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PowerBook User’s Guide for PowerBook computers Includes setup instructions and important health-related information ðK Apple Computer, Inc. This manual and the software described in it are copyrighted, with all rights reserved. Under the copyright laws, this manual or the software may not be copied, in whole or part, without written consent of Apple, except in the normal use of the software or to make a backup copy of the software. The same proprietary and copyright notices must be affixed to any permitted copies as were affixed to the original. This exception does not allow copies to be made for others, whether or not sold, but all of the material purchased (with all backup copies) may be sold, given, or loaned to another person. Under the law, copying includes translating into another language or format. You may use the software on any computer owned by you, but extra copies cannot be made for this purpose. The Apple logo is a trademark of Apple Computer, Inc., registered in the U.S. and other countries. Use of the “keyboard” Apple logo (Option-Shift-K) for commercial purposes without the prior written consent of Apple may constitute trademark infringement and unfair competition in violation of federal and state laws. Every effort has been made to ensure that the information in this manual is accurate. Apple is not responsible for printing or clerical errors. © Apple Computer, Inc., 1993 20525 Mariani Avenue Cupertino, CA 95014-6299 (408) 996-1010 Apple, the Apple logo, APDA, AppleLink, AppleShare, AppleTalk, EtherTalk, ImageWriter, LaserWriter, LocalTalk, Macintosh, ProDOS, and StyleWriter are trademarks of Apple Computer, Inc., registered in the U.S. and other countries. AppleColor, Apple Desktop Bus, Finder, Disk First Aid, PowerBook, PowerBook Duo, System 7, and TrueType are trademarks of Apple Computer, Inc. AppleCare is a service mark of Apple Computer, Inc., registered in the U.S. and other countries. Adobe, Adobe Illustrator, and PostScript are trademarks of Adobe Systems Incorporated, registered in the United States. Adobe Photoshop is a trademark of Adobe Systems Incorporated. Classic is a registered trademark licensed to Apple Computer, Inc. Exposure is a registered trademark of Preferred Publishers, Inc. Times is a registered trademark of Linotype Company. ITC Garamond is a registered trademark of International Typeface Corporation. MacWrite is a registered trademark of Claris Corporation. MS-DOS is a registered trademark of Microsoft Corporation. NuBus is a trademark of Texas Instruments. QuarkXPress is a registered trademark of Quark, Inc. SelectSet is a trademark of Miles, Inc., Agfa Division. SuperPaint is a registered trademark of Aldus Corporation. Tektronix is a registered trademark and Phaser is a trademark of Tektronix, Inc. Simultaneously published in the United States and Canada. Mention of third-party products is for informational purposes only and constitutes neither an endorsement nor a recommendation. Apple assumes no responsibility with regard to the performance or use of these products.Contents Radio and television interference xiii Preface How to Use This Book xv n Part I Getting Started With Your Computer 1 Chapter 1 Setting Up Your PowerBook Duo 1 Setting up the computer 2 Step 1: Plug in the power adapter 2 Step 2: Open the display 3 Step 3: Turn on the computer 4 What to do next 6 Learning the basics 7 Before you begin 7 Starting the tour 8 Turning the PowerBook on and off 12 Off 12 Sleep 13 On 14 On/Off summary 14 When you turn on your computer 15 Restarting a computer that’s already on 16 Restarting a computer that can’t be turned on normally 16 Important care and safety instructions 18 ± Warning 18 s Caution 19 S Important 20 Health-related information about computer use 21 Musculoskeletal discomfort 21 Eye fatigue 22 Arranging your work area and equipment 22 iiin Part II Learning Macintosh 27 Chapter 2 Working on the Desktop 27 Use the trackball 28 Point 28 Click 29 Press 30 Drag 31 Choose a command 32 Giving orders to your computer 32 Open an icon 33 Look at the contents of a window 34 Make a window the active window 34 Make a window larger or smaller 36 Move the hidden contents of a window into view 38 Close a window 40 Move a window 41 What’s on the desktop 42 Using the keyboard 45 Chapter 3 Creating and Changing a Document 47 Open a program 48 Create a document 49 Save your work 49 Switch programs 50 Close a document 52 Two types of programs 53 Open a document 53 Change a document 54 Save your work so far 57 Taking a shortcut 58 Make more changes 58 Quit a program 60 Opening and closing documents and programs 61 Make a copy of a document 61 Change the name of an icon 62 Use the Trash 63 iv ContentsChapter 4 Learning More About Your Computer 65 Open the Battery desk accessory 66 Open the PowerBook control panel 66 Use Balloon Help 67 Turn on Balloon Help 67 Turn off Balloon Help 68 Using floppy disks 69 Taking care of floppy disks 69 Floppy disks and hard disks 70 Use Part III of this book 71 What next? 71 n Part III PowerBook Reference 73 Chapter 5 Setting up Your Programs 73 Installing or updating system software 73 Before you install 74 Installing system software 74 Installing customized system software 76 Starting up with a floppy disk 77 Installing your programs 78 Installing programs without a floppy disk drive 78 Checking for computer viruses 79 Working with several programs at a time 80 Finding out what programs are open 80 Switching programs 80 Hiding and showing windows on the desktop 80 Changing the amount of memory a program uses 81 Using the Scrapbook 82 Storing items in the Scrapbook 82 Copying items from the Scrapbook 82 Deleting items from the Scrapbook 82 Using a RAM disk 83 Creating a RAM disk 83 Erasing a RAM disk 84 Resizing or removing a RAM disk 84 Making a RAM disk the startup disk 85 Contents vChapter 6 Power Management 87 Power sources 87 Monitoring the battery charge level 88 Using the Battery desk accessory 88 Responding to low-power messages 89 Recharging the battery 90 Recharging in the computer 90 Recharging in a recharger 91 Recharging in both the computer and a recharger 93 Removing or replacing the battery 94 Maximizing battery life and work time 95 Disposing of dead batteries 96 Replacing the backup batteries 96 Reconditioning the battery 97 Maximizing work time 99 Ways to conserve battery power 99 Adjusting the battery conservation settings 100 Using the custom options 101 Chapter 7 Using Disks 105 Preparing a new disk for use 105 Initializing a hard disk 105 Initializing a floppy disk 107 Erasing a floppy disk 108 Designating a startup disk 108 Scanning order for startup disks 109 Protecting the information on a disk 109 Locking a floppy disk 109 Locking a file 110 Backing up your files 111 If you can’t save files on a floppy disk 111 Ejecting a disk 112 If you can’t eject a floppy disk 112 Caring for disks 113 Hard disk precautions 113 Testing and repairing disks 113 If a hard disk icon doesn’t appear 113 Using Disk First Aid 114 Testing a hard disk 116 vi ContentsChapter 8 Organizing Your Files 117 Straightening up your files 117 Using folders to organize your files 118 Creating and naming folders 118 Filing documents when you save them 119 Making items easier to find 120 Creating an alias 120 Installing an item in the Apple menu 121 Moving an item to the desktop 121 Finding an item 122 Finding an item by name 122 Finding an item using other criteria 123 Finding items that meet two criteria 125 Ways to use the Find command 125 Creating a template or stationery 126 Getting information about your files 127 Using the Info window 127 Using the View menu 128 Assigning a label to a file 128 Tips on transferring files 129 Chapter 9 Sound, Color, and Video 131 Setting the beep sound 131 Installing a sound 132 Removing a sound 133 Recording sounds 133 Displaying colors or grays 135 Changing the highlight color or gray 136 Changing the color of window borders 137 Changing the background pattern 138 Assigning a color to an icon 139 Changing the colors in the Label menu 140 Using more than one monitor 141 Using a second monitor for presentations 142 Magnifying the screen image 143 Chapter 10 Adapting Your Computer to Your Own Use 145 Specifying which items you want opened at startup 146 Installing an item in the Apple menu 146 Installing files in the System Folder 146 Removing files from the System Folder 147 Changing the items in the Label menu 148 Contents viiSetting the time and date 148 Setting a time for the Alarm Clock to go off 149 Turning the alarm off 150 Changing time and date formats 150 Changing the date format 151 Changing the time format 152 Changing number and currency formats 153 Adjusting the way the trackball or mouse works 154 Adjusting the way the keyboard works 155 Making keyboard shortcuts easier to type 156 Adjusting the keyboard for very slow typing 156 Adjusting the blinking of a menu item 157 Adjusting the blinking of the insertion point 157 Changing the way the contents of windows appear 158 Changing an icon 159 Turning off the Empty Trash warning 160 Managing memory 161 Checking memory use 161 Making the most of your memory 161 Adjusting the disk cache 162 Using hard disk space as memory 163 Turning on 32-bit addressing 164 Chapter 11 Printing 165 Before you print 165 Choosing a printer 165 Selecting Page Setup options 168 Updating printer software on networked computers 169 Printing your work 170 Printing the contents of a window or the desktop 171 Solutions to common printing problems 172 Controlling background printing 173 Working with fonts 174 Outline fonts and bitmap fonts 174 Installing fonts 175 Removing fonts 176 Transferring fonts to a LaserWriter printer 176 Finding out about available fonts 178 Other ways to use the LaserWriter Font Utility 178 Chapter 12 Using Your Computer on a Network 181 What networking offers 181 Setting up your computer on a network 182 Connecting to a network 183 viii ContentsTurning on AppleTalk 183 Naming your computer and its owner 184 Gaining access to files on shared disks 185 Before you begin 185 