.1.0 255.255.255.0 209.165.201.0 255.255.255.224 hostname(config)# access-list ACL_IN extended permit ip any any If you want to restrict access to selected hosts only, then enter a limited permit ACE. By default, all other traffic is denied unless explicitly permitted. hostname(config)# access-list ACL_IN extended permit ip 192.168.1.0 255.255.255.0 209.165.201.0 255.255.255.224 The following access list restricts all hosts (on the interface to which you apply the access list) from accessing a website at address 209.165.201.29. All other traffic is allowed. hostname(config)# access-list ACL_IN extended deny tcp any host 209.165.201.29 eq www hostname(config)# access-list ACL_IN extended permit ip any any The following access list that uses object groups restricts several hosts on the inside network from accessing several web servers. All other traffic is allowed. hostname(config-network)# access-list ACL_IN extended deny tcp object-group denied object-group web eq www hostname(config)# access-list ACL_IN extended permit ip any any hostname(config)# access-group ACL_IN in interface inside The following example temporarily disables an access list that permits traffic from one group of network objects (A) to another group of network objects (B): hostname(config)# access-list 104 permit ip host object-group A object-group B inactive Command Purpose show access list Displays the access list entries by number. show running-config access-list Displays the current running access-list configuration.11-8 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 11 Adding an Extended Access List Feature History for Extended Access Lists To implement a time-based access list, use the time-range command to define specific times of the day and week. Then use the access-list extended command to bind the time range to an access list. The following example binds an access list named “Sales” to a time range named “New_York_Minute”: hostname(config)# access-list Sales line 1 extended deny tcp host 209.165.200.225 host 209.165.201.1 time-range New_York_Minute Feature History for Extended Access Lists Table 11-3 lists the release history for this feature. Table 11-3 Feature History for Extended Access Lists Feature Name Releases Feature Information Extended access control lists 7.0 Access lists are used to control network access or to specify traffic for many features to act upon. An extended access control list is made up of one or more access control entries (ACE) in which you can specify the line number to insert the ACE, the source and destination addresses, and, depending upon the ACE type, the protocol, the ports (for TCP or UDP), or the IPCMP type (for ICMP). The following command was introduced: access-list extended.C H A P T E R 12-1 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 12 Adding an EtherType Access List This chapter describes how to configure EtherType access lists and includes the following topics: • Information About EtherType Access Lists, page 12-1 • Licensing Requirements for EtherType Access Lists, page 12-2 • Guidelines and Limitations, page 12-2 • Default Settings, page 12-3 • Configuring EtherType Access Lists, page 12-4 • Monitoring EtherType Access Lists, page 12-6 • What to Do Next, page 12-6 • Configuration Examples for EtherType Access Lists, page 12-7 • Feature History for EtherType Access Lists, page 12-7 Information About EtherType Access Lists An EtherType access list is made up of one or more Access List Entries (ACEs) that specify an EtherType. This section includes the following topics: • Supported EtherTypes, page 12-1 • Implicit Permit of IP and ARPs Only, page 12-2 • Implicit and Explicit Deny ACE at the End of an Access List, page 12-2 • Allowing MPLS, page 12-2 Supported EtherTypes An EtherType ACE controls any EtherType identified by a 16-bit hexadecimal number. You can apply only one access list of each type (extended and EtherType) to each direction of an interface. You can also apply the same access lists on multiple interfaces.12-2 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 12 Adding an EtherType Access List Licensing Requirements for EtherType Access Lists Implicit Permit of IP and ARPs Only IPv4 traffic is allowed through the transparent firewall automatically from a higher security interface to a lower security interface, without an access list. ARPs are allowed through the transparent firewall in both directions without an access list. ARP traffic can be controlled by ARP inspection. However, to allow any traffic with EtherTypes other than IPv4 and ARP, you need to apply an EtherType access list, even from a high security to a low security interface. Because EtherTypes are connectionless, you need to apply the access list to both interfaces if you want traffic to pass in both directions. Implicit and Explicit Deny ACE at the End of an Access List For EtherType access lists, the implicit deny at the end of the access list does not affect IP traffic or ARPs; for example, if you allow EtherType 8037, the implicit deny at the end of the access list does not now block any IP traffic that you previously allowed with an extended access list (or implicitly allowed from a high security interface to a low security interface). However, if you explicitly deny all traffic with an EtherType ACE, then IP and ARP traffic is denied. Allowing MPLS If you allow MPLS, ensure that Label Distribution Protocol and Tag Distribution Protocol TCP connections are established through the ASA by configuring both MPLS routers connected to the ASA to use the IP address on the ASA interface as the router-id for LDP or TDP sessions. (LDP and TDP allow MPLS routers to negotiate the labels [addresses] used to forward packets.) On Cisco IOS routers, enter the appropriate command for your protocol, either LDP or TDP. The interface is the interface connected to the ASA. hostname(config)# mpls ldp router-id interface force Or hostname(config)# tag-switching tdp router-id interface force Licensing Requirements for EtherType Access Lists The following table shows the licensing requirements for this feature: Guidelines and Limitations This section includes the guidelines and limitations for this feature: • Context Mode Guidelines, page 12-3 • Firewall Mode Guidelines, page 12-3 • Additional Guidelines and Limitations, page 12-3 Model License Requirement All models Base License.12-3 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 12 Adding an EtherType Access List Default Settings Context Mode Guidelines Available in single and multiple context modes. Firewall Mode Guidelines Supported in transparent firewall mode only. Additional Guidelines and Limitations The following guidelines and limitations apply to EtherType access lists: • When you enter the access-list command for a given access list name, the ACE is added to the end of the access list. • EtherType access lists support Ethernet V2 frames. • 802.3-formatted frames are not handled by the access list because they use a length field as opposed to a type field. Bridge protocol data units, which are allowed by default, are the only exception; they are SNAP-encapsulated, and the adaptive security appliance is designed to specifically handle BPDUs. • Because EtherTypes are connectionless, you need to apply the ACL to both interfaces if you want traffic to pass in both directions. • If you allow MPLS, ensure that LDP and TDP TCP connections are established through the adaptive security appliance by configuring both MPLD routers connected to the adaptive security appliance to use the IP address on the adaptive security appliance interface as the router-ID for LDP or TDP sessions. (LDP and TDP allow MPLS routers to negotiate the labels, or addresses, used to forward packets.) • For EtherType access lists, the implicit deny at the end of the access list does not affect IP traffic or ARPs; for example, if you allow EtherType 8037, the implicit deny at the end of the access list does not now block any IP traffic that you previously allowed with an extended access list (or implicitly allowed from a high security interface to a low security interface). However, if you explicitly deny all traffic with an EtherType ACE, then IP and ARP traffic is denied. • You can apply only one access list of each type (extended and Ethertype) to each direction of an interface. You can also apply the same access lists on multiple interfaces. Default Settings Table 12-1 lists the default settings for EtherType access lists parameters. Table 12-1 Default EtherType Access Lists Parameters Parameters Default bpdu By default, BPDUs are permitted. deny | permit The adaptive security appliance denies all packets on the originating interface unless you specifically permit access. 12-4 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 12 Adding an EtherType Access List Configuring EtherType Access Lists Configuring EtherType Access Lists This section includes the following topics: • Task Flow for Configuring EtherType Access Lists, page 12-4 • Adding EtherType Access Lists, page 12-5 • Adding Remarks to Access Lists, page 12-6 Task Flow for Configuring EtherType Access Lists Use the following guidelines to create and implement an access list: • Create an access list by adding an ACE and applying an access list name, as shown in the “Adding EtherType Access Lists” section on page 12-5. • Apply the access list to an interface. (See the “Applying an Access List to an Interface” section on page 35-4 for more information.) deny Access list logging generates system log message 106023 for denied packets. Deny packets must be present to loge denied packets. log When the log optional keyword is specified, the default severity level for system log message 106100 is 6 (informational). Table 12-1 Default EtherType Access Lists Parameters (continued) Parameters Default12-5 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 12 Adding an EtherType Access List Configuring EtherType Access Lists Adding EtherType Access Lists To configure an access list that controls traffic based upon its EtherType, enter the following command: Example The following sample access list allows common EtherTypes originating on the inside interface: hostname(config)# access-list ETHER ethertype permit ipx hostname(config)# access-list ETHER ethertype permit mpls-unicast hostname(config)# access-group ETHER in interface inside Command Purpose access-list access_list_name ethertype {deny | permit} {ipx | bpdu | mpls-unicast | mpls-multicast | any | hex_number} Example: hostname(config)# hostname(config)# access-list ETHER ethertype permit ipx Adds an EtherType ACE. The access_list_name argument lists the name or number of an access list. When you specify an access list name, the ACE is added to the end of the access list. Enter the access_list_name in upper case letters so that the name is easy to see in the configuration. You might want to name the access list for the interface (for example, INSIDE) or for the purpose (for example, MPLS or PIX). The any keyword specifies access to anyone. The bpdu keyword specifies access to bridge protocol data units, which are permitted by default. The deny keyword denies access if the conditions are matched. If an EtherType access list is configured to deny all, all ethernet frames are discarded. Only physical protocol traffic, such as auto-negotiation, is still allowed. The hex_number argument indicates any Ethertype that can be identified by a 16-bit hexadecimal number greater than or equal to 0x600. (See RFC 1700, “Assigned Numbers,” at http://www.ietf.org/rfc/rfc1700.txt for a list of EtherTypes.) The ipx keyword specifies access to IPX. The mpls-multicast keyword specifies access to MPLS multicast. The mpls-unicast keyword specifies access to MPLS unicast. The permit keyword permits access if the conditions are matched. Note To remove an EtherType ACE, enter the no access-list command with the entire command syntax string as it appears in the configuration.12-6 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 12 Adding an EtherType Access List What to Do Next Adding Remarks to Access Lists You can include remarks about entries in any access list, including extended, EtherType, IPv6, standard, and Webtype access lists. The remarks make an access list easier to understand. To add a remark after the last access-list command you entered, enter the following command: Example You can add remarks before each ACE, and the remarks appear in the access list in these locations. Entering a dash (-) at the beginning of a remark helps to set it apart from the ACE. hostname(config)# access-list OUT remark - this is the inside admin address hostname(config)# access-list OUT extended permit ip host 209.168.200.3 any hostname(config)# access-list OUT remark - this is the hr admin address hostname(config)# access-list OUT extended permit ip host 209.168.200.4 any What to Do Next Apply the access list to an interface. (See the “Applying an Access List to an Interface” section on page 35-4 for more information.) Monitoring EtherType Access Lists To monitor EtherType access lists, enter one of the following commands: Command Purpose access-list access_list_name remark text Example: hostname(config)# access-list OUT remark - this is the inside admin address Adds a remark after the last access-list command you entered. The text can be up to 100 characters in length. You can enter leading spaces at the beginning of the text. Trailing spaces are ignored. If you enter the remark before any access-list command, then the remark is the first line in the access list. If you delete an access list using the no access-list access_list_name command, then all remarks are also removed. Command Purpose show access-list Displays the access list entries by number. show running-config access-list Displays the current running access-list configuration.12-7 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 12 Adding an EtherType Access List Configuration Examples for EtherType Access Lists Configuration Examples for EtherType Access Lists The following example shows how to configure EtherType access lists: The following access list allows some EtherTypes through the ASA, but it denies IPX: hostname(config)# access-list ETHER ethertype deny ipx hostname(config)# access-list ETHER ethertype permit 0x1234 hostname(config)# access-list ETHER ethertype permit mpls-unicast hostname(config)# access-group ETHER in interface inside hostname(config)# access-group ETHER in interface outside The following access list denies traffic with EtherType 0x1256, but it allows all others on both interfaces: hostname(config)# access-list nonIP ethertype deny 1256 hostname(config)# access-list nonIP ethertype permit any hostname(config)# access-group ETHER in interface inside hostname(config)# access-group ETHER in interface outside Feature History for EtherType Access Lists Table 12-2 lists the release history for this feature. Table 12-2 Feature History for EtherType Access Lists Feature Name Releases Feature Information EtherType access lists 7.0 EtherType access lists control traffic based upon its EtherType. The feature and the following command were introduced: access-list ethertype.12-8 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 12 Adding an EtherType Access List Feature History for EtherType Access ListsC H A P T E R 13-1 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 13 Adding a Standard Access List This chapter describes how to configure a standard access list and includes the following topics: • Information About Standard Access Lists, page 13-1 • Licensing Requirements for Standard Access Lists, page 13-1 • Guidelines and Limitations, page 13-1 • Default Settings, page 13-2 • Adding a Standard Access List, page 13-3 • What to Do Next, page 13-4 • Monitoring Access Lists, page 13-4 • Configuration Examples for Standard Access Lists, page 13-5 • Feature History for Standard Access Lists, page 13-5 Information About Standard Access Lists Standard access lists identify the destination IP addresses of OSPF routes and can be used in a route map for OSPF redistribution. Standard access lists cannot be applied to interfaces to control traffic. Licensing Requirements for Standard Access Lists The following table shows the licensing requirements for this feature: Guidelines and Limitations This section includes the guidelines and limitations for this feature: • Context Mode Guidelines, page 13-2 • Firewall Mode Guidelines, page 13-2 Model License Requirement All models Base License.13-2 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 13 Adding a Standard Access List Default Settings • IPv6 Guidelines, page 13-2 • Additional Guidelines and Limitations, page 13-2 Context Mode Guidelines Supported in single context mode only. Firewall Mode Guidelines Supported in routed and transparent firewall modes. IPv6 Guidelines Supports IPv6. Additional Guidelines and Limitations The following guidelines and limitations apply for standard access lists: • To add additional ACEs at the end of the access list, enter another access-list command, specifying the same access list name. • When used with the access-group command, the deny keyword does not allow a packet to traverse the adaptive security appliance. By default, the adaptive security appliance denies all packets on the originating interface unless you specifically permit access. • When specifying a source, local, or destination address, use the following guidelines: – Use a 32-bit quantity in four-part, dotted-decimal format. – Use the keyword any as an abbreviation for an address and mask of 0.0.0.0.0.0.0.0. – Use the host ip_address option as an abbreviation for a mask of 255.255.255.255. • You can disable an ACE by specifying the keyword inactive in the access-list command. Default Settings Table 13-1 lists the default settings for standard access list parameters. Table 13-1 Default Standard Access List Parameters Parameters Default deny The adaptive security appliance denies all packets on the originating interface unless you specifically permit access. Access list logging generates system log message 106023 for denied packets. Deny packets must be present to log denied packets. 13-3 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 13 Adding a Standard Access List Adding a Standard Access List Adding a Standard Access List This section includes the following topics: • Task Flow for Configuring Extended Access Lists, page 13-3 • Adding a Standard Access List, page 13-3 • Adding Remarks to Access Lists, page 13-4 Task Flow for Configuring Extended Access Lists Use the following guidelines to create and implement an access list: • Create an access list by adding an ACE and applying an access list name. See in the “Adding a Standard Access List” section on page 13-3. • Apply the access list to an interface. See the “Applying an Access List to an Interface” section on page 35-4 for more information. Adding a Standard Access List To add an access list to identify the destination IP addresses of OSPF routes, which can be used in a route map for OSPF redistribution, enter the following command: Command Purpose hostname(config)# access-list access_list_name standard {deny | permit} {any | ip_address mask} Example: hostname(config)# access-list OSPF standard permit 192.168.1.0 255.255.255.0 Adds a standard access list entry. To add another ACE to the end of the access list, enter another access-list command, specifying the same access list name. The access_list_name argument specifies the name of number of an access list. The any keyword specifies access to anyone. The deny keyword denies access if the conditions are matched. The host ip_address syntax specifies access to a host IP address The ip_address ip_mask argument specifies access to a specific IP address and subnet mask. The line line-num option specifies the line number at which to insert an ACE. The permit keyword permits access if the conditions are matched. Note To remove an ACE, enter the no access-list command with the entire command syntax string as it appears in the configuration.13-4 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 13 Adding a Standard Access List What to Do Next Adding Remarks to Access Lists You can include remarks about entries in any access list, including extended, EtherType, IPv6, standard, and Webtype access lists. The remarks make the access list easier to understand. To add a remark after the last access-list command you entered, enter the following command: Example You can add a remark before each ACE, and the remarks appear in the access lists in these location. Entering a dash (-) at the beginning of a remark helps to set it apart from an ACE. hostname(config)# access-list OUT remark - this is the inside admin address hostname(config)# access-list OUT extended permit ip host 209.168.200.3 any hostname(config)# access-list OUT remark - this is the hr admin address hostname(config)# access-list OUT extended permit ip host 209.168.200.4 any What to Do Next Apply the access list to an interface. See the “Applying an Access List to an Interface” section on page 35-4 for more information. Monitoring Access Lists To monitor access lists, perform one of the following tasks: Command Purpose access-list access_list_name remark text Example: hostname(config)# access-list OUT remark - this is the inside admin address Adds a remark after the last access-list command you entered. The text can be up to 100 characters in length. You can enter leading spaces at the beginning of the text. Trailing spaces are ignored. If you enter the remark before any access-list command, then the remark is the first line in the access list. If you delete an access list using the no access-list access_list_name command, then all the remarks are also removed. Command Purpose show access-list Displays the access list entries by number. show running-config access-list Displays the current running access-list configuration.13-5 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 13 Adding a Standard Access List Configuration Examples for Standard Access Lists Configuration Examples for Standard Access Lists The following example shows how to deny IP traffic through the adaptive security appliance: hostname(config)# access-list 77 standard deny The following example shows how to permit IP traffic through the adaptive security appliance if conditions are matched: hostname(config)# access-list 77 standard permit The following example shows how to specify a destination address: hostname(config)# access-list 77 standard permit host 10.1.10.123 Feature History for Standard Access Lists Table 13-2 lists the release history for this feature. Table 13-2 Feature History for Standard Access Lists Feature Name Releases Feature Information Standard access lists 7.0 Standard access lists identify the destination IP addresses of OSPF routes, which can be used in a route map for OSPF redistribution. The feature and the following command were introduced: access-list standard.13-6 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 13 Adding a Standard Access List Feature History for Standard Access ListsC H A P T E R 14-1 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 14T Adding a Webtype Access List Webtype access lists are added to a configuration that supports filtering for clientless SSL VPN. This chapter describes how to add an access list to the configuration that supports filtering for WebVPN. This chapter includes the following topics: • Licensing Requirements for Webtype Access Lists, page 14-1 • Guidelines and Limitations, page 14-1 • Default Settings, page 14-2 • Adding Webtype Access Lists, page 14-2 • What to Do Next, page 14-5 • Monitoring Webtype Access Lists, page 14-5 • Configuration Examples for Webtype Access Lists, page 14-5 • Feature History for Webtype Access Lists, page 14-7 Licensing Requirements for Webtype Access Lists The following table shows the licensing requirements for this feature: Guidelines and Limitations This section includes the guidelines and limitations for this feature: • Context Mode Guidelines, page 14-1 • Firewall Mode Guidelines, page 14-2 • Additional Guidelines and Limitations, page 14-2 Context Mode Guidelines Supported in single and multiple context mode. Model License Requirement All models Base License.14-2 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 14 Adding a Webtype Access List Default Settings Firewall Mode Guidelines Supported in routed and transparent firewall mode. IPv6 Guidelines Supports IPv6. Additional Guidelines and Limitations The following guidelines and limitations apply to Webtype access lists: • The access-list Webtype command is used to configure clientless SSL VPN filtering. The URL specified may be full or partial (no file specified), may include wildcards for the server, or may specify a port. See the “Adding Webtype Access Lists with a URL String” section on page 14-3 for information about using wildcard characters in the URL string. • Valid protocol identifiers are http, https, cifs, imap4, pop3, and smtp. The RL may also contain the keyword any to refer to any URL. An asterisk may be used to refer to a subcomponent of a DNS name. Default Settings Table 14-1 lists the default settings for Webtype access lists parameters. Adding Webtype Access Lists This section includes the following topics: • Task Flow for Configuring Webtype Access Lists, page 14-2 • Adding Webtype Access Lists with a URL String, page 14-3 • Adding Webtype Access Lists with an IP Address, page 14-4 • Adding Remarks to Access Lists, page 14-5 Task Flow for Configuring Webtype Access Lists Use the following guidelines to create and implement an access list: • Create an access list by adding an ACE and applying an access list name. See the “Adding Webtype Access Lists” section on page 14-2. Table 14-1 Default Webtype Access List Parameters Parameters Default deny The adaptive security appliance denies all packets on the originating interface unless you specifically permit access. log Access list logging generates system log message 106023 for denied packets. Deny packets must be present to log denied packets.14-3 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 14 Adding a Webtype Access List Adding Webtype Access Lists • Apply the access list to an interface. See the “Applying an Access List to an Interface” section on page 35-4 for more information. Adding Webtype Access Lists with a URL String To add an access list to the configuration that supports filtering for clientless SSL VPN, enter the following command: Command Purpose access-list access_list_name webtype {deny | permit} url [url_string | any] [log[[disable | default] | level] interval secs][time_range name]] Example: hostname(config)# access-list acl_company webtype deny url http://*.company.com Adds an access list to the configuration that supports filtering for WebVPN. The access_list_name argument specifies the name or number of an access list. The any keyword specifies all URLs. The deny keyword denies access if the conditions are matched. The interval option specifies the time interval at which to generate system log message 106100; valid values are from 1 to 600 seconds. The log [[disable | default] | level] option specifies that system log message 106100 is generated for the ACE. When the log optional keyword is specified, the default level for system log message 106100 is 6 (informational). See the log command for more information. The permit keyword permits access if the conditions are matched. The time_range name option specifies a keyword for attaching the time-range option to this access list element. The url keyword specifies that a URL be used for filtering. The url_string option specifies the URL to be filtered. You can use the following wildcard characters to define more than one wildcard in the Webtype access list entry: • Enter an asterisk “*” to match no characters or any number of characters. • Enter a question mark “?” to match any one character exactly. • Enter square brackets “[]” to create a range operator that matches any one character in a range. Note To match any http URL, you must enter http://*/* instead of the former method of entering http://*. To remove an access list, use the no form of this command with the complete syntax string as it appears in the configuration.14-4 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 14 Adding a Webtype Access List Adding Webtype Access Lists Adding Webtype Access Lists with an IP Address To add an access list to the configuration that supports filtering for clientless SSL VPN, enter the following command: Command Purpose access-list access_list_name webtype {deny | permit} tcp [host ip_address | ip_address subnet_mask | any] [oper port[port]] [log[[disable | default] | level] interval secs][time_range name]] Example: hostname(config)# access-list acl_company webtype permit tcp any Adds an access list to the configuration that supports filtering for WebVPN. The access_list_name argument specifies the name or number of an access list. The any keyword specifies all IP addresses. The deny keyword denies access if the conditions are matched. The host ip_address option specifies a host IP address. The interval option specifies the time interval at which to generate system log message 106100; valid values are from 1 to 600 seconds. The ip_address ip_mask option specifies a specific IP address and subnet mask. The log [[disable | default]| level] option specifies that system log message 106100 is generated for the ACE. When the log optional keyword is specified, the default level for system log message 106100 is 6 (informational). See the log command for more information. The permit keyword permits access if the conditions are matched. The port option specifies the decimal number or name of a TCP or UDP port. The time_range name option specifies a keyword for attaching the time-range option to this access list element. To remove an access list, use the no form of this command with the complete syntax string as it appears in the configuration.14-5 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 14 Adding a Webtype Access List What to Do Next Adding Remarks to Access Lists You can include remarks about entries in any access list, including extended, EtherType, IPv6, standard, and Webtype access lists. The remarks make the access list easier to understand. To add a remark after the last access-list command you entered, enter the following command: Example You can add a remark before each ACE, and the remarks appear in the access list in these locations. Entering a dash (-) at the beginning of a remark helps set it apart from an ACE. hostname(config)# access-list OUT remark - this is the inside admin address hostname(config)# access-list OUT extended permit ip host 209.168.200.3 any hostname(config)# access-list OUT remark - this is the hr admin address hostname(config)# access-list OUT extended permit ip host 209.168.200.4 any What to Do Next Apply the access list to an interface. See the “Applying an Access List to an Interface” section on page 35-4 for more information. Monitoring Webtype Access Lists To monitor webtype access lists, enter the following command: Configuration Examples for Webtype Access Lists The following example shows how to deny access to a specific company URL: hostname(config)# access-list acl_company webtype deny url http://*.company.com Command Purpose access-list access_list_name remark text Example: hostname(config)# access-list OUT remark - this is the inside admin address Adds a remark after the last access-list command you entered. The text can be up to 100 characters in length. You can enter leading spaces at the beginning of the text. Trailing spaces are ignored. If you enter the remark before any access-list command, then the remark is the first line in the access list. If you delete an access list using the no access-list access_list_name command, then all the remarks are also removed. Command Purpose show running-config access list Displays the access-list configuration running on the adaptive security appliance.14-6 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 14 Adding a Webtype Access List Configuration Examples for Webtype Access Lists The following example shows how to deny access to a specific file: hostname(config)# access-list acl_file webtype deny url https://www.company.com/dir/file.html The following example shows how to deny HTTP access to any URL through port 8080: hostname(config)# access-list acl_company webtype deny url http://my-server:8080/* The following examples show how to use wildcards in Webtype access lists. • The following example matches URLs such as http://www.cisco.com/ and http://wwz.caco.com/: access-list test webtype permit url http://ww?.c*co*/ • The following example matches URLs such as http://www.cisco.com and ftp://wwz.carrier.com: access-list test webtype permit url *://ww?.c*co*/ • The following example matches URLs such as http://www.cisco.com:80 and https://www.cisco.com:81: access-list test webtype permit url *://ww?.c*co*:8[01]/ The range operator “[]” in the preceding example specifies that either character 0 or 1 can occur. • The following example matches URLs such as http://www.google.com and http://www.boogie.com: access-list test webtype permit url http://www.[a-z]oo?*/ The range operator “[]” in the preceding example specifies that any character in the range from a to z can occur. • The following example matches URLs such as http://www.cisco.com/anything/crazy/url/ddtscgiz: access-list test webtype permit url htt*://*/*cgi?* Note To match any http URL, you must enter http://*/* instead of the former method of entering http://*. The following example shows how to enforce a webtype access list to disable access to specific CIFS shares. In this scenario we have a root folder named “shares” that contains two sub-folders named “Marketing_Reports” and “Sales_Reports.” We want to specifically deny access to the “shares/Marketing_Reports” folder. access-list CIFS_Avoid webtype deny url cifs://172.16.10.40/shares/Marketing_Reports. However, due to the implicit “deny all,” the above access list makes all of the sub-folders inaccessible (“shares/Sales_Reports” and “shares/Marketing_Reports”), including the root folder (“shares”). To fix the problem, add a new access list to allow access to the root folder and the remaining sub-folders. access-list CIFS_Allow webtype permit url cifs://172.16.10.40/shares*14-7 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 14 Adding a Webtype Access List Feature History for Webtype Access Lists Feature History for Webtype Access Lists Table 14-2 lists the release history for this feature. Table 14-2 Feature History for Webtype Access Lists Feature Name Releases Feature Information Webtype access lists 7.0 Webtype access lists are access lists that are added to a configuration that supports filtering for clientless SSL VPN. The feature and the following command were introduced: access-list webtype.14-8 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 14 Adding a Webtype Access List Feature History for Webtype Access ListsC H A P T E R 15-1 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 15 Adding an IPv6 Access List This chapter describes how to configure IPv6 access lists to control and filter traffic through the security appliance. This chapter includes the following sections: • Information About IPv6 Access Lists, page 15-1 • Licensing Requirements for IPv6 Access Lists, page 15-1 • Prerequisites for Adding IPv6 Access Lists, page 15-2 • Guidelines and Limitations, page 15-2 • Default Settings, page 15-3 • Configuring IPv6 Access Lists, page 15-4 • Monitoring IPv6 Access Lists, page 15-7 • Configuration Examples for IPv6 Access Lists, page 15-7 • Where to Go Next, page 15-7 • Feature History for IPv6 Access Lists, page 15-7 Information About IPv6 Access Lists The typical access list functionality in IPv6 is similar to access lists in IPv4. Access lists determine which traffic to block and which traffic to forward at router interfaces. Access lists allow filtering based upon source and destination addresses, inbound and outbound to specific interfaces. Each access list has an implicit deny statement at the end. You define IPv6 access lists and set their deny and permit conditions using the ipv6 access-list command with the deny and permit keywords in global configuration mode. Licensing Requirements for IPv6 Access Lists The following table shows the licensing requirements for this feature: Model License Requirement All models Base License.15-2 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 15 Adding an IPv6 Access List Prerequisites for Adding IPv6 Access Lists Prerequisites for Adding IPv6 Access Lists You should be familiar with IPv6 addressing and basic configuration. See the ipv6 commands in the Cisco Security Appliance Command Reference for more information about configuring IPv6. Guidelines and Limitations This section includes the guidelines and limitations for this feature. Context Mode Guidelines Supported in single and multiple context modes. Firewall Mode Guidelines Supported in routed and transparent firewall modes. IPv6 Guidelines Supports IPv6. Additional Guidelines and Limitations The following guidelines and limitations apply to IPv6 access lists: • The ipv6 access-list command allows you to specify whether an IPv6 address is permitted or denied access to a port or protocol. Each command is called an ACE. One or more ACEs with the same access list name are referred to as an access list. Apply an access list to an interface using the access-group command. • The ASA denies all packets from an outside interface to an inside interface unless you specifically permit access using an access list. All packets are allowed by default from an inside interface to an outside interface unless you specifically deny access. • The ipv6 access-list command is similar to the access-list command, except that it is IPv6-specific. For additional information about access lists, refer to the access-list extended command. • The ipv6 access-list icmp command is used to filter ICMPv6 messages that pass through the ASA.To configure the ICMPv6 traffic that is allowed to originate and terminate at a specific interface, use the ipv6 icmp command. • See the object-group command for information on how to configure object groups. • Possible operands for the operator option of the ipv6 access-list command include lt for less than, gt for greater than, eq for equal to, neq for not equal to, and range for an inclusive range. Use the ipv6 access-list command without an operator and port to indicate all ports by default. • ICMP message types are filtered by the access rule. Omitting the icmp_type argument indicates all ICMP types. If you specify ICMP types, the value can be a valid ICMP type number (from 0 to 255) or one of the following ICMP type literals: – destination-unreachable – packet-too-big – time-exceeded – parameter-problem – echo-request 15-3 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 15 Adding an IPv6 Access List Default Settings – echo-reply – membership-query – membership-report – membership-reduction – router-renumbering – router-solicitation – router-advertisement – neighbor-solicitation – neighbor-advertisement – neighbor-redirect • If the protocol argument is specified, valid values are icmp, ip, tcp, udp, or an integer in the range of 1 to 254, representing an IP protocol number. Default Settings Table 15-1 lists the default settings for IPv6 access list parameters. Table 15-1 Default IPv6 Access List Parameters Parameters Default default The default option specifies that a syslog message 106100 is generated for the ACE. interval secs Specifies the time interval at which to generate a 106100 syslog message; valid values are from 1 to 600 seconds. The default interval is 300 seconds. This value is also used as the timeout value for deleting an inactive flow. level The level option specifies the syslog level for message 106100; valid values are from 0 to 7. The default level is 6 (informational). log The log option specifies logging action for the ACE. If you do not specify the log keyword or you specify the log default keyword, then message 106023 is generated when a packet is denied by the ACE. If you specify the log keyword alone or with a level or interval, then message 106100 is generated when a packet is denied by the ACE. Packets that are denied by the implicit deny at the end of an access list are not logged. You must implicitly deny packets with an ACE to enable logging.15-4 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 15 Adding an IPv6 Access List Configuring IPv6 Access Lists Configuring IPv6 Access Lists This section includes the following topics: • Task Flow for Configuring IPv6 Access Lists, page 15-4 • Adding IPv6 Access Lists, page 15-5 • Adding Remarks to Access Lists, page 15-6 Task Flow for Configuring IPv6 Access Lists Use the following guidelines to create and implement an access list: • Create an access list by adding an ACE and applying an access list name, as shown in the “Adding IPv6 Access Lists” section on page 15-5. • Apply the access list to an interface. (See the “Applying an Access List to an Interface” section on page 35-4 for more information.)15-5 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 15 Adding an IPv6 Access List Configuring IPv6 Access Lists Adding IPv6 Access Lists You can add a regular IPv6 access list or add an IPv6 access list with TCP. To add a regular IPv6 access list, enter the following command: Command Purpose ipv6 access-list id [line line-num] {deny | permit} {protocol | object-group protocol_obj_grp_id} {source-ipv6-prefix/prefix-length | any | host source-ipv6-address | object-group network_obj_grp_id} [operator {port [port] | object-group service_obj_grp_id}] {destination-ipv6-prefix/prefix-length | any | host destination-ipv6-address | object-group network_obj_grp_id} [{operator port [port] | object-group service_obj_grp_id}] [log [[level] [interval secs] | disable | default]] Example: hostname(config)# ipv6 access-list acl_grp permit tcp any host 3001:1::203:A0FF:FED6:162D Configures an IPv6 access list. The any keyword is an abbreviation for the IPv6 prefix ::/0, indicating any IPv6 address. The deny keyword denies access if the conditions are matched. The destination-ipv6-address argument identifies the IPv6 address of the host receiving the traffic. The destination-ipv6-prefix argument identifies the IPv6 network address where the traffic is destined. The disable option disables syslog messaging. The host keyword indicates that the address refers to a specific host. The id keyword specifies the number of an access list. The line line-num option specifies the line number for inserting the access rule into the list. By default, the ACE is added to the end of the access list. The network_obj_grp_id argument specifies existing network object group identification. The object-group option specifies an object group. The operator option compares the source IP address or destination IP address ports. For a list of permitted operands, see the “Guidelines and Limitations” section on page 15-2. The permit keyword permits access if the conditions are matched. The port option specifies the port that you permit or deny access. You can specify the port either by a number in the range of 0 to 65535 or by a literal name if the protocol is tcp or udp. For a list of permitted TCP or UDP literal names, see the “Guidelines and Limitations” section on page 15-2. The prefix-length argument indicates how many of the high-order, contiguous bits of the address comprise the IPv6 prefix. The protocol argument specifies the name or number of an IP protocol. The protocol_obj_grp_id indicates the existing protocol object group ID. The service_obj_grp_id option specifies the object group. The source-ipv6-address specifies the address of the host sending traffic. The source-ipv6-prefix specifies the IPv6 address of traffic origin.15-6 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 15 Adding an IPv6 Access List Configuring IPv6 Access Lists To configure an IPv6 access list with ICMP, enter the following command: Adding Remarks to Access Lists You can include remarks about entries in any access list, including extended, EtherType, IPv6, standard, and Webtype access lists. The remarks make the access list easier to understand. To add a remark after the last access-list command you entered, enter the following command: Example You can add remarks before each ACE, and the remarks appear in the access list in these locations. Entering a dash (-) at the beginning of a remark helps set it apart from an ACE. hostname(config)# access-list OUT remark - this is the inside admin address hostname(config)# access-list OUT extended permit ip host 209.168.200.3 any hostname(config)# access-list OUT remark - this is the hr admin address hostname(config)# access-list OUT extended permit ip host 209.168.200.4 any Command Purpose ipv6 access-list id [line line-num] {deny | permit} icmp6 {source-ipv6-prefix/prefix-length | any | host source-ipv6-address | object-group network_obj_grp_id} {destination-ipv6-prefix/prefix-length | any | host destination-ipv6-address | object-group network_obj_grp_id} [icmp_type | object-group icmp_type_obj_grp_id] [log [[level] [interval secs] | disable | default]] Example: hostname(config)# ipv6 access list acl_grp permit tcp any host 3001:1::203:AOFF:FED6:162D Configures an IPv6 access list with ICMP. The icmp6 keyword specifies that the access rule applies to ICMPv6 traffic passing through the ASA. The icmp_type argument specifies the ICMP message type being filtered by the access rule. The value can be a valid ICMP type number from 0 to 255. (For a list of the permitted ICMP type literals, see the “Guidelines and Limitations” section on page 15-2.) The icmp_type_obj_grp_id option specifies the object group ICMP type ID. For details about additional ipv6 access-list command parameters, see the preceding procedure for adding a regular IPv6 access list, or see the ipv6 access-list command in the Cisco Security Appliance Command Reference. Command Purpose access-list access_list_name remark text Example: hostname(config)# access-list OUT remark - this is the inside admin address Adds a remark after the last access-list command you entered. The text can be up to 100 characters in length. You can enter leading spaces at the beginning of the text. Trailing spaces are ignored. If you enter the remark before any access-list command, then the remark is the first line in the access list. If you delete an access list using the no access-list access_list_name command, then all the remarks are also removed.15-7 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 15 Adding an IPv6 Access List Monitoring IPv6 Access Lists Monitoring IPv6 Access Lists To monitor IPv6 access lists, perform one of the following tasks: Configuration Examples for IPv6 Access Lists The following example shows how to configure IPv6 access lists: The following example allows any host using TCP to access the 3001:1::203:A0FF:FED6:162D server: hostname(config)# ipv6 access-list acl_grp permit tcp any host 3001:1::203:A0FF:FED6:162D The following example uses eq and a port to deny access to just FTP: hostname(config)# ipv6 access-list acl_out deny tcp any host 3001:1::203:A0FF:FED6:162D eq ftp hostname(config)# access-group acl_out in interface inside The following example uses lt to permit access to all ports less than port 2025, which permits access to the well-known ports (1 to 1024): hostname(config)# ipv6 access-list acl_dmz1 permit tcp any host 3001:1::203:A0FF:FED6:162D lt 1025 hostname(config)# access-group acl_dmz1 in interface dmz1 Where to Go Next Apply the access list to an interface. (See the “Applying an Access List to an Interface” section on page 35-4 for more information.) Feature History for IPv6 Access Lists Table 15-2 lists the release history for this feature. Command Purpose show ipv6 access-list Displays all IPv6 access list information. Table 15-2 Feature History for IPv6 Access Lists Feature Name Releases Feature Information IPv6 access lists 7.0(1) The following command was introduced: ipv6 access-list.15-8 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 15 Adding an IPv6 Access List Feature History for IPv6 Access ListsC H A P T E R 16-1 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 16 Configuring Object Groups You can configure access lists in modules, or object groups, to simplify access list creation and maintenance. This chapter describes how to configure, organize, and display object groups, and it includes the following sections: • Configuring Object Groups, page 16-1 • Using Object Groups with Access Lists, page 16-10 • Adding Remarks to Access Lists, page 16-13 • Scheduling Extended Access List Activation, page 16-14 Configuring Object Groups This section includes the following topics: • Information About Object Groups, page 16-2 • Licensing Requirements for Object Groups, page 16-2 • Guidelines and Limitations for Object Groups, page 16-3 • Adding Object Groups, page 16-4 • Removing Object Groups, page 16-8 • Monitoring Object Groups, page 16-8 • Nesting Object Groups, page 16-9 • Feature History for Object Groups, page 16-1016-2 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 16 Configuring Object Groups Configuring Object Groups Information About Object Groups By grouping like objects together, you can use the object group in an ACE instead of having to enter an ACE for each object separately. You can create the following types of object groups: • Protocol • Network • Service • ICMP type For example, consider the following three object groups: • MyServices—Includes the TCP and UDP port numbers of the service requests that are allowed access to the internal network. • TrustedHosts—Includes the host and network addresses allowed access to the greatest range of services and servers. • PublicServers—Includes the host addresses of servers to which the greatest access is provided. After creating these groups, you could use a single ACE to allow trusted hosts to make specific service requests to a group of public servers. You can also nest object groups in other object groups. Note The ACE system limit applies to expanded access lists. If you use object groups in ACEs, the number of actual ACEs that you enter is fewer, but the number of expanded ACEs is the same as without object groups. In many cases, object groups create more ACEs than if you added them manually because creating ACEs manually leads you to summarize addresses more than an object group does. For example, consider a network object group with 100 sources, a network object group with 100 destinations, and a port object group with 5 ports. Permitting the ports from sources to destinations could result in 50,000 ACEs (5 x 100 x 100) in the expanded access list. Licensing Requirements for Object Groups The following table shows the licensing requirements for this feature: Model License Requirement All models Base License.16-3 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 16 Configuring Object Groups Configuring Object Groups Guidelines and Limitations for Object Groups This section includes the guidelines and limitations for this feature: • Context Mode Guidelines, page 16-3 • Firewall Mode Guidelines, page 16-3 • IPv6 Guidelines, page 16-3 • Additional Guidelines and Limitations, page 16-3 Context Mode Guidelines Supported in single and multiple context mode. Firewall Mode Guidelines Supported in routed and transparent firewall modes. IPv6 Guidelines Supports IPv6. Additional Guidelines and Limitations The following guidelines and limitations apply to object groups: • Object groups must have unique names. While you might want to create a network object group named “Engineering” and a service object group named “Engineering,” you need to add an identifier (or “tag”) to the end of at least one object group name to make it unique. For example, you can use the names “Engineering_admins” and “Engnineering_hosts” to make the object group names unique and to aid in identification. • After you add an object group you can add more objects as required by following the same procedure again for the same group name and specifying additional objects. You do not need to reenter existing objects: the command you already set remains in place unless you remove the object group with the no form of the command. • Objects such as hosts, protocols, or services can be grouped, and then you can enter a single command using the group name to apply every item in the group. • When you define a group with the object group command and then use any security appliance command, the command applies to every item in that group. This feature can significantly reduce your configuration size. Note You cannot remove an object group or make an object group empty if it is used in an access list. For information about removing object groups, see the “Removing Object Groups” section on page 16-8. • The security appliance does not support IPv6 nested object groups, so you cannot group an object with IPv6 entities under another IPv6 object-group.16-4 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 16 Configuring Object Groups Configuring Object Groups Adding Object Groups This section includes the following topics: • Adding a Protocol Object Group, page 16-4 • Adding a Network Object Group, page 16-5 • Adding a Service Object Group, page 16-6 • Adding an ICMP Type Object Group, page 16-7 Adding a Protocol Object Group To add or change a protocol object group, perform the steps in this section. After you add the group, you can add more objects as required by following this procedure again for the same group name and specifying additional objects. You do not need to reenter existing objects; the commands you already set remain in place unless you remove them with the no form of the command. Detailed Steps Example To create a protocol group for TCP, UDP, and ICMP, enter the following commands: hostname (config)# object-group protocol tcp_udp_icmp hostname (config-protocol)# protocol-object tcp hostname (config-protocol)# protocol-object udp hostname (config-protocol)# protocol-object icmp Command Purpose Step 1 object-group protocol obj_grp_id Example: hostname(config)# object-group protocol tcp_udp_icmp Adds a protocol group. The obj_grp_id is a text string up to 64 characters in length and can be any combination of letters, digits, and the following characters: • underscore “_” • dash “-” • period “.” The prompt changes to protocol configuration mode. Step 2 description text Example: hostname(config-protocol)# description New Group (Optional) Adds a description. The description can be up to 200 characters. Step 3 protocol-object protocol Example: hostname(config-protocol)# protocol-object tcp Defines the protocols in the group. Enter the command for each protocol. The protocol is the numeric identifier of the specified IP protocol (1 to 254) or a keyword identifier (for example, icmp, tcp, or udp). To include all IP protocols, use the keyword ip. For a list of protocols that you can specify, see the “Protocols and Applications” section on page C-11. 16-5 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 16 Configuring Object Groups Configuring Object Groups Adding a Network Object Group A network object group supports IPv4 and IPv6 addresses, depending upon the type of access list. For more information about IPv6 access lists, see Chapter 15, “Adding an IPv6 Access List.” To add or change a network object group, perform the steps in this section. After you add the group, you can add more objects as required by following this procedure again for the same group name and specifying additional objects. You do not need to reenter existing objects; the commands you already set remain in place unless you remove them with the no form of the command. Detailed Steps Example To create a network group that includes the IP addresses of three administrators, enter the following commands: hostname (config)# object-group network admins hostname (config-protocol)# description Administrator Addresses hostname (config-protocol)# network-object host 10.1.1.4 hostname (config-protocol)# network-object host 10.1.1.78 hostname (config-protocol)# network-object host 10.1.1.34 Command Purpose Step 1 object-group network grp_id Example: hostname(config)# object-group network admins Adds a network group. The grp_id is a text string up to 64 characters in length and can be any combination of letters, digits, and the following characters: • underscore “_” • dash “-” • period “.” The prompt changes to protocol configuration mode. Step 2 description text Example: hostname(config-network)# Administrator Addresses (Optional) Adds a description. The description can be up to 200 characters. Step 3 network-object network {host ip_address | ip_address mask} Example: hostname(config-network)# network-object host 10.1.1.4 Defines the networks in the group. Enter the command for each network or address. 