Connecting to a shared disk 185 Disconnecting from a shared disk 187 Connecting quickly to a shared disk 188 Connecting automatically when you start up 188 Reconnecting a PowerBook to shared disks 189 Working with files and folders on other computers 190 Creating a new folder on another computer 190 Changing your password 190 Giving folder ownership to someone else 191 Sharing your own files 192 How file sharing works 192 Turning file sharing on 192 Turning on guest access 193 Selecting a folder or disk to share 194 Naming a registered user 195 Setting a registered user’s password 196 Naming a group of users 197 Seeing who’s in a group 197 Selecting a user or group to share a folder or disk 198 Preventing specific users or guests from accessing your computer 199 Removing a user from a group 201 Removing a user or group from your list of registered users 201 Giving away ownership of a folder or disk on your computer 201 Turning file sharing off 202 Monitoring file-sharing activity 203 Disconnecting someone who is connected to your computer 203 Gaining access to your computer from another computer 204 Changing your password 205 Using access privileges 206 Understanding access privileges 206 Setting access privileges to folders and disks 207 Access privilege strategies 208 Working with privileges that others have set 209 Checking your access privileges 210 Linking programs 210 Linking to a program on another computer 210 Disconnecting a program link 212 Allowing other people to link to your programs 212 Contents ixChapter 13 Building a PowerBook Duo System 215 Using the PowerBook Duo Dock 215 Duo Dock features 216 Setting up the Duo Dock 218 Inserting the PowerBook Duo into the Duo Dock 220 Turning on the PowerBook Duo system 221 Working with a PowerBook Duo system 222 Your preferences 222 Battery recharging 222 Power conservation 222 Hard disks 223 SCSI devices 223 Virtual memory 223 Networking 224 Modem 224 If you have system problems 224 Using security features 225 Ejecting the PowerBook Duo from the Duo Dock 226 A useful shortcut 227 Installing a NuBus card 228 Getting ready 228 Installing the card 229 Using the PowerBook Duo MiniDock 237 Duo MiniDock features 238 Setting up the Duo MiniDock 239 Before you dock 243 Connecting the PowerBook Duo to the Duo MiniDock 244 Turning on the PowerBook Duo system 245 Working with a PowerBook Duo system 247 Removing the PowerBook Duo from the Duo MiniDock 250 Using the PowerBook Duo Floppy Adapter 251 Connecting the floppy adapter, disk drive, and input device(s) to the PowerBook Duo 251 Turning on the PowerBook Duo 254 Disconnecting the floppy adapter, disk drive, and input device(s) from the PowerBook Duo 255 Floppy disk drive precautions 255 Other adapters 255 Using SCSI devices 256 Installing software 256 Setting SCSI ID numbers 257 Checking that the SCSI chain is properly terminated 258 Connecting cables 259 Using your PowerBook Duo as a SCSI disk 260 Connecting your computer as a SCSI disk 260 Simplifying the SCSI disk connection process 263 x ContentsUsing SCSI disk mode to reinstall system software 263 Drawing battery power in SCSI disk mode 265 Quitting SCSI disk mode 265 Connecting a modem 266 Connecting a printer 267 Connecting sound input and output devices 268 Adding memory to your computer 268 Chapter 14 Travel, Storage, and Service 269 Traveling with the PowerBook 269 Storing the PowerBook 270 Protecting the PowerBook Duo system from theft 271 Service and support 271 If the PowerBook malfunctions or is damaged 271 How to get help 271 For more information about Macintosh computers 273 Macintosh user groups 273 Technical information 273 Quick Reference Summary and Shortcuts 275 Double-click 275 Shift-click 275 Working with icons 275 Selecting icons 275 Opening an icon 276 Moving, copying, and renaming an icon 276 Working with windows 276 Making a window the active window 276 Moving a window and changing its size 276 Scrolling through the contents of a window 277 Opening higher-level folder windows 277 Using the outline form in list views 278 Working with menus 278 Choosing an item from a menu 279 Choosing an item from a submenu 279 Keyboard shortcuts in the Finder and in directory dialog boxes 280 Contents xiTroubleshooting 281 The PowerBook Duo 281 The Duo Dock 287 The Duo MiniDock 288 SCSI devices 289 Disk drives and disks 290 Modems 293 Printers 293 Networks 295 Application programs 296 Appendix A Keyboard and Character Sets 297 Using Caps Lock 298 Typing special characters and symbols 298 Appendix B Exchanging Disks and Files with MS-DOS Computers 301 Initializing a disk in MS-DOS format 301 Converting files to and from MS-DOS format 303 Other file-conversion options 305 Appendix C Map 307 Setting your location 307 Comparing locations 308 Finding a location 309 Adding or removing a location 310 Adding a location 310 Changing or removing a location 310 n Part IV Index 313 xii Contentsxiii S Important: Changes or modifications to this product not authorized by Apple Computer, Inc., could void the FCC Certification and negate your authority to operate the product. This product was tested for FCC compliance under conditions that included the use of shielded cables and connectors between system components. It is important that you use shielded cables and connectors to reduce the possibility of causing interference to radios, television sets, and other electronic devices. For Apple peripheral devices, you can obtain the proper shielded cables from your Appleauthorized dealer. For non-Apple peripheral devices, contact the manufacturer or dealer for assistance. S DOC Class B Compliance This digital apparatus does not exceed the Class B limits for radio noise emissions from digital apparatus set out in the radio interference regulations of the Canadian Department of Communications. Observation des normes—Classe B Le présent appareil numérique n’émet pas de bruits radioélectriques dépassant les limites applicables aux appareils numériques de la Classe B prescrites dans les règlements sur le brouillage radioélectrique édictés par le Ministère des Communications du Canada. Important This equipment has been tested and found to comply with the limits for a Class B digital device in accordance with the specifications in Part 15 of FCC rules. See instructions if interference to radio or television reception is suspected. Radio and television interference The equipment described in this manual generates, uses, and can radiate radiofrequency energy. If it is not installed and used properly—that is, in strict accordance with Apple’s instructions—it may cause interference with radio and television reception. This equipment has been tested and found to comply with the limits for a Class B digital device in accordance with the speci?cations in Part 15 of FCC rules. These specifications are designed to provide reasonable protection against such interference in a residential installation. However, there is no guarantee that interference will not occur in a particular installation. You can determine whether your computer system is causing interference by turning it off. If the interference stops, it was probably caused by the computer or one of the peripheral devices. If your computer system does cause interference to radio or television reception, try to correct the interference by using one or more of the following measures: m Turn the television or radio antenna until the interference stops. m Move the computer to one side or the other of the television or radio. m Move the computer farther away from the television or radio. m Plug the computer into an outlet that is on a different circuit from the television or radio. (That is, make certain the computer and the television or radio are on circuits controlled by different circuit breakers or fuses.) If necessary, consult your Apple-authorized service provider or Apple. See the service and support information that came with your Apple product. Or, consult an experienced radio/television technician for additional suggestions. You may find helpful the following booklet, prepared by the Federal Communications Commission: Interference Handbook (stock number 004-000-00493-1). This booklet is available from the U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, DC 20402. ð Macintosh Performa User’s Guide Includes setup, troubleshooting, and health-related information for Macintosh Performa 5200CD and 5300CD series computersK Apple Computer, Inc. © 1995 Apple Computer, Inc. All rights reserved. Under the copyright laws, this manual may not be copied, in whole or in part, without the written consent of Apple. Your rights to the software are governed by the accompanying software license agreement. The Apple logo is a trademark of Apple Computer, Inc., registered in the U.S. and other countries. Use of the “keyboard” Apple logo (Option-Shift-K) for commercial purposes without the prior written consent of Apple may constitute trademark infringement and unfair competition in violation of federal and state laws. Every effort has been made to ensure that the information in this manual is accurate. Apple is not responsible for printing or clerical errors. Apple Computer, Inc. 1 Infinite Loop Cupertino, CA 95014-2084 (408) 996-1010 Apple, the Apple logo, AppleTalk, EtherTalk, LaserWriter, LocalTalk, Macintosh, MacTCP, and Performa are trademarks of Apple Computer, Inc., registered in the U.S. and other countries. AppleCD, Apple Desktop Bus, Balloon Help, Disk First Aid, Extensions Manager, Finder, Macintosh PC Exchange, Power Macintosh, PowerTalk, and QuickDraw are trademarks of Apple Computer, Inc. Adobe, Adobe Illustrator, Adobe Photoshop, and PostScript are trademarks of Adobe Systems Incorporated or its subsidiaries and may be registered in certain jurisdictions. ExposurePro is a registered trademark of Baseline Publishing, Inc. Helvetica and Times are registered trademarks of Linotype-Hell AG and/or its subsidiaries. IBM is a registered trademark, and PowerPC and the PowerPC logo are trademarks of International Business Machines Corporation, used under license therefrom. Motorola is a registered trademark of Motorola Corporation. QMS is a registered trademark of QMS, Inc. QuarkXPress is a registered trademark of Quark, Inc. SuperPaint is a trademark of Aldus Corporation, a subsidiary of Adobe Systems Incorporated which may be registerd in certain jurisdictions. Tektronix is a registered trademark of Tektronix, Inc. Simultaneously published in the United States and Canada. Mention of third-party products is for informational purposes only and constitutes neither an endorsement nor a recommendation. Apple assumes no responsibility with regard to the performance or use of these products.iii Communications regulation information vi Preface Welcome to Macintosh ix 1 Getting Started 1 Plugging in the computer 1 Installing an expansion card 4 Connecting the mouse and keyboard 5 Adjusting the angle of the screen 7 Connecting other equipment 7 Turning the computer on for the first time 8 What’s next? 10 Learning the basics 11 Reviewing the basics 13 Turning the computer off 15 Turning the computer on 15 Where to find answers 16 Contents2 Getting Help 17 Getting answers to your questions 18 Identifying objects on the screen 26 Learning useful shortcuts 27 3 Expanding Your Computer and Using Special Features 29 Your computer at a glance 30 Connecting additional equipment 31 Using the sound control buttons on your computer 32 Using the screen control buttons on your computer 33 Using the built-in microphone 34 Expanding memory 35 Replacing internal storage devices 35 Adding an Ethernet card or a second monitor 35 4 Using Programs and Backing Up Disks 37 Installing application programs 38 Working with several programs at a time 39 Protecting the information on a disk 40 Using application programs designed for the PowerPC microprocessor 42 Using older Macintosh programs 42 5 Using the CD-ROM Drive 43 Inserting a CD-ROM disc 44 Ejecting a CD-ROM disc 45 Types of compact discs you can use 46 Playing audio CDs 47 Working with Photo CDs 48 Sharing a CD-ROM disc over a network 50 iv Contents6 Troubleshooting 51 When you have questions 51 If you have trouble 51 Solutions to common problems 55 Solutions to CD-ROM problems 67 If your computer’s performance decreases 72 Repairing a damaged disk 73 Initializing a hard disk 79 Installing or reinstalling system software 81 A Health, Safety, and Maintenance Tips 83 Health-related information about computer use 83 Safety instructions 88 Handling your computer equipment 89 Cleaning your equipment 94 Locking and unlocking the mouse 96 B Installing an Expansion Card 99 Opening the computer 101 Installing an LC-PDS card 104 Installing a communication card 105 Closing the computer 107 C Special Keys on Your Keyboard 111 Typing special characters and symbols 113 Special key combinations 114 D If You Purchase Additional Equipment 115 Connecting to an Ethernet network 115 Connecting a second monitor for video mirroring 117 Index 119 Contents vCommunications regulation information FCC statement This equipment has been tested and found to comply with the limits for a Class B digital device in accordance with the specifications in Part 15 of FCC rules. See instructions if interference to radio or television reception is suspected. Radio and television interference The equipment described in this manual generates, uses, and can radiate radio-frequency energy. If it is not installed and used properly—that is, in strict accordance with Apple’s instructions—it may cause interference with radio and television reception. This equipment has been tested and found to comply with the limits for a Class B digital device in accordance with the specifications in Part 15 of FCC rules. These specifications are designed to provide reasonable protection against such interference in a residential installation. However, there is no guarantee that interference will not occur in a particular installation. You can determine whether your computer system is causing interference by turning it off. If the interference stops, it was probably caused by the computer or one of the peripheral devices. If your computer system does cause interference to radio or television reception, try to correct the interference by using one or more of the following measures: m Turn the television or radio antenna until the interference stops. m Move the computer to one side or the other of the television or radio. m Move the computer farther away from the television or radio. m Plug the computer into an outlet that is on a different circuit from the television or radio. (That is, make certain the computer and the television or radio are on circuits controlled by different circuit breakers or fuses.) If necessary, consult an Apple-authorized service provider or Apple. See the service and support information that came with your Apple product. Or, consult an experienced radio/television technician for additional suggestions. You may find the following booklet helpful: Interference Handbook (stock number 004-000-00493-1). This booklet, prepared by the Federal Communications Commission, is available from the U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, DC 20402. IMPORTANT Changes or modifications to this product not authorized by Apple Computer, Inc., could void the FCC Certification and negate your authority to operate the product. This product was tested for FCC compliance under conditions that included the use of Apple peripheral devices and Apple shielded cables and connectors between system components. It is important that you use Apple peripheral devices and shielded cables and connectors between system components to reduce the possibility of causing interference to radios, television sets, and other electronic devices. You can obtain Apple peripheral devices and the proper shielded cables and connectors through an Apple-authorized dealer. For non-Apple peripheral devices, contact the manufacturer or dealer for assistance. vi Communications Regulation InformationDOC statement DOC Class B Compliance This digital apparatus does not exceed the Class B limits for radio noise emissions from digital apparatus as set out in the interference-causing equipment standard entitled “Digital Apparatus,” ICES-003 of the Department of Communications. Observation des normes—Classe B Cet appareil numérique respecte les limites de bruits radioélectriques applicables aux appareils numériques de Classe B prescrites dans la norme sur le matériel brouilleur : “Appareils Numériques”, NMB-003 édictée par le ministre des Communications. VCCI statement CD-ROM drive WARNING Making adjustments or performing procedures other than those specified in your equipment’s manual may result in hazardous exposure. WARNING Do not attempt to disassemble the cabinet containing the laser. The laser beam used in this product is harmful to the eyes. The use of optical instruments, such as magnifying lenses, with this product increases the potential hazard to your eyes. For your safety, have this equipment serviced only by an Apple-authorized service provider. If you have an internal Apple CD-ROM drive in your computer, your computer is a Class 1 laser product. The Class 1 label, located in a user-accessible area, indicates that the drive meets minimum safety requirements. A service warning label is located in a service-accessible area. The labels on your product may differ slightly from the ones shown here. Class 1 label Service warning label Communications Regulation Information viiCongratulations on the purchase of your new Macintosh. Your computer is designed to give you the highest performance combined with real ease of use—it’s easy to set up, easy to use, and easy to expand. This book will guide you through the setup procedure, tell you how to expand your Macintosh, and provide many tips on using your new system. Your Macintosh computer is powered by the new  microprocessor (or “chip”). This microprocessor was designed by Apple Computer, Inc., Motorola, Inc., and IBM Corporation. The  microprocessor uses Reduced Instruction Set Computing (RISC) technology to deliver very high performance at the lowest possible cost. The  RISC microprocessor represents the state of the art in microprocessor design. Your new Macintosh will run almost all of your existing Macintosh software, but for best performance and greatest speed, look for the new software microprocessor. You’ll find programs designed especially for computers that contain the  microprocessor–compatible programs   at any software store that carries products for the Macintosh computer. ix Welcome to MacintoshKeyboard Macintosh Performa computer Keyboard cable (permanently attached to the keyboard) Computer power cord MouseThe illustration on the facing page shows all the equipment you will need to set up your computer and begin using it. Place your equipment on a sturdy, flat surface near a grounded wall outlet. Before following the setup instructions in this chapter, you may want to read “Arranging Your Office” in Appendix A (in the section on health-related information) for tips on adjusting your work furniture so that you’re comfortable when using the computer. If you used the setup poster: The poster included with your Macintosh Performa computer was designed to help you start using your computer as quickly as possible. This chapter contains more detailed information than the poster. If you have already set up your computer using the poster, you may want to turn to the section “What’s Next?” later in this chapter. Plugging in the computer Before you plug your Macintosh into a wall socket, carefully read all the setup instructions in this chapter. Then, before you connect anything to your Macintosh, follow the instructions in this section to plug it in. The plug grounds the computer and protects it from electrical damage while you are setting up. 1 1 Getting Started Follow the instructions in this chapter to set up your computer and learn the basics.When you are ready to begin, follow these steps: 1 Place the computer where you want it. Carry the computer with its screen facing you. Most of its weight is near the screen. Lift with your knees, not your back. 2 Chapter 12 Plug the socket end of the