16-6 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 16 Configuring Object Groups Configuring Object Groups Adding a Service Object Group To add or change a service object group, perform the steps in this section. After you add the group, you can add more objects as required by following this procedure again for the same group name and specifying additional objects. You do not need to reenter existing objects; the commands you already set remain in place unless you remove them with the no form of the command. Detailed Steps Example To create service groups that include DNS (TCP/UDP), LDAP (TCP), and RADIUS (UDP), enter the following commands: hostname (config)# object-group service services1 tcp-udp hostname (config-service)# description DNS Group hostname (config-service)# port-object eq domain hostname (config)# object-group service services2 udp hostname (config-service)# description RADIUS Group hostname (config-service)# port-object eq radius hostname (config-service)# port-object eq radius-acct hostname (config)# object-group service services3 tcp hostname (config-service)# description LDAP Group hostname (config-service)# port-object eq ldap Command Purpose Step 1 object-group service grp_id {tcp | udp | tcp-udp} Example: hostname(config)# object-group service services1 tcp-udp Adds a service group. The grp_id is a text string up to 64 characters in length and can be any combination of letters, digits, and the following characters: • underscore “_” • dash “-” • period “.” Specify the protocol for the services (ports) you want to add with either the tcp, udp, or tcp-udp keywords. Enter the tcp-udp keyword if your service uses both TCP and UDP with the same port number, for example, DNS (port53). The prompt changes to service configuration mode. Step 2 description text Example: hostname(config-service)# description DNS Group (Optional) Adds a description. The description can be up to 200 characters. Step 3 port-object {eq port | range begin_port end_port} Example: hostname(config-service)# port-object eq domain Defines the ports in the group. Enter the command for each port or range of ports. For a list of permitted keywords and well-known port assignments, see the “Protocols and Applications” section on page C-11. 16-7 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 16 Configuring Object Groups Configuring Object Groups Adding an ICMP Type Object Group To add or change an ICMP type object group, perform the steps in this section. After you add the group, you can add more objects as required by following this procedure again for the same group name and specifying additional objects. You do not need to reenter existing objects; the commands you already set remain in place unless you remove them with the no form of the command. Detailed Steps Example Create an ICMP type group that includes echo-reply and echo (for controlling ping) by entering the following commands. hostname (config)# object-group icmp-type ping hostname (config-service)# description Ping Group hostname (config-service)# icmp-object echo hostname (config-service)# icmp-object echo-reply Command Purpose Step 1 object-group icmp-type grp_id Example: hostname(config)# object-group icmp-type ping Adds an ICMP type object group. The grp_id is a text string up to 64 characters in length and can be any combination of letters, digits, and the following characters: • underscore “_” • dash “-” • period “.” The prompt changes to ICMP type configuration mode. Step 2 description text Example: hostname(config-icmp-type)# description Ping Group (Optional) Adds a description. The description can be up to 200 characters. Step 3 icmp-object icmp-type Example: hostname(config-icmp-type)# icmp-object echo-reply Defines the ICMP types in the group. Enter the command for each type. For a list of ICMP types, see the“ICMP Types” section on page C-15.16-8 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 16 Configuring Object Groups Configuring Object Groups Removing Object Groups You can remove a specific object group or remove all object groups of a specified type; however, you cannot remove an object group or make an object group empty if it is used in an access list. Detailed Step Monitoring Object Groups To monitor object groups, enter the following commands: Step 1 Do one of the following: no object-group grp_id Example: hostname(config)# no object-group Engineering_host Removes the specified object group. The grp_id is a text string up to 64 characters in length and can be any combination of letters, digits, and the following characters: • underscore “_” • dash “-” • period “.” clear object-group [protocol | network | services | icmp-type] Example: hostname(config)# clear-object group network Removes all object groups of the specified type. Note If you do not enter a type, all object groups are removed. Command Purpose show access-list Displays the access list entries that are expanded out into individual entries without their object groupings. show running-config object-group Displays all current object groups. show running-config object-group grp_id Displays the current object groups by their group ID. show running-config object-group grp_type Displays the current object groups by their group type.16-9 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 16 Configuring Object Groups Configuring Object Groups Nesting Object Groups You can nest object groups heirarchically so that one object group can contain other object groups of the same type. However, the security appliance does not support IPv6 nested object groups, so you cannot group an object with IPv6 entities under another IPv6 object-group. To nest an object group within another object group of the same type, first create the group that you want to nest (see the “Adding Object Groups” section on page 16-4) and then perform the steps in this section. Detailed Steps Examples Create network object groups for privileged users from various departments by entering the following commands: hostname (config)# object-group network eng hostname (config-network)# network-object host 10.1.1.5 hostname (config-network)# network-object host 10.1.1.9 hostname (config-network)# network-object host 10.1.1.89 hostname (config)# object-group network hr hostname (config-network)# network-object host 10.1.2.8 hostname (config-network)# network-object host 10.1.2.12 hostname (config)# object-group network finance hostname (config-network)# network-object host 10.1.4.89 hostname (config-network)# network-object host 10.1.4.100 You then nest all three groups together as follows: hostname (config)# object-group network admin hostname (config-network)# group-object eng hostname (config-network)# group-object hr hostname (config-network)# group-object finance Command Purpose Step 1 object-group group {{protocol | network | icmp-type} grp_id |service grp_id {tcp | udp | tcp-udp}} Example: hostname(config)# object-group network Engineering_group Adds or edits the specified object group type under which you want to nest another object group. The service_grp_id is a text string up to 64 characters in length and can be any combination of letters, digits, and the following characters: • underscore “_” • dash “-” • period “.” Step 2 group-object group_id Example: hostname(config-network)# network-object host 10.1.1.5 hostname(config-network)# network-object host 10.1.1.7 hostname(config-network)# network-object host 10.1.1.9 Adds the specified group under the object group you specified in Step 1. The nested group must be of the same type. You can mix and match nexted group objects and regular objects within an object group.16-10 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 16 Configuring Object Groups Using Object Groups with Access Lists You only need to specify the admin object group in your ACE as follows: hostname (config)# access-list ACL_IN extended permit ip object-group admin host 209.165.201.29 Feature History for Object Groups Table 16-1 lists the release history for this feature. Using Object Groups with Access Lists This section contains the following topics: • Information About Using Object Groups with Access Lists, page 16-10 • Licensing Requirements for Using Object Groups with Access Lists, page 16-10 • Guidelines and Limitations for Using Object Groups with Access Lists, page 16-11 • Configuring Object Groups with Access Lists, page 16-11 • Monitoring the Use of Object Groups with Access Lists, page 16-12 • Configuration Examples for Using Object Groups with Access Lists, page 16-12 • Feature History for Using Object Groups with Access Lists, page 16-13 Information About Using Object Groups with Access Lists You can use object groups in an access list, replace the normal protocol (protocol), network (source_address mask, and so on) service (operator port), or ICMP type (icmp_type) parameter with the object-group grp_id parameter. Licensing Requirements for Using Object Groups with Access Lists The following table shows the licensing requirements for this feature: Table 16-1 Feature History for Object Groups Feature Name Releases Feature Information Object groups 7.0 Object groups simplify access list creation and maintenance. The following commands were introduced or modified: object-group protocol, object-group network, object-group service, object-group icmp_type. Model License Requirement All models Base License.16-11 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 16 Configuring Object Groups Using Object Groups with Access Lists Guidelines and Limitations for Using Object Groups with Access Lists This section includes the guidelines and limitations for this feature: • Context Mode Guidelines, page 16-11 • Firewall Mode Guidelines, page 16-11 • IPv6 Guidelines, page 16-3 • Additional Guidelines and Limitations, page 16-11 Context Mode Guidelines Supported in single and multiple context mode. Firewall Mode Guidelines Supported in routed and transparent firewall modes. IPv6 Guidelines Supports IPv6. Additional Guidelines and Limitations The following guidelines and limitations apply to using object groups with access lists: You do not have to use object groups for all parameters; for example, you can use an object group for the source address but identify the destination address with an address and mask. Configuring Object Groups with Access Lists To use object groups for all available parameters in the access-list {tcp | udp} command, enter the following command: Command Purpose access-list access_list_name [line line_number] [extended] {deny | permit} {tcp | udp} object-group nw_grp_id [object-group svc_grp_id] object-group nw_grp_id [object-group svc_grp_id] [log [[level] [interval secs] | disable | default]] [inactive | time-range time_range_name] hostname(config)# access-list 104 permit tcp object-group A object-group B inactive Configures object groups with access lists. For a detailed list of command options, see the access list estended command in the Cisco Adaptive Security Appliance Command Reference. For a complete configuration example about using object groups with access lists, see the “Configuration Examples for Scheduling Access List Activation” section on page 16-16.16-12 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 16 Configuring Object Groups Using Object Groups with Access Lists Monitoring the Use of Object Groups with Access Lists To monitor the use of object groups with accesslists, enter the following commands: Example The following is sample output from the show object-group command: hostname# show object-group object-group network ftp_servers description: This is a group of FTP servers network-object host 209.165.201.3 network-object host 209.165.201.4 object-group network TrustedHosts network-object host 209.165.201.1 network-object 192.168.1.0 255.255.255.0 group-object ftp_servers Configuration Examples for Using Object Groups with Access Lists The following normal access list that does not use object groups restricts several hosts on the inside network from accessing several web servers. All other traffic is allowed. hostname(config)# access-list ACL_IN extended deny tcp host 10.1.1.4 host 209.165.201.29 eq www hostname(config)# access-list ACL_IN extended deny tcp host 10.1.1.78 host 209.165.201.29 eq www hostname(config)# access-list ACL_IN extended deny tcp host 10.1.1.89 host 209.165.201.29 eq www hostname(config)# access-list ACL_IN extended deny tcp host 10.1.1.4 host 209.165.201.16 eq www hostname(config)# access-list ACL_IN extended deny tcp host 10.1.1.78 host 209.165.201.16 eq www hostname(config)# access-list ACL_IN extended deny tcp host 10.1.1.89 host 209.165.201.16 eq www hostname(config)# access-list ACL_IN extended deny tcp host 10.1.1.4 host 209.165.201.78 eq www hostname(config)# access-list ACL_IN extended deny tcp host 10.1.1.78 host 209.165.201.78 eq www Command Purpose show access-list Displays the access list entries that are expanded out into individual entries without their object groupings. show object-group [protocol | network | service | icmp-type | id grp_id] Displays a list of the currently configured object groups. If you enter the command without any parameters, the system displays all configured object groups. show running-config object-group Displays all current object groups. show running-config object-group grp_id Displays the current object groups by their group ID. show running-config object-group grp_type Displays the current object groups by their group type.16-13 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 16 Configuring Object Groups Adding Remarks to Access Lists hostname(config)# access-list ACL_IN extended deny tcp host 10.1.1.89 host 209.165.201.78 eq www hostname(config)# access-list ACL_IN extended permit ip any any hostname(config)# access-group ACL_IN in interface inside If you make two network object groups, one for the inside hosts, and one for the web servers, then the configuration can be simplified and can be easily modified to add more hosts: hostname(config)# object-group network denied hostname(config-network)# network-object host 10.1.1.4 hostname(config-network)# network-object host 10.1.1.78 hostname(config-network)# network-object host 10.1.1.89 hostname(config-network)# object-group network web hostname(config-network)# network-object host 209.165.201.29 hostname(config-network)# network-object host 209.165.201.16 hostname(config-network)# network-object host 209.165.201.78 hostname(config-network)# access-list ACL_IN extended deny tcp object-group denied object-group web eq www hostname(config)# access-list ACL_IN extended permit ip any any hostname(config)# access-group ACL_IN in interface inside Feature History for Using Object Groups with Access Lists Table 16-2 lists the release history for this feature. Adding Remarks to Access Lists You can include remarks about entries in any access list, including extended, EtherType, IPv6, standard, and Webtype access lists. The remarks make the access list easier to understand. To add a remark after the last access-list command you entered, enter the following command: Table 16-2 Feature History for Using Object Groups with Access Lists Feature Name Releases Feature Information Object groups 7.0 Object groups simplify access list creation and maintenance. The following commands were introduced or modified: object-group protocol, object-group network, object-group service, object-group icmp_type.16-14 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 16 Configuring Object Groups Scheduling Extended Access List Activation Example You can add a remark before each ACE, and the remarks appear in the access list in these location. Entering a dash (-) at the beginning of a remark helps to set it apart from the ACE. hostname(config)# access-list OUT remark - this is the inside admin address hostname(config)# access-list OUT extended permit ip host 209.168.200.3 any hostname(config)# access-list OUT remark - this is the hr admin address hostname(config)# access-list OUT extended permit ip host 209.168.200.4 any Scheduling Extended Access List Activation This section includes the following topics: • Information About Scheduling Access List Activation, page 16-14 • Licensing Requirements for Scheduling Access List Activation, page 16-14 • Guidelines and Limitations for Scheduling Access List Activation, page 16-15 • Configuring and Applying Time Ranges, page 16-15 • Configuration Examples for Scheduling Access List Activation, page 16-16 • Feature History for Scheduling Access Lis t Activation, page 16-17 Information About Scheduling Access List Activation You can schedule each ACE in an access list to be activated at specific times of the day and week by applying a time range to the ACE. Licensing Requirements for Scheduling Access List Activation The following table shows the licensing requirements for this feature: Command Purpose access-list access_list_name remark text Example: hostname(config)# access-list OUT remark - this is the inside admin address Adds a remark after the last access-list command you entered. The text can be up to 100 characters in length. You can enter leading spaces at the beginning of the text. Trailing spaces are ignored. If you enter the remark before any access-list command, then the remark is the first line in the access list. If you delete an access list using the no access-list access_list_name command, then all the remarks are also removed. Model License Requirement All models Base License.16-15 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 16 Configuring Object Groups Scheduling Extended Access List Activation Guidelines and Limitations for Scheduling Access List Activation This section includes the guidelines and limitations for this feature: • Context Mode Guidelines, page 16-15 • Firewall Mode Guidelines, page 16-15 • IPv6 Guidelines, page 16-11 • Additional Guidelines and Limitations, page 16-15 Context Mode Guidelines Supported in single and multiple context mode. Firewall Mode Guidelines Supported in routed and transparent firewall modes. IPv6 Guidelines Supports IPv6. Additional Guidelines and Limitations The following guidelines and limitations apply to using object groups with access lists: • Users could experience a delay of approximately 80 to 100 seconds after the specified end time for the ACL to become inactive. For example, if the specified end time is 3:50, because the end time is inclusive, the command is picked up anywhere between 3:51:00 and 3:51:59. After the command is picked up, the security appliance finishes any currently running task and then services the command to deactivate the ACL. • Multiple periodic entries are allowed per time-range command. If a time-range command has both absolute and periodic values specified, then the periodic commands are evaluated only after the absolute start time is reached, and they are not further evaluated after the absolute end time is reached. Configuring and Applying Time Ranges You can add a time range to implement a time-based access list. To identify the time range, perform the steps in this section. Detailed Steps Command Purpose Step 1 time-range name Example: hostname(config)# time range Sales Identifies the time-range name. Step 2 Do one of the following:16-16 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 16 Configuring Object Groups Scheduling Extended Access List Activation Example The following example binds an access list named “Sales” to a time range named “New_York_Minute.” hostname(config)# access-list Sales line 1 extended deny tcp host 209.165.200.225 host 209.165.201.1 time-range New_York_Minute Configuration Examples for Scheduling Access List Activation The following is an example of an absolute time range beginning at 8:00 a.m. on January 1, 2006. Because no end time and date are specified, the time range is in effect indefinitely. hostname(config)# time-range for2006 hostname(config-time-range)# absolute start 8:00 1 january 2006 The following is an example of a weekly periodic time range from 8:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m on weekdays: hostname(config)# time-range workinghours hostname(config-time-range)# periodic weekdays 8:00 to 18:00 periodic days-of-the-week time to [days-of-the-week] time Example: hostname(config-time-range)# periodic monday 7:59 to friday 17:01 Specifies a recurring time range. You can specify the following values for days-of-the-week: • monday, tuesday, wednesday, thursday, friday, saturday, or sunday. • daily • weekdays • weekend The time is in the format hh:mm. For example, 8:00 is 8:00 a.m. and 20:00 is 8:00 p.m. absolute start time date [end time date] Example: hostname(config-time-range)# absolute start 7:59 2 january 2009 Specifies an absolute time range. The time is in the format hh:mm. For example, 8:00 is 8:00 a.m. and 20:00 is 8:00 p.m. The date is in the format day month year; for example, 1 january 2006. Step 3 access-list access_list_name [extended] {deny | permit}...[time-range name] Example: hostname(config)# access list Marketing extended deny tcp host 209.165.200.225 host 209.165 201.1 time-range Pacific_Coast Applies the time range to an ACE. Note If you also enable logging for the ACE, use the log keyword before the time-range keyword. If you disable the ACE using the inactive keyword, use the inactive keyword as the last keyword. See Chapter 11, “Adding an Extended Access List,” for complete access-list command syntax. Command Purpose16-17 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 16 Configuring Object Groups Scheduling Extended Access List Activation Feature History for Scheduling Access Lis t Activation Table 16-3 lists the release history for this feature. Table 16-3 Feature History for Scheduling Access List Activation Feature Name Releases Feature Information Scheduling access list activation 7.0 You can schedule each ACE in an access list to be activated at specific times of the day and week. The following commands were introduced or modified: object-group protocol, object-group network, object-group service, object-group icmp_type.16-18 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 16 Configuring Object Groups Scheduling Extended Access List ActivationC H A P T E R 17-1 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 17 Configuring Logging for Access Lists This chapter describes how to configure access list logging for extended access lists and Webytpe access lists, and it describes how to manage deny flows. This section includes the following topics: • Configuring Logging for Access Lists, page 17-1 • Managing Deny Flows, page 17-5 Configuring Logging for Access Lists This section includes the following topics • Information About Logging Access List Activity, page 17-1 • Licensing Requirements for Access List Logging, page 17-2 • Guidelines and Limitations, page 17-3 • Default Settings, page 17-3 • Configuring Access List Logging, page 17-3 • Monitoring Access Lists, page 17-4 • Configuration Examples for Access List Logging, page 17-4 • Feature History for Access List Logging, page 17-5 Information About Logging Access List Activity By default, when traffic is denied by an extended ACE or a Webtype ACE, the ASA generates system message 106023 for each denied packet in the following form: %ASA|PIX-4-106023: Deny protocol src [interface_name:source_address/source_port] dst interface_name:dest_address/dest_port [type {string}, code {code}] by access_group acl_id If the ASA is attacked, the number of system messages for denied packets can be very large. We recommend that you instead enable logging using system message 106100, which provides statistics for each ACE and enables you to limit the number of system messages produced. Alternatively, you can disable all logging.17-2 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 17 Configuring Logging for Access Lists Configuring Logging for Access Lists Note Only ACEs in the access list generate logging messages; the implicit deny at the end of the access list does not generate a message. If you want all denied traffic to generate messages, add the implicit ACE manually to the end of the access list, as shown in the following example: hostname(config)# access-list TEST deny ip any any log The log options at the end of the extended access-list command enable you to set the following behavior: • Enable message 106100 instead of message 106023 • Disable all logging • Return to the default logging using message 106023 System message 106100 uses the following form: %ASA|PIX-n-106100: access-list acl_id {permitted | denied} protocol interface_name/source_address(source_port) -> interface_name/dest_address(dest_port) hit-cnt number ({first hit | number-second interval}) When you enable logging for message 106100, if a packet matches an ACE, the ASA creates a flow entry to track the number of packets received within a specific interval. The ASA generates a system message at the first hit and at the end of each interval, identifying the total number of hits during the interval. At the end of each interval, the ASA resets the hit count to 0. If no packets match the ACE during an interval, the ASA deletes the flow entry. A flow is defined by the source and destination IP addresses, protocols, and ports. Because the source port might differ for a new connection between the same two hosts, you might not see the same flow increment because a new flow was created for the connection. See the “Managing Deny Flows” section on page 17-5 to limit the number of logging flows. Permitted packets that belong to established connections do not need to be checked against access lists; only the initial packet is logged and included in the hit count. For connectionless protocols, such as ICMP, all packets are logged, even if they are permitted, and all denied packets are logged. See the Cisco ASA 5500 Series System Log Messages for detailed information about this system message. Licensing Requirements for Access List Logging The following table shows the licensing requirements for this feature: Model License Requirement All models Base License.17-3 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 17 Configuring Logging for Access Lists Configuring Logging for Access Lists Guidelines and Limitations This section includes the guidelines and limitations for this feature: • Context Mode Guidelines, page 17-3 • Firewall Mode Guidelines, page 17-3 • IPv6 Guidelines, page 17-3 • Additional Guidelines and Limitations, page 17-3 Context Mode Guidelines Supported in single and multiple context mode. Firewall Mode Guidelines Supported only in routed and transparent firewall modes. IPv6 Guidelines Supports IPv6. Additional Guidelines and Limitations ACE logging generates system log message 106023 for denied packets. A deny ACE must be present to log denied packets. Default Settings Table 17-1 lists the default settings for extended access list parameters. Configuring Access List Logging This sections describes how to configure access list logging. Note For complete access list command syntax, see the “Configuring Extended Access Lists” section on page 11-4 and the “Adding Webtype Access Lists” section on page 14-2. Table 17-1 Default Extended Access List Parameters Parameters Default log When the log keyword is specified, the default level for system log message 106100 is 6 (informational), and the default interval is 300 seconds. 17-4 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 17 Configuring Logging for Access Lists Configuring Logging for Access Lists To configure logging for an ACE, enter the following command: Monitoring Access Lists To monitor access lists, enter one of the following commands: Configuration Examples for Access List Logging This section includes sample configurations for logging access lists. You might configure the following access list: hostname(config)# access-list outside-acl permit ip host 1.1.1.1 any log 7 interval 600 hostname(config)# access-list outside-acl permit ip host 2.2.2.2 any hostname(config)# access-list outside-acl deny ip any any log 2 hostname(config)# access-group outside-acl in interface outside Command Purpose access-list access_list_name [extended] {deny | permit}...[log [[level] [interval secs] | disable | default]] Example: hostname(config)# access-list outside-acl permit ip host 1.1.1.1 any log 7 interval 600 Configures logging for an ACE. The access-list access_list_name syntax specifies the access list for which you want to configure logging. The extended option adds an ACE. The deny keyword denies a packet if the conditions are matched. Some features do not allow deny ACEs, such as NAT. (See the command documentation for each feature that uses an access list for more information.) The permit keyword permits a packet if the conditions are matched. If you enter the log option without any arguments, you enable system log message 106100 at the default level (6) and for the default interval (300 seconds). See the following options: • level—A severity level between 0 and 7. The default is 6. • interval secs—The time interval in seconds between system messages, from 1 to 600. The default is 300. This value is also used as the timeout value for deleting an inactive flow. • disable—Disables all access list logging. • default—Enables logging to message 106023. This setting is the same as having no log option. (See the access-list command in the Cisco Security Appliance Command Reference for more information about command options.) Command Purpose show access list Displays the access list entries by number. show running-config access-list Displays the current running access-list configuration.17-5 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 17 Configuring Logging for Access Lists Managing Deny Flows When the first ACE of outside-acl permits a packet, the ASA generates the following system message: %ASA|PIX-7-106100: access-list outside-acl permitted tcp outside/1.1.1.1(12345) -> inside/192.168.1.1(1357) hit-cnt 1 (first hit) Although 20 additional packets for this connection arrive on the outside interface, the traffic does not have to be checked against the access list, and the hit count does not increase. If one or more connections by the same host are initiated within the specified 10 minute interval (and the source and destination ports remain the same), then the hit count is incremented by 1, and the following message displays at the end of the 10 minute interval: %ASA|PIX-7-106100: access-list outside-acl permitted tcp outside/1.1.1.1(12345)-> inside/192.168.1.1(1357) hit-cnt 2 (600-second interval) When the third ACE denies a packet, the ASA generates the following system message: %ASA|PIX-2-106100: access-list outside-acl denied ip outside/3.3.3.3(12345) -> inside/192.168.1.1(1357) hit-cnt 1 (first hit) If 20 additional attempts occur within a 5 minute interval (the default), the following message appears at the end of 5 minutes: %ASA|PIX-2-106100: access-list outside-acl denied ip outside/3.3.3.3(12345) -> inside/192.168.1.1(1357) hit-cnt 21 (300-second interval) Feature History for Access List Logging Table 17-2 lists the release history for this feature. Managing Deny Flows This section includes the following topics: • Information About Managing Deny Flows, page 17-6 • Licensing Requirements for Managing Deny Flows, page 17-6 • Guidelines and Limitations, page 17-6 • Managing Deny Flows, page 17-7 • Monitoring Deny Flows, page 17-8 • Feature History for Managing Deny Flows, page 17-8 Table 17-2 Feature History for Access List Logging Feature Name Releases Feature Information Access list logging 7.0 You can enable logging using system message 106100, which provides statistics for each ACE and lets you limit the number of system messages produced. The following command was introduced: access-list.17-6 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 17 Configuring Logging for Access Lists Managing Deny Flows Information About Managing Deny Flows When you enable logging for message 106100, if a packet matches an ACE, the ASA creates a flow entry to track the number of packets received within a specific interval. The ASA has a maximum of 32 K logging flows for ACEs. A large number of flows can exist concurrently at any point of time. To prevent unlimited consumption of memory and CPU resources, the ASA places a limit on the number of concurrent deny flows; the limit is placed on deny flows only (not on permit flows) because they can indicate an attack. When the limit is reached, the ASA does not create a new deny flow for logging until the existing flows expire. For example, if someone initiates a DoS attack, the ASA can create a large number of deny flows in a short period of time. Restricting the number of deny flows prevents unlimited consumption of memory and CPU resources. When you reach the maximum number of deny flows, the ASA issues system message 106100: %ASA|PIX-1-106101: The number of ACL log deny-flows has reached limit (number). The access-list alert-interval command sets the time interval for generating the system log message 106001. The system log message 106001 alerts you that the adaptive security appliance has reached a deny flow maximum. When the deny flow maximum is reached, another system log message 106001 is generated if at least six seconds have passed since the last 106001 message was generated. Licensing Requirements for Managing Deny Flows The following table shows the licensing requirements for this feature: Guidelines and Limitations This section includes the guidelines and limitations for this feature: • Context Mode Guidelines, page 17-3 • Firewall Mode Guidelines, page 17-3 • IPv6 Guidelines, page 17-3 • Additional Guidelines and Limitations, page 17-3 Context Mode Guidelines Supported in single and multiple context mode. Firewall Mode Guidelines Supported only in routed and transparent firewall modes. IPv6 Guidelines Supports IPv6. Model License Requirement All models Base License.17-7 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 17 Configuring Logging for Access Lists Managing Deny Flows Additional Guidelines and Limitations The ASA places a limit on the number of concurrent deny flows only—not permit flows. Default Settings Table 17-1 lists the default settings for managing deny flows. Managing Deny Flows To configure the maximum number of deny flows and to set the interval between deny flow alert messages (106100), enter the following command: To set the amount of time between system messages (number 106101), which identifies that the maximum number of deny flows was reached, enter the following command: Table 17-3 Default Parameters for Managing Deny Flows Parameters Default numbers The numbers argument specifies the maximum number of deny flows. The default is 4096. secs The secs argument specifies the time, in seconds, between system messages. The default is 300. Command Purpose access-list deny-flow-max number Example: hostname(config)# access-list deny-flow-max 3000 Sets the maximum number of deny flows. The numbers argument specifies the maximum number, which can be between 1 and 4096. The default is 4096. Command Purpose access-list alert-interval secs Example: hostname(config)# access-list alert-interval 200 Sets the time, in seconds, between system messages. The secs argument specifies the time interval between each deny flow maximum message. Valid values are from 1 to 3600 seconds. The default is 300 seconds. 17-8 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 17 Configuring Logging for Access Lists Managing Deny Flows Monitoring Deny Flows To monitor access lists, enter one of the following commands: Feature History for Managing Deny Flows Table 17-2 lists the release history for this feature. Command Purpose show access-list Displays access list entries by number. show running-config access-list Displays the current running access-list configuration. Table 17-4 Feature History for Managing Deny Flows Feature Name Releases Feature Information Managing Deny Flows 7.0 You can configure the maximum number of deny flows and set the interval between deny flow alert messages. The following commands were introduced: access-list deny-flow and access-list alert-interval.P A R T 3 Configuring IP RoutingC H A P T E R 18-1 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 18 Information About Routing This chapter describes underlying concepts of how routing behaves on the ASA, and the routing protocols that are supported. Subsequent chapters address each specific routing protocol in more detail. This chapter includes the following sections: • Information About Routing, page 18-1 • How Routing Behaves Within the Adaptive Security Appliance, page 18-3 • Supported Internet Protocols for Routing, page 18-4 • Information About the Routing Table, page 18-5 • Information About IPv6 Support, page 18-8 Information About Routing Routing is the act of moving information across an internetwork from a source to a destination. Along the way, at least one intermediate node typically is encountered. Routing involves two basic activities: determining optimal routing paths and transporting information groups (typically called packets) through an internetwork. In the context of the routing process, the latter of these is referred to as packet switching. Although packet switching is relatively straightforward, path determination can be very complex. Switching Switching algorithms is relatively simple; it is the same for most routing protocols. In most cases, a host determines that it must send a packet to another host. Having acquired a router's address by some means, the source host sends a packet addressed specifically to a router’s physical (Media Access Control [MAC]-layer) address, this time with the protocol (network layer) address of the destination host. As it examines the packet's destination protocol address, the router determines that it either knows or does not know how to forward the packet to the next hop. If the router does not know how to forward the packet, it typically drops the packet. If the router knows how to forward the packet, however, it changes the destination physical address to that of the next hop and transmits the packet. The next hop may be the ultimate destination host. If not, the next hop is usually another router, which executes the same switching decision process. As the packet moves through the internetwork, its physical address changes, but its protocol address remains constant.18-2 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 18 Information About Routing Information About Routing Path Determination Routing protocols use metrics to evaluate what path will be the best for a packet to travel. A metric is a standard of measurement, such as path bandwidth, that is used by routing algorithms to determine the optimal path to a destination. To aid the process of path determination, routing algorithms initialize and maintain routing tables, which contain route information. Route information varies depending on the routing algorithm used. Routing algorithms fill routing tables with a variety of information. Destination/next hop associations tell a router that a particular destination can be reached optimally by sending the packet to a particular router representing the "next hop" on the way to the final destination. When a router receives an incoming packet, it checks the destination address and attempts to associate this address with a next hop. Routing tables also can contain other information, such as data about the desirability of a path. Routers compare metrics to determine optimal routes, and these metrics differ depending on the design of the routing algorithm used. Routers communicate with one another and maintain their routing tables through the transmission of a variety of messages. The routing update message is one such message that generally consists of all or a portion of a routing table. By analyzing routing updates from all other routers, a router can build a detailed picture of network topology. A link-state advertisement, another example of a message sent between routers, informs other routers of the state of the sender's links. Link information also can be used to build a complete picture of network topology to enable routers to determine optimal routes to network destinations. Note Asymetric routing is not supported on the ASA. Supported RouteTypes There are several types of route types that a router can use, Listed below are the route types that the ASA uses. • Static Versus Dynamic, page 18-2 • Single-Path Versus Multipath, page 18-3 • Flat Versus Hierarchical, page 18-3 • Link-State Versus Distance Vector, page 18-3 Static Versus Dynamic Static routing algorithms are hardly algorithms at all, but are table mappings established by the network administrator before the beginning of routing. These mappings do not change unless the network administrator alters them. Algorithms that use static routes are simple to design and work well in environments where network traffic is relatively predictable and where network design is relatively simple. Because static routing systems cannot react to network changes, they generally are considered unsuitable for today's large, constantly changing networks. Most of the dominant routing algorithms today are dynamic routing algorithms, which adjust to changing network circumstances by analyzing incoming routing update messages. If the message indicates that a network change has occurred, the routing software recalculates routes and sends out new routing update messages. These messages permeate the network, stimulating routers to rerun their algorithms and change their routing tables accordingly. 18-3 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 18 Information About Routing How Routing Behaves Within the Adaptive Security Appliance Dynamic routing algorithms can be supplemented with static routes where appropriate. A router of last resort (a router to which all unroutable packets are sent), for example, can be designated to act as a repository for all unroutable packets, ensuring that all messages are at least handled in some way. Single-Path Versus Multipath Some sophisticated routing protocols support multiple paths to the same destination. Unlike single-path algorithms, these multipath algorithms permit traffic multiplexing over multiple lines. The advantages of multipath algorithms are obvious: They can provide substantially better throughput and reliability. This is generally called load sharing. Flat Versus Hierarchical Some routing algorithms operate in a flat space, while others use routing hierarchies. In a flat routing system, the routers are peers of all others. In a hierarchical routing system, some routers form what amounts to a routing backbone. Packets from nonbackbone routers travel to the backbone routers, where they are sent through the backbone until they reach the general area of the destination. At this point, they travel from the last backbone router through one or more nonbackbone routers to the final destination. Routing systems often designate logical groups of nodes, called domains, autonomous systems, or areas. In hierarchical systems, some routers in a domain can communicate with routers in other domains, while others can communicate only with routers within their domain. In very large networks, additional hierarchical levels may exist, with routers at the highest hierarchical level forming the routing backbone. The primary advantage of hierarchical routing is that it mimics the organization of most companies and therefore supports their traffic patterns well. Most network communication occurs within small company groups (domains). Because intradomain routers need to know only about other routers within their domain, their routing algorithms can be simplified, and, depending on the routing algorithm being used, routing update traffic can be reduced accordingly. Link-State Versus Distance Vector Link-state algorithms (also known as shortest path first algorithms) flood routing information to all nodes in the internetwork. Each router, however, sends only the portion of the routing table that describes the state of its own links. In link-state algorithms, each router builds a picture of the entire network in its routing tables. Distance vector algorithms (also known as Bellman-Ford algorithms) call for each router to send all or some portion of its routing table, but only to its neighbors. In essence, link-state algorithms send small updates everywhere, while distance vector algorithms send larger updates only to neighboring routers. Distance vector algorithms know only about their neighbors. Typically, this type of algorithmn is used in conjunction with OSPF routing protocols. How Routing Behaves Within the Adaptive Security Appliance The ASA uses both routing table and XLATE tables for routing decisions. To handle destination IP translated traffic, that is, untranslated traffic, the ASA searches for existing XLATE, or static translation to select the egress interface. The selection process is as follows: Egress Interface Selection Process 1. If destination IP translating XLATE already exists, the egress interface for the packet is determined from the XLATE table, but not from the routing table. 18-4 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 18 Information About Routing Supported Internet Protocols for Routing 2. If destination IP translating XLATE does not exist, but a matching static translation exists, then the egress interface is determined from the static route and an XLATE is created, and the routing table is not used. 3. If destination IP translating XLATE does not exist and no matching static translation exists, the packet is not destination IP translated. The ASA processes this packet by looking up the route to select egress interface, then source IP translation is performed (if necessary). For regular dynamic outbound NAT, initial outgoing packets are routed using the route table and then creating the XLATE. Incoming return packets are forwarded using existing XLATE only. For static NAT, destination translated incoming packets are always forwarded using existing XLATE or static translation rules. Next Hop Selection Process After selecting egress interface using any method described above, an additional route lookup is performed to find out suitable next hop(s) that belong to previously selected egress interface. If there are no routes in routing table that explicitly belong to selected interface, the packet is dropped with level 6 error message 110001 "no route to host", even if there is another route for a given destination network that belongs to different egress interface. If the route that belongs to selected egress interface is found, the packet is forwarded to corresponding next hop. Load sharing on the ASA is possible only for multiple next-hops available using single egress interface. Load sharing cannot share multiple egress interfaces. If dynamic routing is in use on ASA and route table changes after XLATE creation, for example route flap, then destination translated traffic is still forwarded using old XLATE, not via route table, until XLATE times out. It may be either forwarded to wrong interface or dropped with message 110001 "no route to host" if old route was removed from the old interface and attached to another one by routing process. The same problem may happen when there is no route flaps on the ASA itself, but some routing process is flapping around it, sending source translated packets that belong to the same flow through the ASA using different interfaces. Destination translated return packets may be forwarded back using the wrong egress interface. This issue has a high probability in same security traffic configuration, where virtually any traffic may be either source-translated or destination-translated, depending on direction of initial packet in the flow. When this issue occurs after a route flap, it can be resolved manually by using the clear xlate command, or automatically resolved by an XLATE timeout. XLATE timeout may be decreased if necessary. To ensure that this rarely happens, make sure that there is no route flaps on ASA and around it. That is, ensure that destination translated packets that belong to the same flow are always forwarded the same way through the ASA. Supported Internet Protocols for Routing The ASA supports several internet protocols for routing. Each protocol is briefly desribed in this section. • Enhanced Interior Gateway Routing Protocol (EIGRP) Enhanced IGRP provides compatibility and seamless interoperation with IGRP routers. An automatic-redistribution mechanism allows IGRP routes to be imported into Enhanced IGRP, and vice versa, so it is possible to add Enhanced IGRP gradually into an existing IGRP network. For more infomation on configuring EIGRP, see the chapter ‘Configuring EIGRP’. • Open Shortest Path First (OSPF)18-5 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 18 Information About Routing Information About the Routing Table Open Shortest Path First (OSPF) is a routing protocol developed for Internet Protocol (IP) networks by the interior gateway protocol (IGP) working group of the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF). OSPF uses a link-state algorithm in order to build and calculate the shortest path to all known destinations. Each router in an OSPF area contains an identical link-state database, which is a list of each of the router usable interfaces and reachable neighbors For more infomation on configuring OSPF, see the chapter ‘Configuring OSPF’. • Routing Information Protocol The Routing Information Protocol (RIP) is a distance-vector protocol that uses hop count as its metric. RIP is widely used for routing traffic in the global Internet and is an interior gateway protocol (IGP), which means that it performs routing within a single autonomous system. For more infomation on configuring RIP, see the chapter ‘Configuring RIP’. Information About the Routing Table This section contains the following topics: • Displaying the Routing Table, page 18-5 • How the Routing Table is Populated, page 18-5 • How Forwarding Decisions are Made, page 18-7 Displaying the Routing Table To view the entries in the routing table, enter the following command: hostname# show route Codes: C - connected, S - static, I - IGRP, R - RIP, M - mobile, B - BGP D - EIGRP, EX - EIGRP external, O - OSPF, IA - OSPF inter area N1 - OSPF NSSA external type 1, N2 - OSPF NSSA external type 2 E1 - OSPF external type 1, E2 - OSPF external type 2, E - EGP i - IS-IS, L1 - IS-IS level-1, L2 - IS-IS level-2, ia - IS-IS inter area * - candidate default, U - per-user static route, o - ODR P - periodic downloaded static route Gateway of last resort is 10.86.194.1 to network 0.0.0.0 S 10.1.1.0 255.255.255.0 [3/0] via 10.86.194.1, outside C 10.86.194.0 255.255.254.0 is directly connected, outside S* 0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 [1/0] via 10.86.194.1, outside On the ASA 5505 ASA, the following route is also shown. It is the internal loopback interface, which is used by the VPN hardware client feature for individual user authentication. C 127.1.0.0 255.255.0.0 is directly connected, _internal_loopback How the Routing Table is Populated The ASA routing table can be populated by statically defined routes, directly connected routes, and routes discovered by the RIP, EIGRP, and OSPF routing protocols. Because the ASA can run multiple routing protocols in addition to having static and connected routed in the routing table, it is possible that 18-6 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 18 Information About Routing Information About the Routing Table the same route is discovered or entered in more than one manner. When two routes to the same destination are put into the routing table, the one that remains in the routing table is determined as follows: • If the two routes have different network prefix lengths (network masks), then both routes are considered unique and are entered in to the routing table. The packet forwarding logic then determines which of the two to use. For example, if the RIP and OSPF processes discovered the following routes: – RIP: 192.168.32.0/24 – OSPF: 192.168.32.0/19 Even though OSPF routes have the better administrative distance, both routes are installed in the routing table because each of these routes has a different prefix length (subnet mask). They are considered different destinations and the packet forwarding logic determine which route to use. • If the ASA learns about multiple paths to the same destination from a single routing protocol, such as RIP, the route with the better metric (as determined by the routing protocol) is entered into the routing table. Metrics are values associated with specific routes, ranking them from most preferred to least preferred. The parameters used to determine the metrics differ for different routing protocols. The path with the lowest metric is selected as the optimal path and installed in the routing table. If there are multiple paths to the same destination with equal metrics, load balancing is done on these equal cost paths. • If the ASA learns about a destination from more than one routing protocol, the administrative distances of the routes are compared and the routes with lower administrative distance is entered into the routing table. You can change the administrative distances for routes discovered by or redistributed into a routing protocol. If two routes from two different routing protocols have the same administrative distance, then the route with the lower default administrative distance is entered into the routing table. In the case of EIGRP and OSPF routes, if the EIGRP route and the OSPF route have the same administrative distance, then the EIGRP route is chosen by default. Administrative distance is a route parameter that the ASA uses to select the best path when there are two or more different routes to the same destination from two different routing protocols. Because the routing protocols have metrics based on algorithms that are different from the other protocols, it is not always possible to determine the “best path” for two routes to the same destination that were generated by different routing protocols. Each routing protocol is prioritized using an administrative distance value. Table 18-1 shows the default administrative distance values for the routing protocols supported by the ASA. Table 18-1 Default Administrative Distance for Supported Routing Protocols Route Source Default Administrative Distance Connected interface 0 Static route 1 EIGRP Summary Route 5 Internal EIGRP 90 OSPF 110 RIP 12018-7 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 18 Information About Routing Information About the Routing Table The smaller the administrative distance value, the more preference is given to the protocol. For example, if the ASA receives a route to a certain network from both an OSPF routing process (default administrative distance - 110) and a RIP routing process (default administrative distance - 120), the ASA chooses the OSPF route because OSPF has a higher preference. This means the router adds the OSPF version of the route to the routing table. In the above example, if the source of the OSPF-derived route was lost (for example, due to a power shutdown), the ASA would then use the RIP-derived route until the OSPF-derived route reappears. The administrative distance is a local setting. For example, if you use the distance-ospf command to change the administrative distance of routes obtained through OSPF, that change would only affect the routing table for the ASA the command was entered on. The administrative distance is not advertised in routing updates. Administrative distance does not affect the routing process. The OSPF and RIP routing processes only advertise the routes that have been discovered by the routing process or redistributed into the routing process. For example, the RIP routing process advertises RIP routes, even if routes discovered by the OSPF routing process are used in the ASA routing table. Backup Routes A backup route is registered when the initial attempt to install the route in the routing table fails because another route was installed instead. If the route that was installed in the routing table fails, the routing table maintenance process calls each routing protocol process that has registered a backup route and requests them to reinstall the route in the routing table. If there are multiple protocols with registered backup routes for the failed route, the preferred route is chosen based on administrative distance. Because of this process, you can create “floating” static routes that are installed in the routing table when the route discovered by a dynamic routing protocol fails. A floating static route is simply a static route configured with a greater administrative distance than the dynamic routing protocols running on the ASA. When the corresponding route discover by a dynamic routing process fails, the static route is installed in the routing table. How Forwarding Decisions are Made Forwarding decisions are made as follows: • If the destination does not match an entry in the routing table, the packet is forwarded through the interface specified for the default route. If a default route has not been configured, the packet is discarded. • If the destination matches a single entry in the routing table, the packet is forwarded through the interface associated with that route. • If the destination matches more than one entry in the routing table, and the entries all have the same network prefix length, the packets for that destination are distributed among the interfaces associated with that route. EIGRP external route 170 Unknown 255 Table 18-1 Default Administrative Distance for Supported Routing Protocols18-8 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 18 Information About Routing Information About IPv6 Support • If the destination matches more than one entry in the routing table, and the entries have different network prefix lengths, then the packet is forwarded out of the interface associated with the route that has the longer network prefix length. For example, a packet destined for 192.168.32.1 arrives on an interface of a ASA with the following routes in the routing table: hostname# show route .... R 192.168.32.0/24 [120/4] via 10.1.1.2 O 192.168.32.0/19 [110/229840] via 10.1.1.3 .... In this case, a packet destined to 192.168.32.1 is directed toward 10.1.1.2, because 192.168.32.1 falls within the 192.168.32.0/24 network. It also falls within the other route in the routing table, but the 192.168.32.0/24 has the longest prefix within the routing table (24 bits verses 19 bits). Longer prefixes are always preferred over shorter ones when forwarding a packet. Dynamic Routing and Failover Because static routing systems cannot react to network changes, they generally are considered unsuitable for today's large, constantly changing networks. Most of the dominant routing algorithms today are dynamic routing algorithms, which adjust to changing network circumstances by analyzing incoming routing update messages. If the message indicates that a network change has occurred, the routing software recalculates routes and sends out new routing update messages. These messages permeate the network, stimulating routers to rerun their algorithms and change their routing tables accordingly. Dynamic routing algorithms can be supplemented with static routes where appropriate. A router of last resort (a router to which all unroutable packets are sent), for example, can be designated to act as a repository for all unroutable packets, ensuring that all messages are at least handled in some way. Dynamic routes are not replicated to the standby unit or failover group in a failover configuration. Therefore, immediately after a failover occurs, some packets received by the ASA may be dropped because of a lack of routing information or routed to a default static route while the routing table is repopulated by the configured dynamic routing protocols. For more information on static routs and how to configure them , see “Configuring Static and Default Routes”. Information About IPv6 Support Many, but not all, features on the ASA supports IPv6 traffic. This section describes the commands and features that support IPv6, and includes the following topics: • Features that Support IPv6, page 18-8 • IPv6-Enabled Commands, page 18-9 • Entering IPv6 Addresses in Commands, page 18-10 Features that Support IPv6 The following features support IPv6.18-9 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 18 Information About Routing Information About IPv6 Support Note For features that use the Modular Policy Framework, be sure to use the match any command to match IPv6 traffic; other match commands do not support IPv6. • The following application inspections support IPv6 traffic: – FTP – HTTP – ICMP – SIP – SMTP – IPSec-pass-thru • IPS • NetFlow Secure Event Logging filtering • Connection limits, timeouts, and TCP randomization • TCP Normalization • TCP state bypass • Access group, using an IPv6 access list • Static Routes • VPN (all types) IPv6-Enabled Commands The following ASA commands can accept and display IPv6 addresses: • capture • configure • copy • http • name • object-group • ping • show conn • show local-host • show tcpstat • ssh • telnet • tftp-server • who • write18-10 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 18 Information About Routing Information About IPv6 Support The following commands were modified to work for IPv6: • debug • fragment • ip verify • mtu • icmp (entered as ipv6 icmp) IPv6 Command Guidelines in Transparent Firewall Mode The ipv6 address and ipv6 enable commands are available in global configuration mode instead of interface configuration mode. The ipv6 address command does not support the eui keyword. (The ipv6 address link-local command is still available in interface configuration mode. The following IPv6 commands are not supported in transparent firewall mode, because they require router capabilities: • ipv6 address autoconfig • ipv6 nd prefix • ipv6 nd ra-interval • ipv6 nd ra-lifetime • ipv6 nd suppress-ra The following VPN command is not supported, because transparent mode does not support VPN: • ipv6 local pool Entering IPv6 Addresses in Commands When entering IPv6 addresses in commands that support them, simply enter the IPv6 address using standard IPv6 notation, for example: ping fe80::2e0:b6ff:fe01:3b7a. The ASA correctly recognizes and processes the IPv6 address. However, you must enclose the IPv6 address in square brackets ([ ]) in the following situations: • You need to specify a port number with the address, for example: [fe80::2e0:b6ff:fe01:3b7a]:8080. • The command uses a colon as a separator, such as the write net and config net commands, for example: configure net [fe80::2e0:b6ff:fe01:3b7a]:/tftp/config/pixconfig.C H A P T E R 19-1 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 19 Configuring Static and Default Routes This chapter describes how to configure static and default routes on the ASA, and includes the following sections: • Information About Static and Default Routes, page 19-1 • Licensing Requirements for Static and Default Routes, page 19-2 • Guidelines and Limitations, page 19-2 • Configuring Static and Default Routes, page 19-2 • Monitoring a Static or Default Route, page 19-5 • Configuration Examples for Static or Default Routes, page 19-7 • Feature History for Static and Default Routes, page 19-7 Information About Static and Default Routes To route traffic to a non-connected host or network, you must define a static route to the host or network or, at a minimum, a default route for any networks to which the ASA is not directly connected; for example, when there is a router between a network and the ASA. Without a static or default route defined, traffic to non-connected hosts or networks generates the following error message: %ASA-6-110001: No route to dest_address from source_address Multiple context mode does not support dynamic routing, You might want to use static routes in single context mode in the following cases: • Your networks use a different router discovery protocol from EIGRP, RIP, or OSPF. • Your network is small and you can easily manage static routes. • You do not want the traffic or CPU overhead associated with routing protocols. The simplest option is to configure a default route to send all traffic to an upstream router, relying on the router to route the traffic for you. However, in some cases the default gateway might not be able to reach the destination network, so you must also configure more specific static routes. For example, if the default gateway is outside, then the default route cannot direct traffic to any inside networks that are not directly connected to the ASA. In transparent firewall mode, for traffic that originates on the ASA and is destined for a non-directly connected network, you need to configure either a default route or static routes so the ASA knows out of which interface to send traffic. Traffic that originates on the ASA might include communications to a 19-2 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 19 Configuring Static and Default Routes Licensing Requirements for Static and Default Routes syslog server, Websense or N2H2 server, or AAA server. If you have servers that cannot all be reached through a single default route, then you must configure static routes. Additionally, the ASA supports up to three equal cost routes on the same interface for load balancing. Licensing Requirements for Static and Default Routes Guidelines and Limitations This section includes the guidelines and limitations for this feature. Context Mode Guidelines Supported in single and multiple context mode. Firewall Mode Guidelines Supported in routed and transparent firewall mode. IPv6 Guidelines Supports IPv6. Configuring Static and Default Routes This section explains how to configure a static, and a static default route and includes the following topics: • Configuring a Static Route, page 19-2 • Configuring a Default Static Route, page 19-3 • Configuring IPv6 Default and Static Routes, page 19-4 Configuring a Static Route Static routing algorithms are basically table mappings established by the network administrator before the beginning of routing. These mappings do not change unless the network administrator alters them. Algorithms that use static routes are simple to design and work well in environments where network traffic is relatively predictable and where network design is relatively simple. Because of this fact, static routing systems cannot react to network changes. Static routes remain in the routing table even if the specified gateway becomes unavailable. If the specified gateway becomes unavailable, you need to remove the static route from the routing table manually. However, static routes are removed from the routing table if the specified interface goes down, and are reinstated when the interface comes back up. Model License Requirement All models Base License.19-3 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 19 Configuring Static and Default Routes Configuring Static and Default Routes Note If you create a static route with an administrative distance greater than the administrative distance of the routing protocol running on the ASA, then a route to the specified destination discovered by the routing protocol takes precedence over the static route. The static route is used only if the dynamically discovered route is removed from the routing table. To configure a static route, enter the following command: Detailed Steps Configuring a Default Static Route A default route identifies the gateway IP address to which the ASA sends all IP packets for which it does not have a learned or static route. A default static route is simply a static route with 0.0.0.0/0 as the destination IP address. Routes that identify a specific destination take precedence over the default route. Note In ASA software Versions 7.0 and later, if you have two default routes configured on different interfaces that have different metrics, the connection to the ASA firewall that is made from the higher metric interface fails, but connections to the ASA firewall from the lower metric interface succeed as expected. You can define up to three equal cost default route entries per device. Defining more than one equal cost default route entry causes the traffic sent to the default route to be distributed among the specified gateways. When defining more than one default route, you must specify the same interface for each entry. If you attempt to define more than three equal cost default routes, or if you attempt to define a default route with a different interface than a previously defined default route, you receive the following message: “ERROR: Cannot add route entry, possible conflict with existing routes.” Command Purpose route if_name dest_ip mask gateway_ip [distance] Example: hostname(config)# route outside 10.10.10.0 255.255.255.0 192.168.1.1 [1] This enables you to add a static route. The dest_ip and mask is the IP address for the destination network and the gateway_ip is the address of the next-hop router.The addresses you specify for the static route are the addresses that are in the packet before entering the ASA and performing NAT. The distance is the administrative distance for the route. The default is 1 if you do not specify a value. Administrative distance is a parameter used to compare routes among different routing protocols. The default administrative distance for static routes is 1, giving it precedence over routes discovered by dynamic routing protocols but not directly connect routes. The default administrative distance for routes discovered by OSPF is 110. If a static route has the same administrative distance as a dynamic route, the static routes take precedence. Connected routes always take precedence over static or dynamically discovered routes.19-4 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 19 Configuring Static and Default Routes Configuring Static and Default Routes You can define a separate default route for tunneled traffic along with the standard default route. When you create a default route with the tunneled option, all traffic from a tunnel terminating on the ASA that cannot be routed using learned or static routes, is sent to this route. For traffic emerging from a tunnel, this route overrides over any other configured or learned default routes. Limitations on Configuring a Default Static Route The following restrictions apply to default routes with the tunneled option: • Do not enable unicast RPF (ip verify reverse-path) on the egress interface of tunneled route. Enabling Unicast RPF on the egress interface of a tunneled route causes the session to fail. • Do not enable TCP intercept on the egress interface of the tunneled route. Doing so causes the session to fail. • Do not use the VoIP inspection engines (CTIQBE, H.323, GTP, MGCP, RTSP, SIP, SKINNY), the DNS inspect engine, or the DCE RPC inspection engine with tunneled routes. These inspection engines ignore the tunneled route. You cannot define more than one default route with the tunneled option; ECMP for tunneled traffic is not supported. To define a tunneled default route, enter the following command: Detailed Steps Tip You can enter 0 0 instead of 0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 for the destination network address and mask, for example: hostname(config)# route outside 0 0 192.168.1 1 Configuring IPv6 Default and Static Routes The ASA automatically routes IPv6 traffic between directly connected hosts if the interfaces to which the hosts are attached are enabled for IPv6 and the IPv6 ACLs allow the traffic. Command Purpose route if_name 0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 gateway_ip [distance | tunneled] Example: hostname(config)# route outside 0 0 192.168.2.4 tunneled This enables you to add a static route. The dest_ip and mask is the IP address for the destination network and the gateway_ip is the address of the next-hop router. The addresses you specify for the static route are the addresses that are in the packet before entering the ASA and performing NAT. The distance is the administrative distance for the route. The default is 1 if you do not specify a value. Administrative distance is a parameter used to compare routes among different routing protocols. The default administrative distance for static routes is 1, giving it precedence over routes discovered by dynamic routing protocols but not directly connect routes. The default administrative distance for routes discovered by OSPF is 110. If a static route has the same administrative distance as a dynamic route, the static routes take precedence. Connected routes always take precedence over static or dynamically discovered routes.19-5 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 19 Configuring Static and Default Routes Monitoring a Static or Default Route To configure an IPv6 default route and static routes, perform the following steps: Detailed Steps Note The ipv6 route command works like the route command used to define IPv4 static routes. Monitoring a Static or Default Route One of the problems with static routes is that there is no inherent mechanism for determining if the route is up or down. They remain in the routing table even if the next hop gateway becomes unavailable. Static routes are only removed from the routing table if the associated interface on the ASA goes down. The static route tracking feature provides a method for tracking the availability of a static route and installing a backup route if the primary route should fail. This allows you to, for example, define a default route to an ISP gateway and a backup default route to a secondary ISP in case the primary ISP becomes unavailable. The ASA does this by associating a static route with a monitoring target that you define. It monitors the target using ICMP echo requests. If an echo reply is not received within a specified time period, the object is considered down and the associated route is removed from the routing table. A previously configured backup route is used in place of the removed route. When selecting a monitoring target, you need to make sure it can respond to ICMP echo requests. The target can be any network object that you choose, but you should consider using: • the ISP gateway (for dual ISP support) address • the next hop gateway address (if you are concerned about the availability of the gateway) • a server on the target network, such as a AAA server, that the ASA needs to communicate with • a persistent network object on the destination network (a desktop or notebook computer that may be shut down at night is not a good choice) You can configure static route tracking for statically defined routes or default routes obtained through DHCP or PPPoE. You can only enable PPPoE clients on multiple interface with route tracking. To configure static route tracking, perform the following steps: Command Purpose Step 1 ipv6 route if_name ::/0 next_hop_ipv6_addr Example: hostname(config)#ipv6 route inside 7fff::0/32 3FFE:1100:0:CC00::1 This step adds a default IPv6 route. This example routes packets for network 7fff::0/32 to a networking device on the inside interface at 3FFE:1100:0:CC00::1 The address ::/0 is the IPv6 equivalent of “any.” Step 2 ipv6 route if_name destination next_hop_ipv6_addr [admin_distance] Example: hostname(config)# ipv6 route inside 7fff::0/32 3FFE:1100:0:CC00::1 [110] This step adds an IPv6 static route to the IPv6 routing table. This example routes packets for network 7fff::0/32 to a networking device on the inside interface at 3FFE:1100:0:CC00::1 , and with an administrative distance of 110.19-6 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 19 Configuring Static and Default Routes Monitoring a Static or Default Route Detailed Steps Command Purpose Step 1 sla monitor sla_id Example: hostname(config)# sla monitor sla_id Configure the tracked object monitoring parameters by defining the monitoring process. If you are configuring a new monitoring process, you enter SLA monitor configuration mode. If you are changing the monitoring parameters for an unscheduled monitoring process that already has a type defined, you automatically enter SLA protocol configuration mode. Step 2 type echo protocol ipIcmpEcho target_ip interface if_name Example: hostname(config-sla-monitor)# type echo protocol ipIcmpEcho target_ip interface if_name Specify the monitoring protocol. If you are changing the monitoring parameters for an unscheduled monitoring process that already has a type defined, you automatically enter SLA protocol configuration mode and cannot change this setting. The target_ip is the IP address of the network object whose availability the tracking process monitors. While this object is available, the tracking process route is installed in the routing table. When this object becomes unavailable, the tracking process removed the route and the backup route is used in its place. Step 3 sla monitor schedule sla_id [life {forever | seconds}] [start-time {hh:mm[:ss] [month day | day month] | pending | now | after hh:mm:ss}] [ageout seconds] [recurring] Example: hostname(config)# sla monitor schedule sla_id [life {forever | seconds}] [start-time {hh:mm[:ss] [month day | day month] | pending | now | after hh:mm:ss}] [ageout seconds] [recurring] Schedule the monitoring process. Typically, you will use sla monitor schedule sla_id life forever start-time now for the monitoring schedule, and allow the monitoring configuration determine how often the testing occurs. However, you can schedule this monitoring process to begin in the future and to only occur at specified times. Step 4 track track_id rtr sla_id reachability Example: hostname(config)# track track_id rtr sla_id reachability Associate a tracked static route with the SLA monitoring process. The track_id is a tracking number you assign with this command. The sla_id is the ID number of the SLA process. Step 5 Do one of the following to define the static route to be installed in the routing table while the tracked object is reachable. These options allow you to track a static route, or default route obtained through DHCP or PPPOE. route if_name dest_ip mask gateway_ip [admin_distance] track track_id Example: hostname(config)# route if_name dest_ip mask gateway_ip [admin_distance] track track_id This option tracks a static route. You cannot use the tunneled option with the route command with static route tracking.19-7 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 19 Configuring Static and Default Routes Configuration Examples for Static or Default Routes Configuration Examples for Static or Default Routes Step 1 Create a static route: hostname(config)# route inside 10.1.1.0 255.255.255.0 10.1.2.45 1 In this step, a static route is created that sends all traffic destined for 10.1.1.0/24 to the router (10.1.2.45) connected to the inside interface. Step 2 Define three equal cost static routes that directs traffic to three different gateways on the outside interface, and adds a default route for tunneled traffic. The ASA distributes the traffic among the specified gateways. hostname(config)# route outside 10.10.10.0 255.255.255.0 192.168.2.1 hostname(config)# route outside 10.10.10.0 255.255.255.0 192.168.2.2 hostname(config)# route outside 10.10.10.0 255.255.255.0 192.168.2.3 hostname(config)# route outside 0 0 192.168.2.4 tunneled Unencrypted traffic received by the ASA for which there is no static or learned route is distributed among the gateways with the IP addresses 192.168.2.1, 192.168.2.2, 192.168.2.3. Encrypted traffic receive by the ASA for which there is no static or learned route is passed to the gateway with the IP address 192.168.2.4. Feature History for Static and Default Routes Table 19-1 lists the release history for this feature. hostname(config)# interface phy_if hostname(config-if)# dhcp client route track track_id hostname(config-if)# ip addresss dhcp setroute hostname(config-if)# exit This option tracks a default route obtained through DHCP, Remember that you must use the setroute argument with the ip address dhcp command to obtain the default route using DHCP. hostname(config)# interface phy_if hostname(config-if)# pppoe client route track track_id hostname(config-if)# ip addresss pppoe setroute hostname(config-if)# exit This option tracks a default route obtained through PPPoE. You must use the setroute argument with the ip address pppoe command to obtain the default route using PPPoE. Command Purpose Table 19-1 Feature History for Static and Default Routes Feature Name Releases Feature Information route command 7.0 The route command is used to enter a static or default route for the specified interface.19-8 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 19 Configuring Static and Default Routes Feature History for Static and Default RoutesC H A P T E R 20-1 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 20 Defining Route Maps This chapter includes the following sections: • Overview, page 20-1 • Licensing Requirements for Route Maps, page 20-3 • Guidelines and Limitations, page 20-3 • Defining a Route Map, page 20-4 • Customizing a Route Map, page 20-4 • Configuration Example for Route Maps, page 20-6 • Related Documents, page 20-6 • Feature History for Route Maps, page 20-6 Overview Route maps are used when redistributing routes into an OSPF, RIP, or EIGRP routing process. They are also used when generating a default route into an OSPF routing process. A route map defines which of the routes from the specified routing protocol are allowed to be redistributed into the target routing process. Route maps have many features in common with widely known access control lists (ACLs). These are some of the traits common to both mechanisms: • They are an ordered sequence of individual statements, each has a permit or deny result. Evaluation of ACL or route-maps consists of a list scan, in a predetermined order, and an evaluation of the criteria of each statement that matches. A list scan is aborted once the first statement match is found and an action associated with the statement match is performed. • They are generic mechanisms—criteria matches and match interpretation are dictated by the way they are applied. The same route map applied to different tasks might be interpreted differently. These are some of the differences between route-maps and ACLs: • Rout -maps frequently use ACLs as matching criteria. • The main result from the evaluation of an access list is a yes or no answer—an ACL either permits or denies input data. Applied to redistribution, an ACL determines if a particular route can (route matches ACLs permit statement) or can not (matches deny statement) be redistributed. Typical route-maps not only permit (some) redistributed routes but also modify information associated with the route, when it is redistributed into another protocol.20-2 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 20 Defining Route Maps Overview • Route-maps are more flexible than ACLs and can verify routes based on criteria which ACLs can not verify. For example, a route map can verify if the type of route is internal. • Each ACL ends with an implicit deny statement, by design convention; there is no similar convention for route-maps. If the end of a route map is reached during matching attempts, the result depends on the specific application of the route map. Fortunately, route-maps that are applied to redistribution behave the same way as ACLs: if the route does not match any clause in a route map then the route redistribution is denied, as if the route map contained deny statement at the end. The dynamic protocol redistribute command allows you to apply a route map. Route-maps are preferred if you intend to either modify route information during redistribution or if you need more powerful matching capability than an ACL can provide. If you simply need to selectively permit some routes based on their prefix or mask, Cisco recommends that you use route map to map to an ACL (or equivalent prefix list) directly in the redistribute command. If you use a route map to selectively permit some routes based on their prefix or mask, you typically use more configuration commands to achieve the same goal. Permit and Deny Clauses Route-maps can have permit and deny clauses. In route map ospf-to-eigrp, there is one deny clause (with sequence number 10) and two permit clauses. The deny clause rejects route matches from redistribution. Therefore, these rules apply: • If you use an ACL in a route map permit clause, routes that are permitted by the ACL are redistributed. • If you use an ACL in a route map deny clause, routes that are permitted by the ACL are not redistributed. • If you use an ACL in a route map permit or deny clause, and the ACL denies a route, then the route map clause match is not found and the next route map clause is evaluated. Match and Set Commands Each route map clause has two types of commands: • match—Selects routes to which this clause should be applied. • set—Modifies information which will be redistributed into the target protocol. For each route that is being redistributed, the router first evaluates the match command of a clause in the route map. If the match criteria succeeds, then the route is redistributed or rejected as dictated by the permit or deny clause, and some of its attributes might be modified by set commands. If the match criteria fails, then this clause is not applicable to the route, and the software proceeds to evaluate the route against the next clause in the route map. Scan of the route map continues until a clause is found whose match command(s) match the route or until the end of the route map is reached. A match or set command in each clause can be missed or repeated several times, if one of these conditions exist: • If several match commands are present in a clause, all must succeed for a given route in order for that route to match the clause (in other words, the logical AND algorithm is applied for multiple match commands). • If a match command refers to several objects in one command, either of them should match (the logical OR algorithm is applied). For example, in the match ip address 101 121 command, a route is permitted if it is permitted by access list 101 or access list 121.20-3 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 20 Defining Route Maps Licensing Requirements for Route Maps • If a match command is not present, all routes match the clause. In the previous example, all routes that reach clause 30 match; therefore, the end of the route map is never reached. • If a set command is not present in a route map permit clause then the route is redistributed without modification of its current attributes. Note Do not configure a set command in a deny route map clause because the deny clause prohibits route redistribution—there is no information to modify. A route map clause without a match or set command performs an action. An empty permit clause allows a redistribution of the remaining routes without modification. An empty deny clause does not allows a redistribution of other routes (this is the default action if a route map is completely scanned but no explicit match is found). Licensing Requirements for Route Maps Guidelines and Limitations This section includes the guidelines and limitations for this feature: Context Mode Guidelines Supported in single context mode. Firewall Mode Guidelines Supported only in routed firewall mode. Transparent mode is not supported. IPv6 Guidelines Does not support IPv6. Model License Requirement All models Base License.20-4 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 20 Defining Route Maps Defining a Route Map Defining a Route Map To define a route map, enter the following command: Detailed Steps Customizing a Route Map This section describes how to customize the route map, and includes the following topics: • Defining a Route to Match a Specific Destination Address, page 20-4 • Configuring the Metric Values for a Route Action, page 20-5 Defining a Route to Match a Specific Destination Address To define a route to match a specified desitnation address, perform the following steps: Detailed Steps Command Purpose route-map name {permit | deny} [sequence_number] Example: hostname(config)# route-map name {permit} [12] Create the route map entry. Route map entries are read in order. You can identify the order using the sequence_number option, or the ASA uses the order in which you add the entries. Command Purpose Step 1 route-map name {permit | deny} [sequence_number] Example: hostname(config)# route-map name {permit} [12] Create the route map entry. Route map entries are read in order. You can identify the order using the sequence_number option, or the ASA uses the order in which you add the entries. Step 2 Enter one of the following match commands to match routes to a specified destination address: match ip address acl_id [acl_id] [...] Example: hostname(config-route-map)# match ip address acl_id [acl_id] [...] This allows you to match any routes that have a destination network that matches a standard ACL. If you specify more than one ACL, then the route can match any of the ACLs. match metric metric_value Example: hostname(config-route-map)# match metric 200 This allows you to match any routes that have a specified metric. The metric_value can be from 0 to 4294967295.20-5 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 20 Defining Route Maps Customizing a Route Map Configuring the Metric Values for a Route Action If a route matches the match commands, then the following set commands determine the action to perform on the route before redistributing it. To configure a route action, perform the following steps: Detailed Steps match ip next-hop acl_id [acl_id] [...] Example: hostname(config-route-map)# match ip next-hop acl_id [acl_id] [...] This allows you to match any routes that have a next hop router address that matches a standard ACL. If you specify more than one ACL, then the route can match any of the ACLs. match interface if_name Example: hostname(config-route-map)# match interface if_name This allows you to match any routes with the specified next hop interface. If you specify more than one interface, then the route can match either interface. match ip route-source acl_id [acl_id] [...] Example: hostname(config-route-map)# match ip route-source acl_id [acl_id] [...] This allows you to match any routes that have been advertised by routers that match a standard ACL. If you specify more than one ACL, then the route can match any of the ACLs. match route-type {internal | external [type-1 | type-2]} Example: hostname(config-route-map)# match route-type internal type-1 This allows you to match the route type. Command Purpose Command Purpose Step 1 route-map name {permit | deny} [sequence_number] Example: hostname(config)# route-map name {permit} [12] Create the route map entry. Route map entries are read in order. You can identify the order using the sequence_number option, or the ASA uses the order in which you add the entries. Step 2 Enter one or more of the following set commands to set a metric for the route map: set metric metric_value Example: hostname(config-route-map)# set metric 200 This allows you to set the metric. The metric_value can be a value between 0 and 294967295. set metric-type {type-1 | type-2} Example: hostname(config-route-map)# set metric-type type-2 This allows you to set the metric type. The metric-type can be type-1 or type-2.20-6 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 20 Defining Route Maps Configuration Example for Route Maps Configuration Example for Route Maps The following example shows how to redistribute routes with a hop count equal to 1 into OSPF. The ASA redistributes these routes as external LSAs with a metric of 5 and a metric type of Type 1. hostname(config)# route-map 1-to-2 permit hostname(config-route-map)# match metric 1 hostname(config-route-map)# set metric 5 hostname(config-route-map)# set metric-type type-1 The following example shows how to redistribute the 10.1.1.0 static route into eigrp process 1 with the configured metric value: hostname(config)# route outside 10.1.1.0 255.255.255.0 192.168.1.1 hostname(config-route-map)# access-list mymap2 line 1 permit 10.1.1.0 255.255.255.0 hostname(config-route-map)# route-map mymap2 permit 10 hostname(config-route-map)# match ip address mymap2 hostname(config-route-map)# router eigrp 1 hostname(config)# redistribute static metric 250 250 1 1 1 route-map mymap2 Related Documents For additional information related to routing, see the following: Feature History for Route Maps Table 20-1 lists the release history for this feature. Related Topic Document Title Routing Overview Information About Routing How to configure OSPF Configuring OSPF How to configure EIGRP Configuring EIGRP How to configure RIP Configuring RIP How to configure a static or default route Configuring Static and Default Routes How to configure multicast routing Configuring Multicast Routing Table 20-1 Feature History for Route Maps Feature Name Releases Feature Information Route mapping 7.0(1) The route-map command allows you to define a route map entry.C H A P T E R 21-1 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 21 Configuring OSPF This chapter describes how to configure the ASA to route data, perform authentication, and redistribute routing information, using the Open Shortest Path First (OSPF) routing protocol. This chapter includes the following sections: • Overview, page 21-1 • Licensing Requirements for OSPF, page 21-2 • Guidelines and Limitations, page 21-3 • Enabling OSPF, page 21-3 • Customizing OSPF, page 21-4 • Monitoring OSPF, page 21-15 • Configuration Example for OSPF, page 21-16 • Feature History for OSPF, page 21-17 • Additional References, page 21-17 Overview OSPF is an interior gateway routing protocol that uses link states rather than distance vectors for path selection. OSPF propagates link-state advertisements rather than routing table updates. Because only LSAs are exchanged instead of the entire routing tables, OSPF networks converge more quickly than RIP networks. OSPF uses a link-state algorithm to build and calculate the shortest path to all known destinations. Each router in an OSPF area contains an identical link-state database, which is a list of each of the router usable interfaces and reachable neighbors. The advantages of OSPF over RIP include the following: • OSPF link-state database updates are sent less frequently than RIP updates, and the link-state database is updated instantly rather than gradually as stale information is timed out. • Routing decisions are based on cost, which is an indication of the overhead required to send packets across a certain interface. The ASA calculates the cost of an interface based on link bandwidth rather than the number of hops to the destination. The cost can be configured to specify preferred paths. The disadvantage of shortest path first algorithms is that they require a lot of CPU cycles and memory. 21-2 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 21 Configuring OSPF Licensing Requirements for OSPF The ASA can run two processes of OSPF protocol simultaneously, on different sets of interfaces. You might want to run two processes if you have interfaces that use the same IP addresses (NAT allows these interfaces to coexist, but OSPF does not allow overlapping addresses). Or you might want to run one process on the inside, and another on the outside, and redistribute a subset of routes between the two processes. Similarly, you might need to segregate private addresses from public addresses. You can redistribute routes into an OSPF routing process from another OSPF routing process, a RIP routing process, or from static and connected routes configured on OSPF-enabled interfaces. The ASA supports the following OSPF features: • Support of intra-area, interarea, and external (Type I and Type II) routes. • Support of a virtual link. • OSPF LSA flooding. • Authentication to OSPF packets (both password and MD5 authentication). • Support for configuring the ASA as a designated router or a designated backup router. The ASA also can be set up as an ABR. • Support for stub areas and not-so-stubby-areas. Area boundary router type-3 LSA filtering. OSPF supports MD5 and clear text neighbor authentication. Authentication should be used with all routing protocols when possible because route redistribution between OSPF and other protocols (like RIP) can potentially be used by attackers to subvert routing information. If NAT is used, if OSPF is operating on public and private areas, and if address filtering is required, then you need to run two OSPF processes—one process for the public areas and one for the private areas. A router that has interfaces in multiple areas is called an Area Border Router (ABR). A router that acts as a gateway to redistribute traffic between routers using OSPF and routers using other routing protocols is called an Autonomous System Boundary Router (ASBR). An ABR uses LSAs to send information about available routes to other OSPF routers. Using ABR type 3 LSA filtering, you can have separate private and public areas with the ASA acting as an ABR. Type 3 LSAs (inter-area routes) can be filtered from one area to other. This lets you use NAT and OSPF together without advertising private networks. Note Only type 3 LSAs can be filtered. If you configure the ASA as an ASBR in a private network, it will send type 5 LSAs describing private networks, which will get flooded to the entire AS including public areas. If NAT is employed but OSPF is only running in public areas, then routes to public networks can be redistributed inside the private network, either as default or type 5 AS External LSAs. However, you need to configure static routes for the private networks protected by the ASA. Also, you should not mix public and private networks on the same ASA interface. You can have two OSPF routing processes, one RIP routing process, and one EIGRP routing process running on the ASA at the same time. Licensing Requirements for OSPF21-3 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 21 Configuring OSPF Guidelines and Limitations Guidelines and Limitations This section includes the guidelines and limitations for this feature: Context Mode Guidelines Supported in single context mode. Firewall Mode Guidelines Supported in routed firewall mode only. Transparent mode is not supported. IPv6 Guidelines Does not support IPv6. Configuring OSPF This section explains how to enable and restart the OSPF process on your system. After enabling see the section, to learn how to customize the OSPF process on your system. • Enabling OSPF, page 21-3 • Restarting the OSPF Process, page 21-4 Enabling OSPF To enable OSPF, you need to create an OSPF routing process, specify the range of IP addresses associated with the routing process, then assign area IDs associated with that range of IP addresses. To enable OSPF, perform the following detailed steps: Model License Requirement All models Base License.21-4 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 21 Configuring OSPF Customizing OSPF Detailed Steps Restarting the OSPF Process This step allows you to remove the entire OSPF configuration you have enabled. Once this is cleared, you must reconfigure OSPF again using the router ospf command, perform the following step: Customizing OSPF This section explains how to customize the OSPF process and includes the following topics: • Redistributing Routes Into OSPF, page 21-5 • Generating a Default Route, page 21-6 • Configuring OSPF Interface Parameters, page 21-8 • Configuring Route Summarization Between OSPF Areas, page 21-8 • Configuring OSPF Interface Parameters, page 21-8 • Configuring OSPF Area Parameters, page 21-11 • Configuring OSPF NSSA, page 21-12 • Configuring Route Calculation Timers, page 21-13 • Defining Static OSPF Neighbors, page 21-13 • Logging Neighbors Going Up or Down, page 21-14 Command Purpose Step 1 router ospf process_id Example: hostname(config)# router ospf 2 This creates an OSPF routing process, and the user enters router configuration mode for this OSPF process. The process_id is an internally used identifier for this routing process. It can be any positive integer. This ID does not have to match the ID on any other device; it is for internal use only. You can use a maximum of two processes. Step 2 network ip_address mask area area_id Example: hostname(config)# router ospf 2 hostname(config-router)# network 10.0.0.0 255.0.0.0 area 0 This step defines the IP addresses on which OSPF runs and to define the area ID for that interface. Command Purpose clear ospf pid {process | redistribution | counters [neighbor [neighbor-interface] [neighbor-id]]} Example: hostname(config)# clear ospf This remove entire OSPF configuration you have enabled. Once this is cleared, you must reconfigure OSPF again using the router ospf command.21-5 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 21 Configuring OSPF Customizing OSPF Redistributing Routes Into OSPF The ASA can control the redistribution of routes between OSPF routing processes. The ASA matches and changes routes according to settings in the redistribute command or by using a route map. If you want to redistribute a route by defining which of the routes from the specified routing protocol are allowed to be redistributed into the target routing process, you must firstgenerate a default map and then define a route map. Note (Optional) Create a route-map to further define which routes from the specified routing protocol are redistributed in to the OSPF routing process. See Chapter 20, “Defining Route Maps.” Also, see the “Generating a Default Route” section on page 21-6 for another use for route maps. To redistribute static, connected, RIP, or OSPF routes into an OSPF process, perform the following steps: Detailed Steps Command Purpose Step 1 router ospf process_id Example: hostname(config)# router ospf 2 This creates an OSPF routing process, and the user enters router configuration mode for tfor the OSPF process you want to redistribute. The process_id is an internally used identifier for this routing process. It can be any positive integer. This ID does not have to match the ID on any other device; it is for internal use only. You can use a maximum of two processes. Step 2 Do one of the following to redistribute the selected route type into the OSPF routing process: redistribute connected [[metric metric-value] [metric-type {type-1 | type-2}] [tag tag_value] [subnets] [route-map map_name] Example: hostname(config)# redistribute connected This step redistributes connected routes into the OSPF routing process redistribute static [metric metric-value] [metric-type {type-1 | type-2}] [tag tag_value] [subnets] [route-map map_name Example: hostname(config)# redistribute static This step redistribute static routes into the OSPF routing process.21-6 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 21 Configuring OSPF Customizing OSPF Generating a Default Route You can force an autonomous system boundary router to generate a default route into an OSPF routing domain. Whenever you specifically configure redistribution of routes into an OSPF routing domain, the router automatically becomes an autonomous system boundary router. However, an autonomous system boundary router does not by default generate a default route into the OSPF routing domain. To generate a default route, perform the following steps: redistribute ospf pid [match {internal | external [1 | 2] | nssa-external [1 | 2]}] [metric metric-value] [metric-type {type-1 | type-2}] [tag tag_value] [subnets] [route-map map_name] Example: hostname(config)# route-map 1-to-2 permit hostname(config-route-map)# match metric 1 hostname(config-route-map)# set metric 5 hostname(config-route-map)# set metric-type type-1 hostname(config-route-map)# router ospf 2 hostname(config-router)# redistribute ospf 1 route-map 1-to-2 This step allows you to redistribute routes from an OSPF routing process into another OSPF routing process. You can either use the match options in this command to match and set route properties, or you can use a route map. The subnet option does not have equivalents in the route-map command. If you use both a route map and match options in the redistribute command, then they must match. This example shows route redistribution from OSPF process 1 into OSPF process 2 by matching routes with a metric equal to 1. The ASA redistributes these routes as external LSAs with a metric of 5, metric type of Type 1. redistribute rip [metric metric-value] [metric-type {type-1 | type-2}] [tag tag_value] [subnets] [route-map map_name] Example: hostname(config)# redistribute rip 25 This step allows you to redistribute routes from a RIP routing process into the OSPF routing process. redistribute eigrp as-num [metric metric-value] [metric-type {type-1 | type-2}] [tag tag_value] [subnets] [route-map map_name] Example: hostname(config)# redistribute eigrp 2 This step allows you to redistribute routes from an EIGRP routing process into the OSPF routing process. Command Purpose21-7 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 21 Configuring OSPF Customizing OSPF Detailed Steps Configuring Route Summarization When Redistributing Routes into OSPF When routes from other protocols are redistributed into OSPF, each route is advertised individually in an external LSA. However, you can configure the ASA to advertise a single route for all the redistributed routes that are covered by a specified network address and mask. This configuration decreases the size of the OSPF link-state database. To configure the software advertisement on one summary route for all redistributed routes covered by a network address and mask, perform the following steps: Detailed Steps Note OSPF does not support summary-address 0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0. Command Purpose Step 1 router ospf process_id Example: hostname(config)# router ospf 2 This creates an OSPF routing process, and the user enters router configuration mode for this OSPF process. The process_id is an internally used identifier for this routing process. It can be any positive integer. This ID does not have to match the ID on any other device; it is for internal use only. You can use a maximum of two processes. Step 2 default-information originate [always] [metric metric-value] [metric-type {1 | 2}] [route-map map-name] Example: hostname(config-router)# default-information originate always This step forces the autonomous system boundary router to generate a default route. Command Purpose Step 1 router ospf process_id Example: hostname(config)# router ospf 1 This creates an OSPF routing process, and the user enters router configuration mode for this OSPF process. The process_id is an internally used identifier for this routing process. It can be any positive integer. This ID does not have to match the ID on any other device; it is for internal use only. You can use a maximum of two processes. Step 2 summary-address ip_address mask [not-advertise] [tag tag] Example: hostname(config)# router ospf 1 hostname(config-router)# summary-address 10.1.0.0 255.255.0.0 This step sets the summary address. In this example, the summary address 10.1.0.0 includes address 10.1.1.0, 10.1.2.0, 10.1.3.0, and so on. Only the address 10.1.0.0 is advertised in an external link-state advertisement21-8 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 21 Configuring OSPF Customizing OSPF Configuring Route Summarization Between OSPF Areas Route summarization is the consolidation of advertised addresses. This feature causes a single summary route to be advertised to other areas by an area boundary router. In OSPF, an area boundary router advertises networks in one area into another area. If the network numbers in an area are assigned in a way such that they are contiguous, you can configure the area boundary router to advertise a summary route that covers all the individual networks within the area that fall into the specified range. To define an address range for route summarization, perform the following steps: Detailed Steps Configuring OSPF Interface Parameters You can alter some interface-specific OSPF parameters as necessary. You are not required to alter any of these parameters, but the following interface parameters must be consistent across all routers in an attached network: ospf hello-interval, ospf dead-interval, and ospf authentication-key. Be sure that if you configure any of these parameters, the configurations for all routers on your network have compatible values. Command Purpose Step 1 router ospf process_id Example: hostname(config)# router ospf 1 This creates an OSPF routing process, and the user enters router configuration mode for this OSPF process. The process_id is an internally used identifier for this routing process. It can be any positive integer. This ID does not have to match the ID on any other device; it is for internal use only. You can use a maximum of two processes. Step 2 area area-id range ip-address mask [advertise | not-advertise] Example: hostname(config)# router ospf 1 hostname(config-router)# area 17 range 12.1.0.0 255.255.0.0 This step sets the address range. In this example, the address range is set between OSPF areas.21-9 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 21 Configuring OSPF Customizing OSPF To configure OSPF interface parameters, perform the following steps: Detailed Steps Command Purpose Step 1 router ospf process_id Example: hostname(config)# router ospf 2 This creates an OSPF routing process, and the user enters router configuration mode for tfor the OSPF process you want to redistribute. The process_id is an internally used identifier for this routing process. It can be any positive integer. This ID does not have to match the ID on any other device; it is for internal use only. You can use a maximum of two processes. Step 2 network ip_address mask area area_id Example: hostname(config)# router ospf 2 hostname(config-router)# network 10.0.0.0 255.0.0.0 area 0 This step defines the IP addresses on which OSPF runs and to define the area ID for that interface. Step 3 hostname(config)# interface interface_name Example: hostname(config)# interface my_interface This allows you to enter interface configuration mode. Step 4 Do one of the following to configure optional OSPF interface parameters: ospf authentication [message-digest | null] Example: hostname(config-interface)# ospf authentication message-digest This specifies the authentication type for an interface. ospf authentication-key key Example: hostname(config-interface)# ospf authentication-key cisco This allows you to assign a password to be used by neighboring OSPF routers on a network segment that is using the OSPF simple password authentication. The key can be any continuous string of characters up to 8 bytes in length. The password created by this command is used as a key that is inserted directly into the OSPF header when the ASA software originates routing protocol packets. A separate password can be assigned to each network on a per-interface basis. All neighboring routers on the same network must have the same password to be able to exchange OSPF information. ospf cost cost Example: hostname(config-interface)# ospf cost 20 This allows you to explicitly specify the cost of sending a packet on an OSPF interface. The cost is an integer from 1 to 65535. In this example, the cost is set to 20. ospf dead-interval seconds Example: hostname(config-interface)# ospf dead-interval 40 This allows you to set the number of seconds that a device must wait before it declares a neighbor OSPF router down because it has not received a hello packet. The value must be the same for all nodes on the network. In this example, the dead-interval is set to 40.21-10 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 21 Configuring OSPF Customizing OSPF ospf hello-interval seconds Example: hostname(config-interface)# ospf hello-interval 10 This allows you to specify the length of time between the hello packets that the ASA sends on an OSPF interface. The value must be the same for all nodes on the network. In this example, the hello-interval is set to 10. ospf message-digest-key key_id md5 key Example: hostname(config-interface)# ospf message-digest-key 1 md5 cisco This enables OSPF MD5 authentication. The following values can be set: • key_id—An identifier in the range from 1 to 255. • key—Alphanumeric password of up to 16 bytes. Usually, one key per interface is used to generate authentication information when sending packets and to authenticate incoming packets. The same key identifier on the neighbor router must have the same key value. We recommend that you not keep more than one key per interface. Every time you add a new key, you should remove the old key to prevent the local system from continuing to communicate with a hostile system that knows the old key. Removing the old key also reduces overhead during rollover. ospf priority number_value Example: hostname(config-interface)# ospf priority 20 This allows you to set the priority to help determine the OSPF designated router for a network. The number_value is between 0 to 255. In this example, the priority number value is set to 20. ospf retransmit-interval seconds Example: hostname(config-interface)# ospf retransmit-interval seconds This allows you to specify the number of seconds between LSA retransmissions for adjacencies belonging to an OSPF interface. The value for seconds must be greater than the expected round-trip delay between any two routers on the attached network. The range is from 1 to 65535 seconds. The default value is 5 seconds. In this example, the retransmit-interval value is set to 15. ospf transmit-delay seconds Example: hostname(config-interface)# ospf transmit-delay 5 Sets the estimated number of seconds required to send a link-state