power cord into the recessed power plug (marked with the symbol ²) on the back of the computer. Make sure at least one end of the power cord is within easy reach so that you can unplug the computer when you need to. IMPORTANT To protect both yourself and the computer from electrical hazards, the computer should remain turned off until you are finished connecting its parts. Check the power switch at the back of the computer. Make sure that the side of the switch marked with the j symbol is pressed in. “Off” position Power switch Getting Started 33 Plug the other end of the power cord into a three-hole grounded outlet or power strip. Installing an expansion card If you purchased an expansion card for your Macintosh, install it now. (See Appendix B, “Installing an Expansion Card,” for instructions.) If you don’t have an expansion card, continue with the next section, “Connecting the Mouse and Keyboard.” WARNING This equipment is intended to be electrically grounded. Your Macintosh is equipped with a three-wire grounding plug—a plug that has a third (grounding) pin. This plug will fit only a grounded AC outlet. This is a safety feature. If you are unable to insert the plug into the outlet, contact a licensed electrician to replace the outlet with a properly grounded outlet. Do not defeat the purpose of the grounding plug! Socket end of the power cord Power cord plug 4 Chapter 1Connecting the mouse and keyboard 1 Plug the mouse cable into the recessed port on the back of the keyboard. The plug and the port are marked with the × icon (symbol). The positions of the port and icon on your keyboard may be different from those pictured. By the way: A port marked with the × icon is called an Apple Desktop Bus (ADB) port. This cable plugs into the Apple Desktop Bus (ADB) port, marked with the × icon, on the back of the computer. Plug the mouse into the recessed port on the keyboard. The flat part of the plug should be pointing down, as shown here. Getting Started 52 Plug the keyboard cable into the port marked with the × icon on the back of the computer. If you use a second monitor in addition to the one built into your computer, it may also have a port to which you can connect the keyboard or mouse. See the information that came with the monitor. 3 If you want to adjust the keyboard angle, lower the feet on the keyboard. To adjust the keyboard angle, lower the feet until they snap into position. V ADB port 6 Chapter 1Adjusting the angle of the screen You can adjust the angle of the screen to avoid glare and reflections by using the computer’s tilt-and-swivel base. Turn the computer to either side or tilt it slightly back or forward. For more information on setting up your office for comfort and safety, see Appendix A, “Health, Safety, and Maintenance Tips.” Connecting other equipment If you are new to the Macintosh, it’s a good idea to get some experience using your computer before you connect other equipment, such as a printer or scanner. To learn basic Macintosh skills, continue with the instructions in this chapter. When you’re ready to connect other equipment to your Macintosh, see the instructions in Chapter 3. Getting Started 7Turning the computer on for the first time To turn the computer on for the first time, follow these steps: 1 On the back of the computer, press the side of the power switch marked with the symbol i. 2 Press the Power key (marked with a triangle) on your keyboard. You hear a tone from the computer as it starts up. 8 Chapter 13 Check to see what’s on your screen. m You will see a welcome screen that gives you a choice about what you want to do next. m If you’re new to the Macintosh or would like some review of the basics, you’ll want to go through the Performa Tutorial, a program that teaches how to use your computer. Press the Return key on your keyboard to go to the tutorial. m If you already know how to use your Macintosh and you don’t want to use the tutorial, you can leave the welcome screen (by clicking Go To Desktop) and go to the Macintosh desktop. m When you see the Macintosh desktop, as in the illustration below, your computer is ready to use. Skip now to the section “What’s Next?” later in this chapter. m If you see a blinking question mark, or nothing at all, see the next section, “Problems Starting Up?” Getting Started 9 Macintosh desktop Hard disk icon Your Launcher has more items in it than are shown in this illustration.What’s next? Congratulations! You’ve finished setting up your computer. Now continue with one of the following steps: m If you are new to the Macintosh, see the next section, “Learning the Basics.” m If you are an experienced Macintosh user, turn to Chapter 2, “Getting Help,” to learn about Macintosh Guide, your main source of information when you’re working with the Macintosh. Problems starting up? If the screen is dark, check these items to see if you can identify the problem: m Is the computer turned on? The power-on light on the front of the computer should be on. Make sure the side of the power switch marked with the symbol i (on the back of the computer) is pressed in. m Is the power cord connected to the computer, and is the cord plugged into a power source? m If the computer is plugged into a power strip, is the power strip turned on and plugged in? m Are the keyboard and mouse cables connected correctly? (Don’t disconnect the keyboard or mouse cable while the computer is on. You could damage your equipment.) m Are the screen control buttons on the front of the computer (marked with the ü icon) adjusted correctly? m If you have an external hard disk attached to your computer, is that hard disk turned on? Was it turned on before you turned on the computer? If you’re not sure, turn everything off. Then turn on the external hard disk before you turn on your computer. If you see a blinking question mark on the screen, turn to “Solutions to Common Problems” in Chapter 6. 10 Chapter 1m If you want to connect other equipment, such as a printer, to your computer, see Chapter 3, “Expanding Your Computer and Using Special Features.” m If you want to install application software on your computer, see Chapter 4 of this book for information on setting up your programs and managing memory. You’ll need this information to properly set up any software programs specifically designed for computers with PowerPC microprocessors. Before you begin working with your computer, be sure to read the important health and safety information in Appendix A. IMPORTANT If you need to turn off your computer at any point, please see “Turning the Computer Off” later in this chapter. It is very important to use the correct procedure for shutting down your Macintosh before turning it off. Learning the basics If you are new to the Macintosh, you should begin by looking at the easyto-use program called Performa Tutorial. The tutorial teaches you the basic skills you’ll need to use your computer. To start the tutorial once you are past the introductory screens, follow these steps: 1 Slide your mouse along your mouse pad or desk. Hold the mouse as shown, with the cable pointing away from you. Don’t press the mouse button (under your index finger). Notice that the arrow (8) on the screen moves in the same direction that you move the mouse. If the arrow doesn’t move, make sure that the cables connecting the mouse and keyboard are secure and that your mouse is positioned as shown in the illustration. Getting Started 112 Move the mouse so that the arrow (8) is over the picture labeled “Performa Tutorial.” If you don’t see the Performa Tutorial picture on your screen, put the arrow on the word “Learning” and click (press and release) the mouse button. If you run out of room on your mouse pad or desk while moving the mouse, pick up the mouse and place it where there’s more room. (The arrow on the screen moves only when the mouse is in contact with the mouse pad or desk.) 3 Without moving the mouse, click the mouse button. A window appears welcoming you to the tutorial. You can set this book aside for now and follow the instructions on the screen. When you have completed both parts of the tutorial, return to this book. 12 Chapter 1Reviewing the basics You can use the following illustrations to review the elements you use on your screen to do work with your computer. Menus The strip across the top of the screen is called the menu bar. The symbols and words in it represent menus of commands. To open a menu, place the pointer on the symbol or word for the menu and press the mouse button. Getting Started 13 Menu Window Icons Application menu You can have several application programs open at once. To see which program is active or to switch from one program to another, use this menu (called the Application menu). Guide menu To find an answer to a question, look in the Guide (h) menu.Icons Icons are small pictures that represent disks, programs, documents, and folders. You can double-click any icon to open it and see what it contains. This icon represents your computer’s internal hard disk. Icons like this one represent application programs, which you use to create documents and do other work. Icons like this one represent documents, which you can create and edit. Icons like this represent folders. A folder contains other icons. To throw away an item you no longer want, drag it to the Trash icon and choose Empty Trash from the Special menu. Windows Windows are boxes that display text, graphics, or icons. To change the shape or position of a window, or to close the window, use the elements shown here. 14 Chapter 1 Scroll arrow To bring hidden portions of a window’s contents into view, click one of the four scroll arrows. Close box To close a window, click the close box. Title bar To move a window, drag it by the middle of the title bar (anywhere in the bar except the small box on each end). Size box To change the shape or size of a window, drag the size box. To bring a partially covered window to the front, click anywhere in it.Turning the computer off To turn the computer off: 1 Press the Power key (marked with a triangle) on the keyboard. You will see a message asking whether you want to shut down or continue working. 