update packet on an OSPF interface. The seconds value is from 1 to 65535 seconds. The default value is 1 second. In this example, the transmit-delay is 5 seconds. ospf network point-to-point non-broadcast Example: hostname(config-interface)# ospf network point-to-point non-broadcast Specifies the interface as a point-to-point, non-broadcast network. When you designate an interface as point-to-point, non-broadcast, you must manually define the OSPF neighbor; dynamic neighbor discover is not possible. See Defining Static OSPF Neighbors, page 21-13, for more information. Additionally, you can only define one OSPF neighbor on that interface. Command Purpose21-11 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 21 Configuring OSPF Customizing OSPF Configuring OSPF Area Parameters You can configure several area parameters. These area parameters (shown in the following task table) include setting authentication, defining stub areas, and assigning specific costs to the default summary route. Authentication provides password-based protection against unauthorized access to an area. Stub areas are areas into which information on external routes is not sent. Instead, there is a default external route generated by the ABR, into the stub area for destinations outside the autonomous system. To take advantage of the OSPF stub area support, default routing must be used in the stub area. To further reduce the number of LSAs sent into a stub area, you can configure the no-summary keyword of the area stub command on the ABR to prevent it from sending summary link advertisement (LSA Type 3) into the stub area. To specify area parameters for your network, perform the following steps: Detailed Steps Command Purpose Step 1 router ospf process_id Example: hostname(config)# router ospf 2 This creates an OSPF routing process, and the user enters router configuration mode for tfor the OSPF process you want to redistribute. The process_id is an internally used identifier for this routing process. It can be any positive integer. This ID does not have to match the ID on any other device; it is for internal use only. You can use a maximum of two processes. Step 2 Do one of the following to configure optional OSPF area parameters: area area-id authentication Example: hostname(config-router)# area 0 authentication This step enables authentication for an OSPF area. area area-id authentication message-digest Example: hostname(config-router)# area 0 authentication message-digest This step enables MD5 authentication for an OSPF area. area area-id stub [no-summary] Example: hostname(config-router)# area 17 stub This defines an area to be a stub area. area area-id default-cost cost Example: hostname(config-router)# area 17 default-cost 20 This step assigns a specific cost to the default summary route used for the stub area. The cost is an integer from 1 to 65535. The default value is 1.21-12 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 21 Configuring OSPF Customizing OSPF Configuring OSPF NSSA The OSPF implementation of an NSSA is similar to an OSPF stub area. NSSA does not flood type 5 external LSAs from the core into the area, but it can import autonomous system external routes in a limited way within the area. NSSA importsType 7 autonomous system external routes within an NSSA area by redistribution. These Type 7 LSAs are translated into Type 5 LSAs by NSSA ABRs, which are flooded throughout the whole routing domain. Summarization and filtering are supported during the translation. You can simplify administration if you are an ISP or a network administrator that must connect a central site using OSPF to a remote site that is using a different routing protocol using NSSA. Before the implementation of NSSA, the connection between the corporate site border router and the remote router could not be run as an OSPF stub area because routes for the remote site could not be redistributed into the stub area, and two routing protocols needed to be maintained. A simple protocol such as RIP was usually run and handled the redistribution. With NSSA, you can extend OSPF to cover the remote connection by defining the area between the corporate router and the remote router as an NSSA. Before you use this feature, consider these guidelines: – You can set a Type 7 default route that can be used to reach external destinations. When configured, the router generates a Type 7 default into the NSSA or the NSSA area boundary router. – Every router within the same area must agree that the area is NSSA; otherwise, the routers will not be able to communicate. To specify area parameters for your network as needed to configure OSPF NSSA, perform the following steps: Detailed Steps Command Purpose Step 1 router ospf process_id Example: hostname(config)# router ospf 2 This creates an OSPF routing process, and the user enters router configuration mode for tfor the OSPF process you want to redistribute. The process_id is an internally used identifier for this routing process. It can be any positive integer. This ID does not have to match the ID on any other device; it is for internal use only. You can use a maximum of two processes. Step 2 Do one of the following to configure optional OSPF NSSA parameters:21-13 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 21 Configuring OSPF Customizing OSPF Note OSPF does not support summary-address 0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0. Defining Static OSPF Neighbors You need to define static OSPF neighbors to advertise OSPF routes over a point-to-point, non-broadcast network. This lets you broadcast OSPF advertisements across an existing VPN connection without having to encapsulate the advertisements in a GRE tunnel. Before you begin, you must create a static route to the OSPF neighbor. See the chapter, ‘Configuring Static and Default Routes’ for more information about creating static routes. To define a static OSPF neighbor, perform the following tasks: Detailed Steps Configuring Route Calculation Timers You can configure the delay time between when OSPF receives a topology change and when it starts an SPF calculation. You also can configure the hold time between two consecutive SPF calculations. area area-id nssa [no-redistribution] [default-information-originate] Example: hostname(config-router)# area 0 nssa This step defines an NSSA area. summary-address ip_address mask [not-advertise] [tag tag] Example: hostname(config)# router ospf 1 hostname(config-router)# summary-address 10.1.0.0 255.255.0.0 This step sets the summary address and helps reduce the size of the routing table. Using this command for OSPF causes an OSPF ASBR to advertise one external route as an aggregate for all redistributed routes that are covered by the address. In this example, the summary address 10.1.0.0 includes address 10.1.1.0, 10.1.2.0, 10.1.3.0, and so on. Only the address 10.1.0.0 is advertised in an external link-state advertisement Command Purpose Command Purpose Step 1 router ospf process_id Example: hostname(config)# router ospf 2 This creates an OSPF routing process, and the user enters router configuration mode for this OSPF process. The process_id is an internally used identifier for this routing process. It can be any positive integer. This ID does not have to match the ID on any other device; it is for internal use only. You can use a maximum of two processes. Step 2 neighbor addr [interface if_name] Example: hostname(config-router)# neighbor 255.255.0.0 [interface my_interface] This step defines the OSPF neighborhood. The addr argument is the IP address of the OSPF neighbor. The if_name is the interface used to communicate with the neighbor. If the OSPF neighbor is not on the same network as any of the directly-connected interfaces, you must specify the interface.21-14 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 21 Configuring OSPF Customizing OSPF To configure route calculation timers, perform the following steps: Detailed Steps Logging Neighbors Going Up or Down By default, the system sends a system message when an OSPF neighbor goes up or down. Configure this command if you want to know about OSPF neighbors going up or down without turning on the debug ospf adjacency command. The log-adj-changes router configuration command provides a higher level view of the peer relationship with less output. Configure log-adj-changes detail if you want to see messages for each state change. To log neighbors going up or down, perform the following steps: Detailed Steps Command Purpose Step 1 router ospf process_id Example: hostname(config)# router ospf 2 This creates an OSPF routing process, and the user enters router configuration mode for this OSPF process. The process_id is an internally used identifier for this routing process. It can be any positive integer. This ID does not have to match the ID on any other device; it is for internal use only. You can use a maximum of two processes. Step 2 timers spf spf-delay spf-holdtime Example: hostname(config-router)# timers spf 10 120 This step configure the route calculation times. The spf-delay is the delay time (in seconds) between when OSPF receives a topology change and when it starts an SPF calculation. It can be an integer from 0 to 65535. The default time is 5 seconds. A value of 0 means that there is no delay; that is, the SPF calculation is started immediately. The spf-holdtime is the minimum time (in seconds) between two consecutive SPF calculations. It can be an integer from 0 to 65535. The default time is 10 seconds. A value of 0 means that there is no delay; that is, two SPF calculations can be done, one immediately after the other. Command Purpose Step 1 router ospf process_id Example: hostname(config)# router ospf 2 This creates an OSPF routing process, and the user enters router configuration mode for this OSPF process. The process_id is an internally used identifier for this routing process. It can be any positive integer. This ID does not have to match the ID on any other device; it is for internal use only. You can use a maximum of two processes. Step 2 log-adj-changes [detail] Example: hostname(config-router)# log-adj-changes [detail] This step configures logging for neighbors going up or down.21-15 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 21 Configuring OSPF Monitoring OSPF Note Logging must be enabled for the the neighbor up/down messages to be sent. Monitoring OSPF You can display specific statistics such as the contents of IP routing tables, caches, and databases. You can also use the information provided to determine resource utilization and solve network problems. You can also display information about node reachability and discover the routing path that your device packets are taking through the network. To monitor or display various OSPF routing statistics, perform one of the following tasks: Command Purpose show ospf [process-id [area-id]] Displays general information about OSPF routing processes. show ospf border-routers Displays the internal OSPF routing table entries to the ABR and ASBR. show ospf [process-id [area-id]] database Displays lists of information related to the OSPF database for a specific router. show ospf flood-list if-name Displays a list of LSAs waiting to be flooded over an interface (to observe OSPF packet pacing). OSPF update packets are automatically paced so they are not sent less than 33 milliseconds apart. Without pacing, some update packets could get lost in situations where the link is slow, a neighbor could not receive the updates quickly enough, or the router could run out of buffer space. For example, without pacing packets might be dropped if either of the following topologies exist: • A fast router is connected to a slower router over a point-to-point link. • During flooding, several neighbors send updates to a single router at the same time. Pacing is also used between resends to increase efficiency and minimize lost retransmissions. You also can display the LSAs waiting to be sent out an interface. The benefit of the pacing is that OSPF update and retransmission packets are sent more efficiently. There are no configuration tasks for this feature; it occurs automatically show ospf interface [if_name] Displays OSPF-related interface information. show ospf neighbor [interface-name] [neighbor-id] [detail] Displays OSPF neighbor information on a per-interface basis. show ospf request-list neighbor if_name Displays a list of all LSAs requested by a router.21-16 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 21 Configuring OSPF Configuration Example for OSPF Configuration Example for OSPF The following example shows how to enable and configure OSPF with various optional processes: Step 1 Enable OSPF. hostname(config)# router ospf 2 hostname(config-router)# network 10.0.0.0 255.0.0.0 area 0 Step 2 Redistribute routes from one OSPF process to another OSPF process (optional): hostname(config)# route-map 1-to-2 permit hostname(config-route-map)# match metric 1 hostname(config-route-map)# set metric 5 hostname(config-route-map)# set metric-type type-1 hostname(config-route-map)# router ospf 2 hostname(config-router)# redistribute ospf 1 route-map 1-to-2 Step 3 Configure OSPF interface parameters (optional): hostname(config)# router ospf 2 hostname(config-router)# network 2.0.0.0 255.0.0.0 area 0 hostname(config-router)# interface inside hostname(config-interface)# ospf cost 20 hostname(config-interface)# ospf retransmit-interval 15 hostname(config-interface)# ospf transmit-delay 10 hostname(config-interface)# ospf priority 20 hostname(config-interface)# ospf hello-interval 10 hostname(config-interface)# ospf dead-interval 40 hostname(config-interface)# ospf authentication-key cisco hostname(config-interface)# ospf message-digest-key 1 md5 cisco hostname(config-interface)# ospf authentication message-digest Step 4 Configure OSPF area parameters (optional): hostname(config)# router ospf 2 hostname(config-router)# area 0 authentication hostname(config-router)# area 0 authentication message-digest hostname(config-router)# area 17 stub hostname(config-router)# area 17 default-cost 20 Step 5 Configure the route calculation timers and show the log neighbor up/down messages (optional): hostname(config-router)# timers spf 10 120 hostname(config-router)# log-adj-changes [detail] Step 6 Restart the OSPF process . hostname(config)# clear ospf pid {process | redistribution | counters [neighbor [neighbor-interface] [neighbor-id]]} show ospf retransmission-list neighbor if_name Displays a list of all LSAs waiting to be resent. show ospf [process-id] summary-address Displays a list of all summary address redistribution information configured under an OSPF process. show ospf [process-id] virtual-links Displays OSPF-related virtual links information. Command Purpose21-17 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 21 Configuring OSPF Feature History for OSPF Step 7 Show the results of your OSPF configuration (optional): The following is sample output from the show ospf command: hostname(config)# show ospf Routing Process "ospf 2" with ID 20.1.89.2 and Domain ID 0.0.0.2 Supports only single TOS(TOS0) routes Supports opaque LSA SPF schedule delay 5 secs, Hold time between two SPFs 10 secs Minimum LSA interval 5 secs. Minimum LSA arrival 1 secs Number of external LSA 5. Checksum Sum 0x 26da6 Number of opaque AS LSA 0. Checksum Sum 0x 0 Number of DCbitless external and opaque AS LSA 0 Number of DoNotAge external and opaque AS LSA 0 Number of areas in this router is 1. 1 normal 0 stub 0 nssa External flood list length 0 Area BACKBONE(0) Number of interfaces in this area is 1 Area has no authentication SPF algorithm executed 2 times Area ranges are Number of LSA 5. Checksum Sum 0x 209a3 Number of opaque link LSA 0. Checksum Sum 0x 0 Number of DCbitless LSA 0 Number of indication LSA 0 Number of DoNotAge LSA 0 Flood list length 0 Feature History for OSPF Table 21-1 lists the release history for this feature. Additional References For additional information related to routing, see the following: • Related Documents, page 21-18 Table 21-1 Feature History for OSPF Feature Name Releases Feature Information router ospf 7.0 route data, perform authentication, redistribute and monitor routing information, using the Open Shortest Path First (OSPF) routing protocol.21-18 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 21 Configuring OSPF Additional References Related Documents Related Topic Document Title Routing Overview Information About Routing How to configure EIGRP Configuring EIGRP How to configure RIP Configuring RIP How to configure a static or default route Configuring Static and Default Routes How to configure a route map Defining Route Maps How to configure multicast routing Configuring Multicast RoutingC H A P T E R 22-1 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 22 Configuring RIP This chapter describes how to configure the ASA to route data, perform authentication, and redistribute routing information, using the Routing Information Protocol (RIP) routing protocol. This chapter includes the following sections: • Overview, page 22-1 • Licensing Requirements for RIP, page 22-2 • Guidelines and Limitations, page 22-2 • Configuring RIP, page 22-3 • Customizing RIP, page 22-3 • Monitoring RIP, page 22-8 • Configuration Example for RIP, page 22-9 • Feature History for RIP, page 22-10 • Additional References, page 22-10 Overview The Routing Information Protocol, or RIP, as it is more commonly called, is one of the most enduring of all routing protocols. RIP has four basic components: routing update process, RIP routing metrics, routing stability, and routing timers. Devices that support RIP send routing-update messages at regular intervals and when the network topology changes. These RIP packets contain information about the networks that the devices can reach, as well as the number of routers or gateways that a packet must travel through to reach the destination address. RIP generates more traffic than OSPF, but is easier to configure. RIP has advantages over static routes because the initial configuration is simple, and you do not need to update the configuration when the topology changes. The disadvantage to RIP is that there is more network and processing overhead than static routing. The ASA supports RIP Version 1 and RIP Version 2. Routing Update Process RIP sends routing-update messages at regular intervals and when the network topology changes. When a router receives a routing update that includes changes to an entry, it updates its routing table to reflect the new route. The metric value for the path is increased by 1, and the sender is indicated as the next hop. 22-2 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 22 Configuring RIP Licensing Requirements for RIP RIP routers maintain only the best route (the route with the lowest metric value) to a destination. After updating its routing table, the router immediately begins transmitting routing updates to inform other network routers of the change. These updates are sent independently of the regularly scheduled updates that RIP routers send. RIP Routing Metric RIP uses a single routing metric (hop count) to measure the distance between the source and a destination network. Each hop in a path from source to destination is assigned a hop count value, which is typically 1. When a router receives a routing update that contains a new or changed destination network entry, the router adds 1 to the metric value indicated in the update and enters the network in the routing table. The IP address of the sender is used as the next hop. RIP Stability Features RIP prevents routing loops from continuing indefinitely by implementing a limit on the number of hops allowed in a path from the source to a destination. The maximum number of hops in a path is 15. If a router receives a routing update that contains a new or changed entry, and if increasing the metric value by 1 causes the metric to be infinity (that is, 16), the network destination is considered unreachable. The downside of this stability feature is that it limits the maximum diameter of a RIP network to less than 16 hops. RIP includes a number of other stability features that are common to many routing protocols. These features are designed to provide stability despite potentially rapid changes in network topology. For example, RIP implements the split horizon and holddown mechanisms to prevent incorrect routing information from being propagated. RIP Timers RIP uses numerous timers to regulate its performance. These include a routing-update timer, a route-timeout timer, and a route-flush timer. The routing-update timer clocks the interval between periodic routing updates. Generally, it is set to 30 seconds, with a small random amount of time added whenever the timer is reset. This is done to help prevent congestion, which could result from all routers simultaneously attempting to update their neighbors. Each routing table entry has a route-timeout timer associated with it. When the route-timeout timer expires, the route is marked invalid but is retained in the table until the route-flush timer expires. Licensing Requirements for RIP Guidelines and Limitations This section includes the guidelines and limitations for this feature: Model License Requirement All models Base License.22-3 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 22 Configuring RIP Configuring RIP Context Mode Guidelines Supported in single and multiple context mode. Firewall Mode Guidelines Supported in routed and transparent firewall mode. IPv6 Guidelines Does not support IPv6. Configuring RIP This section explains how to enable and restart the RIP process on your system. • Enabling RIP, page 22-3 After enabling see the section Customizing RIP, page 22-3, to learn how to customize the RIP process on your system. Enabling RIP You can only enable one RIP routing process on the ASA. After you enable the RIP routing process, you must define the interfaces that will participate in that routing process using the network command. By default, the ASA sends RIP Version 1 updates and accepts RIP Version 1 and Version 2 updates. To enable the RIP routing process, perform the following step: Detailed Steps Use the no router rip command to remove entire RIP configuration you have enabled. Once this is cleared, you must reconfigure RIP again using the router rip command. Customizing RIP This section describes how to configure RIP, and includes the following topics: • Generating a Default Route, page 22-4 • Configuring Interfaces for RIP, page 22-4 • Disabling Route Summarization, page 22-5 • Filtering Networks in RIP, page 22-5 • Redistributing Routes into the RIP Routing Process, page 22-6 Command Purpose router rip Example: hostname(config)# router rip This starts the RIP routing process and places you in router configuration mode.22-4 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 22 Configuring RIP Customizing RIP • Configuring RIP Send/Receive Version on an Interface, page 22-7 • Enabling RIP Authentication, page 22-8 Generating a Default Route To generate a default route in RIP, use the following steps: Detailed Steps Configuring Interfaces for RIP If you have an interface that you do not want to participate in RIP routing, but that is attached to a network that you want advertised, you can configure a network command that covers the network to which the interface is attached, and use the passive-interface command to prevent that interface from sending RIP advertisements. Additionally, you can specify the version of RIP that is used by the ASA for updates. Detailed Steps Command Purpose Step 1 router rip Example: hostname(config)# router rip This starts the RIP routing process and places you in router configuration mode. Step 2 default-information originate Example: hostname(config-router):# default-information originate This step generates a default route into RIP. Command Purpose Step 1 router rip Example: hostname(config)# router rip This starts the RIP routing process and places you in router configuration mode. Step 2 network network_address Example: hostname(config)# router rip hostname(config-router)# network 10.0.0.0 This step specifies the interfaces that will participate in the RIP routing process. If an interface belongs to a network defined by this command, the interface will participate in the RIP routing process. If an interface does not belong to a network defined by this command, it will not send or receive RIP updates. Step 3 Do one of the following to customize an interface to participate in RIP routing:22-5 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 22 Configuring RIP Customizing RIP Disabling Route Summarization RIP Version 1 always uses automatic route summarization. You cannot disable this feature for RIP Version 1. RIP Version 2 uses automatic route summarization by default. The RIP routing process summarizes on network number boundaries. This can cause routing problems if you have non-contiguous networks. For example, if you have a router with the networks 192.168.1.0, 192.168.2.0, and 192.168.3.0 connected to it, and those networks all participate in RIP, the RIP routing process creates the summary address 192.168.0.0 for those routes. If an additional router is added to the network with the networks 192.168.10.0 and 192.168.11.0, and those networks participate in RIP, they will also be summarized as 192.168.0.0. To prevent the possibility of traffic being routed to the wrong location, you should disable automatic route summarization on the routers creating the conflicting summary addresses. To disable automatic router summarization, enter the following command in router configuration mode for the RIP routing process: Detailed Steps Filtering Networks in RIP To filter the networks received in updates, perform the following steps: version [1 | 2] Example: hostname(config-router):# version [1] Specifies the version of RIP used by the ASA. You can override this setting on a per-interface basis passive-interface [default | if_name] Example: hostname(config-router):# passive-interface [default] This step specifies an interface to operate in passive mode. Using the default keyword causes all interfaces to operate in passive mode. Specifying an interface name sets only that interface to passive RIP mode. In passive mode, RIP routing updates are accepted by, but not sent out of, the specified interface. You can enter this command for each interface that you want to set to passive mode. Command Purpose Command Purpose Step 1 router rip Example: hostname(config)# router rip This starts the RIP routing process and places you in router configuration mode. Step 2 no auto-summarize Example: hostname(config-router):# no auto-summarize This step disables automatic route summarization.22-6 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 22 Configuring RIP Customizing RIP Note Before you begin, you must create a standard access list permitting the networks you want the RIP process to allow in the routing table and denying the networks you want the RIP process to discard. For more information on creating standard access lists, see the chapter, “Identifying Traffic with Access Lists”. Detailed Steps Redistributing Routes into the RIP Routing Process You can redistribute routes from the OSPF, EIGRP, static, and connected routing processes into the RIP routing process. To redistribute a routes into the RIP routing process, perform the following steps: Note Before you begin this procedure, you must create a route-map to further define which routes from the specified routing protocol are redistributed in to the RIP routing process. See Chapter 20, “Defining Route Maps,” for more information about creating a route map. Detailed Steps Command Purpose Step 1 router rip Example: hostname(config)# router rip This starts the RIP routing process and places you in router configuration mode. Step 2 distribute-list acl in [interface if_name] distribute-list acl out [connected | eigrp | interface if_name | ospf | rip | static] Example: hostname(config-router)# distribute-list acl2 in [interface interface1] hostname(config-router): distribute-list acl3 out [connected] This step filters the networks sent in updates. You can specify an interface to apply the filter to only those updates received or sent by that interface. You can enter this command for each interface you want to apply a filter to. If you do not specify an interface name, the filter is applied to all RIP updates. Command Purpose Step 1 Do one of the following to redistribute the selected route type into the RIP routing process. You must specify the RIP metric values in the redistribute command if you do not have a default-metric command in the RIP router configuration. redistribute connected [ metric | transparent ] [route-map ] Example: hostname(config-router): # redistribute connected [ metric | transparent ] [route-map ] Use this step to redistribute connected routes into the RIP routing process.22-7 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 22 Configuring RIP Customizing RIP Configuring RIP Send/Receive Version on an Interface You can override the globally-set version of RIP the ASA uses to send and receive RIP updates on a per-interface basis. To configure the RIP send and receive version, perform the following steps: Detailed Steps redistribute static [metric {metric_value | transparent}] [route-map map_name] Example: hostname(config-router):# redistribute static [metric {metric_value | transparent}] [route-map map_name] Use this step to redistribute static routes into the EIGRP routing process. redistribute ospf pid [match {internal | external [1 | 2] | nssa-external [1 | 2]}] [metric {metric_value | transparent}] [route-map map_name] Example: hostname(config-router):# redistribute ospf pid [match {internal | external [1 | 2] | nssa-external [1 | 2]}] [metric {metric_value | transparent}] [route-map map_name] Use this step to redistribute routes from an OSPF routing process into the RIP routing process. redistribute eigrp as-num [metric {metric_value | transparent}] [route-map map_name] Example: hostname(config-router):# redistribute eigrp as-num [metric {metric_value | transparent}] [route-map map_name] Use this step to redistribute routes from an EIGRP routing process into the RIP routing process. Command Purpose Command Purpose Step 1 interface phy_if Example: hostname(config)# interface phy_if This step enters interface configuration mode for the interface you are configuring. Step 2 Do one of the following to to send or receive RIP updates on a per-interface basis. rip send version {[1] [2]} Example: hostname(config-if)# rip send version 1 This step specifies the version of RIP to use when sending RIP updates out of the interface. In this example, version 1 is selected. rip receive version {[1] [2]} Example: hostname(config-if)# rip receive version 2 This step specifies the version of RIP advertisements permitted to be received by an interface. In this example, version 2 is selected. RIP updates received on the interface that do not match the allowed version are dropped.22-8 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 22 Configuring RIP Monitoring RIP Enabling RIP Authentication Note The ASA supports RIP message authentication for RIP Version 2 messages. RIP route authentication provides MD5 authentication of routing updates from the RIP routing protocol. The MD5 keyed digest in each RIP packet prevents the introduction of unauthorized or false routing messages from unapproved sources. RIP route authentication is configured on a per-interface basis. All RIP neighbors on interfaces configured for RIP message authentication must be configured with the same authentication mode and key for adjacencies to be established. Note Before you can enable RIP route authentication, you must enable RIP. To enable RIP authentication on an interface, perform the following steps: Detailed Steps Monitoring RIP You can use the following commands to monitor or debug the RIP routing process. We recommend that you only use the debug commands to troubleshoot specific problems or during troubleshooting sessions with Cisco TAC. Command Purpose Step 1 router rip Example: hostname(config)# router rip This creates an RIP routing process, and the user enters router configuration mode for this RIP process. The as-num argument is the autonomous system number of the RIP routing process. Step 2 interface phy_if Example: hostname(config)# interface phy_if Enter interface configuration mode for the interface on which you are configuring RIP message authentication. Step 3 rip authentication mode {text | md5} Example: hostname(config-if)# rip authentication mode md5 This step sets the authentication mode. By default, text authentication is used. We recommend MD5 authentication. Step 4 rip authentication key key key-id key-id Example: hostname(config-if)# rip authentication key cisco key-id 200 Configure the authentication key used by the MD5 algorithm. The key argument can contain up to 16 characters. The key-id argument is a number from 0 to 255.22-9 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 22 Configuring RIP Configuration Example for RIP Debugging output is assigned high priority in the CPU process and can render the system unusable. It is best to use debug commands during periods of lower network traffic and fewer users. Debugging during these periods decreases the likelihood that increased debug command processing overhead will affect system performance. For examples and descriptions of the command output, see the Cisco Security Appliance Command Reference. To monitor or debug various RIP routing statistics, perform one of the following tasks: Configuration Example for RIP The following example shows how to enable and configure RIP with various optional processes: Step 1 Enable RIP: hostname(config)# router rip 2 Step 2 Configure a default route into RIP: hostname(config-router): default-information originate Step 3 Specify the version of RIP to use: hostname(config-router): version [1] Step 4 Specify the interfaces that will participate in the RIP routing process: hostname(config-router)# network 225.25.25.225 Step 5 Specify an interface to operate in passive mode: hostname(config-router)# passive-interface [default] Step 6 Redistribute a connected route into the RIP routing process hostname(config-router): redistribute connected [metric bandwidth delay reliability loading mtu] [route-map map_name] Command Purpose Monitoring RIP Routing show rip database Display the contents of the RIP routing database. show running-config router rip Displays the RIP commands. Debug RIP debug rip events Displays RIP processing events. debug rip database Displays RIP database events.22-10 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 22 Configuring RIP Feature History for RIP Feature History for RIP Table 22-1 lists the release history for this feature. Additional References For additional information related to routing, see the following: • Related Documents, page 22-10 Related Documents Table 22-1 Feature History for RIP Feature Name Releases Feature Information router rip 7.0 This feature allows you to route data, perform authentication, redistribute and monitor routing information, using the Routing Information Protocol (RIP) routing protocol. Related Topic Document Title Routing Overview Information About Routing How to configure EIGRP Configuring EIGRP How to configure RIP Configuring RIP How to configure a static or default route Configuring Static and Default Routes How to configure a route map Defining Route Maps How to configure multicast routing Configuring Multicast RoutingC H A P T E R 23-1 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 23 Configuring EIGRP This chapter describes how to configure the ASA to route data, perform authentication, and redistribute routing information, using the Enhanced Interior Gateway Routing Protocol (EIGRP) routing protocol. This chapter includes the following sections: • Overview, page 23-1 • Licensing Requirements for EIGRP, page 23-2 • Guidelines and Limitations, page 23-2 • Enabling EIGRP, page 23-3 • Customizing EIGRP, page 23-4 • Monitoring EIGRP, page 23-13 • Configuration Example for EIGRP, page 23-14 • Feature History for EIGRP, page 23-15 • Additional References, page 23-15 Overview EIGRP is an enhanced version of IGRP developed by Cisco. Unlike IGRP and RIP, EIGRP does not send out periodic route updates. EIGRP updates are sent out only when the network topology changes. Key capabilities that distinguish EIGRP from other routing protocols include fast convergence, support for variable-length subnet mask, support for partial updates, and support for multiple network layer protocols. A router running EIGRP stores all the neighbor routing tables so that it can quickly adapt to alternate routes. If no appropriate route exists, EIGRP queries its neighbors to discover an alternate route. These queries propagate until an alternate route is found. Its support for variable-length subnet masks permits routes to be automatically summarized on a network number boundary. In addition, EIGRP can be configured to summarize on any bit boundary at any interface. EIGRP does not make periodic updates. Instead, it sends partial updates only when the metric for a route changes. Propagation of partial updates is automatically bounded so that only those routers that need the information are updated. As a result of these two capabilities, EIGRP consumes significantly less bandwidth than IGRP. Neighbor discovery is the process that the ASA uses to dynamically learn of other routers on directly attached networks. EIGRP routers send out multicast hello packets to announce their presence on the network. When the ASA receives a hello packet from a new neighbor, it sends its topology table to the neighbor with an initialization bit set. When the neighbor receives the topology update with the initialization bit set, the neighbor sends its topology table back to the ASA.23-2 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 23 Configuring EIGRP Licensing Requirements for EIGRP The hello packets are sent out as multicast messages. No response is expected to a hello message. The exception to this is for statically defined neighbors. If you use the neighbor command to configure a neighbor, the hello messages sent to that neighbor are sent as unicast messages. Routing updates and acknowledgements are sent out as unicast messages. Once this neighbor relationship is established, routing updates are not exchanged unless there is a change in the network topology. The neighbor relationship is maintained through the hello packets. Each hello packet received from a neighbor contains a hold time. This is the time in which the ASA can expect to receive a hello packet from that neighbor. If the ASA does not receive a hello packet from that neighbor within the hold time advertised by that neighbor, the ASA considers that neighbor to be unavailable. The EIGRP protocol uses four key algorithm technologies, four key technologies, including neighbor discover/recovery, Reliable Transport Protocol (RTP), and the fourth one, DUAL being important for route computations. DUAL saves all routes to a destination in the topology table, not just the least-cost route. The least-cost route is inserted into the routing table. The other routes remain in the topology table. If the main route fails, another route is chosen from the feasible successors. A successor is a neighboring router used for packet forwarding that has a least-cost path to a destination. The feasibility calculation guarantees that the path is not part of a routing loop. If a feasible successor is not found in the topology table, a route recomputation must occur. During route recomputation, DUAL queries the EIGRP neighbors for a route, who in turn query their neighbors. Routers that do no have a feasible successor for the route return an unreachable message. During route recomputation, DUAL marks the route as active. By default, the ASA waits for three minutes to receive a response from its neighbors. If the ASA does not receive a response from a neighbor, the route is marked as stuck-in-active. All routes in the topology table that point to the unresponsive neighbor as a feasibility successor are removed. Note EIGRP neighbor relationships are not supported through the IPSec tunnel without a GRE tunnel. Licensing Requirements for EIGRP Guidelines and Limitations This section includes the guidelines and limitations for this feature. Context Mode Guidelines Supported in single context mode. Firewall Mode Guidelines Supported only in routed firewall mode. Transparent mode is not supported. IPv6 Guidelines Does not support IPv6. Model License Requirement All models Base License.23-3 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 23 Configuring EIGRP Configuring EIGRP Configuring EIGRP This section explains how to enable and restart the EIGRP process on your system. After enabling see the section, to learn how to customize the EIGRP process on your system. • Enabling EIGRP, page 23-3 • Enabling EIGRP Stub Routing, page 23-3 • Restarting the EIGRP Process, page 23-4 Enabling EIGRP You can only enable one EIGRP routing process on the ASA. To enable EIGRP, perform the following detailed steps. Detailed Steps Enabling EIGRP Stub Routing You can enable, and configure the ASA as an EIGRP stub router. Stub routing decreases memory and processing requirements on the ASA. As a stub router, the ASA does not need to maintain a complete EIGRP routing table because it forwards all nonlocal traffic to a distribution router. Generally, the distribution router need not send anything more than a default route to the stub router. Only specified routes are propagated from the stub router to the distribution router. As a stub router, the ASA responds to all queries for summaries, connected routes, redistributed static routes, external routes, and internal routes with the message “inaccessible.” When the ASA is configured as a stub, it sends a special peer information packet to all neighboring routers to report its status as a stub router. Any Command Purpose Step 1 router eigrp as-num Example: hostname(config)# router eigrp 2 This creates an EIGRP routing process, and the user enters router configuration mode for this EIGRP process. The as-num argument is the autonomous system number of the EIGRP routing process. Step 2 network ip-addr [mask] Example: hostname(config)# router eigrp 2 hostname(config-router)# network 10.0.0.0 255.0.0.0 This step configure the interfaces and networks that participate in EIGRP routing. You can configure one or more network statements with this command. Directly-connected and static networks that fall within the defined network are advertised by the ASA. Additionally, only interfaces with an IP address that fall within the defined network participate in the EIGRP routing process. If you have an interface that you do not want to participate in EIGRP routing, but that is attached to a network that you want advertised, see the section Configuring Interfaces in EIGRP.23-4 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 23 Configuring EIGRP Customizing EIGRP neighbor that receives a packet informing it of the stub status will not query the stub router for any routes, and a router that has a stub peer will not query that peer. The stub router depends on the distribution router to send the proper updates to all peers. To enable the ASA as an EIGRP stub routing process, perform the following steps: Detailed Steps Restarting the EIGRP Process To restart an EIGRP process, clear redistribution, or counters, enter the following command: hostname(config)# clear eigrp pid {<1-65535> | neighbors | topology | events)} Customizing EIGRP This section describes how to customize the EIGRP routing, and includes the following topics: • Configuring Interfaces for EIGRP, page 23-5 • Configuring the Summary Aggregate Addresses on Interfaces, page 23-6 • Changing the Interface Delay Value, page 23-6 • Enabling EIGRP Authentication on an Interface, page 23-7 Command Purpose Step 1 router eigrp as-num Example: hostname(config)# router eigrp 2 This creates an EIGRP routing process, and the user enters router configuration mode for this EIGRP process. The as-num argument is the autonomous system number of the EIGRP routing process. Step 2 network ip-addr [mask] Example: hostname(config)# router eigrp 2 hostname(config-router)# network 10.0.0.0 255.0.0.0 This step configure the interfaces and networks that participate in EIGRP routing. You can configure one or more network statements with this command. Directly-connected and static networks that fall within the defined network are advertised by the ASA. Additionally, only interfaces with an IP address that fall within the defined network participate in the EIGRP routing process. If you have an interface that you do not want to participate in EIGRP routing, but that is attached to a network that you want advertised, see the section Configuring Interfaces for EIGRP. Step 3 eigrp stub {receive-only | [connected] [redistributed] [static] [summary]} Example: hostname(config)# router eigrp 2 hostname(config-router)# network 10.0.0.0 255.0.0.0 hostname(config-router)# eigrp stub {receive-only | [connected] [redistributed] [static] [summary]} This step configure the stub routing process. You must specify which networks are advertised by the stub routing process to the distribution router. Static and connected networks are not automatically redistributed into the stub routing process.23-5 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 23 Configuring EIGRP Customizing EIGRP • Defining an EIGRP Neighbor, page 23-8 • Redistributing Routes Into EIGRP, page 23-9 • Filtering Networks in EIGRP, page 23-10 • Customizing the EIGRP Hello Interval and Hold Time, page 23-11 • Disabling Automatic Route Summarization, page 23-12 • Disabling EIGRP Split Horizon, page 23-13 Configuring Interfaces for EIGRP If you have an interface that you do not want to participate in EIGRP routing, but that is attached to a network that you want advertised, you can configure a network command that covers the network the interface is attached to, and use the passive-interface command to prevent that interface from sending or receiving EIGRP updates. Detailed Steps Command Purpose Step 1 router eigrp as-num Example: hostname(config)# router eigrp 2 This creates an EIGRP routing process, and the user enters router configuration mode for this EIGRP process. The as-num argument is the autonomous system number of the EIGRP routing process. Step 2 hostname(config-router)# network ip-addr [mask] Example: hostname(config)# router eigrp 2 hostname(config-router)# network 10.0.0.0 255.0.0.0 This step configure the interfaces and networks that participate in EIGRP routing. You can configure one or more network statements with this command. Directly-connected and static networks that fall within the defined network are advertised by the ASA. Additionally, only interfaces with an IP address that fall within the defined network participate in the EIGRP routing process. If you have an interface that you do not want to participate in EIGRP routing, but that is attached to a network that you want advertised, see the section Configuring Interfaces for EIGRP. Step 3 Do one of the following to customize an interface to participate in EIGRP routing:23-6 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 23 Configuring EIGRP Customizing EIGRP Configuring the Summary Aggregate Addresses on Interfaces You can configure a summary addresses on a per-interface basis. You need to manually define summary addresses if you want to create summary addresses that do not occur at a network number boundary or if you want to use summary addresses on a ASA with automatic route summarization disabled. If any more specific routes are in the routing table, EIGRP will advertise the summary address out the interface with a metric equal to the minimum of all more specific routes. To create a summary address, perform the following steps: Detailed Steps Changing the Interface Delay Value The interface delay value is used in EIGRP distance calculations. You can modify this value on a per-interface basis. To change the delay value, perform the following steps: passive-interface {default | if-name} Example: hostname(config)# router eigrp 2 hostname(config-router)# network 10.0.0.0 255.0.0.0 hostname(config-router)# passive-interface {default} This step prevents an interface from sending or receiving EIGRP routing message. Using the default keyword disables EIGRP routing updates on all interfaces. Specifying an interface name, as defined by the nameif command, disables EIGRP routing updates on the specified interface. You can have multiple passive-interface commands in your EIGRP router configuration. no default-information {in | out | WORD} Example: hostname(config)# router eigrp 2 hostname(config-router)# network 10.0.0.0 255.0.0.0 hostname(config-router)# no default-information {in | out | WORD} This allows you to control the sending or receiving of candidate default route information. Configuring no default-information in causes the candidate default route bit to be blocked on received routes. Configuring no default-information out disables the setting of th edefault route bit in advertised routes. Command Purpose Command Purpose Step 1 interface phy_if Example: hostname(config)# interface phy_if Enter interface configuration mode for the interface on which you are changing the delay value used by EIGRP. Step 2 summary-address eigrp as-num address mask [distance] Example: hostname(config-if)# summary-address eigrp 2 address mask [20] This step creates the summary address. By default, EIGRP summary addresses that you define have an administrative distance of 5. You can change this value by specifying the optional distance argument in the summary-address command.23-7 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 23 Configuring EIGRP Customizing EIGRP Detailed Steps Enabling EIGRP Authentication on an Interface EIGRP route authentication provides MD5 authentication of routing updates from the EIGRP routing protocol. The MD5 keyed digest in each EIGRP packet prevents the introduction of unauthorized or false routing messages from unapproved sources. EIGRP route authentication is configured on a per-interface basis. All EIGRP neighbors on interfaces configured for EIGRP message authentication must be configured with the same authentication mode and key for adjacencies to be established. Note Before you can enable EIGRP route authentication, you must enable EIGRP. To enable EIGRP authentication on an interface, perform the following steps: Command Purpose Step 1 interface phy_if Example: hostname(config)# interface phy_if Enter interface configuration mode for the interface on which you are changing the delay value used by EIGRP. Step 2 delay value Example: hostname(config-if)# delay 200 The value entered is in tens of microseconds. So, to set the delay for 2000 microseconds, you would enter a value of 200. To view the delay value assigned to an interface, use the show interface command.23-8 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 23 Configuring EIGRP Customizing EIGRP Detailed Steps Defining an EIGRP Neighbor EIGRP hello packets are sent as multicast packets. If an EIGRP neighbor is located across a nonbroadcast network, such as a tunnel, you must manually define that neighbor. When you manually define an EIGRP neighbor, hello packets are sent to that neighbor as unicast messages. To manually define an EIGRP neighbor, perform the following steps: Step 1 router eigrp as-num Example: hostname(config)# router eigrp 2 This creates an EIGRP routing process, and the user enters router configuration mode for this EIGRP process. The as-num argument is the autonomous system number of the EIGRP routing process. Step 2 network ip-addr [mask] Example: hostname(config)# router eigrp 2 hostname(config-router)# network 10.0.0.0 255.0.0.0 This step configure the interfaces and networks that participate in EIGRP routing. You can configure one or more network statements with this command. Directly-connected and static networks that fall within the defined network are advertised by the ASA. Additionally, only interfaces with an IP address that fall within the defined network participate in the EIGRP routing process. If you have an interface that you do not want to participate in EIGRP routing, but that is attached to a network that you want advertised, see the section Configuring Interfaces in EIGRP. Step 3 interface phy_if Example: hostname(config)# interface phy_if Enter interface configuration mode for the interface on which you are configuring EIGRP message authentication. Step 4 authentication mode eigrp as-num md5 Example: hostname(config)# authentication mode eigrp 2 md5 Enable MD5 authentication of EIGRP packets. The as-num argument is the autonomous system number of the EIGRP routing process configured on the ASA. If EIGRP is not enabled or if you enter the wrong number, the ASA returns the following error message: % Asystem(100) specified does not exist Step 5 authentication key eigrp as-num key key-id key-id Example: hostname(config)# authentication key eigrp 2 cisco key-id 200 Configure the key used by the MD5 algorithm. The as-num argument is the autonomous system number of the EIGRP routing process configured on the ASA. If EIGRP is not enabled or if you enter the wrong number, the ASA returns the following error message: % Asystem(100) specified does not exist The key argument can contain up to 16 characters. The key-id argument is a number from 0 to 25523-9 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 23 Configuring EIGRP Customizing EIGRP Detailed Steps Redistributing Routes Into EIGRP You can redistribute routes discovered by RIP and OSPF into the EIGRP routing process. You can also redistribute static and connected routes into the EIGRP routing process. You do not need to redistribute connected routes if they fall within the range of a network statement in the EIGRP configuration. Note For RIP only: Before you begin this procedure, you must create a route-map to further define which routes from the specified routing protocol are redistributed in to the RIP routing process. See Chapter 20, “Defining Route Maps,” for more information about creating a route map. To redistribute routes into the EIGRP routing process, perform the following steps: Detailed Steps Command Purpose Step 1 router eigrp as-num Example: hostname(config)# router eigrp 2 This creates an EIGRP routing process, and the user enters router configuration mode for this EIGRP process. The as-num argument is the autonomous system number of the EIGRP routing process. Step 2 neighbor ip-addr interface if_name Example: hostname(config)# router eigrp 2 hostname(config-router)# neighbor 10.0.0.0 interface interface1 This step defines the static neighbor. The ip-addr argument is the IP address of the neighbor. The if-name argument is the name of the interface, as specified by the nameif command, through which that neighbor is available. You can define multiple neighbors for an EIGRP routing process. Command Purpose Step 1 router eigrp as-num Example: hostname(config)# router eigrp 2 This creates an EIGRP routing process, and the user enters router configuration mode for this EIGRP process. The as-num argument is the autonomous system number of the EIGRP routing process. Step 2 default-metric bandwidth delay reliability loading mtu Example: hostname(config)# router eigrp 2 hostname(config-router)# default-metric bandwidth delay reliability loading mtu (Optional) Specify the default metrics that should be applied to routes redistributed into the EIGRP routing process. If you do not specify a default-metric in the EIGRP router configuration, you must specify the metric values in each redistribute command. If you specify the EIGRP metrics in the redistribute command and have the default-metric command in the EIGRP router configuration, the metrics in the redistribute command are used. Step 3 Do one of the following to redistribute the selected route type into the EIGRP routing process. You must specify the EIGRP metric values in the redistribute command if you do not have a default-metric command in the EIGRP router configuration.23-10 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 23 Configuring EIGRP Customizing EIGRP Filtering Networks in EIGRP Note Before you begin this process, you must create a standard access list that defines the routes you want to advertise. That is, create a standard access list that defines the routes you want to filter from sending or receiving updates. For more information on creating standard access lists, see the chapter, “Identifying Traffic with Access Lists”. redistribute connected [metric bandwidth delay reliability loading mtu] [route-map map_name] Example: hostname(config-router): redistribute connected [metric bandwidth delay reliability loading mtu] [route-map map_name] To redistribute connected routes into the EIGRP routing process. redistribute static [metric bandwidth delay reliability loading mtu] [route-map map_name] Example: hostname(config-router): redistribute static [metric bandwidth delay reliability loading mtu] [route-map map_name] To redistribute static routes into the EIGRP routing process. redistribute ospf pid [match {internal | external [1 | 2] | nssa-external [1 | 2]}] [metric bandwidth delay reliability loading mtu] [route-map map_name] Example: hostname(config-router): redistribute ospf pid [match {internal | external [1 | 2] | nssa-external [1 | 2]}] [metric bandwidth delay reliability loading mtu] [route-map map_name] To redistribute routes from an OSPF routing process into the EIGRP routing process. redistribute rip [metric bandwidth delay reliability load mtu] [route-map map_name] Example: (config-router): redistribute rip [metric bandwidth delay reliability load mtu] [route-map map_name] To redistribute routes from a RIP routing process into the EIGRP routing process. Command Purpose23-11 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 23 Configuring EIGRP Customizing EIGRP Detailed Steps Customizing the EIGRP Hello Interval and Hold Time The ASA periodically sends hello packets to discover neighbors and to learn when neighbors become unreachable or inoperative. By default, hello packets are sent every 5 seconds. The hello packet advertises the ASA hold time. The hold time indicates to EIGRP neighbors the length of time the neighbor should consider the ASA reachable. If the neighbor does not receive a hello packet within the advertised hold time, then the ASA is considered unreachable. By default, the advertised hold time is 15 seconds (three times the hello interval). Both the hello interval and the advertised hold time are configured on a per-interface basis. We recommend setting the hold time to be at minimum three times the hello interval. To configure the hello interval and advertised hold time, perform the following steps: Command Purpose Step 1 router eigrp as-num Example: hostname(config)# router eigrp 2 This creates an EIGRP routing process, and the user enters router configuration mode for this EIGRP process. The as-num argument is the autonomous system number of the EIGRP routing process. Step 2 hostname(config-router)# network ip-addr [mask] Example: hostname(config)# router eigrp 2 hostname(config-router)# network 10.0.0.0 255.0.0.0 This step configure the interfaces and networks that participate in EIGRP routing. You can configure one or more network statements with this command. Directly-connected and static networks that fall within the defined network are advertised by the ASA. Additionally, only interfaces with an IP address that fall within the defined network participate in the EIGRP routing process. If you have an interface that you do not want to participate in EIGRP routing, but that is attached to a network that you want advertised, see the section Configuring Interfaces for EIGRP. Step 3 Do one of the following to filter networks sent or received in EIGRP routing updates. You can enter multiple distribute-list commands in your EIGRP router configuration. distribute-list acl out [connected | ospf | rip | static | interface if_name] Example: hostname(config)# router eigrp 2 hostname(config-router)# network 10.0.0.0 255.0.0.0 hostname(config-router): distribute-list acl out [connected] This allows you to filter networks sent in EIGRP routing updates. You can specify an interface to apply the filter to only those updates sent by that specific interface. distribute-list acl in [interface if_name] Example: hostname(config)# router eigrp 2 hostname(config-router)# network 10.0.0.0 255.0.0.0 hostname(config-router): distribute-list acl in [interface interface1] This allows you to filter networks received in EIGRP routing updates. You can specify an interface to apply the filter to only those updates received by that interface.23-12 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 23 Configuring EIGRP Customizing EIGRP Detailed Steps Disabling Automatic Route Summarization Automatic route summarization is enabled by default. The EIGRP routing process summarizes on network number boundaries. This can cause routing problems if you have non-contiguous networks. For example, if you have a router with the networks 192.168.1.0, 192.168.2.0, and 192.168.3.0 connected to it, and those networks all participate in EIGRP, the EIGRP routing process creates the summary address 192.168.0.0 for those routes. If an additional router is added to the network with the networks 192.168.10.0 and 192.168.11.0, and those networks participate in EIGRP, they will also be summarized as 192.168.0.0. To prevent the possibility of traffic being routed to the wrong location, you should disable automatic route summarization on the routers creating the conflicting summary addresses. To disable automatic router summarization, enter the following command in router configuration mode for the EIGRP routing process: Detailed Steps Command Purpose Step 1 interface phy_if Example: hostname(config)# interface phy_if Enter interface configuration mode for the interface on which you are configuring hello interval or advertised hold time. Step 2 hello-interval eigrp as-num seconds Example: hostname(config)# hello-interval eigrp 2 60 This step allows you to change the hello interval. Step 3 hold-time eigrp as-num seconds Example: hostname(config)# hold-time eigrp 2 60 This step allows you to change the hold time. Command Purpose Step 1 router eigrp as-num Example: hostname(config)# router eigrp 2 This creates an EIGRP routing process, and the user enters router configuration mode for this EIGRP process. The as-num argument is the autonomous system number of the EIGRP routing process. Step 2 no auto-summary Example: hostname(config-router)# no auto-summary Automatic summary addresses have an adminstrative distance of 5. You cannot configure this value.23-13 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 23 Configuring EIGRP Monitoring EIGRP Disabling EIGRP Split Horizon Split horizon controls the sending of EIGRP update and query packets. When split horizon is enabled on an interface, update and query packets are not sent for destinations for which this interface is the next hop. Controlling update and query packets in this manner reduces the possibility of routing loops. By default, split horizon is enabled on all interfaces. Split horizon blocks route information from being advertised by a router out of any interface from which that information originated. This behavior usually optimizes communications among multiple routing devices, particularly when links are broken. However, with nonbroadcast networks, there may be situations where this behavior is not desired. For these situations, including networks in which you have EIGRP configured, you may want to disable split horizon. If you disable split horizon on an interface, you must disable it for all routers and access servers on that interface. To disable EIGRP split-horizon, perform the following steps: Detailed Steps Monitoring EIGRP You can use the following commands to monitor the EIGRP routing process. For examples and descriptions of the command output, see the Cisco Security Appliance Command Reference. Additionally, you can disable the logging of neighbor change message and neighbor warning messages To monitor or disable various EIGRP routing statistics, perform one of the following tasks: Command Purpose Step 1 interface phy_if Example: hostname(config)# interface phy_if Enter interface configuration mode for the interface on which you are changing the delay value used by EIGRP. Step 2 no split-horizon eigrp as-number Example: hostname(config-if)# no split-horizon eigrp 2 This step disables the split horizon. Command Purpose Monitoring EIGRP Routing show eigrp [as-number] events [{start end} | type] Displays the EIGRP event log. show eigrp [as-number] neighbors [detail | static] [if-name] Displays the EIGRP neighbor table. show eigrp [as-number] interfaces [if-name] [detail] Displays the interfaces participating in EIGRP routing. show eigrp [as-number] topology [ip-addr [mask] | active | all-links | pending | summary | zero-successors] Displays the EIGRP topology table.23-14 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 23 Configuring EIGRP Configuration Example for EIGRP Note By default neighbor change, and neighbor warning messages are logged. Configuration Example for EIGRP The following example shows how to enable and configure EIGRP with various optional processes: Step 1 Enable EIGRP: hostname(config)# router eigrp 2 hostname(config-router)# network 10.0.0.0 255.0.0.0 Step 2 Configure an interface from sending or receiving EIGRP routing message: hostname(config-router)# passive-interface {default} Step 3 Define an EIGRP neighbor: hostname(config-router)# neighbor 10.0.0.0 interface interface1 Step 4 Configure the interfaces and networks that participate in EIGRP routing: hostname(config-router)# network 10.0.0.0 255.0.0.0 Step 5 Change the interface delay value is used in EIGRP distance calculations: hostname(config-router)# exit hostname(config)# interface phy_if hostname(config-if)# delay 200 show eigrp [as-number] traffic Displays EIGRP traffic statistics. router-id Displays the router-id for this EIGRP process. Disabling EIGRP Logging Messages no eigrp log-neighbor-changes Disables the logging of neighbor change messages. Enter this command in router configuration mode for the EIGRP routing process. no eigrp log-neighbor-warnings Disables the logging of neighbor warning messages. Command Purpose23-15 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 23 Configuring EIGRP Feature History for EIGRP Feature History for EIGRP Table 23-1 lists the release history for this feature. Additional References For additional information related to routing, see the following: • Related Documents, page 23-15 Related Documents Table 23-1 Feature History for EIGRP Feature Name Releases Feature Information router eigrp 7.0 This feature allows you to route data, perform authentication, redistribute and monitor routing information, using the Enhanced Interior Gateway Routing Protocol (EIGRP) routing protocol. Related Topic Document Title Routing Overview Information About Routing How to configure OSPF Configuring OSPF How to configure RIP Configuring RIP How to configure a static or default route Configuring Static and Default Routes How to configure a route map Defining Route Maps How to configure multicast routing Configuring Multicast Routing23-16 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 23 Configuring EIGRP Additional ReferencesC H A P T E R 24-17 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 24 Configuring Multicast Routing This chapter describes how to configure the ASA to use the multicast routing protocol and includes the following sections: • Information About Multicast Routing, page 24-17 • Licensing Requirements for Multicast Routing, page 24-18 • Guidelines and Limitations, page 24-18 • Enabling Multicast Routing, page 24-19 • Customizing Multicast Routing, page 24-20 • Configuration Example for Multicast Routing, page 24-30 • Configuration Example for Multicast Routing, page 24-30 • Additional References, page 24-31 Information About Multicast Routing Multicast routing is a bandwidth-conserving technology that reduces traffic by simultaneously delivering a single stream of information to thousands of corporate recipients and homes. Applications that take advantage of multicast routing include videoconferencing, corporate communications, distance learning, and distribution of software, stock quotes, and news. Multicast routing protocols delivers source traffic to multiple receivers without adding any additional burden on the source or the receivers while using the least network bandwidth of any competing technology. Multicast packets are replicated in the network by Cisco routers enabled with Protocol Independent Multicast (PIM) and other supporting multicast protocols resulting in the most efficient delivery of data to multiple receivers possible. The ASA supports both stub multicast routing and PIM multicast routing. However, you cannot configure both concurrently on a single ASA. Note The UDP and non-UDP transports are both supported for multicast routing. However, the non-UDP transport has no FastPath optimization.24-18 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 24 Configuring Multicast Routing Licensing Requirements for Multicast Routing Stub Multicast Routing Stub multicast routing provides dynamic host registration and facilitates multicast routing. When configured for stub multicast routing, the ASA acts as an IGMP proxy agent. Instead of fully participating in multicast routing, the ASA forwards IGMP messages to an upstream multicast router, which sets up delivery of the multicast data. When configured for stub multicast routing, the ASA cannot be configured for PIM. The ASA supports both PIM-SM and bi-directional PIM. PIM-SM is a multicast routing protocol that uses the underlying unicast routing information base or a separate multicast-capable routing information base. It builds unidirectional shared trees rooted at a single Rendezvous Point per multicast group and optionally creates shortest-path trees per multicast source. PIM Multicast Routing Bi-directional PIM is a variant of PIM-SM that builds bi-directional shared trees connecting multicast sources and receivers. Bi-directional trees are built using a DF election process operating on each link of the multicast topology. With the assistance of the DF, multicast data is forwarded from sources to the Rendezvous Point, and therefore along the shared tree to receivers, without requiring source-specific state. The DF election takes place during Rendezvous Point discovery and provides a default route to the Rendezvous Point. Note If the ASA is the PIM RP, use the untranslated outside address of the ASA as the RP address. Multicast Group Concept Multicast is based on the concept of a group. An arbitrary group of receivers expresses an interest in receiving a particular data stream. This group does not have any physical or geographical boundaries—the hosts can be located anywhere on the Internet. Hosts that are interested in receiving data flowing to a particular group must join the group using IGMP. Hosts must be a member of the group to receive the data stream. Multicast Addresses Multicast addresses specify an arbitrary group of IP hosts that have joined the group and want to receive traffic sent to this group. Licensing Requirements for Multicast Routing Guidelines and Limitations This section includes the guidelines and limitations for this feature: Model License Requirement All models Base License.24-19 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 24 Configuring Multicast Routing Enabling Multicast Routing Context Mode Guidelines Supported in single context mode. In multiple context mode, shared interfaces are not supported. Firewall Mode Guidelines Supported only in routed firewall mode. Transparent mode is not supported. IPv6 Guidelines Does not support IPv6. Enabling Multicast Routing Enabling multicast routing lets the ASA forward multicast packets. Enabling multicast routing automatically enables PIM and IGMP on all interfaces. To enable multicast routing, perform the following step: Detailed Steps Table 24-1 lists the maximum number of entries for specific multicast tables based on the amount of RAM on the ASA. Once these limits are reached, any new entries are discarded. Command Purpose multicast-routing Example: hostname(config)# multicast-routing This step enables multicast routing. The number of entries in the multicast routing tables are limited by the amount of RAM on the system. Table 24-1 Entry Limits for Multicast Tables Table 16 MB 128 MB 128+ MB MFIB 1000 3000 5000 IGMP Groups 1000 3000 5000 PIM Routes 3000 7000 1200024-20 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 24 Configuring Multicast Routing Customizing Multicast Routing Customizing Multicast Routing This section describes how to customize multicast routing and includes the following topics: • Configuring Stub Multicast Routing, page 24-20 • Configuring a Static Multicast Route, page 24-20 • Configuring IGMP Features, page 24-21 • Configuring PIM Features, page 24-25 Configuring Stub Multicast Routing Note Stub Multicast Routing and PIM are not supported concurrently. A ASA acting as the gateway to the stub area does not need to participate in PIM. Instead, you can configure it to act as an IGMP proxy agent and forward IGMP messages from hosts connected on one interface to an upstream multicast router on another. To configure the ASA as an IGMP proxy agent, forward the host join and leave messages from the stub area interface to an upstream interface. To forward the host join and leave messages, perform the following step from the interface attached to the stub area: Detailed Steps Configuring a Static Multicast Route When using PIM, the ASA expects to receive packets on the same interface where it sends unicast packets back to the source. In some cases, such as bypassing a route that does not support multicast routing, you may want unicast packets to take one path and multicast packets to take another. Static multicast routes are not advertised or redistributed. Command Purpose igmp forward interface if_name Example: hostname(config-if)# igmp forward interface interface1 This step configures stub multicast routing.24-21 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 24 Configuring Multicast Routing Customizing Multicast Routing To configure a static multicast route or a static multicast route for a stub area, perform the following steps: Detailed Steps Configuring IGMP Features IP hosts use Internet Group Management Protocol, or IGMP, to report their group memberships to directly connected multicast routers. IGMP is used to dynamically register individual hosts in a multicast group on a particular LAN. Hosts identify group memberships by sending IGMP messages to their local multicast router. Under IGMP, routers listen to IGMP messages and periodically send out queries to discover which groups are active or inactive on a particular subnet. IGMP uses group addresses (Class D IP address) as group identifiers. Host group address can be in the range 224.0.0.0 to 239.255.255.255. The address 224.0.0.0 is never assigned to any group. The address 224.0.0.1 is assigned to all systems on a subnet. The address 224.0.0.2 is assigned to all routers on a subnet. When you enable multicast routing on the ASA, IGMP Version 2 is automatically enabled on all interfaces. Note Only the no igmp command appears in the interface configuration when you use the show run command. If the multicast-routing command appears in the device configuration, then IGMP is automatically enabled on all interfaces. This section describes how to configure optional IGMP setting on a per-interface basis. This section includes the following topics: • Disabling IGMP on an Interface, page 24-22 • Configuring IGMP Group Membership, page 24-22 • Configuring a Statically Joined IGMP Group, page 24-22 • Controlling Access to Multicast Groups, page 24-23 • Limiting the Number of IGMP States on an Interface, page 24-23 Command Purpose Step 1 Do one of the following to configure a static multicast route or a static multicast route for a stub area. mroute src_ip src_mask {input_if_name | rpf_neighbor} [distance] Example: hostname(config)# mroute src_ip src_mask {input_if_name | rpf_neighbor} [distance] This step configures a static multicast route. mroute src_ip src_mask input_if_name [dense output_if_name] [distance] Example: hostname(config)# mroute src_ip src_mask input_if_name [dense output_if_name] [distance] This step configures a static multicast route for a stub area. The dense output_if_name keyword and argument pair is only supported for stub multicast routing.24-22 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 24 Configuring Multicast Routing Customizing Multicast Routing • Modifying the Query Messages to Multicast Groups, page 24-24 • Changing the IGMP Version, page 24-25 Disabling IGMP on an Interface You can disable IGMP on specific interfaces. This is useful if you know that you do not have any multicast hosts on a specific interface and you want to prevent the ASA from sending host query messages on that interface. To disable IGMP on an interface, perform the following steps: Detailed Steps Note Only the no igmp command appears in the interface configuration. Configuring IGMP Group Membership You can configure the ASA to be a member of a multicast group. Configuring the ASA to join a multicast group causes upstream routers to maintain multicast routing table information for that group and keep the paths for that group active. To have the ASA join a multicast group, perform the following steps: Detailed Steps Configuring a Statically Joined IGMP Group Sometimes a group member cannot report its membership in the group, or there may be no members of a group on the network segment, but you still want multicast traffic for that group to be sent to that network segment. You can have multicast traffic for that group sent to the segment in one of two ways: • Using the igmp join-group command (see Configuring IGMP Group Membership, page 24-22). This causes the ASA to accept and to forward the multicast packets. Command Purpose no igmp Example: hostname(config-if)# no igmp This step disables IGMP on an interface. To reenable IGMP on an interface, do the following: hostname(config-if)# igmp Command Purpose igmp join-group group-address Example: hostname(config-if)# igmp join-group mcast-group This step configures the ASA to be a member of a multicast group. The group-address is the IP address of the group.24-23 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 24 Configuring Multicast Routing Customizing Multicast Routing • Using the igmp static-group command. The ASA does not accept the multicast packets but rather forwards them to the specified interface. To configure a statically joined multicast group on an interface,perform the following steps: Detailed Steps Controlling Access to Multicast Groups To control the multicast groups that hosts on the ASA interface can join, perform the following steps: Detailed Steps Limiting the Number of IGMP States on an Interface You can limit the number of IGMP states resulting from IGMP membership reports on a per-interface basis. Membership reports exceeding the configured limits are not entered in the IGMP cache and traffic for the excess membership reports is not forwarded. Command Purpose igmp static-group Example: hostname(config-if)# igmp static-group group-address This step configures the ASA statistically join a multicast group on an interface. The group-address is the IP address of the group. Command Purpose Step 1 Do one of the following to to create a standard or extended access list. access-list name standard [permit | deny] ip_addr mask Example: hostname(config)# access-list acl1 standard permit 192.52.662.25 This step creates a standard access list for the multicast traffic. You can create more than one entry for a single access list. You can use extended or standard access lists. The ip_addr mask argument is the IP address of the multicast group being permitted or denied. access-list name extended [permit | deny] protocol src_ip_addr src_mask dst_ip_addr dst_mask Example: hostname(config)# access-list acl2 extended permit protocol src_ip_addr src_mask dst_ip_addr dst_mask This step creates an extended access list. The dst_ip_addr argument is the IP address of the multicast group being permitted or denied. Step 2 igmp access-group acl Example: hostname(config-if)# igmp access-group acl Apply the access list to an interface. The acl argument is the name of a standard or extended IP access list.24-24 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 24 Configuring Multicast Routing Customizing Multicast Routing To limit the number of IGMP states on an interface, perform the following steps: Detailed Steps Modifying the Query Messages to Multicast Groups Note The igmp query-timeout and igmp query-interval commands require IGMP Version 2. The ASA sends query messages to discover which multicast groups have members on the networks attached to the interfaces. Members respond with IGMP report messages indicating that they want to receive multicast packets for specific groups. Query messages are addressed to the all-systems multicast group, which has an address of 224.0.0.1, with a time-to-live value of 1. These messages are sent periodically to refresh the membership information stored on the ASA. If the ASA discovers that there are no local members of a multicast group still attached to an interface, it stops forwarding multicast packet for that group to the attached network and it sends a prune message back to the source of the packets. By default, the PIM designated router on the subnet is responsible for sending the query messages. By default, they are sent once every 125 seconds. When changing the query response time, by default, the maximum query response time advertised in IGMP queries is 10 seconds. If the ASA does not receive a response to a host query within this amount of time, it deletes the group. To change the query interval, query response time, and query timeout value, perform the following steps: Detailed Steps Command Purpose igmp limit number Example: hostname(config-if)# igmp limit 50 This limit the number of IGMP states on an interface. Valid values range from 0 to 500, with 500 being the default value. Setting this value to 0 prevents learned groups from being added, but manually defined memberships (using the igmp join-group and igmp static-group commands) are still permitted. The no form of this command restores the default value. Command Purpose Step 1 igmp query-interval seconds Example: hostname(config-if)# igmp query-interval 30 To set the query interval time in seconds. Valid values range from 0 to 500, with 125 being the default value. If the ASA does not hear a query message on an interface for the specified timeout value (by default, 255 seconds), then the ASA becomes the designated router and starts sending the query messages.24-25 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 24 Configuring Multicast Routing Customizing Multicast Routing Changing the IGMP Version By default, the ASA runs IGMP Version 2, which enables several additional features such as the igmp query-timeout and igmp query-interval commands. All multicast routers on a subnet must support the same version of IGMP. The ASA does not automatically detect version 1 routers and switch to version 1. However, a mix of IGMP Version 1 and 2 hosts on the subnet works; the ASA running IGMP Version 2 works correctly when IGMP Version 1 hosts are present. To control which version of IGMP is running on an interface, perform the following steps: Detailed Steps Configuring PIM Features Routers use PIM to maintain forwarding tables for forwarding multicast diagrams. When you enable multicast routing on the ASA, PIM and IGMP are automatically enabled on all interfaces. Note PIM is not supported with PAT. The PIM protocol does not use ports and PAT only works with protocols that use ports. This section describes how to configure optional PIM settings. This section includes the following topics: • Enabling and Disabling PIM on an Interface, page 24-26 • Configuring a Static Rendezvous Point Address, page 24-26 • Configuring the Designated Router Priority, page 24-27 • Filtering PIM Register Messages, page 24-28 • Configuring PIM Message Intervals, page 24-28 • Configuring a Multicast Boundary, page 24-28 Step 2 igmp query-timeout seconds Example: hostname(config-if)# igmp query-timeout 30 To change this timeout value of the query. Valid values range from 0 to 500, with 225 being the default value. Step 3 igmp query-max-response-time seconds Example: hostname(config-if)# igmp query-max-response-time 30 To change the maximum query response time. Command Purpose Command Purpose igmp version {1 | 2} Example: hostname(config-if)# igmp version 2 This step controls which version of IGMP you want to run on the interface. 24-26 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 24 Configuring Multicast Routing Customizing Multicast Routing • Filtering PIM Neighbors, page 24-29 • Supporting Mixed Bidirectional/Sparse-Mode PIM Networks, page 24-29 Enabling and Disabling PIM on an Interface You can disable PIM on specific interfaces. To disable PIM on an interface, use the following steps Detailed Steps Note Only the no pim command appears in the interface configuration. Configuring a Static Rendezvous Point Address All routers within a common PIM sparse mode or bidir domain require knowledge of the PIM RP address. The address is statically configured using the pim rp-address command. Note The ASA does not support Auto-RP or PIM BSR; you must use the pim rp-address command to specify the RP address. You can configure the ASA to serve as RP to more than one group. The group range specified in the access list determines the PIM RP group mapping. If an access list is not specified, then the RP for the group is applied to the entire multicast group range (224.0.0.0/4). Command Purpose Step 1 pim Example: hostname(config-if)# pim This step enables or reenables PIM on a specific interface. Step 2 no pim Example: hostname(config-if)# no pim This step disables PIM on a specific interface.24-27 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 24 Configuring Multicast Routing Customizing Multicast Routing To configure the address of the PIM PR, use the following step: Detailed Steps Note The ASA always advertises the bidir capability in the PIM hello messages regardless of the actual bidir configuration. Configuring the Designated Router Priority The DR is responsible for sending PIM register, join, and prune messaged to the RP. When there is more than one multicast router on a network segment, there is an election process to select the DR based on DR priority. If multiple devices have the same DR priority, then the device with the highest IP address becomes the DR. By default, the ASA has a DR priority of 1. You can change this value by performing this step: Detailed Steps Command Purpose pim rp-address ip_address [acl] [bidir] Example: hostname(config)# pim rp-address ip_address [acl] [bidir] This step enables or reenables PIM on a specific interface. The ip_address argument is the unicast IP address of the router to be a PIM RP. The acl argument is the name or number of a standard access list that defines which multicast groups the RP should be used with. Do not use a host ACL with this command. Excluding the bidir keyword causes the groups to operate in PIM sparse mode. Command Purpose pim dr-priority num Example: hostname(config-if)# pim dr-priority 500 This step changes the designated router priority. The num argument can be any number from 1 to 4294967294.24-28 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 24 Configuring Multicast Routing Customizing Multicast Routing Filtering PIM Register Messages You can configure the ASA to filter PIM register messages. To filter PIM register messages, perform the following step: Detailed Steps Configuring PIM Message Intervals Router query messages are used to select the PIM DR. The PIM DR is responsible for sending router query messages. By default, router query messages are sent every 30 seconds. Additionally, every 60 seconds, the ASA sends PIM join/prune messages. To change these intervals, perform the following steps: Detailed Steps Configuring a Multicast Boundary Address scoping defines domain boundaries so that domains with RPs that have the same IP address do not leak into each other. Scoping is performed on the subnet boundaries within large domains and on the boundaries between the domain and the Internet. You can set up an administratively scoped boundary on an interface for multicast group addresses using the multicast boundary command. IANA has designated the multicast address range 239.0.0.0 to 239.255.255.255 as the administratively scoped addresses. This range of addresses can be reused in domains administered by different organizations. They would be considered local, not globally unique. A standard ACL defines the range of addresses affected. When a boundary is set up, no multicast data packets are allowed to flow across the boundary from either direction. The boundary allows the same multicast group address to be reused in different administrative domains. Command Purpose pim accept-register {list acl | route-map map-name} Example: hostname(config)# pim accept-register {list acl | route-map map-name} This step configure the ASA to filter PIM register messages. Command Purpose Step 1 pim hello-interval seconds Example: hostname(config-if)# pim hello-interval 60 This step sends router query messages. Valid values for the seconds argument range from 1 to 3600 seconds. Step 2 pim join-prune-interval seconds Example: hostname(config-if)# pim join-prune-interval 60 This step changes the amount of time (in seconds) that the ASA sends PIM join/prune messages. Valid values for the seconds argument range from 10 to 600 seconds24-29 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 24 Configuring Multicast Routing Customizing Multicast Routing You can configure the filter-autorp keyword to examine and filter Auto-RP discovery and announcement messages at the administratively scoped boundary. Any Auto-RP group range announcements from the Auto-RP packets that are denied by the boundary access control list (ACL) are removed. An Auto-RP group range announcement is permitted and passed by the boundary only if all addresses in the Auto-RP group range are permitted by the boundary ACL. If any address is not permitted, the entire group range is filtered and removed from the Auto-RP message before the Auto-RP message is forwarded. To configure a multicast boundary, perform the following step: Detailed Steps Filtering PIM Neighbors You can define the routers that can become PIM neighbors . By filtering the routers that can become PIM neighbors, you can: • Prevent unauthorized routers from becoming PIM neighbors. • Prevent attached stub routers from participating in PIM. To define the neighbors that can become a PIM neighbor, perform the following steps: Detailed Steps Supporting Mixed Bidirectional/Sparse-Mode PIM Networks Bidirectional PIM allows multicast routers to keep reduced state information. All of the multicast routers in a segment must be bidirectionally enabled in order for bidir to elect a DF. Command Purpose multicast boundary acl [filter-autorp] Example: hostname(config-if)# multicast boundary acl [filter-autorp] This step configures a multicast boundary. Command Purpose Step 1 access-list pim_nbr deny router-IP_addr PIM neighbor Example: hostname(config)# access-list pim_nbr deny 10.1.1.1 255.255.255.255 This step uses the access-list command to define a standard access list defines the routers you want to participate in PIM. In this example the following access list, when used with the pim neighbor-filter command, prevents the 10.1.1.1 router from becoming a PIM neighbor: Step 2 pim neighbor-filter pim_nbr Example: hostname(config)# interface GigabitEthernet0/3 hostname(config-if)# pim neighbor-filter pim_nbr Use the pim neighbor-filter command on an interface to filter the neighbor routers. In this example, the 10.1.1.1 router is prevented from becoming a PIM neighbor on interface GigabitEthernet0/3.24-30 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 24 Configuring Multicast Routing Configuration Example for Multicast Routing Bidirectional PIM enables the transition from a sparse-mode-only network to a bidir network by letting you specify the routers that should participate in DF election while still allowing all routers to participate in the sparse-mode domain. The bidir-enabled routers can elect a DF from among themselves, even when there are non-bidir routers on the segment. Multicast boundaries on the non-bidir routers prevent PIM messages and data from the bidir groups from leaking in or out of the bidir subset cloud. When bidirectional PIM is enabled, the routers that are permitted by the ACL are considered to be bidir-capable. Therefore: • If a permitted neighbor does not support bidir, the DF election does not occur. • If a denied neighbor supports bidir, then DF election does not occur. • If a denied neighbor des not support bidir, the DF election occurs. To control which neighbors can participate in the DF election, perform the following steps: Detailed Steps Configuration Example for Multicast Routing The following example shows how to enable and configure muticastrouting with various optional processes: Step 1 Enable multicast routing. hostname(config)# multicast-routing Step 2 Configure a static multicast route. hostname(config)# mroute src_ip src_mask {input_if_name | rpf_neighbor} [distance] hostname(config)# exit Step 3 Configure the configure the ASA to be a member of a multicast group: hostname(config) # interface hostname(config-if)# igmp join-group group-address Command Purpose Step 1 access-list pim_bidir deny any Example: hostname(config)# access-list pim_bidir permit 10.1.1.1 255.255.255.255 hostname(config)# access-list pim_bidir permit 10.1.1.2 255.255.255.255 hostname(config)# access-list pim_bidir deny any This step uses the access-list command to define a standard access list defines the routers you want to participate in in the DF election and denies all others. In this example, the following access list permits the routers at 10.1.1.1 and 10.2.2.2 to participate in the DF election and denies all others. Step 2 pim bidir-neighbor-filter pim_bidir Example: hostname(config)# interface GigabitEthernet0/3 hostname(config-if)# pim bidir-neighbor-filter pim_bidir Enable bidirectional PIM on an interface. This example applies the access list created previous step to the interface GigabitEthernet0/3.24-31 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 24 Configuring Multicast Routing Additional References Additional References For additional information related to routing, see the following: • Related Documents, page 24-31 • RFCs, page 24-31 Related Documents RFCs The following is list of RFCs from the IETF provide technical details about the IGMP and multicast routing standards used for implementing the SMR feature: • RFC 2236 IGMPv2 • RFC 2362 PIM-SM • RFC 2588 IP Multicast and Firewalls • RFC 2113 IP Router Alert Option • IETF draft-ietf-idmr-igmp-proxy-01.txt Related Topic Document Title Routing Overview Information About Routing How to configure OSPF Configuring OSPF How to configure EIGRP Configuring EIGRP How to configure RIP Configuring RIP How to configure a static or default route Configuring Static and Default Routes How to configure a route map Defining Route Maps24-32 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 24 Configuring Multicast Routing Additional ReferencesC H A P T E R 25-1 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 25 Configuring IPv6 Neighbor Discovery The IPv6 neighbor discovery process uses ICMPv6 messages and solicited-node multicast addresses to determine the link-layer address of a neighbor on the same network (local link), verify the readability of a neighbor, and keep track of neighboring routers. This chapter describes how to enable and configure IPv6 neighbor discovery on the security appliance, and it includes the following topics: • Configuring Neighbor Solicitation Messages, page 25-1 • Configuring Router Advertisement Messages, page 25-7 • Configuring a Static IPv6 Neighbor, page 25-22 Configuring Neighbor Solicitation Messages This section includes the following configuration task topics: • Configuring Neighbor Solicitation Message Interval, page 25-1 • Configuring the Neighbor Reachable Time, page 25-5 Configuring Neighbor Solicitation Message Interval • Information About Neighbor Solicitation Messages, page 25-2 • Licensing Requirements for Neighbor Solicitation Messages, page 25-3 • Guidelines and Limitations for the Neighbor Solicitation Message Interval, page 25-3 • Default Settings for the Neighbor Solicitation Message Interval, page 25-3 • Configuring the Neighbor Solicitation Message Interval, page 25-3 • Monitoring Neighbor Solicitation Message Intervals, page 25-4 • Feature History for Neighbor Solicitation Message Interval, page 25-425-2 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 25 Configuring IPv6 Neighbor Discovery Configuring Neighbor Solicitation Messages Information About Neighbor Solicitation Messages Neighbor solicitation messages (ICMPv6 Type 135) are sent on the local link by nodes attempting to discover the link-layer addresses of other nodes on the local link. The neighbor solicitation message is sent to the solicited-node multicast address.The source address in the neighbor solicitation message is the IPv6 address of the node sending the neighbor solicitation message. The neighbor solicitation message also includes the link-layer address of the source node. After receiving a neighbor solicitation message, the destination node replies by sending a neighbor advertisement message (ICPMv6 Type 136) on the local link. The source address in the neighbor advertisement message is the IPv6 address of the node sending the neighbor advertisement message; the destination address is the IPv6 address of the node that sent the neighbor solicitation message. The data portion of the neighbor advertisement message includes the link-layer address of the node sending the neighbor advertisement message. After the source node receives the neighbor advertisement, the source node and destination node can communicate. Figure 25-1 shows the neighbor solicitation and response process. Figure 25-1 IPv6 Neighbor Discovery—Neighbor Solicitation Message Neighbor solicitation messages are also used to verify the reachability of a neighbor after the link-layer address of a neighbor is identified. When a node wants to verifying the reachability of a neighbor, the destination address in a neighbor solicitation message is the unicast address of the neighbor. Neighbor advertisement messages are also sent when there is a change in the link-layer address of a node on a local link. When there is such a change, the destination address for the neighbor advertisement is the all-nodes multicast address. This section shows how you can configure the neighbor solicitation message interval and neighbor reachable time on a per-interface basis. 132958 A and B can now exchange packets on this link ICMPv6 Type = 135 Src = A Dst = solicited-node multicast of B Data = link-layer address of A Query = what is your link address? ICMPv6 Type = 136 Src = B Dst = A Data = link-layer address of B25-3 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 25 Configuring IPv6 Neighbor Discovery Configuring Neighbor Solicitation Messages Licensing Requirements for Neighbor Solicitation Messages The following table shows the licensing requirements for this feature: Guidelines and Limitations for the Neighbor Solicitation Message Interval This section includes the guidelines and limitations for this feature: • Context Mode Guidelines, page 25-23 • Firewall Mode Guidelines, page 25-23 • Additional Guidelines and Limitations, page 25-23 Context Mode Guidelines Supported in single and multiple context mode. Firewall Mode Guidelines Supported in routed firewall mode only. Transparent mode is not supported. Additional Guidelines and Limitations The interval value is included in all IPv6 router advertisements sent out this interface. Default Settings for the Neighbor Solicitation Message Interval Table 25-13 lists the default settings for neighbor solicitation message parameters. Configuring the Neighbor Solicitation Message Interval To configure the interval between IPv6 neighbor solicitation retransmissions on an interface, enter the following command: Model License Requirement All models Base License. Table 25-1 Default Neighbor Solicitation Messages Parameters Parameters Default value (transmission interval) 1000 seconds between neighbor solicitation transmissions Command Purpose ipv6 nd ns-interval value Example: hostname (config-if)# ipv6 nd ns-interval 9000 Sets the interval between IPv6 neighbor solicitation retransmissions on an interface. Valid values for the value argument range from 1000 to 3600000 milliseconds. This information is also sent in router advertisement messages.25-4 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 25 Configuring IPv6 Neighbor Discovery Configuring Neighbor Solicitation Messages Example The following example configures an IPv6 neighbor solicitation transmission interval of 9000 milliseconds for Gigabitethernet 0/0: hostname (config)# interface gigabitethernet 0/0 hostname (config-if)# ipv6 nd ns-interval 9000 Monitoring Neighbor Solicitation Message Intervals To monitor IPv6 neighbor solicitation message intervals, perform one of the following tasks: Feature History for Neighbor Solicitation Message Interval Table 25-14 lists the release history for this feature. Command Purpose show ipv6 interface Displays the usability status of interfaces configured for IPv6. Including the interface name, such as “outside,” displays the settings for the specified interface. Excluding the name from the command displays the settings for all interfaces that have IPv6 enabled on them. Output for the command shows the following: • The name and status of the interface. • The link-local and global unicast addresses. • The multicast groups to which the interface belongs. • ICMP redirect and error message settings. • Neighbor discovery settings. • The actual time when the command is set to 0. • The neighbor discovery reachable time that is being used. Table 25-2 Feature History for Neighbor Solicitation Message Interval Feature Name Releases Feature Information Neighbor solicitation message interval 7.0(1) The feature was introduced. The following command was introduced: ipv6 nd ns-interval.25-5 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 25 Configuring IPv6 Neighbor Discovery Configuring Neighbor Solicitation Messages Configuring the Neighbor Reachable Time This section includes the following topics: • Information About Neighbor Reachable Time, page 25-5 • Licensing Requirements for Neighbor Reachable Time, page 25-5 • Guidelines and Limitations for Neighbor Reachable Time, page 25-5 • Default Settings for Neighbor Reachable Time, page 25-6 • Configuring Neighbor Reachable Time, page 25-6 • Monitoring Neighbor Reachable Time, page 25-7 • Feature History for Neighbor Reachable Time, page 25-7 Information About Neighbor Reachable Time The neighbor reachable time enables detecting unavailable neighbors. Shorter configured times enable detecting unavailable neighbors more quickly, however, shorter times consume more IPv6 network bandwidth and processing resources in all IPv6 network devices. Very short configured times are not recommended in normal IPv6 operation. Licensing Requirements for Neighbor Reachable Time The following table shows the licensing requirements for this feature: Guidelines and Limitations for Neighbor Reachable Time This section includes the guidelines and limitations for this feature: • Context Mode Guidelines, page 25-5 • Firewall Mode Guidelines, page 25-5 • Additional Guidelines and Limitations, page 25-6 Context Mode Guidelines Supported in single and multiple context mode. Firewall Mode Guidelines Supported in routed firewall mode only. Transparent mode is not supported. Model License Requirement All models Base License.25-6 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 25 Configuring IPv6 Neighbor Discovery Configuring Neighbor Solicitation Messages Additional Guidelines and Limitations • The interval value is included in all IPv6 router advertisements sent out this interface. • The configured time enables detecting unavailable neighbors. Shorter configured times enable detecting unavailable neighbors more quickly; however, shorter times consume more IPv6 network bandwidth and processing resources in all IPv6 network devices. Very short configured times are not recommended in normal IPv6 operation. Default Settings for Neighbor Reachable Time Table 25-3 lists the default settings for neighbor reachable time parameters. Configuring Neighbor Reachable Time To configure the amount of time that a remote IPv6 node is considered reachable after a reachability confirmation event has occurred, enter the following command: Example The following example configures an IPv6 reachable time of 1700000 milliseconds for the selected interface, Gigabitethernet 0/0: hostname (config)# interface gigabitethernet 0/0 hostname (config-if)# ipv6 nd reachable-time 1700000 Table 25-3 Default Neighbor Reachable Time Parameters Parameters Default value (time mode is reachable) The default is 0. Command Purpose ipv6 nd reachable-time value Example: hostname (config-if)# ipv6 nd reachable-time 1700000 Sets the amount of time that a remote IPv6 node is reachable. Valid values for the value argument range from 0 to 3600000 milliseconds. When 0 is used for the value, the reachable time is sent as undetermined. It is up to the receiving devices to set and track the reachable time value.25-7 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 25 Configuring IPv6 Neighbor Discovery Configuring Router Advertisement Messages Monitoring Neighbor Reachable Time To monitor IPv6 neighbor reachable time, perform one of the following tasks: Feature History for Neighbor Reachable Time Table 25-4 lists the release history for this feature. Configuring Router Advertisement Messages A security appliance can participate in router advertisements so that neighboring devices can dynamically learn a default router address. This section includes the following topics: • Information About Router Advertisement Messages, page 25-8 • Configuring the Router Advertisement Transmission Interval, page 25-9 • Configuring the Router Lifetime Value, page 25-12 • Configuring the IPv6 Prefix, page 25-15 • Suppressing Router Advertisement Messages, page 25-21 Command Purpose show ipv6 interface Displays the usability status of interfaces configured for IPv6. Including the interface name, such as “outside,” displays the settings for the specified interface. Excluding the name from the command displays the settings for all interfaces that have IPv6 enabled on them. Output for the command shows the following: • The name and status of the interface. • The link-local and global unicast addresses. • The multicast groups to which the interface belongs. • ICMP redirect and error message settings. • Neighbor discovery settings. • The actual time when the command is set to 0. • The neighbor discovery reachable time that is being used. Table 25-4 Feature History for Neighbor Reachable Time Feature Name Releases Feature Information Neighbor solicitation message interval 7.0 The feature was introduced. The following command was introduced: ipv6 nd ns-interval.25-8 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 25 Configuring IPv6 Neighbor Discovery Configuring Router Advertisement Messages Information About Router Advertisement Messages A security appliance can participate in router advertisements so that neighboring devices can dynamically learn a default router address. Router advertisement messages (ICMPv6 Type 134) are periodically sent out each IPv6 configured interface of the ASA. The router advertisement messages are sent to the all-nodes multicast address. Figure 25-2 IPv6 Neighbor Discovery—Router Advertisement Message Router advertisement messages typically include the following information: • One or more IPv6 prefix that nodes on the local link can use to automatically configure their IPv6 addresses. • Lifetime information for each prefix included in the advertisement. • Sets of flags that indicate the type of autoconfiguration (stateless or stateful) that can be completed. • Default router information (whether the router sending the advertisement should be used as a default router and, if so, the amount of time (in seconds) the router should be used as a default router). • Additional information for hosts, such as the hop limit and MTU a host should use in packets that it originates. • The amount of time between neighbor solicitation message retransmissions on a given link. • The amount of time a node considers a neighbor reachable. Router advertisements are also sent in response to router solicitation messages (ICMPv6 Type 133). Router solicitation messages are sent by hosts at system startup so that the host can immediately autoconfigure without needing to wait for the next scheduled router advertisement message. Because router solicitation messages are usually sent by hosts at system startup, and the host does not have a configured unicast address, the source address in router solicitation messages is usually the unspecified IPv6 address (0:0:0:0:0:0:0:0). If the host has a configured unicast address, the unicast address of the interface sending the router solicitation message is used as the source address in the message. The destination address in router solicitation messages is the all-routers multicast address with a scope of the link. When a router advertisement is sent in response to a router solicitation, the destination address in the router advertisement message is the unicast address of the source of the router solicitation message. You can configure the following settings for router advertisement messages: • The time interval between periodic router advertisement messages. • The router lifetime value, which indicates the amount of time IPv6 nodes should consider the ASA to be the default router. • The IPv6 network prefixes in use on the link. 132917 Router advertisement packet definitions: ICMPv6 Type = 134 Src = router link-local address Dst = all-nodes multicast address Data = options, prefix, lifetime, autoconfig flag Router advertisement Router advertisement25-9 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 25 Configuring IPv6 Neighbor Discovery Configuring Router Advertisement Messages • Whether or not an interface transmits router advertisement messages. Unless otherwise noted, the router advertisement message settings are specific to an interface and are entered in interface configuration mode. See the following topics for information about changing these settings: • Configuring the Router Advertisement Transmission Interval, page 25-9 • Configuring the Router Lifetime Value, page 25-12 • Configuring the IPv6 Prefix, page 25-15 • Suppressing Router Advertisement Messages, page 25-19 Configuring the Router Advertisement Transmission Interval This section shows how to configure the interval between IPv6 router advertisement transmissions on an interface. This section includes the following topics: • Licensing Requirements for Router Advertisement Transmission Interval, page 25-9 • Guidelines and Limitations for Router Advertisement Transmission Interval, page 25-9 • Default Settings for Router Advertisement Transmission Interval, page 25-10 • Configuring Router Advertisement Transmission Interval, page 25-10 • Monitoring Router Advertisement Transmission Interval, page 25-11 • Feature History for Router Advertisement Transmission Interval, page 25-11 Licensing Requirements for Router Advertisement Transmission Interval The following table shows the licensing requirements for this feature: Guidelines and Limitations for Router Advertisement Transmission Interval This section includes the guidelines and limitations for this feature: • Context Mode Guidelines, page 25-9 • Firewall Mode Guidelines, page 25-9 • Additional Guidelines and Limitations, page 25-10 Context Mode Guidelines Supported in single and multiple context mode. Firewall Mode Guidelines Supported in routed firewall mode only. Transparent mode is not supported. Model License Requirement All models Base License.25-10 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 25 Configuring IPv6 Neighbor Discovery Configuring Router Advertisement Messages Additional Guidelines and Limitations The interval between transmissions should be less than or equal to the IPv6 router advertisement lifetime if the security appliance is configured as a default router by using the ipv6 nd ra-lifetime command. To prevent synchronization with other IPv6 nodes, randomly adjust the actual value used to within 20 percent of the specified value. Default Settings for Router Advertisement Transmission Interval Table 25-5 lists the default settings for neighbor reachable time parameters. Configuring Router Advertisement Transmission Interval To configure the interval between IPv6 router advertisement transmissions on an interface, enter the following command: Example The following example configures an IPv6 router advertisement interval of 201 seconds for the selected interface, Gigabitethernet 0/0: hostname (config)# interface gigabitethernet 0/0 hostname (config-if)# ipv6 nd ra-interval 201 Table 25-5 Default Router Advertisement Transmission Interval Parameters Parameters Default value (interval between transmissions) The default is 200 seconds. Command Purpose ipv6 nd ra-interval [msec] value Example: hostname (config-if)# ipv6 nd ra-interval 201 Sets the interval between IPv6 router advertisement transmissions. The optional msec keyword indicates that the value provided is in milliseconds. If this keyword is not present, the value provided is in seconds. Valid values for the value argument range from 3 to 1800 seconds or from 500 to 1800000 milliseconds if the msec keyword is provided. 