2 Click Shut Down. You can also turn off your computer by choosing Shut Down from the Apple (K) menu. Detailed instructions follow. (Note: The Shut Down command is also available in the Special menu.) 1 Move the tip of the arrow to the Apple (K) menu at the top left of the screen. 2 With the tip of the arrow on the apple, press and hold down the mouse button. 3 While holding down the mouse button, move the arrow down the list of choices until the words “Shut Down” are highlighted, then release the mouse button. Turning the computer on To turn on the computer after you’ve shut it down (using either the Power key on the keyboard or the Shut Down command): m Press the Power key (marked with a triangle) on the keyboard. Leave the power switch on the back of your computer in the “on” position. (The side of the switch marked with the i symbol should be pressed in.) Getting Started 15Where to find answers When you have questions about using your Macintosh, there are several places you can look for answers. In this book Use this book to help you set up your computer and learn about it, or to find solutions to problems with your equipment. In the Guide menu The Guide menu (marked with the h icon) is your main source of information about the Macintosh. To learn how to get different kinds of help from the Guide menu, see Chapter 2 in this book. In other manuals For answers to questions about other equipment or about application programs you have purchased, see the manuals that came with the equipment or programs. From the Read Me files in the Apple Extras folder The Apple Extras folder (in your System Folder) on your hard disk contains SimpleText documents with important information about some of the application programs included with your computer. From Apple’s customer support hotline If you can’t find an answer in any of the materials provided, call the customer support hotline. The phone number for the hotline is in the service and support information that came with your computer. (Note: If you have problems with an application program not published by Apple, call the program’s publisher. Click the Phone Numbers button in the Service/Support area of the Launcher to get a software publisher’s phone number.) User’s Guide Macintosh Performa 16 Chapter 1The Guide menu is your main source of information when you’re working with your computer. The menu is identified by a question mark (h) in the upper-right corner of the screen. 17 2 Getting Help Use the instructions in this chapter to learn about the help available to you in the Guide menu.Getting answers to your questions When you have a question while working with your computer, you can get the answer by choosing Macintosh Guide from the Guide menu. 1 Pull down the Application menu (in the upper-right corner of the screen) and choose Finder to make it the active application program. A checkmark in the menu indicates that the Finder is the active program. 2 Pull down the Guide menu (marked with the h icon) and choose Macintosh Guide. The Macintosh Guide window appears. Whenever you use Macintosh Guide, its window remains in front of other windows. If the window gets in your way, you can move it by dragging its title bar (the gray bar across the top of the window). 18 Chapter 23 Notice the three buttons at the top of the window: Topics, Index, and Look For. Macintosh Guide gives you three ways of finding information: m Topics lets you choose from a list of general subjects; it is like the table of contents in a book. m Index lets you choose from an alphabetical list of more specific subjects; it is like the index in a book. m Look For lets you search for information related to a specific word or phrase that you type. In the following sections you will practice using each method. If you have problems while using Macintosh Guide, see “Tips for Using Macintosh Guide” later in this chapter. Getting answers with the Topics button 1 In the Macintosh Guide window, click the Topics button. A list of general topics appears on the left side of the Macintosh Guide window. (Depending on the hardware and software you have, the list of topics may look different.) Getting Help 192 Click “Setting Options” in the list of topics. When you click any topic area, a list of related questions appears on the right side of the Macintosh Guide window. 3 Click the question “How do I set the time and date?” and then click OK. Or double-click the question. A small window appears with instructions for you to follow. 4 Read and follow the instructions in this window. Macintosh Guide provides step-by-step instructions to answer the question you selected. When you have completed each step, click the right arrow in the lower-right corner to see the next step. 5 When you have completed all the steps, click the Topics button in the lower-left corner to return to the main Macintosh Guide window. Now continue with the next section. 20 Chapter 2 Click here to see the next step (if there is one). To get instructions, click a question… …and then click OK. If you want to return to the main Macintosh Guide window, click here.Getting answers with the Index button 1 In the Macintosh Guide window, click the Index button. An alphabetical list of subjects appears on the left side of the window. 2 Scroll through the alphabetical list until the phrase “background pattern” is visible. You can scroll through the list either by dragging the slider to the letter B or by using the scroll bar at the right of the list. 3 Click the phrase “background pattern” in the alphabetical list. When you click any index entry, a list of related questions appears on the right side of the Macintosh Guide window. Getting Help 21 Scroll bar Slider To get instructions, click a question… …and then click OK.4 Click the question “How do I change the background pattern?” and then click OK. Or double-click the question. A small window appears with instructions for you to follow. 5 Read and follow the instructions in the window. Macintosh Guide provides step-by-step instructions to answer the question you selected. When you have completed each step, click the right arrow in the lower-right corner to see the next step. 6 When you have completed all the steps, click the Topics button in the lower-left corner to return to the main Macintosh Guide window. Now continue with the next section. 22 Chapter 2 Click here to see the next step (if there is one). If you want to return to the main Macintosh Guide window, click here.Getting answers with the Look For button 1 In the Macintosh Guide window, click the Look For button. A small box appears on the left side of the window, where you can type text. 2 Click the arrow button to activate the text box. 3 Type “sound” in the text box and then click Search. When you click Search, a list of questions related to the word or phrase you typed appears on the right side of the Macintosh Guide window. Getting Help 23 To activate the text box, click here. Type a word or phrase in the text box… …and then click here. To get instructions, click a question… …and then click OK.4 Click the question “How do I change the beep sound?” and then click OK. Or doubleclick the question. A small window appears with instructions for you to follow. 5 Read and follow the instructions in the window. Macintosh Guide provides step-by-step instructions to answer the question you selected. When you have completed each step, click the right arrow in the lower-right corner to display the next step. 6 When you have completed all the steps, click the close box in the upper-left corner to close Macintosh Guide. 24 Chapter 2 If you want to close Macintosh Guide, click here. Click here to see the next step (if there is one).Tips for using Macintosh Guide Here are a few tips for using Macintosh Guide effectively: m Macintosh Guide is available only when you are in the Finder—the desktop area where you can see the icons of disks, folders, and files. (Other programs may also have help available in the Guide menu, however.) If you don’t see Macintosh Guide in the Guide menu, pull down the Application menu (to the right of the Guide menu) and choose Finder. m Follow the steps when you’re instructed to; don’t skip ahead or read ahead. That way the computer can check to make sure you’ve done a step correctly. m Unlike most windows, the Macintosh Guide window stays in front of other windows on the screen so that your instructions are never covered. If you need to move the Guide window out of the way, drag it by the title bar at the top of the window. You can also move the window out of the way by clicking the zoom box. Click the box once to shrink the window; click it a second time to expand the window to its original size. m If you need more information about an instruction or a term, click the button labeled “Huh?” to get further explanation. (The “Huh?” button is dimmed when no additional information is available.) m If you want to return to the main Macintosh Guide window, click the Topics button in the lower-left corner of the Guide window. m When you’re finished using Macintosh Guide, click the close box in the upper-left corner of the window. Getting Help 25 Zoom box Close box Title bar Topics button “Huh?” button Right arrowIdentifying objects on the screen Sometimes you’ll see an unfamiliar item on the screen and ask yourself, “What’s that?” You can get an answer by using a Macintosh feature known as Balloon Help. Balloon Help explains the function of icons, menus, commands, and other items on the Macintosh screen in balloons like those you see in comic strips. Follow these steps to use Balloon Help: 1 Pull down the Guide menu (marked with the h icon) and choose Show Balloons. 