25-11 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 25 Configuring IPv6 Neighbor Discovery Configuring Router Advertisement Messages Monitoring Router Advertisement Transmission Interval To monitor IPv6 neighbor reachable time, perform one of the following tasks: Feature History for Router Advertisement Transmission Interval Table 25-6 lists the release history for this feature. Command Purpose show ipv6 interface Displays the usability status of interfaces configured for IPv6. Including the interface name, such as “outside,” displays the settings for the specified interface. Excluding the name from the command displays the settings for all interfaces that have IPv6 enabled on them. Output for the command shows the following: • The name and status of the interface. • The link-local and global unicast addresses. • The multicast groups to which the interface belongs. • ICMP redirect and error message settings. • Neighbor discovery settings. • The actual time when the command is set to 0. • The neighbor discovery reachable time that is being used. Table 25-6 Feature History for Router Advertisement Transmission Interval Feature Name Releases Feature Information Router advertisement transmission interval 7.0(1) The feature was introduced. The following command was introduced: ipv6 nd ra-interval.25-12 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 25 Configuring IPv6 Neighbor Discovery Configuring Router Advertisement Messages Configuring the Router Lifetime Value This section shows how to configure the interval between IPv6 router advertisement transmissions on an interface. This section includes the following topics: • Licensing Requirements for Router Advertisement Transmission Interval, page 25-9 • Guidelines and Limitations for Router Advertisement Transmission Interval, page 25-9 • Default Settings for Router Advertisement Transmission Interval, page 25-10 • Configuring Router Advertisement Transmission Interval, page 25-10 • Monitoring Router Advertisement Transmission Interval, page 25-11 • Feature History for Router Advertisement Transmission Interval, page 25-11 Licensing Requirements for Router Advertisement Transmission Interval The following table shows the licensing requirements for this feature: Guidelines and Limitations for Router Advertisement Transmission Interval This section includes the guidelines and limitations for this feature: • Context Mode Guidelines, page 25-12 • Firewall Mode Guidelines, page 25-12 • Additional Guidelines and Limitations, page 25-13 Context Mode Guidelines Supported in single and multiple context mode. Firewall Mode Guidelines Supported in routed firewall mode only. Transparent mode is not supported. Model License Requirement All models Base License.25-13 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 25 Configuring IPv6 Neighbor Discovery Configuring Router Advertisement Messages Additional Guidelines and Limitations The interval between transmissions should be less than or equal to the IPv6 router advertisement lifetime if the security appliance is configured as a default router by using the ipv6 nd ra-lifetime command. To prevent synchronization with other IPv6 nodes, randomly adjust the actual value used to within 20 percent of the specified value. Default Settings for Router Advertisement Transmission Interval Table 25-7 lists the default settings for neighbor reachable time parameters. Configuring Router Advertisement Transmission Interval To configure the interval between IPv6 router advertisement transmissions on an interface, enter the following command: Example The following example configures an IPv6 router advertisement interval of 201 seconds for the selected interface, Gigabitethernet 0/0: hostname (config)# interface gigabitethernet 0/0 hostname (config-if)# ipv6 nd ra-interval 201 Table 25-7 Default Router Advertisement Transmission Interval Parameters Parameters Default value (interval between transmissions) The default is 200 seconds. Command Purpose ipv6 nd ra-interval [msec] value Example: hostname (config-if)# ipv6 nd ra-interval 201 Sets the interval between IPv6 router advertisement transmissions. The optional msec keyword indicates that the value provided is in milliseconds. If this keyword is not present, the value provided is in seconds. Valid values for the value argument range from 3 to 1800 seconds or from 500 to 1800000 milliseconds if the msec keyword is provided. 25-14 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 25 Configuring IPv6 Neighbor Discovery Configuring Router Advertisement Messages Monitoring Router Advertisement Transmission Interval To monitor IPv6 neighbor reachable time, perform one of the following tasks: Where to Go Next Configure the “router lifetime” value in IPv6 router advertisements on an interface with the ipv6 nd ra-lifetime command. Feature History for Router Advertisement Transmission Interval Table 25-8 lists the release history for this feature. Command Purpose show ipv6 interface Displays the usability status of interfaces configured for IPv6. Including the interface name, such as “outside,” displays the settings for the specified interface. Excluding the name from the command displays the settings for all interfaces that have IPv6 enabled on them. Output for the command shows the following: • The name and status of the interface. • The link-local and global unicast addresses. • The multicast groups to which the interface belongs. • ICMP redirect and error message settings. • Neighbor discovery settings. • The actual time when the command is set to 0. • The neighbor discovery reachable time that is being used. Table 25-8 Feature History for Router Advertisement Transmission Interval Feature Name Releases Feature Information Router advertisement transmission interval 7.0(1) The feature was introduced. The following command was introduced: ipv6 nd ra-interval.25-15 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 25 Configuring IPv6 Neighbor Discovery Configuring Router Advertisement Messages Configuring the IPv6 Prefix Stateless autoconfiguration uses IPv6 prefixes provided in router advertisement messages to create the global unicast address from the link-local address. The prefix advertisement can be used by neighboring devices to autoconfigure their interface addresses. You can configure which IPv6 prefixes ar e included in IPv6 router advertisements. This section shows how to configure IPv6 prefixes and includes the following topics: • Licensing Requirements for IPv6 Prefixes, page 25-15 • Guidelines and Limitations for IPv6 Prefixes, page 25-15 • Default Settings for IPv6 Prefixes, page 25-16 • Configuring IPv6 Prefixes, page 25-17 • Monitoring IPv6 Prefixes, page 25-18 • Feature History for IPv6 Prefixes, page 25-19 Licensing Requirements for IPv6 Prefixes The following table shows the licensing requirements for this feature: Guidelines and Limitations for IPv6 Prefixes This section includes the guidelines and limitations for this feature: • Context Mode Guidelines, page 25-15 • Firewall Mode Guidelines, page 25-15 • Additional Guidelines and Limitations, page 25-16 Context Mode Guidelines Supported in single and multiple context mode. Firewall Mode Guidelines Supported in routed firewall mode only. Transparent mode is not supported. Model License Requirement All models Base License.25-16 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 25 Configuring IPv6 Neighbor Discovery Configuring Router Advertisement Messages Additional Guidelines and Limitations The ipv6 nd prefix command allows control over the individual parameters per prefix, including whether or not the prefix should be advertised. By default, prefixes configured as addresses on an interface using the ipv6 address command are advertised in router advertisements. If you configure prefixes for advertisement using the ipv6 nd prefix command, then only these prefixes are advertised. The default keyword can be used to set default parameters for all prefixes. A date can be set to specify the expiration of a prefix. The valid and preferred lifetimes are counted down in real time. When the expiration date is reached, the prefix will no longer be advertised. When onlink is “on” (by default), the specified prefix is assigned to the link. Nodes sending traffic to such addresses that contain the specified prefix consider the destination to be locally reachable on the link. When autoconfig is “on” (by default), it indicates to hosts on the local link that the specified prefix can be used for IPv6 autoconfiguration. For stateless autoconfiguration to work properly, the advertised prefix length in router advertisement messages must always be 64 bits. Default Settings for IPv6 Prefixes Table 25-9 lists the default settings for neighbor reachable time parameters. Table 25-9 Default for IPv6 Prefixes Parameters Parameters Default prefix lifetime The default lifetime is 2592000 seconds (30 days) and a preferred lifetime of 604800 seconds (7 days). on-link flag The flag is on by default, which means that the prefix is used on the advertising interface. autoconfig flag The flag is on by default, which means that the prefix is used for autoconfiguration.25-17 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 25 Configuring IPv6 Neighbor Discovery Configuring Router Advertisement Messages Configuring IPv6 Prefixes To configure the which IPv6 prefixes are included in IPv6 router advertisements, enter the following command: Example The following example includes the IPv6 prefix 2001:200::/35, with a valid lifetime of 1000 seconds and a preferred lifetime of 900 seconds, in router advertisements sent out on the specified interface, which is Gigabitethernet 0/0: hostname (config)# interface gigabitethernet 0/0 hostname (config-if)# ipv6 nd prefix 2001:200:200::/35 1000 900 Command Purpose ipv6 nd prefix ipv6-prefix/prefix-length | default [[valid-lifetime preferred-lifetime] | [at valid-date preferred-date] | infinite | no-advertise | off-link | no-autoconfig] Example: hostname (config-if)# ipv6 nd prefix 2001:200:200::/35 1000 900 Configures which IPv6 prefixes are included in IPv6 router advertisements. The at valid-date preferred-date syntax indicates the date and time at which the lifetime and preference expire. The prefix is valid until this specified date and time are reached. Dates are expressed in the form date-valid-expire month-valid-expire hh:mm-valid-expire date-prefer-expire month-prefer-expire hh:mm-prefer-expire. The default keyword indicates that default values are used. The optional infinite keyword specifies that the valid lifetime does not expire. The ipv6-prefix argument specifies the IPv6 network number to include in router advertisements. This argument must be in the form documented in RFC 2373 where the address is specified in hexadecimal using 16-bit values between colons. The optional no-advertise keyword indicates to hosts on the local link that the specified prefix is not to be used for IPv6 autoconfiguration. The optional no-autoconfig keyword indicates to hosts on the local link that the specified prefix cannot be used for IPv6 autoconfiguration. The optional off-link keyword indicates that the specified prefix is not used for on-link determination. The preferred-lifetime argument specifies the amount of time (in seconds) that the specified IPv6 prefix is advertised as being preferred. Valid values range from 0 to 4294967295 seconds. The maximum value represents infinity, which can also be specified with infinite. The default is 604800 (7 days). The prefix-length argument specifies the length of the IPv6 prefix. This value indicates how many of the high-order, contiguous bits of the address comprise the network portion of the prefix. The slash (/) must precede the prefix length. The valid-lifetime argument specifies the amount of time that the specified IPv6 prefix is advertised as being valid. Valid values range from 0 to 4294967295 seconds. The maximum value represents infinity, which can also be specified with infinite. The default is 2592000 (30 days).25-18 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 25 Configuring IPv6 Neighbor Discovery Configuring Router Advertisement Messages Monitoring IPv6 Prefixes To monitor IPv6 neighbor reachable time, perform one of the following tasks: Additional References For additional information related to implementing IPv6 router advertisement messages, see the following sections: • Related Documents for IPv6 Prefixes, page 25-19 • RFCs for IPv6 Prefixes, page 25-19 Command Purpose show ipv6 interface Displays the usability status of interfaces configured for IPv6. Including the interface name, such as “outside,” displays the settings for the specified interface. Excluding the name from the command displays the settings for all interfaces that have IPv6 enabled on them. Output for the command shows the following: • The name and status of the interface. • The link-local and global unicast addresses. • The multicast groups to which the interface belongs. • ICMP redirect and error message settings. • Neighbor discovery settings. • The actual time when the command is set to 0. • The neighbor discovery reachable time that is being used.25-19 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 25 Configuring IPv6 Neighbor Discovery Configuring Router Advertisement Messages Related Documents for IPv6 Prefixes RFCs for IPv6 Prefixes Feature History for IPv6 Prefixes Table 25-10 lists the release history for this feature. Suppressing Router Advertisement Messages Router advertisement messages are automatically sent in response to router solicitation messages. You may want to disable these messages on any interface for which you do not want the security appliance to supply the IPv6 prefix (for example, the outside interface). This section shows how to suppress IPv6 router advertisement transmissions on an interface, and it includes the following topics: • Licensing Requirements for Suppressing Router Advertisement Messages, page 25-20 • Guidelines and Limitations for Suppressing Router Advertisement Messages, page 25-20 • Default Settings for Suppressing Router Advertisement Messages, page 25-20 • Suppressing Router Advertisement Messages, page 25-21 • Monitoring Router Advertisement Messages, page 25-21 • Feature History for Suppressing Router Advertisement Messages, page 25-22 Related Topic Document Title ipv6 commands Cisco Security Appliance Command Reference RFC Title RFC 2373 includes complete documentation to show how IPv6 network address numbers must be shown in router advertisements. The command argument ipv6-prefix indicates this network number, where the address must be specified in hexadecimal using 16-bit values between colons. RFC 2373—IP Version 6 Addressing Architecture Table 25-10 Feature History for Router Advertisement Transmission Interval Feature Name Releases Feature Information Router advertisement transmission interval 7.0(1) The feature was introduced. The following command was introduced: ipv6 nd prefix.25-20 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 25 Configuring IPv6 Neighbor Discovery Configuring Router Advertisement Messages Licensing Requirements for Suppressing Router Advertisement Messages The following table shows the licensing requirements for this feature: Guidelines and Limitations for Suppressing Router Advertisement Messages This section includes the guidelines and limitations for this feature: • Context Mode Guidelines, page 25-20 • Firewall Mode Guidelines, page 25-20 • Additional Guidelines and Limitations, page 25-20 Context Mode Guidelines Supported in single and multiple context mode. Firewall Mode Guidelines Supported in routed firewall mode only. Transparent mode is not supported. Additional Guidelines and Limitations The “router lifetime” value is included in all IPv6 router advertisements sent out the interface. The value indicates the usefulness of the security appliance as a default router on this interface. Setting the value to a non-zero value indicates that the security appliance should be considered a default router on this interface. The no-zero value for the “router lifetime” value should not be less than the router advertisement interval. Default Settings for Suppressing Router Advertisement Messages Table 25-11 lists the default settings for neighbor reachable time parameters. Model License Requirement All models Base License. Table 25-11 Default for Suppressing Router Advertisement Parameters Parameters Default router lifetime The default lifetime is 1800 seconds. Setting the value to 0 indicates that the security appliance should not be considered a default router on this interface.25-21 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 25 Configuring IPv6 Neighbor Discovery Configuring Router Advertisement Messages Suppressing Router Advertisement Messages To configure the “router lifetime” value in IPv6 router advertisements on an interface, enter the following command. Entering this command causes the security appliance to appear as a regular IPv6 neighbor on the link and not as an IPv6 router. Example The following example configures an IPv6 router advertisement lifetime of 1801 seconds for the specified interface, which is Gigabitethernet 0/0: hostname (config)# interface gigabitethernet 0/0 hostname (config-if)# ipv6 nd ra-lifetime 1801 Monitoring Router Advertisement Messages To monitor IPv6 neighbor reachable time, perform one of the following tasks: Command Purpose ipv6 nd ra-lifetime seconds Example: hostname (config-if)# ipv6 nd prefix 2001:200:200::/35 1000 900 Configures the “router lifetime” value. The seconds argument specifies the validity of the security appliance as a default router on this interface. Valid values range from 0 to 9000 seconds. The default is 1800 seconds. 0 indicates that the security appliance should not be considered a default router on the specified interface. Command Purpose show ipv6 interface Displays the usability status of interfaces configured for IPv6. Including the interface name, such as “outside,” displays the settings for the specified interface. Excluding the name from the command displays the settings for all interfaces that have IPv6 enabled on them. Output for the command shows the following: • The name and status of the interface. • The link-local and global unicast addresses. • The multicast groups to which the interface belongs. • ICMP redirect and error message settings. • Neighbor discovery settings. • The actual time when the command is set to 0. • The neighbor discovery reachable time that is being used.25-22 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 25 Configuring IPv6 Neighbor Discovery Configuring a Static IPv6 Neighbor Feature History for Suppressing Router Advertisement Messages Table 25-12 lists the release history for this feature. Configuring a Static IPv6 Neighbor This section includes the following topics: • Information About a Static IPv6 Neighbor, page 25-22 • Licensing Requirements for Static IPv6 Neighbor, page 25-22 • Guidelines and Limitations, page 25-22 • Default Settings, page 25-23 • Configuring a Static IPv6 Neighbor, page 25-24 • Monitoring Neighbor Solicitation Messages, page 25-24 • Feature History for Configuring a Static IPv6 Neighbor, page 25-25 Information About a Static IPv6 Neighbor You can manually define a neighbor in the IPv6 neighbor cache. If an entry for the specified IPv6 address already exists in the neighbor discovery cache—learned through the IPv6 neighbor discovery process—the entry is automatically converted to a static entry. Static entries in the IPv6 neighbor discovery cache are not modified by the neighbor discovery process Licensing Requirements for Static IPv6 Neighbor The following table shows the licensing requirements for this feature: Guidelines and Limitations This section includes the guidelines and limitations for this feature: • Context Mode Guidelines, page 25-23 • Firewall Mode Guidelines, page 25-23 Table 25-12 Feature History for Suppressing Router Advertisement Messages Feature Name Releases Feature Information Suppressing router advertisement messages 7.0(1) The feature was introduced. The following command was introduced: ipv6 nd ra-lifetime. Model License Requirement All models Base License.25-23 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 25 Configuring IPv6 Neighbor Discovery Configuring a Static IPv6 Neighbor • Additional Guidelines and Limitations, page 25-23 Context Mode Guidelines Supported in single and multiple context mode. Firewall Mode Guidelines Supported in routed firewall mode only. Transparent mode is not supported. Additional Guidelines and Limitations The following guidelines and limitations apply for configuring a static IPv6 neighbor: • The ipv6 neighbor command is similar to the arp command. If an entry for the specified IPv6 address already exists in the neighbor discovery cache—learned through the IPv6 neighbor discovery process—the entry is automatically converted to a static entry. These entries are stored in the configuration when the copy command is used to store the configuration. • Use the show ipv6 neighbor command to view static entries in the IPv6 neighbor discovery cache. • The clear ipv6 neighbor command deletes all entries in the IPv6 neighbor discovery cache except static entries. The no ipv6 neighbor command deletes a specified static entry from the neighbor discovery cache; the command does not remove dynamic entries—entries learned from the IPv6 neighbor discovery process—from the cache. Disabling IPv6 on an interface by using the no ipv6 enable command deletes all IPv6 neighbor discovery cache entries configured for that interface except static entries (the state of the entry changes to INCMP [Incomplete]). • Static entries in the IPv6 neighbor discovery cache are not modified by the neighbor discovery process. • The clear ipv6 neighbor command does not remove static entries from the IPv6 neighbor discovery cache; it only clears the dynamic entries. Default Settings Table 25-13 lists the default settings for static IPv6 neighbor parameters. Table 25-13 Default Static IPv6 Neighbor Parameters Parameters Default Static IPv6 neighbor Static entries are not configured in the IPv6 neighbor discovery cache. 25-24 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 25 Configuring IPv6 Neighbor Discovery Configuring a Static IPv6 Neighbor Configuring a Static IPv6 Neighbor To configure a static entry in the IPv6 neighbor discovery cache, enter the following command: Example The following example adds a static entry for an inside host with an IPv6 address of 3001:1::45A and a MAC address of 002.7D1a.9472 to the neighbor discovery cache: hostname)config-if)# ipv6 neighbor 3001:1::45A inside 002.7D1A.9472 Monitoring Neighbor Solicitation Messages To monitor IPv6 neighbor discovery, perform the following task: Command Purpose ipv6 neighbor ipv6_address if_name mac_address Example: hostname)config-if)# ipv6 neighbor 3001:1::45A inside 002.7D1A.9472 Configures a static entry in the IPv6 neighbor discovery cache. The ipv6_address argument is the link-local IPv6 address of the neighbor, the if_name argument is the interface through which the neighbor is available, and the mac_address argument is the MAC address of the neighbor interface. Command Purpose show ipv6 interface Displays the usability status of interfaces configured for IPv6. Including the interface name, such as “outside,” displays the settings for the specified interface. Excluding the name from the command displays the settings for all interfaces that have IPv6 enabled on them. Output for the command shows the following: • The name and status of the interface. • The link-local and global unicast addresses. • The multicast groups to which the interface belongs. • ICMP redirect and error message settings. • Neighbor discovery settings.25-25 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 25 Configuring IPv6 Neighbor Discovery Configuring a Static IPv6 Neighbor Feature History for Configuring a Static IPv6 Neighbor Table 25-14 lists the release history for this feature. Table 25-14 Feature History for Configuring a Static IPv6 Neighbor Feature Name Releases Feature Information Static IPv6 Neighbor 7.0(1) The feature was introduced. The following command was introduced: ipv6 neighbor.25-26 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 25 Configuring IPv6 Neighbor Discovery Configuring a Static IPv6 NeighborP A R T 4 Configuring Network Address TranslationC H A P T E R 26-1 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 26 Information About NAT This chapter provides an overview of how Network Address Translation (NAT) works on the ASA and includes the following sections: • Introduction to NAT, page 26-1 • NAT Types, page 26-2 • NAT in Routed Mode, page 26-2 • NAT in Transparent Mode, page 26-3 • Policy NAT, page 26-5 • NAT and Same Security Level Interfaces, page 26-8 • Order of NAT Commands Used to Match Real Addresses, page 26-8 • Mapped Address Guidelines, page 26-8 • DNS and NAT, page 26-9 • Where to Go Next, page 26-11 Introduction to NAT Address translation substitutes the real address in a packet with a mapped address that is routable on the destination network. NAT is composed of two steps: the process by which a real address is translated into a mapped address and the process to undo translation for returning traffic. The ASA translates an address when a NAT rule matches the traffic. If no NAT rule matches, processing for the packet continues. The exception is when you enable NAT control. NAT control requires that packets traversing from a higher security interface (inside) to a lower security interface (outside) match a NAT rule, or processing for the packet stops. See the “Security Levels” section on page 6-5 for more information about security levels. See Chapter 27, “Configuring NAT Control,” for more information about NAT control. Note In this document, all types of translation are referred to as NAT. When describing NAT, the terms inside and outside represent the security relationship between any two interfaces. The higher security level is inside and the lower security level is outside. For example, interface 1 is at 60 and interface 2 is at 50; therefore, interface 1 is “inside” and interface 2 is “outside.” Some of the benefits of NAT are as follows:26-2 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 26 Information About NAT NAT Types • You can use private addresses on your inside networks. Private addresses are not routable on the Internet. See the “Private Networks” section on page C-2 for more information. • NAT hides the real addresses from other networks, so attackers cannot learn the real address of a host. • You can resolve IP routing problems, such as overlapping addresses. See Table 40-1 on page 40-4 for information about protocols that do not support NAT. NAT Types You can implement address translation as dynamic NAT, Port Address Translation (PAT), static NAT, static PAT, or as a mix of these types. You can also configure rules to bypass NAT; for example, to enable NAT control when you do not want to perform NAT. The following translation types are available: • Dynamic NAT—Dynamic NAT translates a group of real addresses to a pool of mapped addresses that are routable on the destination network. For details about dynamic NAT, see the Chapter 29, “Configuring Dynamic NAT and PAT.” • PAT—PAT translates multiple real address to a single mapped IP address. For details about PAT, see the Chapter 29, “Configuring Dynamic NAT and PAT.” • Static NAT—Static NAT creates a fixed translation of real addresses to mapped addresses. With dynamic NAT and PAT, each host uses a different address or port for each subsequent translation. For details about static NAT, see the Chapter 28, “Configuring Static NAT.” • Static PAT—Static PAT is the same as static NAT, except that it enables you to specify the protocol and port for the real and mapped addresses. For details about static PAT, see the Chapter 30, “Configuring Static PAT.” If you enable NAT control, then inside hosts must match a NAT rule when accessing outside hosts. If you do not want to perform NAT for some hosts, then you can bypass NAT for those hosts, or you can disable NAT control. For details about bypassing NAT, see Chapter 31, “Bypassing NAT.” NAT in Routed Mode Figure 26-1 shows a typical NAT example in routed mode, with a private network on the inside. When the inside host at 10.1.2.27 sends a packet to a web server, the real source address, 10.1.2.27, of the packet is changed to a mapped address, 209.165.201.10. When the server responds, it sends the response to the mapped address, 209.165.201.10, and the security appliance receives the packet. The security appliance then changes the translation of the mapped address, 209.165.201.10, back to the real address, 10.1.2.27, before sending it to the host.26-3 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 26 Information About NAT NAT in Transparent Mode Figure 26-1 NAT Example: Routed Mode See the following commands for this example: hostname(config)# nat (inside) 1 10.1.2.0 255.255.255.0 hostname(config)# global (outside) 1 209.165.201.1-209.165.201.15 NAT in Transparent Mode Using NAT in transparent mode eliminates the need for the upstream or downstream routers to perform NAT for their networks. For example, a transparent firewall ASA is useful between two VRFs so tha you can establish BGP neighbor relations between the VRFs and the global table. However, NAT per VRF might not be supported. In this case, using NAT in transparent mode is essential. NAT in transparent mode has the following requirements and limitations: • When the mapped addresses are not on the same network as the transparent firewall, then on the upstream router you need to add a static route for the mapped addresses that points to the downstream router (through the ASA). • When you have VoIP or DNS traffic with NAT and inspection enabled, to successfully translate the IP address inside VoIP and DNS packets, the ASA needs to perform a route lookup. Unless the host is on a directly-connected network, then you need to add a static route on the ASA for the real host address that is embedded in the packet. • The alias command is not supported. • Because the transparent firewall does not have any interface IP addresses, you cannot use interface PAT. • ARP inspection is not supported. Moreover, if for some reason a host on one side of the firewall sends an ARP request to a host on the other side of the firewall, and the initiating host real address is mapped to a different address on the same subnet, then the real address remains visible in the ARP request. Web Server www.cisco.com Outside Inside 209.165.201.2 10.1.2.1 10.1.2.27 130023 Translation 10.1.2.27 209.165.201.10 Originating Packet Undo Translation 209.165.201.10 10.1.2.27 Responding Security Packet Appliance26-4 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 26 Information About NAT NAT in Transparent Mode Figure 26-2 shows a typical NAT scenario in transparent mode, with the same network on the inside and outside interfaces. The transparent firewall in this scenario is performing the NAT service so that the upstream router does not have to perform NAT. Figure 26-2 NAT Example: Transparent Mode 1. When the inside host at 10.1.1.75 sends a packet to a web server, the real source address of the packet, 10.1.1.75, is changed to a mapped address, 209.165.201.15. 2. When the server responds, it sends the response to the mapped address, 209.165.201.15, and the ASA receives the packet because the upstream router includes this mapped network in a static route directed through the ASA. 3. The ASA then undoes the translation of the mapped address, 209.165.201.15, back to the real address, 10.1.1.1.75. Because the real address is directly-connected, the ASA sends it directly to the host. 4. For host 192.168.1.2, the same process occurs, except that the ASA looks up the route in its route table and sends the packet to the downstream router at 10.1.1.3 based on the static route. See the following commands for this example: hostname(config)# route inside 192.168.1.0 255.255.255.0 10.1.1.3 1 hostname(config)# nat (inside) 1 10.1.1.0 255.255.255.0 hostname(config)# nat (inside) 1 192.168.1.0 255.255.255.0 hostname(config)# global (outside) 1 209.165.201.1-209.165.201.15 Management IP 10.1.1.1 www.example.com 10.1.1.2 Internet Source Addr Translation 192.168.1.2 209.165.201.10 Source Addr Translation 10.1.1.75 209.165.201.15 ASA 10.1.1.75 10.1.1.3 192.168.1.1 192.168.1.2 Network 2 Static route on router: 209.165.201.0/27 to 10.1.1.1 Static route on ASA: 192.168.1.0/24 to 10.1.1.3 25026126-5 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 26 Information About NAT Policy NAT Policy NAT Policy NAT lets you identify real addresses for address translation by specifying the source and destination addresses in an extended access list. You can also optionally specify the source and destination ports. Regular NAT can only consider the source addresses, not the destination address . For example, with policy NAT you can translate the real address to mapped address A when it accesses server A, but also translate the real address to mapped address B when it accesses server B. Note Policy NAT does not support time-based access lists. For applications that require application inspection for secondary channels (for example, FTP and VoIP), the policy specified in the policy NAT statement should include the secondary ports. When the ports cannot be predicted, the policy should specify only the IP addresses for the secondary channel. With this configuration, the security appliance translates the secondary ports. Note All types of NAT support policy NAT, except for NAT exemption. NAT exemption uses an access list to identify the real addresses, but it differs from policy NAT in that the ports are not considered. See the “Bypassing NAT When NAT Control is Enabled” section on page 27-3 for other differences. You can accomplish the same result as NAT exemption using static identity NAT, which does support policy NAT. Figure 26-3 shows a host on the 10.1.2.0/24 network accessing two different servers. When the host accesses the server at 209.165.201.11, the real address is translated to 209.165.202.129. When the host accesses the server at 209.165.200.225, the real address is translated to 209.165.202.130. Figure 26-3 Policy NAT with Different Destination Addresses Server 1 209.165.201.11 Server 2 209.165.200.225 DMZ Inside 10.1.2.27 10.1.2.0/24 130039 209.165.201.0/27 209.165.200.224/27 Translation 10.1.2.27 209.165.202.129 Translation 10.1.2.27 209.165.202.130 Packet Dest. Address: 209.165.201.11 Packet Dest. Address: 209.165.200.22526-6 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 26 Information About NAT Policy NAT See the following commands for this example: hostname(config)# access-list NET1 permit ip 10.1.2.0 255.255.255.0 209.165.201.0 255.255.255.224 hostname(config)# access-list NET2 permit ip 10.1.2.0 255.255.255.0 209.165.200.224 255.255.255.224 hostname(config)# nat (inside) 1 access-list NET1 hostname(config)# global (outside) 1 209.165.202.129 hostname(config)# nat (inside) 2 access-list NET2 hostname(config)# global (outside) 2 209.165.202.130 Figure 26-4 shows the use of source and destination ports. The host on the 10.1.2.0/24 network accesses a single host for both web services and Telnet services. When the host accesses the server for web services, the real address is translated to 209.165.202.129. When the host accesses the same server for Telnet services, the real address is translated to 209.165.202.130. Figure 26-4 Policy NAT with Different Destination Ports See the following commands for this example: hostname(config)# access-list WEB permit tcp 10.1.2.0 255.255.255.0 209.165.201.11 255.255.255.255 eq 80 hostname(config)# access-list TELNET permit tcp 10.1.2.0 255.255.255.0 209.165.201.11 255.255.255.255 eq 23 hostname(config)# nat (inside) 1 access-list WEB hostname(config)# global (outside) 1 209.165.202.129 hostname(config)# nat (inside) 2 access-list TELNET hostname(config)# global (outside) 2 209.165.202.130 For policy static NAT (and for NAT exemption, which also uses an access list to identify traffic), you can initiate traffic to and from the real host. However, the destination address in the access list is only used for traffic initiated by the real host. For traffic to the real host from the destination network, the source address is not checked, and the first matching NAT rule for the real host address is used. So if you configure static policy NAT such as the following: hostname(config)# access-list NET1 permit ip 10.1.2.0 255.255.255.224 209.165.201.0 Web and Telnet server: 209.165.201.11 Internet Inside Translation 10.1.2.27:80 209.165.202.129 10.1.2.27 10.1.2.0/24 Translation 10.1.2.27:23 209.165.202.130 Web Packet Dest. Address: 209.165.201.11:80 Telnet Packet Dest. Address: 209.165.201.11:23 13004026-7 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 26 Information About NAT Policy NAT 255.255.255.224 hostname(config)# static (inside,outside) 209.165.202.128 access-list NET1 Then when hosts on the 10.1.2.0/27 network access 209.165.201.0/24, they are translated to corresponding addresses on the 209.165.202.128/27 network. But any host on the outside can access the mapped addresses 209.165.202.128/27, and not just hosts on the 209.165.201.0/24 network. For the same reason (the source address is not checked for traffic to the real host), you cannot use policy static NAT to translate different real addresses to the same mapped address. For example, Figure 26-5 shows two inside hosts, 10.1.1.1 and 10.1.1.2, that you want to be translated to 209.165.200.225. When outside host 209.165.201.1 connects to 209.165.200.225, then the connection goes to 10.1.1.1. When outside host 209.165.201.2 connects to the same mapped address, 209.165.200.225, you want the connection to go to 10.1.1.2. However, because the destination address in the access list is not checked for traffic to the real host, then the first ACE that matches the real host is used. Since the first ACE is for 10.1.1.1, then all inbound connections sourced from 209.165.201.1 and 209.165.201.2 and destined to 209.165.200.255 will have their destination address translated to 10.1.1.1. Figure 26-5 Real Addresses Cannot Share the Same Mapped Address See the following commands for this example. (Although the second ACE in the example does allow 209.165.201.2 to connect to 209.165.200.225, it only allows 209.165.200.225 to be translated to 10.1.1.1.) hostname(config)# static (in,out) 209.165.200.225 access-list policy-nat hostname(config)# access-list policy-nat permit ip host 10.1.1.1 host 209.165.201.1 hostname(config)# access-list policy-nat permit ip host 10.1.1.2 host 209.165.201.2 Note Policy NAT does not support SQL*Net, but it is supported by regular NAT. See the “When to Use Application Protocol Inspection” section on page 40-2 for information about NAT support for other protocols. 209.165.201.1 Outside Inside 10.1.1.1 209.165.201.2 10.1.1.2 Undo Translation 209.165.200.225 10.1.1.1 209.165.200.225 10.1.1.2 No Undo Translation 24298126-8 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 26 Information About NAT NAT and Same Security Level Interfaces NAT and Same Security Level Interfaces NAT is not required between same security level interfaces even if you enable NAT control. You can optionally configure NAT if desired. However, if you configure dynamic NAT when NAT control is enabled, then NAT is required. See Chapter 27, “Configuring NAT Control,” for more information. Also, when you specify a group of IP addresses for dynamic NAT or PAT on a same security interface, then you must perform NAT on that group of addresses when they access any lower or same security level interface (even when NAT control is not enabled). Traffic identified for static NAT is not affected. See the “Allowing Same Security Level Communication” section on page 6-30 to enable same security communication. Note The ASA does not support VoIP inspection engines when you configure NAT on same security interfaces. These inspection engines include Skinny, SIP, and H.323. See the “When to Use Application Protocol Inspection” section on page 40-2 for supported inspection engines. Order of NAT Commands Used to Match Real Addresses The ASA matches real addresses to NAT commands in the following order: 1. NAT exemption (nat 0 access-list)—In order, until the first match. Identity NAT is not included in this category; it is included in the regular static NAT or regular NAT category. We do not recommend overlapping addresses in NAT exemption statements because unexpected results can occur. 2. Static NAT and Static PAT (regular and policy) (static)—In order, until the first match. Static identity NAT is included in this category. 3. Policy dynamic NAT (nat access-list)—In order, until the first match. Overlapping addresses are allowed. 4. Regular dynamic NAT (nat)—Best match. Regular identity NAT is included in this category. The order of the NAT commands does not matter; the NAT statement that best matches the real address is used. For example, you can create a general statement to translate all addresses (0.0.0.0) on an interface. If you want to translate a subset of your network (10.1.1.1) to a different address, then you can create a statement to translate only 10.1.1.1. When 10.1.1.1 makes a connection, the specific statement for 10.1.1.1 is used because it matches the real address best. We do not recommend using overlapping statements; they use more memory and can slow the performance of the ASA. Mapped Address Guidelines When you translate the real address to a mapped address, you can use the following mapped addresses: • Addresses on the same network as the mapped interface. If you use addresses on the same network as the mapped interface (through which traffic exits the ASA), the ASA uses proxy ARP to answer any requests for mapped addresses, and thus it intercepts traffic destined for a real address. This solution simplifies routing because the ASA does not have to be the gateway for any additional networks. However, this approach does put a limit on the number of available addresses used for translations. For PAT, you can even use the IP address of the mapped interface. • Addresses on a unique network.26-9 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 26 Information About NAT DNS and NAT If you need more addresses than are available on the mapped interface network, you can identify addresses on a different subnet. The ASA uses proxy ARP to answer any requests for mapped addresses, and thus it intercepts traffic destined for a real address. If you use OSPF to advertise mapped IP addresses that belong to a different subnet from the mapped interface, you need to create a static route to the mapped addresses that are destined to the mapped interface IP, and then redistribute this static route in OSPF. If the mapped interface is passive (not advertising routes) or you are using static routing, then you need to add a static route on the upstream router that sends traffic destined for the mapped addresses to the ASA. DNS and NAT You might need to configure the ASA to modify DNS replies by replacing the address in the reply with an address that matches the NAT configuration. You can configure DNS modification when you configure each translation. For example, a DNS server is accessible from the outside interface. A server, ftp.cisco.com, is on the inside interface. You configure the ASA to statically translate the ftp.cisco.com real address (10.1.3.14) to a mapped address (209.165.201.10) that is visible on the outside network. (See Figure 26-6.) In this case, you want to enable DNS reply modification on this static statement so that inside users who have access to ftp.cisco.com using the real address receive the real address from the DNS server, and not the mapped address.26-10 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 26 Information About NAT DNS and NAT When an inside host sends a DNS request for the address of ftp.cisco.com, the DNS server replies with the mapped address (209.165.201.10). The ASA refers to the static statement for the inside server and translates the address inside the DNS reply to 10.1.3.14. If you do not enable DNS reply modification, then the inside host attempts to send traffic to 209.165.201.10 instead of accessing ftp.cisco.com directly. Figure 26-6 DNS Reply Modification See the following command for this example: hostname(config)# static (inside,outside) 209.165.201.10 10.1.3.14 netmask 255.255.255.255 dns Note If a user on a different network (for example, DMZ) also requests the IP address for ftp.cisco.com from the outside DNS server, then the IP address in the DNS reply is also modified for this user, even though the user is not on the Inside interface referenced by the static command. DNS Server Outside Inside User 130021 1 2 3 4 5 DNS Reply Modification 209.165.201.10 10.1.3.14 DNS Reply 209.165.201.10 DNS Reply 10.1.3.14 DNS Query ftp.cisco.com? FTP Request 10.1.3.14 Security Appliance ftp.cisco.com 10.1.3.14 Static Translation on Outside to: 209.165.201.1026-11 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 26 Information About NAT Where to Go Next Figure 26-7 shows a web server and DNS server on the outside. The ASA has a static translation for the outside server. In this case, when an inside user requests the address for ftp.cisco.com from the DNS server, the DNS server responds with the real address, 209.165.20.10. Because you want inside users to use the mapped address for ftp.cisco.com (10.1.2.56) you need to configure DNS reply modification for the static translation. Figure 26-7 DNS Reply Modification Using Outside NAT See the following command for this example: hostname(config)# static (outside,inside) 10.1.2.56 209.165.201.10 netmask 255.255.255.255 dns Where to Go Next • Chapter 27, “Configuring NAT Control” • Chapter 29, “Configuring Dynamic NAT and PAT” • Chapter 28, “Configuring Static NAT” • Chapter 30, “Configuring Static PAT” • Chapter 31, “Bypassing NAT” ftp.cisco.com 209.165.201.10 DNS Server Outside Inside User 10.1.2.27 Static Translation on Inside to: 10.1.2.56 130022 1 2 7 6 5 4 3 DNS Query ftp.cisco.com? DNS Reply 209.165.201.10 DNS Reply Modification 209.165.201.10 10.1.2.56 DNS Reply 10.1.2.56 FTP Request 209.165.201.10 Dest Addr. Translation 10.1.2.56 209.165.201.10 FTP Request 10.1.2.56 Security Appliance26-12 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 26 Information About NAT Where to Go NextC H A P T E R 27-1 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 27 Configuring NAT Control This chapter describes NAT control, and it includes the following sections: • Information About NAT Control, page 27-1 • Licensing Requirements, page 27-3 • Prerequisites for NAT Control, page 27-4 • Guidelines and Limitations, page 27-4 • Default Settings, page 27-4 • Configuring NAT Control, page 27-5 • Monitoring NAT Control, page 27-5 • Configuration Examples for NAT Control, page 27-5 • Feature History for NAT Control, page 27-6 Information About NAT Control This section describes NAT control, and it includes the following topics: • NAT Control and Inside Interfaces, page 27-1 • NAT Control and Same Security Interfaces, page 27-2 • NAT Control and Outside Dynamic NAT, page 27-2 • NAT Control and Static NAT, page 27-3 • Bypassing NAT When NAT Control is Enabled, page 27-3 NAT Control and Inside Interfaces NAT control requires that packets traversing from an inside interface to an outside interface match a NAT rule; for any host on the inside network to access a host on the outside network, you must configure NAT to translate the inside host address, as shown in Figure 27-1. Note NAT control is used for NAT configurations defined with earlier versions of the ASA. The best practice is to use access rules for access control instead of relying on the absence of a NAT rule to prevent traffic through the ASA.27-2 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 27 Configuring NAT Control Information About NAT Control Figure 27-1 NAT Control and Outbound Traffic NAT Control and Same Security Interfaces Interfaces at the same security level are not required to use NAT to communicate. However, if you configure dynamic NAT or PAT on a same security interface, then all traffic from the interface to a same security interface or an outside interface must match a NAT rule, as shown in Figure 27-2. Figure 27-2 NAT Control and Same Security Traffic NAT Control and Outside Dynamic NAT Similarly, if you enable outside dynamic NAT or PAT, then all outside traffic must match a NAT rule when it accesses an inside interface. (See Figure 27-3.) Figure 27-3 NAT Control and Inbound Traffic 10.1.1.1 NAT No NAT 209.165.201.1 Inside Outside 10.1.2.1 Security Appliance 132212 10.1.1.1 Dyn. NAT No NAT 209.165.201.1 Level 50 Level 50 or Outside 10.1.2.1 Security Appliance 10.1.1.1 No NAT 10.1.1.1 Level 50 Level 50 Security Appliance 132215 209.165.202.129 No NAT 209.165.202.129 Outside Inside Security Appliance 209.165.202.129 209.165.200.240 Dyn. NAT 10.1.1.50 Outside Inside Security Appliance No NAT 13221327-3 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 27 Configuring NAT Control Licensing Requirements NAT Control and Static NAT NAT control does not affect static NAT and does not cause the restrictions seen with dynamic NAT. Bypassing NAT When NAT Control is Enabled If you want the added security of NAT control but do not want to translate inside addresses in some cases, you can apply a NAT exemption or identity NAT rule on those addresses. If you enable NAT control, then inside hosts must match a NAT rule when accessing outside hosts. If you do not want to perform NAT for some hosts, then you can bypass NAT for those hosts or you can disable NAT control. You might want to bypass NAT, for example, if you are using an application that does not support NAT. See the “When to Use Application Protocol Inspection” section on page 40-2 for information about inspection engines that do not support NAT. You can configure traffic to bypass NAT using one of the following three methods. All methods achieve compatibility with inspection engines. However, each method offers slightly different capabilities. • Identity NAT (nat 0 command)—When you configure identity NAT (which is similar to dynamic NAT), you do not limit translation for a host on specific interfaces; you must use identity NAT for connections through all interfaces. Therefore, you cannot choose to perform normal translation on real addresses when you access interface A, but you use identity NAT when accessing interface B. Regular dynamic NAT, on the other hand, enables you to specify a particular interface on which to translate the addresses. Make sure that the real addresses for which you use identity NAT are routable on all networks that are available according to your access lists. For identity NAT, even though the mapped address is the same as the real address, you cannot initiate a connection from the outside to the inside (even if the interface access list allows it). Use static identity NAT or NAT exemption for this functionality. • Static identity NAT (static command)—Static identity NAT enables you to specify the interface on which you want to allow the real addresses to appear, so you can use identity NAT when you access interface A, and use regular translation when you access interface B. Static identity NAT also enables you to use policy NAT, which identifies the real and destination addresses when determining the real addresses to translate. (See the “Policy NAT” section on page 26-5 for more information about policy NAT.) For example, you can use static identity NAT for an inside address when it accesses the outside interface and the destination is server A, but use a normal translation when accessing the outside server B. • NAT exemption (nat 0 access-list command)—NAT exemption allows both translated and remote hosts to initiate connections. Like identity NAT, you do not limit translation for a host on specific interfaces; you must use NAT exemption for connections through all interfaces. However, NAT exemption does enable you to specify the real and destination addresses when determining the real addresses to translate (similar to policy NAT), so you have greater control using NAT exemption. However unlike policy NAT, NAT exemption does not consider the ports in the access list. NAT exemption also does not support connection settings, such as maximum TCP connections. Licensing Requirements Model License Requirement All models Base License.27-4 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 27 Configuring NAT Control Prerequisites for NAT Control Prerequisites for NAT Control NAT control has the following prerequisites: • NAT control requires that packets traversing from an inside interface to an outside interface match a NAT rule; for any host on the inside network to access a host on the outside network, you must configure NAT to translate the inside host address. • Interfaces at the same security level are not required to use NAT to communicate. However, if you configure dynamic NAT or PAT on a same security interface with NAT control enabled, then all traffic from the interface to a same security interface or an outside interface must match a NAT rule. • Similarly, if you enable outside dynamic NAT or PAT with NAT control, then all outside traffic must match a NAT rule when it accesses an inside interface. • Static NAT with NAT control does not cause these restrictions. Guidelines and Limitations This section includes the guidelines and limitations for this feature. Context Mode Guidelines • Supported in single and multiple context modes. • In multiple context mode, the packet classifier might rely on the NAT configuration to assign packets to contexts if you do not enable unique MAC addresses for shared interfaces. See the “How the Security Appliance Classifies Packets” section on page 5-3 for more information about the relationship between the classifier and NAT. Firewall Mode Guidelines Supported in routed and transparent modes. Additional Guidelines and Limitations If you want the added security of NAT control but do not want to translate inside addresses in some cases, you can apply a NAT exemption (nat 0 access-list) or identity NAT (nat 0 or static) rule on those addresses. Default Settings By default, NAT control is disabled; therefore, you do not need to perform NAT on any networks unless you want to do so. If you upgraded from an earlier version of software, however, NAT control might be enabled on your system. Even with NAT control disabled, you need to perform NAT on any addresses for which you configure dynamic NAT. See the Chapter 29, “Configuring Dynamic NAT and PAT,” for more information about how dynamic NAT is applied.27-5 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 27 Configuring NAT Control Configuring NAT Control Configuring NAT Control To enable NAT control, enter the following command: Monitoring NAT Control To monitor NAT control, perform one of the following tasks: Configuration Examples for NAT Control When NAT control is disabled with the no-nat control command, and a NAT and a global command pair are configured for an interface, the real IP addresses cannot go out on other interfaces unless you define those destinations with the nat 0 access-list command. For example, the following NAT is the that one you want performed when going to the outside network: nat (inside) 1 0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 global (outside) 1 209.165.201.2 The above configuration catches everything on the inside network, so if you do not want to translate inside addresses when they go to the DMZ, then you need to match that traffic for NAT exemption, as shown in the following example: access-list EXEMPT extended permit ip any 192.168.1.0 255.255.255.0 access-list EXEMPT remark This matches any traffic going to DMZ1 access-list EXEMPT extended permit ip any 10.1.1.0 255.255.255.0 access-list EXEMPT remark This matches any traffic going to DMZ1 nat (inside) 0 access-list EXEMPT Alternately, you can perform NAT translation on all interfaces: nat (inside) 1 0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 global (outside) 1 209.165.201.2 global (dmz1) 1 192.168.1.230 global (dmz2) 1 10.1.1.230 Command Purpose nat-control Example: hostname(config)# nat-control Enables NAT control. To disable NAT control, enter the no form of the command. Command Purpose show running-config nat-control Shows the NAT configuration requirement. 27-6 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 27 Configuring NAT Control Feature History for NAT Control Feature History for NAT Control Table 27-1 lists the release history for this feature. Table 27-1 Feature History for NAT Control Feature Name Releases Feature Information Ability to enable and disable NAT control 7.0(1) The ability to enable and disable NAT control was introduced. The following command was introduced: nat-control.C H A P T E R 28-1 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 28 Configuring Static NAT This chapter describes how to configure a static network translation and includes the following topics: • Information About Static NAT, page 28-1 • Licensing Requirements for Static NAT, page 28-2 • Guidelines and Limitations, page 28-2 • Default Settings, page 28-3 • Configuring Static NAT, page 28-4 • Monitoring Static NAT, page 28-9 • Configuration Examples for Static NAT, page 28-9 • Additional References, page 28-11 • Feature History for Static NAT, page 28-11 Information About Static NAT Static NAT creates a fixed translation of real address(es) to mapped address(es).With dynamic NAT and PAT, each host uses a different address or port for each subsequent translation. Because the mapped address is the same for each consecutive connection with static NAT, and a persistent translation rule exists, static NAT allows hosts on the destination network to initiate traffic to a translated host (if an access list exists that allows it). The main difference between dynamic NAT and a range of addresses for static NAT is that static NAT allows a remote host to initiate a connection to a translated host (if an access list exists that allows it), while dynamic NAT does not. You also need an equal number of mapped addresses as real addresses with static NAT.28-2 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 28 Configuring Static NAT Licensing Requirements for Static NAT Figure 28-1 shows a typical static NAT scenario. The translation is always active so both translated and remote hosts can originate connections, and the mapped address is statically assigned by the static command. Figure 28-1 Static NAT Licensing Requirements for Static NAT The following table shows the licensing requirements for this feature: Guidelines and Limitations This section includes the guidelines and limitations for this feature: • Context Mode Guidelines, page 28-2 • Firewall Mode Guidelines, page 28-2 • Additional Guidelines and Limitations, page 28-2 Context Mode Guidelines • Supported in single and multiple context mode. Firewall Mode Guidelines • Supported in routed and transparent firewall mode. Additional Guidelines and Limitations The following features are not supported for static NAT: • You cannot use the same real or mapped address in multiple static commands between the same two interfaces unless you use static PAT. (For more information, see Chapter 30, “Configuring Static PAT.”) • Do not use a mapped address in the static command that is also defined in a global command for the same mapped interface. 10.1.1.1 209.165.201.1 Inside Outside 10.1.1.2 209.165.201.2 130035 Security Appliance Model License Requirement All models Base License.28-3 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 28 Configuring Static NAT Default Settings If your nat command includes the address of a host that has an entry in a DNS server, and the DNS server is on a different interface from a client, then the client and the DNS server need different addresses for the host; one needs the mapped address and one needs the real address. This option rewrites the address in the DNS reply to the client. The translated host needs to be on the same interface as either the client or the DNS server. Typically, hosts that need to allow access from other interfaces use a static translation, so this option is more likely to be used with the static command. (See the “DNS and NAT” section on page 26-9 for more information.) • • If you remove a static command, existing connections that use the translation are not affected. To remove these connections, enter the clear local-host command. • You cannot clear static translations from the translation table with the clear xlate command; you must remove the static command instead. Only dynamic translations created by the nat and global commands can be removed with the clear xlate command. Default Settings Table 28-1 lists the command options and defaults for static NAT. Table 28-1 Command Options and Defaults for Policy NAT Command Purpose norandomseq, tcp tcp_max_conns, udp udp_max_conns, and emb_limit These keywords set connection limits. However, we recommend using a more versatile method for setting connection limits; for more information, see Chapter 53, “Configuring Connection Limits and Timeouts.” For tcp_max_conns, emb_limit, and udp_max_conns, the default value is 0 (unlimited), which is the maximum available.28-4 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 28 Configuring Static NAT Configuring Static NAT Table 28-2 Command Options and Defaults for Regular NAT Configuring Static NAT This section describes how to configure a static translation and includes the following topics: • Configuring Policy Static NAT, page 28-5 • Configuring Regular Static NAT, page 28-8 nat_id An integer between 1 and 2147483647. The NAT ID must match a global command NAT ID. See the “Information About Implementing Dynamic NAT and PAT” section on page 29-5 for more information about how NAT IDs are used. 0 is reserved for identity NAT. See the “Configuring Identity NAT” section on page 31-1 for more information about identity NAT. See Table 28-1, “Command Options and Defaults for Policy NAT,” for information about other command options.28-5 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 28 Configuring Static NAT Configuring Static NAT Configuring Policy Static NAT When you configure “policy NAT,” you identify the real addresses and destination/source addresses using an extended access list. To configure policy static NAT, enter the following command:28-6 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 28 Configuring Static NAT Configuring Static NAT Command Purpose static (real_interface,mapped_interface) {mapped_ip | interface} access-list acl_name [dns] [norandomseq] [[tcp] tcp_max_conns [emb_limit]] [udp udp_max_conns] Example: hostname(config)# static (inside,outside) 209.165.202.129 access-list NET1 Configures a persistent one-to-one address translation rule by mapping a real IP address to a mapped IP address. Identify the real addresses and destination/source addresses using an extended access list. Create the extended access list using the access-list extended command. The first address in the access list is the real address; the second address is either the source or destination address, depending on where the traffic originates. (For more information, see Chapter 11, “Adding an Extended Access List.”). This access list should include only permit ACEs. You can optionally specify the real and destination ports in the access list using the eq operator. Policy NAT considers the inactive and time-range keywords, but it does not support ACL with all inactive and time-range ACEs. The real_ifc argument specifies the name of the interface connected to the real IP address network. The mapped_ifc argument specifies the name of the interface connected to the mapped IP address network. The mapped_ip argument specifies the address to which the real address is translated. The interface keyword uses the interface IP address as the mapped address. Use this keyword if you want to use the interface address, but the address is dynamically assigned using DHCP. The dns option rewrites the A record, or address record, in DNS replies that match this static. For DNS replies traversing from a mapped interface to any other interface, the A record is rewritten from the mapped value to the real value. Inversely, for DNS replies traversing from any interface to a mapped interface, the A record is rewritten from the real value to the mapped value. The norandomseq disables TCP ISN randomization protection. The tcp tcp_max_cons option specifies the maximum number of simultaneous TCP connections allowed to the local-host. (See the local-host command). (Idle connections are closed after the idle timeout specified by the timeout conn command.) The emb_limit is the maximum number of embryonic connections per host. Note An embryonic limit applied using static NAT is applied to all connections to or from the real IP address, and not just connections between the specified interfaces. To apply limits to specific flows, see the “Configuring Connection Limits and Timeouts” section on page 53-3. The udp tcp_max_cons option specifies the maximum number of simultaneous UDP connections allowed to the local-host. (See the local-host command.) (Idle connections are closed after the idle timeout specified by the timeout conn command.) If this interface is on a lower security level than the interface you identify by the matching global statement, then you must enter outside to identify the NAT instance as outside NAT.28-7 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 28 Configuring Static NAT Configuring Static NAT Example To translate the real address 10.1.1.1 to the mapped address 192.168.1.1 when 10.1.1.1 sends traffic to the 209.165.200.224 network, the access-list and static commands are as follows: hostname(config)# access-list TEST extended ip host 10.1.1.1 209.165.200.224 255.255.255.224 hostname(config)# static (inside,outside) 192.168.1.1 access-list TEST In this case, the second address is the destination address. However, the same configuration is used for hosts to originate a connection to the mapped address. For example, when a host on the 209.165.200.224/27 network initiates a connection to 192.168.1.1, then the second address in the access list is the source address. This access list should include only permit ACEs. You can optionally specify the real and destination ports in the access list using the eq operator. Policy NAT does not consider the inactive or time-range keywords; all ACEs are considered to be active for policy NAT configuration. See the “Policy NAT” section on page 26-5 for more information. If you specify a network for translation (for example, 10.1.1.0 255.255.255.0), then the ASA translates the .0 and .255 addresses. If you want to prevent access to these addresses, be sure to configure an access list to deny access. See Chapter 29, “Configuring Dynamic NAT and PAT,” for information about the other options.28-8 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 28 Configuring Static NAT Configuring Static NAT Configuring Regular Static NAT To configure regular static NAT, enter the following command: Command Purpose static (real_interface,mapped_interface) {mapped_ip | interface} real_ip [netmask mask][dns] [norandomseq] [[tcp] tcp_max_conns [emb_limit]] [udp udp_max_conns] Example: hostname(config)# static (inside,outside) 209.165.201.12 10.1.1.3 netmask 255.255.255.255 Configures a persistent one-to-one address translation rule by mapping a real IP address to a mapped IP address. The real_ifc argument specifies the name of the interface connected to the real IP address network. The mapped_ifc argument specifies the name of the interface connected to the mapped IP address network. The mapped_ip argument specifies the address to which the real address is translated. The interface keyword uses the interface IP address as the mapped address. Use this keyword if you want to use the interface address, but the address is dynamically assigned using DHCP. The real_ip specifies the real address that you want to translate. The netmask mask specifies the subnet mask for the real and mapped addresses. For single hosts, use 255.255.255.255. If you do not enter a mask, then the default mask for the IP address class is used, with one exception. If a host-bit is non-zero after masking, a host mask of 255.255.255.255 is used. If you use the access-list keyword instead of the real_ip, then the subnet mask used in the access list is also used for the mapped_ip. The dns option rewrites the A record, or address record, in DNS replies that match this static. For DNS replies traversing from a mapped interface to any other interface, the A record is rewritten from the mapped value to the real value. Inversely, for DNS replies traversing from any interface to a mapped interface, the A record is rewritten from the real value to the mapped value. The norandomseq disables TCP ISN randomization protection. The tcp tcp_max_cons option specifies the maximum number of simultaneous TCP connections allowed to the local-host. (See the local-host command). (Idle connections are closed after the idle timeout specified by the timeout conn command.) The emb_limit is the maximum number of embryonic connections per host. Note An embryonic limit applied using static NAT is applied to all connections to or from the real IP address, and not just connections between the specified interfaces. To apply limits to specific flows, see the “Configuring Connection Limits and Timeouts” section on page 53-3. The udp tcp_max_cons option specifies the maximum number of simultaneous UDP connections allowed to the local-host. (See the local-host command.) (Idle connections are closed after the idle timeout specified by the timeout conn command.) 28-9 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 28 Configuring Static NAT Monitoring Static NAT Monitoring Static NAT To monitor static NAT, perform one of the following tasks: Configuration Examples for Static NAT This section contains configuration examples for static NAT and contains these sections: • Typical Static NAT Examples, page 28-9 • Example of Overlapping Networks, page 28-10 Typical Static NAT Examples For example, the following policy static NAT example shows a single real address that is translated to two mapped addresses depending on the destination address (see Figure 26-3 on page 26-5, “Policy NAT with Different Destination Addresses,” for a related figure): hostname(config)# access-list NET1 permit ip host 10.1.2.27 209.165.201.0 255.255.255.224 hostname(config)# access-list NET2 permit ip host 10.1.2.27 209.165.200.224 255.255.255.224 hostname(config)# static (inside,outside) 209.165.202.129 access-list NET1 hostname(config)# static (inside,outside) 209.165.202.130 access-list NET2 The following command maps an inside IP address (10.1.1.3) to an outside IP address (209.165.201.12): hostname(config)# static (inside,outside) 209.165.201.12 10.1.1.3 netmask 255.255.255.255 The following command maps the outside address (209.165.201.15) to an inside address (10.1.1.6): hostname(config)# static (outside,inside) 10.1.1.6 209.165.201.15 netmask 255.255.255.255 The following command statically maps an entire subnet: hostname(config)# static (inside,dmz) 10.1.1.0 10.1.2.0 netmask 255.255.255.0 Command Purpose show running-config static Displays all static commands in the configuration28-10 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 28 Configuring Static NAT Configuration Examples for Static NAT Example of Overlapping Networks In Figure 28-2, the ASA connects two private networks with overlapping address ranges. Figure 28-2 Using Outside NAT with Overlapping Networks Two networks use an overlapping address space (192.168.100.0/24), but hosts on each network must communicate (as allowed by access lists). Without NAT, when a host on the inside network tries to access a host on the overlapping DMZ network, the packet never makes it past the ASA, which sees the packet as having a destination address on the inside network. Moreover, if the destination address is being used by another host on the inside network, that host receives the packet. To solve this problem, use NAT to provide non-overlapping addresses. If you want to allow access in both directions, use static NAT for both networks. If you only want to allow the inside interface to access hosts on the DMZ, then you can use dynamic NAT for the inside addresses, and static NAT for the DMZ addresses you want to access. This example shows static NAT. To configure static NAT for these two interfaces, perform the following steps. The 10.1.1.0/24 network on the DMZ is not translated. Step 1 Translate 192.168.100.0/24 on the inside to 10.1.2.0/24 when it accesses the DMZ by entering the following command: hostname(config)# static (inside,dmz) 10.1.2.0 192.168.100.0 netmask 255.255.255.0 Step 2 Translate the 192.168.100.0/24 network on the DMZ to 10.1.3.0/24 when it accesses the inside by entering the following command: hostname(config)# static (dmz,inside) 10.1.3.0 192.168.100.0 netmask 255.255.255.0 Step 3 Configure the following static routes so that traffic to the dmz network can be routed correctly by the ASA: hostname(config)# route dmz 192.168.100.128 255.255.255.128 10.1.1.2 1 hostname(config)# route dmz 192.168.100.0 255.255.255.128 10.1.1.2 1 192.168.100.2 inside 192.168.100.0/24 outside 10.1.1.2 192.168.100.1 192.168.100.2 dmz 192.168.100.0/24 192.168.100.3 10.1.1.1 130029 192.168.100.328-11 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 28 Configuring Static NAT Additional References The ASA already has a connected route for the inside network. These static routes allow the ASA to send traffic for the 192.168.100.0/24 network out the DMZ interface to the gateway router at 10.1.1.2. (You need to split the network into two because you cannot create a static route with the exact same network as a connected route.) Alternatively, you could use a more broad route for the DMZ traffic, such as a default route. If host 192.168.100.2 on the DMZ network wants to initiate a connection to host 192.168.100.2 on the inside network, the following events occur: 1. The DMZ host 192.168.100.2 sends the packet to IP address 10.1.2.2. 2. When the ASA receives this packet, the ASA translates the source address from 192.168.100.2 to 10.1.3.2. 3. Then the ASA translates the destination address from 10.1.2.2 to 192.168.100.2, and the packet is forwarded. Additional References For additional information related to implementing Static NAT, see the following sections: • Related Documents, page 28-11 Related Documents Feature History for Static NAT Table 28-3 lists the release history for this feature. Related Topic Document Title static command Cisco Security Appliance Command Reference Table 28-3 Feature History for Static NAT Feature Name Releases Feature Information Regular static NAT and policy static NAT 7.0 Static NAT creates a fixed translation of real addresses to mapped addresses. The static command was introduced. Regular static NAT and policy static NAT 7.3.1 NAT began support in transparent firewall mode.28-12 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 28 Configuring Static NAT Feature History for Static NATC H A P T E R 29-1 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 29 Configuring Dynamic NAT and PAT This section describes dynamic network address translation. The configuration for dynamic NAT and PAT are almost identical; for NAT you specify a range of mapped addresses, and for PAT you specify a single address. This chapter includes the following topics: • Information About Dynamic NAT and PAT, page 29-1 • Licensing Requirements for Dynamic NAT and PAT, page 29-10 • Guidelines and Limitations, page 29-11 • Default Settings, page 29-11 • Configuring Dynamic NAT or Dynamic PAT, page 29-13 • Monitoring Dynamic NAT and PAT, page 29-18 • Configuration Examples for Dynamic NAT and PAT, page 29-18 • Feature History for Dynamic NAT and PAT, page 29-19 Information About Dynamic NAT and PAT This section includes the following topics: • Information About Dynamic NAT, page 29-1 • Information About PAT, page 29-4 • Information About Implementing Dynamic NAT and PAT, page 29-5 Information About Dynamic NAT Dynamic NAT translates a group of real addresses to a pool of mapped addresses that are routable on the destination network. The mapped pool may include fewer addresses than the real group. When a host you want to translate accesses the destination network, the ASA assigns the host an IP address from the mapped pool. The translation is added only when the real host initiates the connection. The translation is in place only for the duration of the connection, and a given user does not keep the same IP address after the translation times out. For an example, see the timeout xlate command in the Cisco ASA 5500 Series Command Reference. Users on the destination network, therefore, cannot initiate a reliable connection to a host that uses dynamic NAT, although the connection is allowed by an access list, and 29-2 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 29 Configuring Dynamic NAT and PAT Information About Dynamic NAT and PAT the ASA rejects any attempt to connect to a real host address directly. See Chapter 28, “Configuring Static NAT,” or Chapter 30, “Configuring Static PAT,” for information about how to obtain reliable access to hosts. Note In some cases, a translation is added for a connection, although the session is denied by the ASA. This condition occurs with an outbound access list, a management-only interface, or a backup interface in which the translation times out normally. For an example, see the show xlate command in the Cisco ASA 5500 Series Command Reference. Figure 29-1 shows a remote host attempting to connect to the real address. The connection is denied because the ASA only allows returning connections to the mapped address. Figure 29-1 Remote Host Attempts to Connect to the Real Address Figure 29-2 shows a remote host attempting to initiate a connection to a mapped address. This address is not currently in the translation table; therefore, the ASA drops the packet. Web Server www.example.com Outside Inside 209.165.201.2 10.1.2.1 10.1.2.27 Translation 10.1.2.27 209.165.201.10 10.1.2.27 Security Appliance 13221629-3 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 29 Configuring Dynamic NAT and PAT Information About Dynamic NAT and PAT Figure 29-2 Remote Host Attempts to Initiate a Connection to a Mapped Address Note For the duration of the translation, a remote host can initiate a connection to the translated host if an access list allows it. Because the address is unpredictable, a connection to the host is unlikely. Nevertheless, in this case you can rely on the security of the access list. Dynamic NAT has these disadvantages: • If the mapped pool has fewer addresses than the real group, you could run out of addresses if the amount of traffic is more than expected. Use PAT if this event occurs often because PAT provides over 64,000 translations using ports of a single address. • You have to use a large number of routable addresses in the mapped pool; if the destination network requires registered addresses, such as the Internet, you might encounter a shortage of usable addresses. The advantage of dynamic NAT is that some protocols cannot use PAT. PAT does not work with the following: • IP protocols that do not have a port to overload, such as GRE version 0. • Some multimedia applications that have a data stream on one port, the control path on another port, and are not open standard. See the “When to Use Application Protocol Inspection” section on page 40-2 for more information about NAT and PAT support. Web Server www.example.com Outside Inside 209.165.201.2 10.1.2.1 10.1.2.27 Security Appliance 209.165.201.10 13221729-4 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 29 Configuring Dynamic NAT and PAT Information About Dynamic NAT and PAT Information About PAT PAT translates multiple real addresses to a single mapped IP address. Specifically, the security appliance translates the real address and source port (real socket) to the mapped address and a unique port above 1024 (mapped socket). Each connection requires a separate translation because the source port differs for each connection. For example, 10.1.1.1:1025 requires a separate translation from 10.1.1.1:1026. After the connection expires, the port translation also expires after 30 seconds of inactivity. The timeout is not configurable. Users on the destination network cannot reliably initiate a connection to a host that uses PAT (even if the connection is allowed by an access list). Not only can you not predict the real or mapped port number of the host, but the ASA does not create a translation at all unless the translated host is the initiator. See Chapter 28, “Configuring Static NAT,” or Chapter 30, “Configuring Static PAT,” for information about reliable access to hosts. PAT lets you use a single mapped address, thus conserving routable addresses. You can even use the ASA interface IP address as the PAT address. PAT does not work with some multimedia applications that have a data stream that is different from the control path. See the “When to Use Application Protocol Inspection” section on page 40-2 for more information about NAT and PAT support. Note For the duration of the translation, a remote host can initiate a connection to the translated host if an access list allows it. Because the port address (both real and mapped) is unpredictable, a connection to the host is unlikely. Nevertheless, in this case you can rely on the security of the access list. However, policy PAT does not support time-based ACLs.29-5 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 29 Configuring Dynamic NAT and PAT Information About Dynamic NAT and PAT Information About Implementing Dynamic NAT and PAT For dynamic NAT and PAT, you first configure a nat command identifying the real addresses on a given interface that you want to translate. Then you configure a separate global command to specify the mapped addresses when exiting another interface (in the case of PAT, this is one address). Each nat command matches a global command by comparing the NAT ID, a number that you assign to each command. (See Figure 29-3.) Figure 29-3 nat and global ID Matching See the following commands for this example: hostname(config)# nat (inside) 1 10.1.2.0 255.255.255.0 hostname(config)# global (outside) 1 209.165.201.3-209.165.201.10 130027 Web Server: www.cisco.com Outside Inside Global 1: 209.165.201.3- 209.165.201.10 NAT 1: 10.1.2.0/24 10.1.2.27 Translation 10.1.2.27 209.165.201.329-6 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 29 Configuring Dynamic NAT and PAT Information About Dynamic NAT and PAT You can enter multiple nat commands using the same NAT ID on one or more interfaces; they all use the same global command when traffic exits a given interface. For example, you can configure nat commands for Inside and DMZ interfaces, both on NAT ID 1. Then you configure a global command on the Outside interface that is also on ID 1. Traffic from the Inside interface and the DMZ interface share a mapped pool or a PAT address when exiting the Outside interface. (See Figure 29-4.) Figure 29-4 nat Commands on Multiple Interfaces See the following commands for this example: hostname(config)# nat (inside) 1 10.1.2.0 255.255.255.0 hostname(config)# nat (inside) 1 192.168.1.0 255.255.255.0 hostname(config)# nat (dmz) 1 10.1.1.0 255.255.255.0 hostname(config)# global (outside) 1 209.165.201.3-209.165.201.10 Web Server: www.cisco.com Outside DMZ Inside Network 2 Global 1: 209.165.201.3- 209.165.201.10 NAT 1: 10.1.2.0/24 NAT 1: 192.168.1.0/24 NAT 1: 10.1.1.0/24 10.1.1.15 192.168.1.5 Translation 10.1.2.27 209.165.201.3 Translation 192.168.1.5 209.165.201.5 Translation 10.1.1.15 209.165.201.4 10.1.2.27 25026329-7 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 29 Configuring Dynamic NAT and PAT Information About Dynamic NAT and PAT You can also enter a global command for each interface using the same NAT ID. If you enter a global command for the Outside and DMZ interfaces on ID 1, then the Inside nat command identifies traffic to be translated when going to both the Outside and the DMZ interfaces. Similarly, if you also enter a nat command for the DMZ interface on ID 1, then the global command on the Outside interface is also used for DMZ traffic. (See Figure 29-5.) Figure 29-5 global and nat Commands on Multiple Interfaces See the following commands for this example: hostname(config)# nat (inside) 1 10.1.2.0 255.255.255.0 hostname(config)# nat (dmz) 1 10.1.1.0 255.255.255.0 hostname(config)# global (outside) 1 209.165.201.3-209.165.201.10 hostname(config)# global (dmz) 1 10.1.1.23 If you use different NAT IDs, you can identify different sets of real addresses to have different mapped addresses. For example, on the Inside interface, you can have two nat commands on two different NAT IDs. On the Outside interface, you configure two global commands for these two IDs. Then, when traffic from Inside network A exits the Outside interface, the IP addresses are translated to pool A addresses; while traffic from Inside network B are translated to pool B addresses. (See Figure 29-6.) If you use policy NAT, you can specify the same real addresses for multiple nat commands, as long as the destination addresses and ports are unique in each access list. Web Server: www.cisco.com Outside DMZ Inside Global 1: 209.165.201.3- 209.165.201.10 NAT 1: 10.1.2.0/24 NAT 1: 10.1.1.0/24 Global 1: 10.1.1.23 10.1.1.15 10.1.2.27 130024 Translation 10.1.2.27 209.165.201.3 Translation 10.1.1.15 209.165.201.4 Translation 10.1.2.27 10.1.1.23:2024 Security Appliance29-8 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 29 Configuring Dynamic NAT and PAT Information About Dynamic NAT and PAT Figure 29-6 Different NAT IDs See the following commands for this example: hostname(config)# nat (inside) 1 10.1.2.0 255.255.255.0 hostname(config)# nat (inside) 2 192.168.1.0 255.255.255.0 hostname(config)# global (outside) 1 209.165.201.3-209.165.201.10 hostname(config)# global (outside) 2 209.165.201.11 You can enter multiple global commands for one interface using the same NAT ID; the ASA uses the dynamic NAT global commands first, in the order they are in the configuration, and then it uses the PAT global commands in order. You might want to enter both a dynamic NAT global command and a PAT global command if you need to use dynamic NAT for a particular application, but you should have a backup PAT statement in case all the dynamic NAT addresses are depleted. Similarly, you might enter two PAT statements if you need more than the approximately 64,000 PAT sessions that a single PAT mapped statement supports. (See Figure 29-7.) Web Server: www.cisco.com Outside Inside Global 1: 209.165.201.3- 209.165.201.10 Global 2: 209.165.201.11 NAT 1: 10.1.2.0/24 NAT 2: 192.168.1.0/24 10.1.2.27 192.168.1.14 Translation 10.1.2.27 209.165.201.3 Translation 192.168.1.14 209.165.201.11:4567 130025 Security Appliance29-9 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 29 Configuring Dynamic NAT and PAT Information About Dynamic NAT and PAT Figure 29-7 NAT and PAT Together See the following commands for this example: hostname(config)# nat (inside) 1 10.1.2.0 255.255.255.0 hostname(config)# global (outside) 1 209.165.201.3-209.165.201.4 hostname(config)# global (outside) 1 209.165.201.5 For outside NAT (from outside to inside), you need to use the outside keyword in the nat command. If you also want to translate the same traffic when it accesses an outside interface (for example, traffic on a DMZ is translated when accessing the Inside and the Outside interfaces), then you must configure a separate nat command without the outside option. In this case, you can identify the same addresses in both statements and use the same NAT ID. (See Figure 29-8.) Note that for outside NAT (DMZ interface to Inside interface), the inside host uses a static command to allow outside access, so both the source and destination addresses are translated. Web Server: www.cisco.com Outside Inside Global 1: 209.165.201.3- 209.165.201.4 Global 1: 209.165.201.5 NAT 1: 10.1.2.0/24 10.1.2.27 10.1.2.28 10.1.2.29 130026 Translation 10.1.2.27 209.165.201.3 Translation 10.1.2.28 209.165.201.4 Translation 10.1.2.29 209.165.201.5:609629-10 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 29 Configuring Dynamic NAT and PAT Licensing Requirements for Dynamic NAT and PAT Figure 29-8 Outside NAT and Inside NAT Combined See the following commands for this example: hostname(config)# nat (dmz) 1 10.1.1.0 255.255.255.0 outside hostname(config)# nat (dmz) 1 10.1.1.0 255.255.255.0 hostname(config)# static (inside,dmz) 10.1.1.5 10.1.2.27 netmask 255.255.255.255 hostname(config)# global (outside) 1 209.165.201.3-209.165.201.4 hostname(config)# global (inside) 1 10.1.2.30-1-10.1.2.40 When you specify a group of IP address(es) in a nat command, then you must perform NAT on that group of addresses when they access any lower or same security level interface; you must apply a global command with the same NAT ID on each interface, or use a static command. NAT is not required for that group when it accesses a higher security interface because to perform NAT from outside to inside you must create a separate nat command using the outside keyword. If you do apply outside NAT, then the NAT requirements preceding come into effect for that group of addresses when they access all higher security interfaces. Traffic identified by a static command is not affected. Licensing Requirements for Dynamic NAT and PAT The following table shows the licensing requirements for these features: Outside DMZ Inside Global 1: 209.165.201.3- 209.165.201.10 Global 1: 10.1.2.30- 10.1.2.40 Static to DMZ: 10.1.2.27 10.1.1.5 Outside NAT 1: 10.1.1.0/24 NAT 1: 10.1.1.0/24 10.1.1.15 10.1.2.27 Translation 10.1.1.15 209.165.201.4 Translation 10.1.1.15 10.1.2.30 Undo Translation 10.1.1.5 10.1.2.27 130038 Model License Requirement All models Base License.29-11 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 29 Configuring Dynamic NAT and PAT Guidelines and Limitations Guidelines and Limitations This section includes the guidelines and limitations for this feature. Context Mode Guidelines • Supported in single and multiple context mode. Firewall Mode Guidelines • Supported only in routed and transparent firewall mode. Additional Guidelines and Limitations The following features are not supported for dynamic NAT and PAT: • If you change the NAT configuration, and you do not want to wait for existing translations to time out before the new NAT information is used, you can clear the translation table using the clear xlate command. However, clearing the translation table disconnects all current connections that use translations. Note If you remove a dynamic NAT or PAT rule, and then add a new rule with mapped addresses that overlap the addresses in the removed rule, then the new rule will not be used until all connections associated with the removed rule time out or are cleared using the clear xlate command. This safeguard ensures that the same address is not assigned to multiple hosts. • You can identify overlapping addresses in other nat commands. For example, you can identify 10.1.1.0 in one command but 10.1.1.1 in another. The traffic is matched to a policy NAT command in order, until the first match, or for regular NAT, using the best match. • All types of NAT support policy NAT except for NAT exemption. NAT exemption uses an access list to identify the real addresses, but it differs from policy NAT in that the ports are not considered. You can accomplish the same result as NAT exemption using static identity NAT, which does support policy NAT. • When using dynamic PAT, for the duration of the translation a remote host can initiate a connection to the translated host if an access list allows it. Because the address (both real and mapped) is unpredictable, a connection to the host is unlikely. However, in this case you can rely on the security of the access list. • If the mapped pool has fewer addresses than the real group, you might run out of addresses if the amount of traffic is more than expected. Use PAT if this event occurs often because PAT provides over 64,000 translations using ports of a single address. • You have to use a large number of routable addresses in the mapped pool; if the destination network requires registered addresses, such as the Internet, you might encounter a shortage of usable addresses. Default Settings Table 29-1 lists the command options and default settings for policy NAT and regular NAT. Table 29-2 lists an additional command option for regular NAT. See the nat command in the Cisco Security Appliance Command Reference for a complete description of command options.29-12 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 29 Configuring Dynamic NAT and PAT Default Settings Table 29-1 Configuring Command Options and Defaults for Policy NAT and Regular NAT Command Purpose access-list acl_name Identifies the real addresses and destination addresses using an extended access list. Create the extended access list using the access-list extended command. (See Chapter 11, “Adding an Extended Access List.”) This access list should include only permit ACEs. You can optionally specify the real and destination ports in the access list using the eq operator. Policy NAT considers the inactive and time-range keywords, but it does not support ACL with all inactive and time-range ACEs. nat_id An integer between 1 and 65535. The NAT ID should match a global command NAT ID. See the “Information About Implementing Dynamic NAT and PAT” section on page 29-5 for more information about how NAT IDs are used. 0 is reserved for NAT exemption. (See the “Configuring Static Identity NAT” section on page 31-5 for more information about NAT exemption.) dns If your nat command includes the address of a host that has an entry in a DNS server, and the DNS server is on a different interface from a client, then the client and the DNS server need different addresses for the host; one needs the mapped address and one needs the real address. This option rewrites the address in the DNS reply to the client. The translated host needs to be on the same interface as either the client or the DNS server. Typically, hosts that need to allow access from other interfaces use a static translation, so this option is more likely to be used with the static command. (See the “DNS and NAT” section on page 26-9 for more information.) outside If this interface is on a lower security level than the interface you identify by the matching global statement, then you must enter outside to identify the NAT instance as outside NAT norandomseq, tcp tcp_max_conns, udp udp_max_conns, and emb_limit These keywords set connection limits. However, we recommend using a more versatile method for setting connection limits; for more information, see Chapter 53, “Configuring Connection Limits and Timeouts.” The default value for tcp_max_conns, emb_limit, and udp_max_conns is 0 (unlimited), which is the maximum available.29-13 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 29 Configuring Dynamic NAT and PAT Configuring Dynamic NAT or Dynamic PAT Table 29-2 Command Options and Defaults for Regular NAT Configuring Dynamic NAT or Dynamic PAT This section describes how to configure dynamic NAT or dynamic PAT, and it includes the following topics: • Task Flow for Configuring Dynamic NAT and PAT, page 29-13 • Configuring Policy Dynamic NAT, page 29-15 • Configuring Regular Dynamic NAT, page 29-17 Task Flow for Configuring Dynamic NAT and PAT Use the following guidelines to configure either Dynamic NAT or PAT: • First configure a nat command, identifying the real addresses on a given interface that you want to translate. • Then configure a separate global command to specify the mapped addresses when exiting another interface. (In the case of PAT, this is one address.) Each nat command matches a global command by comparing the NAT ID, a number that you assign to each command. Note The configuration for dynamic NAT and PAT are almost identical; for NAT you specify a range of mapped addresses, and for PAT you specify a single address. Figure 29-9 shows a typical dynamic NAT scenario. Only translated hosts can create a NAT session, and responding traffic is allowed back. The mapped address is dynamically assigned from a pool defined by the global command. Figure 29-9 Dynamic NAT nat_id An integer between 1 and 2147483647. The NAT ID must match a global command NAT ID. See the “Information About Implementing Dynamic NAT and PAT” section on page 29-5 for more information about how NAT IDs are used. 0 is reserved for identity NAT. See the “Configuring Identity NAT” section on page 31-1 for more information about identity NAT. 10.1.1.1 209.165.201.1 Inside Outside 10.1.1.2 209.165.201.2 130032 Security Appliance29-14 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 29 Configuring Dynamic NAT and PAT Configuring Dynamic NAT or Dynamic PAT Figure 29-10 shows a typical dynamic PAT scenario. Only translated hosts can create a NAT session, and responding traffic is allowed back. The mapped address defined by the global command is the same for each translation, but the port is dynamically assigned. Figure 29-10 Dynamic PAT For more information about dynamic NAT, see the “Information About Dynamic NAT” section on page 29-1. For more information about PAT, see the “Information About PAT” section on page 29-4. 10.1.1.1:1025 209.165.201.1:2020 Inside Outside 10.1.1.1:1026 209.165.201.1:2021 10.1.1.2:1025 209.165.201.1:2022 130034 Security Appliance29-15 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 29 Configuring Dynamic NAT and PAT Configuring Dynamic NAT or Dynamic PAT Configuring Policy Dynamic NAT To configure dynamic NAT and PAT and identify the real addresses on one interface that are translated to mapped addressed on another interface, perform the following steps: Command Purpose Step 1 nat (real_interface) nat_id access-list acl_name [dns] [outside][[tcp] tcp_max_conns [emb_limit]] [udp udp_max_conns][norandomseq] Example: hostname(config)# nat (inside) 1 access-list NET1 tcp 0 2000 udp 10000 Configures dynamic policy NAT or PAT, identifying the real addresses on a given interface that you want to translate to one of a pool of mapped addresses. The real_interface specifies the name of the interface connected to the real IP address network. The nat_id should match a nat command NAT ID. The matching nat command identifies the addresses that you want to translate when they exit this interface. You can specify a single address (for PAT) or a range of addresses (for NAT). The range can go across subnet boundaries if desired. For example, you can specify the following “supernet”: 192.168.1.1-192.168.2.254 For policy NAT, the nat_id argument is an integer between 1 and 65535. The access-list keyword identifies the real addresses and destination/source addresses using an extended access list. The acl_name argument identifies the name of the access list. The dns option rewrites the A record, or address record, in DNS replies that match this static. For DNS replies traversing from a mapped interface to any other interface, the A record is rewritten from the mapped value to the real value. Inversely, for DNS replies traversing from any interface to a mapped interface, the A record is rewritten from the real value to the mapped value. Enter the outside optional keyword if this interface is on a lower security level than the interface you identify by the matching global statement. This feature is called outside NAT or bidirectional NAT. The tcp option specifies the protocol at TCP. The tcp_max_cons argument specifies the maximum number of simultaneous TCP connections allowed to the local-host (see the local-host command). The default is 0, which means unlimited connections. (Idle connections are closed after the idle timeout specified by the timeout conn command.) The emb_limit option specifies the maximum number of embryonic connections per host. The default is 0, which means unlimited embryonic connections. The udp udp_max_conns options specify the maximum number of simultaneous UDP connections allowed to the local host. The default is 0, which means unlimited connections. The norandomseq option disables TCP ISN randomization protection. 29-16 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 29 Configuring Dynamic NAT and PAT Configuring Dynamic NAT or Dynamic PAT Step 2 global (mapped_interface) nat_id {mapped_ip[-mapped_ip] | interface} Example: hostname(config)# global (outside) 1 209.165.202.129 Identifies the mapped address(es) to which you want to translate the real addresses when they exit a particular interface. (In the case of PAT, this is one address.) The mapped_interface option specifies the name of the interface connected to the mapped IP address network. The nat_id argument must match a global command NAT ID. See the “Information About Implementing Dynamic NAT and PAT” section on page 29-5 for more information about using NAT IDs. The mapped_ip mapped_ip specify the mapped address(es) to which you want to translate the real addresses when they exit the mapped interface. If you specify a single address, then you configure PAT. If you specify a range of addresses, then you configure dynamic NAT. If the external network is connected to the Internet, each global IP address must be registered with the Network Information Center (NIC). The interface keyword uses the interface IP address as the mapped address. Use this keyword if you want to use the interface address, but the address is dynamically assigned using DHCP. See Table 29-1, “Command Options and Defaults for Policy NAT and Regular NAT,” for information about other command options. Command Purpose29-17 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 29 Configuring Dynamic NAT and PAT Configuring Dynamic NAT or Dynamic PAT Configuring Regular Dynamic NAT To configure regular dynamic NAT and identify the real addresses on one interface that are translated to mapped addressed on another interface, perform the following steps: Command Purpose Step 1 nat (real_interface) nat_id real_ip [mask [dns] [outside]] [[tcp] tcp_max_conns [emb_limit]] [udp udp_max_conns]] [norandomseq] Example: hostname(config)# nat (inside) 1 10.1.2.0 255.255.255.0 Configures dynamic NAT or PAT, identifying the real addresses on a given interface that you want to translate to one of a pool of mapped addresses. The nat_id should match a nat command NAT ID. The matching nat command identifies the addresses that you want to translate when they exit this interface. You can specify a single address (for PAT) or a range of addresses (for NAT). The range can go across subnet boundaries if desired. For example, you can specify the following “supernet”: 192.168.1.1-192.168.2.254. For regular NAT, the nat_id argument is an integer between 1 and 2147483647. The real_ip argument specifies the real address that you want to translate. You can use 0.0.0.0 (or the abbreviation 0) to specify all addresses. The mask argument specifies the subnet mask for the real addresses. If you do not enter a mask, then the default mask for the IP address class is used. The dns keyword rewrites the A record, or address record, in DNS replies that match this command. For DNS replies traversing from a mapped interface to any other interface, the A record is rewritten from the mapped value to the real value. Inversely, for DNS replies traversing from any interface to a mapped interface, the A record is rewritten from the real value to the mapped value. Enter the outside option if this interface is on a lower security level than the interface you identify by the matching global statement. This feature is called outside NAT or bidirectional NAT. The tcp tcp_max_cons argument specifies the maximum number of simultaneous TCP connections allowed to the local-host. (See the local-host command.) The default is 0, which means unlimited connections. (Idle connections are closed after the idle timeout specified by the timeout conn command.) The udp udp_max_conns specify the maximum number of simultaneous UDP connections allowed to the local-host. (See the local-host command.) The default is 0, which means unlimited connections. (Idle connections are closed after the idle timeout specified by the timeout conn command.) The norandomseq keyword disables TCP ISN randomization protection. Not supported for NAT exemption (nat 0 access-list). Although you can enter this argument at the CLI, it is not saved to the configuration. (For additional information about command options, see the Cisco Security Appliance Command Reference.)29-18 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 29 Configuring Dynamic NAT and PAT Monitoring Dynamic NAT and PAT Monitoring Dynamic NAT and PAT To monitor dynamic NAT and PAT, perform the following task: Configuration Examples for Dynamic NAT and PAT For example, to translate the 10.1.1.0/24 network on the inside interface, enter the following command: hostname(config)# nat (inside) 1 10.1.1.0 255.255.255.0 hostname(config)# global (outside) 1 209.165.201.1-209.165.201.30 To identify a pool of addresses for dynamic NAT as well as a PAT address for when the NAT pool is exhausted, enter the following commands: hostname(config)# nat (inside) 1 10.1.1.0 255.255.255.0 hostname(config)# global (outside) 1 209.165.201.5 hostname(config)# global (outside) 1 209.165.201.10-209.165.201.20 To translate the lower security dmz network addresses so they appear to be on the same network as the inside network (10.1.1.0), for example, to simplify routing, enter the following commands: Step 2 global (mapped_interface) nat_id {mapped_ip[-mapped_ip] | interface} Example: hostname(config)# global (outside) 1 209.165.201.3-209.165.201.10 Identifies the mapped address(es) to which you want to translate the real addresses when they exit a particular interface. The mapped_interface option specifies the name of the interface connected to the mapped IP address network. The nat_id must match a global command NAT ID. For more information about how NAT IDs are used, see the “Information About Implementing Dynamic NAT and PAT” section on page 29-5. The mapped_ip mapped_ip specify the mapped address(es) to which you want to translate the real addresses when they exit the mapped interface. If you specify a single address, then you configure PAT. If you specify a range of addresses, then you configure dynamic NAT. If the external network is connected to the Internet, each global IP address must be registered with the Network Information Center (NIC). The interface keyword uses the interface IP address as the mapped address. Use this keyword if you want to use the interface address, but the address is dynamically assigned using DHCP. See Table 29-1, “Command Options and Defaults for Policy NAT and Regular NAT,” for information about other command options, and see and Table 29-2 for additional information specific to regular NAT only. Command Purpose Command Purpose show running-config nat Displays a pool of global IP addresses that are associated with the network.29-19 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 29 Configuring Dynamic NAT and PAT Feature History for Dynamic NAT and PAT hostname(config)# nat (dmz) 1 10.1.2.0 255.255.255.0 outside dns hostname(config)# global (inside) 1 10.1.1.45 To identify a single real address with two different destination addresses using policy NAT, enter the following commands (see Figure 26-3 on page 26-5 for a related figure): hostname(config)# access-list NET1 permit ip 10.1.2.0 255.255.255.0 209.165.201.0 255.255.255.224 hostname(config)# access-list NET2 permit ip 10.1.2.0 255.255.255.0 209.165.200.224 255.255.255.224 hostname(config)# nat (inside) 1 access-list NET1 tcp 0 2000 udp 10000 hostname(config)# global (outside) 1 209.165.202.129 hostname(config)# nat (inside) 2 access-list NET2 tcp 1000 500 udp 2000 hostname(config)# global (outside) 2 209.165.202.130 To identify a single real address/destination address pair that use different ports using policy NAT, enter the following commands (see Figure 26-4 on page 26-6 for a related figure): hostname(config)# access-list WEB permit tcp 10.1.2.0 255.255.255.0 209.165.201.11 255.255.255.255 eq 80 hostname(config)# access-list TELNET permit tcp 10.1.2.0 255.255.255.0 209.165.201.11 255.255.255.255 eq 23 hostname(config)# nat (inside) 1 access-list WEB hostname(config)# global (outside) 1 209.165.202.129 hostname(config)# nat (inside) 2 access-list TELNET hostname(config)# global (outside) 2 209.165.202.130 Feature History for Dynamic NAT and PAT Table 29-3 lists the release history for this feature. Table 29-3 Feature History for Dynamic NAT and PAT Feature Name Releases Feature Information NAT in transparent firewall mode 8.0(2) NAT is now supported in transparent firewall mode.29-20 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 29 Configuring Dynamic NAT and PAT Feature History for Dynamic NAT and PATC H A P T E R 30-1 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 30 Configuring Static PAT Static PAT translations allow a specific UDP or TCP port on a global address to be translated to a specific port on a local address. That is, both the address and the port numbers are translated. This chapter describes how to configure static PAT and includes the following topics: • Information About Static PAT, page 30-1 • Licensing Requirements for Static PAT, page 30-3 • Prerequisites for Static PAT, page 30-3 • Guidelines and Limitations, page 30-4 • Default Settings, page 30-4 • Configuring Static PAT, page 30-5 • Monitoring Static PAT, page 30-9 • Configuration Examples for Static PAT, page 30-9 • Feature History for Static PAT, page 30-11 Information About Static PAT Static PAT is the same as static NAT, except that it enables you to specify the protocol (TCP or UDP) and port for the real and mapped addresses. Static PAT enables you to identify the same mapped address across many different static statements, provided that the port is different for each statement. You cannot use the same mapped address for multiple static NAT statements.30-2 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 30 Configuring Static PAT Information About Static PAT Figure 30-1 shows a typical static PAT scenario. The translation is always active so both translated and remote hosts can originate connections, and the mapped address and port are statically assigned by the static command. Figure 30-1 Typical Static PAT Scenario For applications that require application inspection for secondary channels (for example, FTP and VoIP), the ASA automatically translates the secondary ports. For example, if you want to provide a single address for remote users to access FTP, HTTP, and SMTP, but these are all actually different servers on the real network, you can specify static PAT statements for each server that uses the same mapped IP address, but different ports. (See Figure 30-2.) Figure 30-2 Static PAT See the following commands for this example: hostname(config)# static (inside,outside) tcp 209.165.201.3 ftp 10.1.2.27 ftp netmask 255.255.255.255 10.1.1.1:23 209.165.201.1:23 Inside Outside 10.1.1.2:8080 209.165.201.2:80 130044 Security Appliance Host Outside Inside Undo Translation 209.165.201.3:21 10.1.2.27 Undo Translation 209.165.201.3:80 10.1.2.28 Undo Translation 209.165.201.3:25 10.1.2.29 FTP server 10.1.2.27 HTTP server 10.1.2.28 SMTP server 10.1.2.29 13003130-3 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 30 Configuring Static PAT Licensing Requirements for Static PAT hostname(config)# static (inside,outside) tcp 209.165.201.3 http 10.1.2.28 http netmask 255.255.255.255 hostname(config)# static (inside,outside) tcp 209.165.201.3 smtp 10.1.2.29 smtp netmask 255.255.255.255 You can also use static PAT to translate a well-known port to a non-standard port or vice versa. For example, if inside web servers use port 8080, you can allow outside users to connect to port 80, and then undo translation to the original port 8080. Similarly, to provide extra security, you can tell web users to connect to non-standard port 6785, and then undo translation to port 80. This section describes how to configure a static port translation. Static PAT lets you translate the real IP address to a mapped IP address, as well as the real port to a mapped port. You can choose to translate the real port to the same port, which lets you translate only specific types of traffic, or you can take it further by translating to a different port. Licensing Requirements for Static PAT Prerequisites for Static PAT Static PAT has the following prerequisites: An extended access list must be configured. Create the extended access list using the access-list extended command. (See the Chapter 11, “Adding an Extended Access List,” for more information.) Identify the real