2 Point to any object on the screen that you want to identify. A balloon appears next to the object. In the following illustration, for example, pointing to the Trash displays a balloon that explains how to use the Trash to throw items away. Although balloons appear next to items when you point to them, the way you work does not change; you can still select icons, choose commands, and so on. 3 When you’re finished using Balloon Help, choose Hide Balloons from the Guide menu. 26 Chapter 2Learning useful shortcuts You can perform many tasks in the Finder more quickly if you use keyboard or mouse shortcuts. For example, instead of clicking an icon and choosing Open from the File menu, you can simply double-click the icon to open it. Follow these steps to learn keyboard and mouse shortcuts: 1 Pull down the Guide menu (marked with the h icon) and choose Shortcuts. The main Macintosh Shortcuts window appears. 2 Click one of the category buttons. Another window appears, describing shortcuts for that category. Getting Help 27 If you want to close the window, click here. Click here to see the next window (if there is one). Click here to return to the main Macintosh Shortcuts window for more categories.3 Read about the shortcuts available for the category you selected. Click the right arrow in the lower-right corner of the window to display the next window (if there is one). 4 When you finish reading about the shortcuts for your category, click the Topics button in the lower-left corner to return to the main Macintosh Shortcuts window. Or click the close box in the upper-left corner to close the window. 28 Chapter 2Read this chapter to learn how to connect additional equipment to your Macintosh. Also read this chapter to learn about some of the special features of your Macintosh: m using the sound control buttons m using the screen control buttons m using the built-in microphone 29 3 Expanding Your Computer and Using Special Features Read this chapter for information on expanding your computer system with additional hardware and using special features of your computer.Your computer at a glance This illustration shows your Macintosh Performa system. You can expand your computer system by connecting additional hardware (such as a printer, modem, or scanner). Mouse Built-in microphone Color display Your built-in monitor can display thousands of colors. Headphone jack Floppy disk drive Sound control buttons Use these buttons to change the volume of the computer’s sound. - f Screen control buttons Use these buttons to lighten or darken your screen. Keyboard CD-ROM drive Power-on light A green light indicates that the computer is on. CD-ROM drive Open/Close button P Power key Use this key to turn your computer on and off. Stereo speakers Tilt-and-swivel base ü Remote control sensor 30 Chapter 3Connecting additional equipment The illustration on this page shows where equipment should be connected to your computer. For instructions on connecting equipment such as a printer or scanner, see the manual that came with the equipment. g SCSI port Connects your Macintosh to SCSI equipment, such as external hard disk drives and scanners. External video connector (optional) Connects your Macintosh to a presentation system or a second monitor for video mirroring. LC-PDS card access cover Covers port for optional LC-processor-direct slot (LC-PDS) expansion card. Sound output port Connects your Macintosh to sound output equipment, such as externally powered (amplified) speakers. - Sound input port Connects your Macintosh to another audio source, such as a compact disc or audio cassette player. Å Internal modem (optional) You may have an internal modem or other communication card installed. F Security lock port TV tuner card (optional) Connects your Macintosh to an external TV antenna or cable TV service. Power switch ²Power socket Hard disk drive (internal) [ Printer port Connects your Macintosh to a printer or LocalTalk network. W Modem port Connects an external modem to your Macintosh. * V Apple Desktop Bus (ADB) port Connects your Macintosh to an input device, such as a keyboard or a trackball. Video input card (optional) Connects your Macintosh to a video camera, VCR, or other video equipment. *If your computer has an internal modem, this port is covered. Don’t remove the cover or connect anything to this port if you have an internal modem. Expanding Your Computer and Using Special Features 31Using the sound control buttons on your computer There are two sets of buttons on the front of your Macintosh. The set on the right (marked with the - icon) is for sound control. You can use these buttons to increase or decrease the volume of the sound your Macintosh plays: m Press the button on the right to make the sound louder. m Press the button on the left to make the sound softer. You can also adjust the sound by using the Sound control panel. For more information about adjusting sound, see the “Sound” topic of Macintosh Guide, available in the Guide (h) menu. - Sound control buttons 32 Chapter 3Using the screen control buttons on your computer You can adjust the level of light and dark on the screen of your built-in monitor by using the screen control buttons on your computer (marked with the ü icon). m Press the button on the right to lighten your screen. m Press the button on the left to darken your screen. ü Screen control buttons Expanding Your Computer and Using Special Features 33Using the built-in microphone Your Macintosh comes with a built-in microphone for recording live sounds. The microphone is highly sensitive. Once you’ve turned it on (which you do with a sound-recording application program), it can pick up sounds within a range of several feet. For information on recording sound, see the “Sound” topic of Macintosh Guide, available in the Guide (h) menu. WARNING Do not stick any small objects into the built-in microphone. Doing so may damage your equipment. Built-in microphone 34 Chapter 3Expanding memory You can install additional random-access memory (RAM) in your computer, which allows you to work with more programs and larger documents. Additional memory comes on memory chips (also called SIMMs). The Technical Information booklet that came with your computer describes how much additional memory can be installed in your Macintosh. Replacing internal storage devices Your Macintosh comes with three internal storage devices—a floppy disk drive, a CD-ROM (compact disc read-only memory) drive, and a hard disk drive (several capacities are available). If you want to replace your internal drive, see your Apple-authorized dealer. Adding an Ethernet card or a second monitor If you purchase an Ethernet card or another monitor for your computer, see Appendix D, “If You Purchase Additional Equipment,” for more information. WARNING To avoid damage to your computer, Apple recommends that only an Apple-certified technician install additional RAM. Consult the service and support information that came with your computer for instructions on how to contact an Apple-authorized service provider or Apple for service. If you attempt to install additional RAM yourself, any damage you may cause to your equipment will not be covered by the limited warranty on your computer. See an Apple-authorized dealer or service provider for additional information about this or any other warranty question. Expanding Your Computer and Using Special Features 35Your computer came with several application programs already installed. You can open these programs by clicking their buttons in the Launcher. The Apple Extras folder on your hard disk (and on the Macintosh Performa CD) contains additional programs, including the following: m QuickDraw GX gives your computer more powerful printing and font capabilities. You’ll want to install QuickDraw GX only if you purchased another program that requires it. Your computer needs at least 8 megabytes of random-access memory (RAM) to use QuickDraw GX. You can install QuickDraw GX by opening the QuickDraw GX folder and double-clicking the Installer icon. m PowerTalk provides an open collaboration environment with a universal mailbox and other electronic mail services. You’ll want to install PowerTalk only if you use your computer on a local area network (connected to other computers) and if you purchased another program that requires it. Your computer needs at least 8 megabytes of RAM to use PowerTalk. You can install PowerTalk by opening the PowerTalk folder and double-clicking the Installer icon. m Apple Video Player lets you watch video or TV on your computer. With Apple Video Player and a video input card, you can watch video on your computer. With Apple Video Player, a video input card, and a TV tuner card, you can watch video and TV. For instructions on using Apple Video Player, open Apple Video Player and then choose Apple Video Player Guide from the Guide (h) menu. 37 4 Using Programs and Backing Up Disks Read this chapter to learn how to work with application programs and protect the information on your disks.Installing application programs You may want to buy and install additional application programs. See the manuals you receive with your programs for instructions on installing and using them. In most cases, you’ll install an application program on your internal hard disk from floppy disks that contain the program. The following illustration shows how to insert a floppy disk in your computer’s floppy disk drive. For instructions on how to eject floppy disks, see the “Disks” topic of Macintosh Guide, available in the Guide (h) menu. To use your programs most effectively, follow these guidelines: m Put only one copy of each program on your hard disk. Having more than one copy can cause errors. m Whenever you copy a program disk to your hard disk, be careful not to copy a System Folder. Always check to see what you’ve copied, and drag any extra System Folders to the Trash. m If you have problems using a program, read the manuals you received with the program. m If a program malfunctions consistently, try installing a fresh copy. If that doesn’t help, find out from the software manufacturer whether your version of the program is compatible with your computer model and the system software you’re using. To put a program into the Launcher, simply drag the program’s icon (or its alias) into the Launcher window, or onto the Applications category button in the Launcher. Insert the floppy disk, metal end first, into the floppy disk drive of your computer. 38 Chapter 4Working with several programs at a time You can open as many application programs and desk accessories as your computer’s memory allows. All open programs are listed in the Application menu at the right end of the menu bar. The name of the active program (the one you’re using right now) has a checkmark next to it, and its icon appears in the menu bar. Finding out which programs are open If you have several programs and windows open, you can find out which program is active and which other programs are open by pulling down the Application menu. Switching programs You can switch to another open program or desk accessory by choosing its name from the Application menu. If a program’s icon is dimmed in the menu, that means its windows are hidden. Choosing the program from the Application menu displays its windows. You can also switch to another program by clicking in a window that belongs to an open program, by double-clicking a program icon, or by double-clicking the icon of a document that was created with the program. Using Programs and Backing Up Disks 39 The Finder icon Commands to hide or display open windows A checkmark Programs that are open indicates the active program.Hiding and showing windows on the desktop You can hide all windows except those of the active program by choosing Hide Others from the Application menu. The other programs remain open even though their windows are hidden. When you switch to another program, its windows become visible again. If you want to see all the open windows, choose Show All from the Application menu. Protecting the information on a disk When you have a valuable document like a birth certificate, you probably make an extra copy of it for safekeeping. Similarly, you should make a copy of the documents you create on your computer. The extra copy is called a backup, and the process of making the copy is called backing up. Once you have a backup, you’re protected from accidentally losing the information on your hard disk. In the unlikely event that something happens to your hard disk, you can easily get the information back. Your computer’s hard disk comes with a lot of valuable information already stored on it, including system software and some application programs. The Macintosh Performa CD contains a backup copy of all the system software and application programs that came with your computer. See the Macintosh Performa CD booklet for instructions on using the CD to reinstall software. Making backup copies of your documents m You should regularly make copies of the documents you create. m You can back up files stored on your hard disk by copying them to floppy disks. m You can back up an entire floppy disk by copying it to another floppy disk of the same capacity or larger, or by copying it to a hard disk. m You can use a commercial backup program to copy new and changed files from a hard disk to another hard disk, to a tape drive, or to a series of floppy disks. m If your computer is on a network, you may be able to back up files by copying them to a shared disk on the network. 40 Chapter 4Restoring the information on your hard disk If information on your hard disk becomes damaged or lost, you can restore it if you have a backup copy of the information. The Macintosh Performa CD contains copies of all the system software and application programs that came with your computer. See the Macintosh Performa CD booklet for instructions on using the Macintosh Performa CD. Using Programs and Backing Up Disks 41Using application programs designed for the PowerPC microprocessor Your Macintosh is compatible with most application programs intended for use with Macintosh computers. But certain programs are designed especially for use with computers that have the PowerPC microprocessor. (These programs are sometimes called “native” applications.) You’ll find that these programs take best advantage of your computer’s speed. Special memory requirements Some native applications may be slightly larger than other programs and may take up more memory. If you find that you are running out of memory when you use one of these programs, you can use space on your computer’s hard disk as additional memory. For instructions on how to use hard disk space as memory, see the “Memory” topic of Macintosh Guide, available in the Guide (h) menu. You can also add more memory to your computer, as described in “Expanding Memory” in Chapter 3. Using older Macintosh programs If you experience problems using an older Macintosh program, it may be incompatible with your Macintosh. You may be able to use your older program if you change the Modern Memory Manager setting in your Memory control panel. For detailed instructions on using older programs with your Macintosh, see the “Working with Programs” topic of Macintosh Guide, available in the Guide (h) menu. 42 Chapter 443 5 Using the CD-ROM Drive This chapter provides information on the CD-ROM drive (also called a CD-ROM player). Refer to Appendix A, “Health, Safety, and Maintenance Tips,” for information on the proper handling of these discs. Your internal CD-ROM (Compact Disc Read-Only Memory) drive for Macintosh computers works with CD-ROM discs, standard audio compact discs (CDs), and single-session or multisession Photo CDs. Your CD-ROM drive provides access to large amounts of information. However, you cannot save information on CD-ROM discs. ROM stands for read-only memory, meaning that the drive cannot “write” information onto CD-ROM discs. A wide selection of CD-ROM discs is available for entertainment, education, and business. A typical disc can hold over 650 megabytes (MB) of information—the equivalent of 270,000 pages of text, up to 8 hours of speech or music (depending on the sound quality), hundreds of highresolution images, or any combination of text, sound, and graphics. Read this chapter for information about your computer’s built-in CD-ROM drive.Inserting a CD-ROM disc Follow these instructions to insert a CD-ROM disc into your CD-ROM drive. Then follow the instructions provided with your disc, as well as the instructions in this manual. 1 Start up your Macintosh computer, if it’s not already on. 2 Press the Open/Close button to open the tray of the CD-ROM drive. The tray opens. 3 Place a CD-ROM disc in the tray, with the disc label facing up. Make sure the disc is lying flat and centered in the tray. If you are using a small (8cm) disc, make sure it is centered within the inside ring on the tray. 4 Push the tray in, or press the Open/Close button, to close the tray. In a few moments, an icon for the CD-ROM disc appears on your screen. Open/Close button 44 Chapter 5Using the CD-ROM Drive Ejecting a CD-ROM disc Follow these instructions to open the tray and eject a CD-ROM disc from your computer. IMPORTANT You may not be able to eject a disc if it is being shared. To turn off file sharing, use the Sharing Setup control panel. 1 Open the tray. There are several ways to open the tray of your CD-ROM drive. If a CD-ROM disc icon appears on your screen: m Select the disc icon on your screen and drag the icon to the Trash. m Click the disc icon, then choose the Put Away command in the File menu. m While the AppleCD Audio Player window is active, choose Eject CD from the File menu, or simultaneously press the x and E keys. (AppleCD Audio Player is a program that allows you to control your CD-ROM player and is available in the Apple [K] menu.) If no CD-ROM disc icon appears on your screen: m Press the Open/Close button for your CD-ROM drive. 2 Take the CD-ROM disc out of the tray. Store your disc in a safe place, away from heat, dust, and moisture. 3 Push the tray in, or press the Open/Close button, to close the tray. To avoid possible damage to the tray or the CD-ROM drive, keep the tray closed when you are not using it. 45Types of compact discs you can use Not all CD-ROM discs store information in the same way. A disc stores and displays information according to a given file format. Your computer’s system software must understand the file format in order to use the contents of the disc. Standard file formats You can use CD-ROM discs with these standard file formats: m HFS (Hierarchical File System)—the standard format used by the Macintosh. m ISO 9660—the International Standards Organization’s file format for CD-ROM discs. This format has been adopted by many CD manufacturers to make their discs compatible with a variety of computers. It is also the format that allows you to use Photo CDs in your CD-ROM drive. m The High Sierra format, a predecessor of the ISO 9660 format. m Photo CDs m Audio CDs The software that lets you use discs with these file formats is already installed on your computer. Other CD-ROM formats Your CD-ROM drive also works with file formats other than the ones listed above (for example, CD-ROM XA), provided that you install the appropriate software on your Macintosh. To find out about the availability of Macintosh software for additional file formats, contact the publisher of a particular disc. Audio CDs Your CD-ROM drive can play audio CDs and audio tracks on CD-ROM discs using your computer’s built-in speaker. You can also attach headphones or speakers to your computer for stereo sound. For further information, see the “CD-ROM Discs” topic of Macintosh Guide, available in the Guide (h) menu. 46 Chapter 5Using the CD-ROM Drive Photo CDs With your CD-ROM drive, you can use QuickTime to open digitized images stored on Photo CDs. For further information on Photo CDs, see the “CD-ROM Discs” topic of Macintosh Guide, available in the Guide (h) menu. Playing audio CDs With your CD-ROM drive and your computer’s built-in speaker, you can play audio compact discs (CDs) or audio tracks on CD-ROM discs. You can also attach headphones or speakers to the computer to listen to audio CDs and audio tracks. See Chapter 3 for information on connecting sound equipment to your computer. To start, stop, and otherwise control audio discs, use the AppleCD Audio Player program, available in the Apple (?) menu. Your audio CD software will only play tracks that contain audio information. You can listen to an audio CD or audio tracks in the background while you do other work