addresses and destination/source addresses using an extended access list. Create the extended access list using the access-list extended command. (See Chapter 11, “Adding an Extended Access List.”). The first address in the access list is the real address; the second address is either the source or destination address, depending on where the traffic originates. For example, to translate the real address 10.1.1.1 to the mapped address 192.168.1.1 when 10.1.1.1 sends traffic to the 209.165.200.224 network, the access-list and static commands are: hostname(config)# access-list TEST extended ip host 10.1.1.1 209.165.200.224 255.255.255.224 hostname(config)# static (inside,outside) 192.168.1.1 access-list TEST In this case, the second address is the destination address. However, the same configuration is used for hosts to originate a connection to the mapped address. For example, when a host on the 209.165.200.224/27 network initiates a connection to 192.168.1.1, then the second address in the access list is the source address. This access list should include only permit ACEs. You can optionally specify the real and destination ports in the access list using the eq operator. Policy NAT does not consider the inactive or time-range keywords; all ACEs are considered to be active for policy NAT configuration. See the “Policy NAT” section on page 26-5 for more information. If you specify a network for translation (for example, 10.1.1.0 255.255.255.0), then the ASA translates the .0 and .255 addresses. If you want to prevent access to these addresses, be sure to configure an access list to deny access. See the Chapter 29, “Configuring Dynamic NAT and PAT,” for information about the other options. Model License Requirement All models Base License.30-4 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 30 Configuring Static PAT Guidelines and Limitations Guidelines and Limitations This section includes the guidelines and limitations for this feature: • Context Mode Guidelines, page 30-4 • Firewall Mode Guidelines, page 30-4 • Additional Guidelines and Limitations, page 30-4 Context Mode Guidelines • Supported in single and multiple context mode. Firewall Mode Guidelines • Supported only in routed and transparent firewall mode. Additional Guidelines and Limitations The following guidelines and limitations apply to the static PAT feature: • Static translations can be defined for a single host or for all addresses contained in an IP subnet. • Do not use a mapped address in the static command that is also defined in a global command for the same mapped interface. • If you remove a static command, existing connections that use the translation are not affected. To removed these connections, enter the clear local-host command. • You cannot clear static translations from the translation table with the clear xlate command; you must remove the static command instead. Only dynamic translations created by the nat and global commands can be removed with the clear xlate command. • When configuring static PAT with FTP, you need to add entries for both TCP ports 20 and 21. You must specify port 20 so that the source port for the active transfer is not modified to another port, which may interfere with other devices that perform NAT on FTP traffic. Default Settings Table 30-1 lists the default settings for static PAT parameters. Table 30-1 Default static PAT Parameters Parameters Default emb_limit The default value is 0 (unlimited), which is the maximum available. tcp_max_cons The default value is 0 (unlimited), which is the maximum available. udp_max_cons The default value is 0 (unlimited), which is the maximum available.30-5 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 30 Configuring Static PAT Configuring Static PAT Configuring Static PAT This section describes how to configure a static port translation and includes the following topics: • Configuring Policy Static PAT, page 30-5 • Configuring Regular Static PAT, page 30-7 Configuring Policy Static PAT Policy static PAT enables you to reference a route map to identify specific conditions or policies that trigger a static translation. To configure policy static PAT, enter the following command:30-6 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 30 Configuring Static PAT Configuring Static PAT Command Purpose static (real_interface,mapped_interface) {tcp | udp} {mapped_ip | interface} mapped_port access-list acl_name [dns] [norandomseq] [[tcp] tcp_max_conns [emb_limit]] [udp udp_max_conns] Example: hostname(config)# static (inside,outside) tcp 10.1.2.14 telnet access-list TELNET Configures a route map to identify policies that trigger a static translation. The real real_interfaceargument specifies the name of the interface connected to the real IP address network, and the mapped_interface argument specifies the name of the interface connected to the mapped IP address network. Either tcp or udp specifies the protocol. The mapped_ip argument specifies the address to which the real address is translated (the interface connected to the mapped IP address network). The interface keyword uses the interface IP address as the mapped address. Use this keyword if you want to use the interface address, but the address is dynamically assigned using DHCP. You must use the interface keyword instead of specifying the actual IP address when you want to include the IP address of an interface in a static PAT entry. The mapped_port argument specifies the mapped TCP or UDP port. You can specify the ports by either a literal name or a number in the range of 0 to 65535. You can view valid port numbers online at the following website: http://www.iana.org/assignments/port-numbers The access-list keyword and acl_id argument identify the real addresses and destination/source addresses using an extended access list. Create the extended access list using the access-list extended command. (See Chapter 11, “Adding an Extended Access List,” for more information.) This access list should include only permit ACEs. Make sure that the source address in the access list matches the real_ip in this command. The optional dns keyword rewrites the A record, or address record, in DNS replies that match this static command. For DNS replies traversing from a mapped interface to any other interface, the A record is rewritten from the mapped value to the real value. Inversely, for DNS replies traversing from any interface to a mapped interface, the A record is rewritten from the real value to the mapped value. DNS inspection must be enabled to support this functionality. The optional norandomseq keyword disables TCP ISN randomization protection The optional tcp tcp_max_conns keyword specifies the maximum number of simultaneous TCP connections allowed to the local host. The optional emb_limit argument specifies the maximum number of embryonic connections per host. Note An embryonic limit applied using static NAT is applied to all connections to or from the real IP address, and not just connections between the specified interfaces. To apply limits to specific flows, see the “Configuring Connection Limits and Timeouts” section on page 53-3. The optional udp udp_max_conns keyword and argument specify the maximum number of simultaneous UDP connections allowed to the local host. (For additional information about command options, see the Cisco Security Appliance Command Reference.)30-7 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 30 Configuring Static PAT Configuring Static PAT Configuring Regular Static PAT Static PAT translations allow a specific UDP or TCP port on a global address to be translated to a specific port on a local address. To configure regular static PAT, enter the following command:30-8 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 30 Configuring Static PAT Configuring Static PAT Command Purpose static (real_interface,mapped_interface) {tcp | udp} {mapped_ip | interface} mapped_port real_ip real_port [netmask mask] [dns] [norandomseq] [[tcp] tcp_max_conns [emb_limit]] [udp udp_max_conns] Example: hostname(config)# static (inside,outside) tcp 10.1.2.14 telnet 10.1.1.15 telnet netmask 255.255.255.255 Configures static PAT. The real real_interfaceargument specifies the name of the interface connected to the real IP address network, and the mapped_interface argument specifies the name of the interface connected to the mapped IP address network. Either tcp or udp specifies the protocol. The mapped_ip argument specifies the address to which the real address is translated (the interface connected to the mapped IP address network). The interface keyword uses the interface IP address as the mapped address. Use this keyword if you want to use the interface address, but the address is dynamically assigned using DHCP. You must use the interface keyword instead of specifying the actual IP address when you want to include the IP address of an interface in a static PAT entry. The mapped_port and real_port arguments specify the mapped and real TCP or UDP ports. You can specify the ports by either a literal name or a number in the range of 0 to 65535. You can view valid port numbers online at the following website: http://www.iana.org/assignments/port-numbers The netmask mask option specifies the subnet mask for the real and mapped addresses. For single hosts, use 255.255.255.255. If you do not enter a mask, then the default mask for the IP address class is used, with one exception. If a host-bit is non-zero after masking, a host mask of 255.255.255.255 is used. If you use the access-list keyword instead of the real_ip, then the subnet mask used in the access list is also used for the mapped_ip. The dns option rewrites the A record, or address record, in DNS replies that match this static command. For DNS replies traversing from a mapped interface to any other interface, the A record is rewritten from the mapped value to the real value. Inversely, for DNS replies traversing from any interface to a mapped interface, the A record is rewritten from the real value to the mapped value. DNS inspection must be enabled to support this functionality. The norandomseq option disables TCP ISN randomization protection The tcp tcp_max_conns options specify the maximum number of simultaneous TCP connections allowed to the local host. The emb_limit option specifies the maximum number of embryonic connections per host. Note An embryonic limit applied using static NAT is applied to all connections to or from the real IP address, and not just connections between the specified interfaces. To apply limits to specific flows, see the “Configuring Connection Limits and Timeouts” section on page 53-3. The udp udp_max_conns options specify the maximum number of simultaneous UDP connections allowed to the local host. (For additional information about command options, see the Cisco Security Appliance Command Reference.)30-9 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 30 Configuring Static PAT Monitoring Static PAT Monitoring Static PAT To monitor static PAT, enter the following command: Configuration Examples for Static PAT This section includes configuration examples for policy static PAT and regular static PAT, and it contains these topics: • Examples of Policy Static PAT, page 30-9 • Examples of Regular Static PAT, page 30-9 • Example of Redirecting Ports, page 30-10 Examples of Policy Static PAT For Telnet traffic initiated from hosts on the 10.1.3.0 network to the ASA outside interface (10.1.2.14), you can redirect the traffic to the inside host at 10.1.1.15 by entering the following commands: hostname(config)# access-list TELNET permit tcp host 10.1.1.15 eq telnet 10.1.3.0 255.255.255.0 hostname(config)# static (inside,outside) tcp 10.1.2.14 telnet access-list TELNET For HTTP traffic initiated from hosts on the 10.1.3.0 network to the ASA outside interface (10.1.2.14), you can redirect the traffic to the inside host at 10.1.1.15 by entering: hostname(config)# access-list HTTP permit tcp host 10.1.1.15 eq http 10.1.3.0 255.255.255.0 hostname(config)# static (inside,outside) tcp 10.1.2.14 http access-list HTTP Examples of Regular Static PAT To redirect Telnet traffic from the ASA outside interface (10.1.2.14) to the inside host at 10.1.1.15, enter the following command: hostname(config)# static (inside,outside) tcp 10.1.2.14 telnet 10.1.1.15 telnet netmask 255.255.255.255 If you want to allow the preceding real Telnet server to initiate connections, though, then you need to provide additional translation. For example, to translate all other types of traffic, enter the following commands. The original static command provides translation for Telnet to the server, while the nat and global commands provide PAT for outbound connections from the server. hostname(config)# static (inside,outside) tcp 10.1.2.14 telnet 10.1.1.15 telnet netmask 255.255.255.255 hostname(config)# nat (inside) 1 10.1.1.15 255.255.255.255 hostname(config)# global (outside) 1 10.1.2.14 Command Purpose show running-config static Displays all static commands in the configuration.30-10 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 30 Configuring Static PAT Configuration Examples for Static PAT If you also have a separate translation for all inside traffic, and the inside hosts use a different mapped address from the Telnet server, you can still configure traffic initiated from the Telnet server to use the same mapped address as the static statement that allows Telnet traffic to the server. You need to create a more exclusive nat statement just for the Telnet server. Because nat statements are read for the best match, more exclusive nat statements are matched before general statements. The following example shows the Telnet static statement, the more exclusive nat statement for initiated traffic from the Telnet server, and the statement for other inside hosts, which uses a different mapped address. hostname(config)# static (inside,outside) tcp 10.1.2.14 telnet 10.1.1.15 telnet netmask 255.255.255.255 hostname(config)# nat (inside) 1 10.1.1.15 255.255.255.255 hostname(config)# global (outside) 1 10.1.2.14 hostname(config)# nat (inside) 2 10.1.1.0 255.255.255.0 hostname(config)# global (outside) 2 10.1.2.78 To translate a well-known port (80) to another port (8080), enter the following command: hostname(config)# static (inside,outside) tcp 10.1.2.45 80 10.1.1.16 8080 netmask 255.255.255.255 Example of Redirecting Ports Figure 30-3 shows an example of a network configuration in which the port redirection feature might be useful. Figure 30-3 Port Redirection Using Static PAT In the configuration described in this section, port redirection occurs for hosts on external networks as follows: • Telnet requests to IP address 209.165.201.5 are redirected to 10.1.1.6. • FTP requests to IP address 209.165.201.5 are redirected to 10.1.1.3. • HTTP request to an ASA outside IP address 209.165.201.25 are redirected to 10.1.1.5. • HTTP port 8080 requests to PAT address 209.165.201.15 are redirected to 10.1.1.7 port 80. Telnet Server 10.1.1.6 209.165.201.25 209.165.201.5 209.165.201.15 10.1.1.1 Inside FTP Server 10.1.1.3 Web Server 10.1.1.5 Web Server 10.1.1.7 Outside 13003030-11 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 30 Configuring Static PAT Feature History for Static PAT To implement this configuration, perform the following steps: Step 1 Configure PAT for the inside network by entering the following commands: hostname(config)# nat (inside) 1 0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 0 0 hostname(config)# global (outside) 1 209.165.201.15 Step 2 Redirect Telnet requests for 209.165.201.5 to 10.1.1.6 by entering the following command: hostname(config)# static (inside,outside) tcp 209.165.201.5 telnet 10.1.1.6 telnet netmask 255.255.255.255 Step 3 Redirect FTP requests for IP address 209.165.201.5 to 10.1.1.3 by entering the following command: hostname(config)# static (inside,outside) tcp 209.165.201.5 ftp 10.1.1.3 ftp netmask 255.255.255.255 Step 4 Redirect HTTP requests for the ASA outside interface address to 10.1.1.5 by entering the following command: hostname(config)# static (inside,outside) tcp interface www 10.1.1.5 www netmask 255.255.255.255 Step 5 Redirect HTTP requests on port 8080 for PAT address 209.165.201.15 to 10.1.1.7 port 80 by entering the following command: hostname(config)# static (inside,outside) tcp 209.165.201.15 8080 10.1.1.7 www netmask 255.255.255.255 Feature History for Static PAT Table 30-2 lists the release history for this feature. Table 30-2 Feature History for Static PAT Feature Name Releases Feature Information Static PAT 7.0 Static PAT translations allow a specific UDP or TCP port on a global address to be translated to a specific port on a local address. This feature was introduced. NAT and static PAT 7.3.(1) NAT are supported in transparent firewall mode.30-12 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 30 Configuring Static PAT Feature History for Static PATC H A P T E R 31-1 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 31 Bypassing NAT If you enable NAT control, then inside hosts must match a NAT rule when accessing outside hosts. You might want to bypass NAT when you enable NAT control so that local IP addresses appear untranslated. You also might want to bypass NAT if you are using an application that does not support NAT. See the “When to Use Application Protocol Inspection” section on page 40-2 for information about inspection engines that do not support NAT. You can bypass NAT using identity NAT, static identity NAT, or NAT exemption. This chapter describes how to bypass NAT, and it includes the following topics: • Configuring Identity NAT, page 31-1 • Configuring Static Identity NAT, page 31-5 • Configuring NAT Exemption, page 31-11 Configuring Identity NAT This section includes the following topics: • Information About Identity NAT, page 31-2 • Licensing Requirements for Identity NAT, page 31-2 • Guidelines and Limitations for Identity NAT, page 31-2 • Default Settings for Identity NAT, page 31-3 • Configuring Identity NAT, page 31-4 • Monitoring Identity NAT, page 31-5 • Feature History for Identity NAT, page 31-531-2 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 31 Bypassing NAT Configuring Identity NAT Information About Identity NAT Identity NAT translates the real IP address to the same IP address. Only “translated” hosts can create NAT translations, and responding traffic is allowed back. When you configure identity NAT (which is similar to dynamic NAT), you do not limit translation for a host on specific interfaces; you must use identity NAT for connections through all interfaces. For example, you cannot choose to perform normal translation on real addresses when you access interface A and then use identity NAT when accessing interface B. Because you use identity NAT for all connections through all interfaces, make sure that the real addresses for which you use identity NAT are routable on all networks that are available according to your access list. Note If you need to specify a particular interface on which to translate the addresses, use regular dynamic NAT. Figure 31-1 shows a typical identity NAT scenario. Figure 31-1 Identity NAT Licensing Requirements for Identity NAT The following table shows the licensing requirements for this feature: Guidelines and Limitations for Identity NAT This section includes the guidelines and limitations for this feature: Context Mode Guidelines • Supported in single and multiple context mode. Firewall Mode Guidelines • Supported in routed and transparent firewall modes. 209.165.201.1 209.165.201.1 Inside Outside 209.165.201.2 209.165.201.2 130033 Security Appliance Model License Requirement All models Base License.31-3 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 31 Bypassing NAT Configuring Identity NAT Additional Guidelines and Limitations The following guidelines and limitations apply to identity NAT: • If you change the NAT configuration, and you do not want to wait for existing translations to time out before the new NAT information is used, you can clear the translation table using the clear xlate command. However, clearing the translation table disconnects all current connections that use translations. • The real addresses for which you use identity NAT must be routable on all networks that are available according to your access lists. • For identity NAT, even though the mapped address is the same as the real address, you cannot initiate a connection from the outside to the inside (even if the interface access list allows it). Use static identity NAT or NAT exemption for this functionality. Default Settings for Identity NAT Table 31-1 lists the default settings for identity NAT parameters. Table 31-1 Default Identity NAT Parameters Parameters Default emb_limit The default is 0, which means unlimited embryonic connections tcp tcp_max_conns The default is 0, which means unlimited connections. udp udp_max_conns The default is 0, which means unlimited connections. 31-4 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 31 Bypassing NAT Configuring Identity NAT Configuring Identity NAT To configure identity NAT, enter the following command: Command Purpose nat (real_interface) nat_id real_ip [mask [dns] [outside] [norandomseq] [[tcp] tcp_max_conns [emb_limit]] [udp udp_max_conns] Example: hostname(config)# nat (inside) 0 10.1.1.0 255.255.255.0 Configures identity NAT for the inside 10.1.1.0/24 network. The real_interface argument specifies the name of the interface connected to the real IP address network. The nat_id argument specifies an integer for the NAT ID. For identity NAT, use the NAT ID of 0. This ID is referenced by the global command to associate a global pool with the real_ip. The real_ip argument specifies the real address that you want to translate. You can use 0.0.0.0 (or the abbreviation 0) to specify all addresses. The optional mask argument specifies the subnet mask for the real addresses. If you do not enter a mask, then the default mask for the IP address class is used. The optional dns keyword rewrites the A record, or address record, in DNS replies that match this command. For DNS replies traversing from a mapped interface to any other interface, the A record is rewritten from the mapped value to the real value. Inversely, for DNS replies traversing from any interface to a mapped interface, the A record is rewritten from the real value to the mapped value. Yo u mu s t en ter outside if this interface is on a lower security level than the interface you identify by the matching global statement. The optional norandomseq keyword disables TCP ISN randomization protection. The optional tcp tcp_max_conns keyword and argument specify the maximum number of simultaneous TCP connections allowed to the local host. The default is 0, which means unlimited connections. The optional emb_limit argument specifies the maximum number of embryonic connections per host. The default is 0, which means unlimited embryonic connections. The optional udp udp_max_conns keyword and argument specify the maximum number of simultaneous UDP connections allowed to the local host. The default is 0, which means unlimited connections. (For additional information about command options, see the nat command in the Cisco Security Appliance Command Reference.)31-5 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 31 Bypassing NAT Configuring Static Identity NAT Monitoring Identity NAT To monitor NAT bypass, enter the following command: Feature History for Identity NAT Table 31-2 lists the release history for this feature. Configuring Static Identity NAT This section includes the following topics: • Information About Static Identity NAT, page 31-5 • Licensing Requirements for Static Identity NAT, page 31-6 • Guidelines and Limitations for Static Identity NAT, page 31-6 • Default Settings for Static Identity NAT, page 31-7 • Configuring Static Identity NAT, page 31-7 • Monitoring Static Identity NAT, page 31-10 • Feature History for Static Identity NAT, page 31-10 Information About Static Identity NAT Static identity NAT translates the real IP address to the same IP address. Static identity NAT enables you to specify the interface on which you want to allow the real addresses to appear, so you can use identity NAT when you access interface A, and use regular translation when you access interface B. Static identity NAT also enables you to use policy NAT, which identifies the real and destination addresses when determining the real addresses to translate. (See the “Policy NAT” section on page 26-5 for more information about policy NAT.) For example, you can use static identity NAT for an inside address when it accesses the outside interface and the destination is server A, but you can use a normal translation when accessing the outside server B. The translation is always active, and both “translated” and remote hosts can originate connections. Command Purpose show running-config nat Displays a pool of global IP addresses that are associated with the network. Table 31-2 Feature History for Identity NAT Feature Name Releases Feature Information Identity NAT 7.0 Identity NAT translates the real IP address to the same IP address. You use identity NAT for connections through all interfaces. The following command was introduced: nat. NAT 8.0(2) NAT began support in transparent firewall mode.31-6 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 31 Bypassing NAT Configuring Static Identity NAT Figure 31-2 shows a typical static identity NAT scenario. Figure 31-2 Static Identity NAT Licensing Requirements for Static Identity NAT The following table shows the licensing requirements for this feature: Guidelines and Limitations for Static Identity NAT This section includes the guidelines and limitations for this feature: Context Mode Guidelines • Supported in single and multiple context mode. Firewall Mode Guidelines • Supported in routed and transparent firewall modes. Additional Guidelines and Limitations The following guidelines and limitations apply to static identity NAT: • You cannot clear static translations from the translation table with the clear xlate command; you must remove the static command instead. Only dynamic translations created by the nat and global commands can be removed with the clear xlate command. • If you remove a static command, existing connections that use the translation are not affected. To remove these connections, enter the clear local-host command. • Policy static identity NAT does not consider the inactive or time-range keywords; all ACEs are considered to be active for policy NAT configurations. (See the“Policy NAT” section on page 26-5 for more information.) • For static policy NAT, in undoing the translation, the ACL in the static command is not used. If the destination address in the packet matches the mapped address in the static rule, the static rule is used to untranslate the address. 209.165.201.1 209.165.201.1 Inside Outside 209.165.201.2 209.165.201.2 130036 Security Appliance Model License Requirement All models Base License.31-7 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 31 Bypassing NAT Configuring Static Identity NAT Default Settings for Static Identity NAT Table 31-3 lists the default settings for static identity NAT parameters. Configuring Static Identity NAT This section describes how to configure policy static identity NAT and regular static identity NAT, and it includes the following topics: • Configuring Policy Static Identity NAT, page 31-8 • Configuring Regular Static Identity NAT, page 31-9 Table 31-3 Default Static Identity NAT Parameters Parameters Default emb_limit The default is 0, which means unlimited embryonic connections. tcp tcp_max_conns The default is 0, which means unlimited embryonic connections. udp udp_max_conns The default is 0, which means unlimited embryonic connections. 31-8 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 31 Bypassing NAT Configuring Static Identity NAT Configuring Policy Static Identity NAT To configure policy static identity NAT, enter the following command: Example of Policy Static Identity NAT The following policy static identity NAT example shows a single real address that uses identity NAT when accessing one destination address and a translation when accessing another: hostname(config)# access-list NET1 permit ip host 10.1.2.27 209.165.201.0 255.255.255.224 hostname(config)# access-list NET2 permit ip host 10.1.2.27 209.165.200.224 255.255.255.224 hostname(config)# static (inside,outside) 209.165.202.129 access-list NET1 hostname(config)# static (inside,outside) 209.165.202.130 access-list NET2 Command Purpose static (real_interface,mapped_interface) real_ip access-list acl_id [dns] [norandomseq] [[tcp] tcp_max_conns [emb_limit]] [udp udp_max_conns] Example: hostname(config)# static (inside,outside) 209.165.202.129 access-list NET1 Configures policy static NAT. The real_interface,mapped_interface arguments specify the name of the interface connected to the real IP address network and the name of the interface connected to the mapped IP address network. The real_ip argument specifies the real address that you want to translate. The access-list keyword and acl_id argument identify the real addresses and destination/source addresses using an extended access list. Create the extended access list using the access-list extended command. (See Chapter 11, “Adding an Extended Access List.”) This access list should include only permit ACEs. Make sure that the source address in the access list matches the real_ip in this command. The optional dns keyword rewrites the A record, or address record, in DNS replies that match this static command. For DNS replies traversing from a mapped interface to any other interface, the A record is rewritten from the mapped value to the real value. Inversely, for DNS replies traversing from any interface to a mapped interface, the A record is rewritten from the real value to the mapped value. DNS inspection must be enabled to support this functionality. The optional norandomseq keyword disables TCP ISN randomization protection. The optional tcp tcp_max_conns keyword and argument specify the maximum number of simultaneous TCP connections allowed to the local host. The default is 0, which means unlimited connections. The optional emb_limit argument specifies the maximum number of embryonic connections per host. The default is 0, which means unlimited embryonic connections. The optional udp udp_max_conns keyword and argument specify the maximum number of simultaneous UDP connections allowed to the local host. The default is 0, which means unlimited connections. (For additional information about command options, see the static command in the Cisco Security Appliance Command Reference.)31-9 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 31 Bypassing NAT Configuring Static Identity NAT Configuring Regular Static Identity NAT To configure regular static identity NAT, enter the following command: Examples of Regular Static Identity NAT The following command uses static identity NAT for an inside IP address (10.1.1.3) when accessed by the outside: hostname(config)# static (inside,outside) 10.1.1.3 10.1.1.3 netmask 255.255.255.255 Command Purpose static (real_interface,mapped_interface) real_ip real_ip [netmask mask] [dns] [norandomseq] [[tcp] tcp_max_conns [emb_limit]] [udp udp_max_conns] Example: hostname(config)# static (inside,outside) 10.1.1.3 10.1.1.3 netmask 255.255.255.255 Configures static identity NAT. The real_interface,mapped_interface arguments specify the name of the interface connected to the real IP address network and the name of the interface connected to the mapped IP address network. The real_ip argument specifies the real address that you want to translate. Specify the same IP address for both real_ip arguments. The netmask mask options specify the subnet mask for the real and mapped addresses. The dns option rewrites the A record, or address record, in DNS replies that match this static. For DNS replies traversing from a mapped interface to any other interface, the A record is rewritten from the mapped value to the real value. Inversely, for DNS replies traversing from any interface to a mapped interface, the A record is rewritten from the real value to the mapped value. Note Note DNS inspection must be enabled to support this functionality. The norandomseq option disables TCP ISN randomization protection. Each TCP connection has two ISNs: one generated by the client and one generated by the server. The security appliance randomizes the ISN of the TCP SYN passing in both the inbound and outbound directions. For static PAT, the tcp option specifies the protocol as TCP. The tcp_max_cons argument specifies the maximum number of simultaneous TCP connections allowed to the local-host. (See the local-host command.) The default is 0, which means unlimited connections. The optional emb_limit argument specifies the maximum number of embryonic connections per host. The default is 0, which means unlimited embryonic connections. The udp udp_max_conns option specifies the maximum number of simultaneous UDP connections allowed to the local-host. (See the local-host command.) The default is 0, which means unlimited connections. The example shown uses static identity NAT for an inside IP address (10.1.1.3) when accessed by the outside.31-10 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 31 Bypassing NAT Configuring Static Identity NAT The following command uses static identity NAT for an outside address (209.165.201.15) when accessed by the inside: hostname(config)# static (outside,inside) 209.165.201.15 209.165.201.15 netmask 255.255.255.255 The following command statically maps an entire subnet: hostname(config)# static (inside,dmz) 10.1.2.0 10.1.2.0 netmask 255.255.255.0 Monitoring Static Identity NAT To monitor static identity NAT, enter the following command: Feature History for Static Identity NAT Table 31-4 lists the release history for this feature. Command Purpose show running-config static Displays all static commands in the configuration. Table 31-4 Feature History for Static Identity NAT Feature Name Releases Feature Information Static identity NAT 7.0 Static identity NAT translates the real IP address to the same IP address. The following command was introduced: static. NAT 8.0(2) NAT began support in transparent firewall mode.31-11 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 31 Bypassing NAT Configuring NAT Exemption Configuring NAT Exemption This section includes the following topics: • Information About NAT Exemption, page 31-11 • Licensing Requirements for NAT Exemption, page 31-11 • Guidelines and Limitations for NAT Exemption, page 31-12 • Default Settings for NAT Exemption, page 31-12 • Configuring NAT Exemption, page 31-13 • Monitoring NAT Exemption, page 31-13 • Configuration Examples for NAT Exemption, page 31-13 • Feature History for NAT Exemption, page 31-14 Information About NAT Exemption NAT exemption exempts addresses from translation and allows both translated and remote hosts to initiate connections. Like identity NAT, you do not limit translation for a host on specific interfaces; you must use NAT exemption for connections through all interfaces. However, NAT exemption does enable you to specify the real and destination addresses when determining the real addresses to translate (similar to policy NAT), so you have greater control using NAT exemption than identity NAT. However, unlike policy NAT, NAT exemption does not consider the ports in the access list. Use static identity NAT to consider ports in the access list. Figure 31-3 shows a typical NAT exemption scenario. Figure 31-3 NAT Exemption Licensing Requirements for NAT Exemption The following table shows the licensing requirements for this feature: 209.165.201.1 209.165.201.1 Inside Outside 209.165.201.2 209.165.201.2 130036 Security Appliance Model License Requirement All models Base License.31-12 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 31 Bypassing NAT Configuring NAT Exemption Guidelines and Limitations for NAT Exemption This section includes the guidelines and limitations for this feature: Context Mode Guidelines • Supported in single and multiple context mode. Firewall Mode Guidelines • Supported in routed and transparent firewall modes. Additional Guidelines and Limitations The following guidelines and limitations apply to NAT exemption: • If you remove a NAT exemption configuration, existing connections that use NAT exemption are not affected. To remove these connections, enter the clear local-host command. • NAT exemption does not support connection settings, such as maximum TCP connections. • By default, the nat command exempts traffic from inside to outside. If you want traffic from outside to inside to bypass NAT, then add an additional nat command and enter outside to identify the NAT instance as outside NAT. You might want to use outside NAT exemption if you configure dynamic NAT for the outside interface and want to exempt other traffic. • Access list hit counts, as shown by the show access-list command, do not increment for NAT exemption access lists. Default Settings for NAT Exemption Table 31-5 lists the default settings for NAT exemption parameters. Table 31-5 Default NAT Exemption Parameters Parameters Default nat_id Specifies an integer for the NAT ID. For NAT exemption, use the NAT ID of 0. 31-13 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 31 Bypassing NAT Configuring NAT Exemption Configuring NAT Exemption To configure NAT exemption, enter the following command: Monitoring NAT Exemption To monitor NAT bypass, enter the following command: Configuration Examples for NAT Exemption The following examples show how to configure NAT exemption. To exempt an inside network when accessing any destination address, enter the following command: hostname(config)# access-list EXEMPT permit ip 10.1.2.0 255.255.255.0 any hostname(config)# nat (inside) 0 access-list EXEMPT Command Purpose nat (real_interface) nat_id access-list acl_name [outside] Example: hostname(config)# nat (inside) 0 access-list EXEMPT Configures NAT exemption. The real_interface argument specifies the name of the interface connected to the real Ip address network. The nat_id argument specifies an integer for the NAT ID. For NAT exemption, use the NAT ID of 0. The access-list key word identifies local addresses and destination addresses using an extended access list. Create the extended access list using the access-list extended command. (See the Chapter 11, “Adding an Extended Access List.”) This access list can include both permit ACEs and deny ACEs. Do not specify the real and destination ports in the access list; NAT exemption does not consider the ports. NAT exemption considers the inactive and time-range keywords, but it does not support ACL with all inactive and time-range ACEs. By default, this command exempts traffic from inside to outside. If you want traffic from outside to inside to bypass NAT, then add an additional nat command and enter outside to identify the NAT instance as outside NAT. You might want to use outside NAT exemption if you configure dynamic NAT for the outside interface and want to exempt other traffic. Enter outside if this interface is on a lower security level than the interface you identify by the matching global statement. (For additional information about command options, see the nat command in the Cisco Security Appliance Command Reference.) Command Purpose show running-config nat Displays a pool of global IP addresses that are associated with the network.31-14 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 31 Bypassing NAT Configuring NAT Exemption To use dynamic outside NAT for a DMZ network, and exempt another DMZ network, enter the following command: hostname(config)# nat (dmz) 1 10.1.2.0 255.255.255.0 outside dns hostname(config)# global (inside) 1 10.1.1.45 hostname(config)# access-list EXEMPT permit ip 10.1.3.0 255.255.255.0 any hostname(config)# nat (dmz) 0 access-list EXEMPT To exempt an inside address when accessing two different destination addresses, enter the following commands: hostname(config)# access-list NET1 permit ip 10.1.2.0 255.255.255.0 209.165.201.0 255.255.255.224 hostname(config)# access-list NET1 permit ip 10.1.2.0 255.255.255.0 209.165.200.224 255.255.255.224 hostname(config)# nat (inside) 0 access-list NET1 Feature History for NAT Exemption Table 31-6 lists the release history for this feature. Table 31-6 Feature History for NAT Exemption Feature Name Releases Feature Information NAT exemption 7.0 NAT exemption exempts addresses from translation and allows both translated and remote hosts to initiate connections. The following command was introduced: nat. NAT 8.0(2) NAT began support in transparent firewall mode.P A R T 5 Configuring High AvailabilityC H A P T E R 32-1 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 32 Information About High Availability This chapter provides an overview of the failover features that enable you to achieve high availability on the Cisco 5500 series adaptive security appliances. For information about configuring high availability, see Chapter 34, “Configuring Active/Active Failover” or Chapter 33, “Configuring Active/Standby Failover.” This chapter includes the following sections: • Information About Failover and High Availability, page 32-1 • Failover System Requirements, page 32-2 • Failover and Stateful Failover Links, page 32-3 • Active/Active and Active/Standby Failover, page 32-9 • Stateless (Regular) and Stateful Failover, page 32-10 • Transparent Firewall Mode Requirements, page 32-11 • Auto Update Server Support in Failover Configurations, page 32-12 • Failover Health Monitoring, page 32-14 • Failover Feature/Platform Matrix, page 32-16 • Failover Times by Platform, page 32-16 • Failover Messages, page 32-17 Information About Failover and High Availability Configuring high availability requires two identical ASAs connected to each other through a dedicated failover link and, optionally, a Stateful Failover link. The health of the active interfaces and units is monitored to determine if specific failover conditions are met. If those conditions are met, failover occurs. The ASA supports two failover configurations, Active/Active failover and Active/Standby failover. Each failover configuration has its own method for determining and performing failover. With Active/Active failover, both units can pass network traffic. This also lets you configure traffic sharing on your network. Active/Active failover is available only on units running in multiple context mode. With Active/Standby failover, only one unit passes traffic while the other unit waits in a standby state. Active/Standby failover is available on units running in either single or multiple context mode. Both failover configurations support stateful or stateless (regular) failover. Show Desktop scf32-2 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 32 Information About High Availability Failover System Requirements Note When the security appliance is configured for Active/Active stateful failover, you cannot enable IPsec or SSL VPN. Therefore, these features are unavailable. VPN failover is available for Active/Standby failover configurations only. Failover System Requirements This section describes the hardware, software, and license requirements for ASAs in a failover configuration. This section contains the following topics: • Hardware Requirements, page 32-2 • Software Requirements, page 32-2 • Licensing Requirements, page 32-3 Hardware Requirements The two units in a failover configuration must be the same model, have the same number and types of interfaces, and the same SSMs installed (if any). If you are using units with different Flash memory sizes in your failover configuration, make sure the unit with the smaller Flash memory has enough space to accommodate the software image files and the configuration files. If it does not, configuration synchronization from the unit with the larger Flash memory to the unit with the smaller Flash memory will fail. Although it is not required, it is recommended that both units have the same amount of RAM memory installed. Software Requirements The two units in a failover configuration must be in the same operating modes (routed or transparent, single or multiple context). They must have the same major (first number) and minor (second number) software version. However, you can use different versions of the software during an upgrade process; for example, you can upgrade one unit from Version 7.0(1) to Version 7.0(2) and have failover remain active. We recommend upgrading both units to the same version to ensure long-term compatibility. See “Performing Zero Downtime Upgrades for Failover Pairs” section on page 78-5 for more information about upgrading the software on a failover pair.32-3 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 32 Information About High Availability Failover and Stateful Failover Links Licensing Requirements The licensed features (such as SSL VPN peers or security contexts, for example) on both units participating in failover must be identical. Failover and Stateful Failover Links This section describes the failover and the Stateful Failover links, which are dedicated connections between the two units in a failover configuration. This section includes the following topics: • Failover Link, page 32-3 • Stateful Failover Link, page 32-4 • Avoiding Interrupted Failover Links, page 32-5 Failover Link The two units in a failover pair constantly communicate over a failover link to determine the operating status of each unit. The following information is communicated over the failover link: • The unit state (active or standby) • Hello messages (keep-alives) • Network link status • MAC address exchange • Configuration replication and synchronization Caution All information sent over the failover and Stateful Failover links is sent in clear text unless you secure the communication with a failover key. If the ASA is used to terminate VPN tunnels, this information includes any usernames, passwords and preshared keys used for establishing the tunnels. Transmitting this sensitive data in clear text could pose a significant security risk. We recommend securing the failover communication with a failover key if you are using the ASA to terminate VPN tunnels. You can use any unused Ethernet interface on the device as the failover link; however, you cannot specify an interface that is currently configured with a name. The LAN failover link interface is not configured as a normal networking interface; it exists for failover communication only. This interface should only be used for the LAN failover link (and optionally for the Stateful Failover link). Connect the LAN failover link in one of the following two ways: • Using a switch, with no other device on the same network segment (broadcast domain or VLAN) as the LAN failover interfaces of the ASA. • Using a crossover Ethernet cable to connect the appliances directly, without the need for an external switch. Note When you use a crossover cable for the LAN failover link, if the LAN interface fails, the link is brought down on both peers. This condition may hamper troubleshooting efforts because you cannot easily determine which interface failed and caused the link to come down.32-4 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 32 Information About High Availability Failover and Stateful Failover Links Note The ASA supports Auto-MDI/MDIX on its copper Ethernet ports, so you can either use a crossover cable or a straight-through cable. If you use a straight-through cable, the interface automatically detects the cable and swaps one of the transmit/receive pairs to MDIX. Stateful Failover Link To use Stateful Failover, you must configure a Stateful Failover link to pass all state information. You have three options for configuring a Stateful Failover link: • You can use a dedicated Ethernet interface for the Stateful Failover link. • If you are using LAN-based failover, you can share the failover link. • You can share a regular data interface, such as the inside interface. However, this option is not recommended. If you are using a dedicated Ethernet interface for the Stateful Failover link, you can use either a switch or a crossover cable to directly connect the units. If you use a switch, no other hosts or routers should be on this link. Note Enable the PortFast option on Cisco switch ports that connect directly to the ASA. If you use a data interface as the Stateful Failover link, you receive the following warning when you specify that interface as the Stateful Failover link: ******* WARNING ***** WARNING ******* WARNING ****** WARNING ********* Sharing Stateful failover interface with regular data interface is not a recommended configuration due to performance and security concerns. ******* WARNING ***** WARNING ******* WARNING ****** WARNING ********* Sharing a data interface with the Stateful Failover interface can leave you vulnerable to replay attacks. Additionally, large amounts of Stateful Failover traffic may be sent on the interface, causing performance problems on that network segment. Note Using a data interface as the Stateful Failover interface is supported in single context, routed mode only. In multiple context mode, the Stateful Failover link resides in the system context. This interface and the failover interface are the only interfaces in the system context. All other interfaces are allocated to and configured from within security contexts. Note The IP address and MAC address for the Stateful Failover link does not change at failover unless the Stateful Failover link is configured on a regular data interface. Caution All information sent over the failover and Stateful Failover links is sent in clear text unless you secure the communication with a failover key. If the ASA is used to terminate VPN tunnels, this information includes any usernames, passwords, and preshared keys used for establishing the tunnels. Transmitting this sensitive data in clear text could pose a significant security risk. We recommend securing the failover communication with a failover key if you are using the ASA to terminate VPN tunnels.32-5 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 32 Information About High Availability Failover and Stateful Failover Links Failover Interface Speed for Stateful Links If you use the failover link as the Stateful Failover link, you should use the fastest Ethernet interface available. If you experience performance problems on that interface, consider dedicating a separate interface for the Stateful Failover interface. Use the following failover interface speed guidelines for the adaptive security appliances: • Cisco ASA 5510 – Stateful link speed can be 100 Mbps, even though the data interface can operate at 1 Gigabit due to the CPU speed limitation. • Cisco ASA 5520/5540/5550 – Stateful link speed should match the fastest data link. • Cisco ASA 5580/5585 – Use only non-management 1 Gigabit ports for the stateful link because management ports have lower performance and cannot meet the performance requirement for stateful failover. For optimum performance when using long distance LAN failover, the latency for the failover link should be less than 10 milliseconds and no more than 250 milliseconds. If latency is more than10 milliseconds, some performance degradation occurs due to retransmission of failover messages. All platforms support sharing of failover heartbeat and stateful link, but we recommend using a separate heartbeat link on systems with high Stateful Failover traffic. Avoiding Interrupted Failover Links Because adaptive security appliances uses failover LAN interfaces to transport messages between primary and secondary units, if a failover LAN interface is down (that is, the physical link is down or the switch used to connect the LAN interface is down), then the adaptive security appliance failover operation is affected until the health of the failover LAN interface is restored. In the event that all communication is cut off between the units in a failover pair, both units go into the active state, which is expected behavior. When communication is restored and the two active units resume communication through the failover link or through any monitored interface, the primary unit remains active, and the secondary unit immediately returns to the standby state. This relationship is established regardless of the health of the primary unit. Because of this behavior, stateful flows that were passed properly by the secondary active unit during the network split are now interrupted. To avoid this interruption, failover links and data interfaces should travel through different paths to decrease the chance that all links fail at the same time. In the event that only one failover link is down, the adaptive security appliance takes a sample of the interface health, exchanges this information with its peer through the data interface, and performs a switchover if the active unit has a greater number of down interfaces. Subsequently, the failover operation is suspended until the health of the failover link is restored. Depending upon their network topologies, several primary/secondary failure scenarios exist in adaptive security appliance failover pairs, as shown in the following scenarios. Scenario 1—Not Recommended If a single switch or a set of switches are used to connect both failover and data interfaces between two adaptive security appliances, then when a switch or inter-switch-link is down, both adaptive security appliances become active. Therefore, the following two connection methods shown in Figure 32-1 and Figure 32-2 are NOT recommended.32-6 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 32 Information About High Availability Failover and Stateful Failover Links Figure 32-1 Connecting with a Single Switch—Not Recommended Figure 32-2 Connecting with a Double Switch—Not Recommended Scenario 2—Recommended To make the ASA failover pair resistant to failover LAN interface failure, we recommend that failover LAN interfaces NOT use the same switch as the data interfaces, as shown in the prededing connections. Instead, use a different switch or use a direct cable to connect two adaptive security appliance failover interfaces, as shown in Figure 32-3 and Figure 32-4. Figure 32-3 Connecting with a Different Switch Figure 32-4 Connecting with a Cable Scenario 3—Recommended If the adaptive security appliance data interfaces are connected to more than one set of switches, then a failover LAN interface can be connected to one of the switches, preferably the switch on the secure side of network, as shown in Figure 32-5. 236369 Primary ASA Failover link Failover link Secondary ASA outside outside inside inside 236370 Primary ASA Failover link Failover link Secondary ASA outside outside inside inside ISL Switch 1 Switch 2 Primary ASA 236371 Failover link Failover link Secondary ASA outside outside Switch 1 Switch 2 inside inside Ethernet cable 236372 Primary ASA Failover link Failover link Secondary ASA outside outside Switch 1 inside inside32-7 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 32 Information About High Availability Failover and Stateful Failover Links Figure 32-5 Connecting with a Secure Switch Scenario 4—Recommended The most reliable failover configurations use a redundant interface on the failover LAN interface, as shown in Figure 32-6, Figure 32-7, and Figure 32-8. Figure 32-6 Connecting with Ethernet Cables 236373 Failover link Failover link Primary ASA Secondary ASA outside outside inside inside ISL ISL Switch 3 Switch 4 Switch 1 Switch 2 236374 Primary ASA Active redundant failover link Standby redundant failover link Secondary ASA outside outside Ethernet cable Ethernet cable ISL Switch 1 Switch 2 inside inside ISL Switch 3 Switch 432-8 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 32 Information About High Availability Failover and Stateful Failover Links Figure 32-7 Connecting with Redundant Interfaces Figure 32-8 Connecting with Inter-switch Links 236375 Primary ASA Active redundant failover link Active redundant failover link Standby redundant failover link Standby redundant failover link Secondary ASA outside outside ISL Switch 1 Switch 2 inside inside ISL Switch 5 Switch 3 Switch 6 Switch 4 236376 Primary ASA Active redundant failover link Active redundant failover link Standby redundant failover link Standby redundant failover link Secondary ASA outside ISL outside Switch 1 Switch 2 inside inside ISL ISL ISL Switch 7 Switch 8 Switch 5 Switch 6 Switch 3 Switch 432-9 Cisco ASA 5500 Series Configuration Guide using the CLI OL-18970-03 Chapter 32 Information About High Availability Active/Active and Active/Standby Failover Active/Active and Active/Standby Failover Two types of failover configurations are supported by the ASA: Active/Standby and Active/Active. In Active/Standby failover, one unit is the active unit. It passes traffic. The standby unit does not actively pass traffic. When a failover occurs, the a