on your computer. For more information about playing audio CDs, see the “CD-ROM Discs” topic of Macintosh Guide, available in the Guide (h) menu. You can listen to an audio CD or CD-ROM disc with audio tracks in the background while you use your computer for other work. 47Working with Photo CDs You can use your CD-ROM drive to open Photo CD images stored on Photo CDs. A Photo CD image is a digitized version of a standard photograph that you can open and view on your computer screen. You can do many things with the images on your Photo CDs: m Open and view the images individually on your computer screen. m View the images on your computer screen in a series, as you would view a slide presentation. m Copy and save the images, print them, paste them into word-processing documents or other documents that accept graphics, and edit them with a graphics application program. Photo CD images are an excellent source of graphics for desktop publishing, multimedia presentations, business documents, and professional-quality graphic design. For more information on working with Photo CD images, see the “CD-ROM Discs” topic of Macintosh Guide, available in the Guide (h) menu. 48 Chapter 5Obtaining Photo CDs Your own photographs can be recorded as Photo CD images on a Photo CD. To obtain a Photo CD of your own photographs, take your standard 35-mm film to a photofinisher who has a Photo CD system. The photofinisher develops your film, digitizes the photographs, and gives you back a Photo CD containing your Photo CD images. A single Photo CD can hold approximately a hundred images. If your Photo CD isn’t full, you can take it back to the photofinisher and have more photos added until the disc is full. Such discs are called multisession discs because they contain images added after the first session. Your CD-ROM drive can read both single-session and multisession Photo CDs. (Other CD-ROM drives can read only single-session discs and are unable to read the additional images placed on a multisession disc.) Before viewing the contents of a Photo CD Normally, you open Photo CD images with the SimpleText program that came with your computer. If you wish, you can use a graphics or image-editing program instead of SimpleText to open images. For instructions, see the “Working with Programs” topic of Macintosh Guide, available in the Guide (h) menu. If you use SimpleText to view high-resolution images, you should increase the amount of memory that SimpleText uses. For more information on memory, see the “Memory” topic of Macintosh Guide, available in the Guide (h) menu. A note about resolution When a Photo CD image is created, it’s recorded at five different levels of resolution. The higher the resolution, the more information is recorded about the image, and the sharper the image appears when displayed or printed at larger sizes. However, high-resolution images take up a lot of memory—up to 18 MB of data for one photograph—which affects file size, as well as the amount of time it takes to display or print an image. It’s best to work with a resolution appropriate for your monitor or printer. Some monitors and printers cannot display or print very high-resolution images. Using the CD-ROM Drive 49For most work, a resolution of 768 x 512 pixels or smaller is suitable. For detailed work or very high-quality reproductions, you may want to use a higher resolution. Make sure to open high-resolution images with application programs designed to handle large image files. SimpleText cannot open very large files. Sharing a CD-ROM disc over a network You can share a CD-ROM disc using the file-sharing feature of System 7.5. If the disc has audio portions, you will be able to hear the audio yourself, but other people on the network will not. Likewise, you cannot hear the audio portions of discs you access over a network. For further information about file sharing in System 7.5, see the “Networks and Telecommunications” topic of Macintosh Guide, available in the Guide (h) menu. 50 Chapter 551 Consult this chapter if you experience problems using your computer. When you have questions If you want to know how to do a particular task with your computer, refer to Macintosh Guide in the Guide (h) menu. For instructions on using Macintosh Guide, see Chapter 2 of this manual. If you have trouble While you’re using your computer, you may occasionally see a bomb icon or an error message, or the pointer (8) may “freeze” on the screen. If you have trouble with your computer, take a few minutes to read the information in this chapter. If your problem is related to a particular procedure, you should also look for information on that procedure in Macintosh Guide, available in the Guide (h) menu. For additional troubleshooting information and a list of common questions relating to your system software, see the “Troubleshooting” topic of Macintosh Guide. If you are unable to access Macintosh Guide (for example, if your screen is “frozen”), refer to this chapter to see if you can resolve the problem. 6 TroubleshootingTake your time When you see an error message, you don’t have to take action immediately. The message stays on the screen until you click the OK (or Restart) button or turn off the Macintosh. To help diagnose and correct the problem, follow the suggestions in this section. Gather as much information on the situation as you can. Then follow the instructions in the next section, “Start Over.” m Make a note of exactly what you were doing when the problem occurred. Write down the message on the screen. List the programs you were using and the names of any items you know have been added to the System Folder since the system software was installed. This information will help a service person diagnose the problem. (It is helpful to keep a printed copy of the items in your System Folder. For instructions on printing the contents of a folder, see the “Printing & Fonts” topic of Macintosh Guide, available in the Guide [h] menu.) m Check the screen for any clues. Is a menu selected? What programs and document icons are open? Note anything else that seems relevant. m If you were typing text and were not able to save it before the problem occurred, you can write down the parts of the text still visible on the screen so that some of your work will be easy to replace. m Ask other Macintosh users about the problem you’re having; they may have a solution for it. If you need repair service, consult the service and support information that came with your computer for instructions on how to contact an Appleauthorized service provider or Apple for assistance. 52 Chapter 6Start over Often you can eliminate a problem simply by clearing the computer’s memory and starting over. If you can, save any open documents before restarting the Macintosh. If your system is frozen and does not respond to anything you do, or if you have a “bomb” message on the screen, saving may not be possible. You can try pressing x-Option-Esc to quit the program in use when the problem occurred; if this works, you can then save the documents open in other programs before restarting. (Note: Use this key combination to force a program to quit only when you can’t choose Quit from the File menu.) To restart your Macintosh, try the following steps: 1 If you can, choose Restart from the Special menu or from the dialog box that’s on screen. Dialog boxes contain messages from the computer. If something goes wrong, a message may appear on the screen, asking you to restart the computer. 2 If you can’t choose Restart, hold down the x and Control keys while you press the Power key (marked with a triangle). This key combination restarts the computer. (Use this key combination only when you can’t choose Restart from the Special menu.) 3 If nothing happens, turn off your computer with the power switch, wait at least 10 seconds, and then turn it on again. 4 If the power switch doesn’t turn off the computer, unplug your Macintosh. If you suspect that the problem is with other equipment, such as a printer or an external hard disk that’s attached to your computer, turn that equipment off for 10 seconds or longer, then turn it on again and restart the Macintosh. Troubleshooting 53Rebuild your desktop regularly A process known as “rebuilding the desktop” helps your Macintosh keep track of data on your disks. It’s a good idea to rebuild the desktop of your disks once a month or so, especially your startup disks. (Although you usually use the hard disk in your computer as a startup disk, you can also start up from any other disk that has system software installed.) To rebuild the desktop of your internal hard disk disk, follow these steps: 1 Hold down the Option and x keys while you start up your computer. Do not release the keys until you see a message asking whether you want to rebuild the desktop. 2 Click OK. You can also use this procedure to rebuild the desktop of an external hard disk or a floppy disk. Simply turn on the external hard disk or insert the floppy disk into a floppy disk drive before you turn on the computer. If icons do not appear correctly after you rebuild the desktop, restart your computer while pressing the Shift key to temporarily turn off system extensions. When you see the “Welcome to Macintosh—extensions off” message, release the Shift key and press the Option and x keys until you see a message asking if you want to rebuild the desktop. 54 Chapter 6Solutions to common problems This section contains descriptions of problems you could experience with your computer. Some problems may be caused by your CD-ROM drive, so if you don’t find your problem here, be sure to check the section, “Solutions to CD-ROM Problems,” later in this chapter. The computer is turned on but the screen is dark. One of the following is probably the cause: m You have a screen saver program that darkens the screen when the computer has not been used for a certain period. Press a key or move the mouse to turn off the screen saver. m The screen control buttons (ü) are not adjusted properly. Press the top screen control button to lighten the screen. m The Macintosh is not getting power. Check that the computer’s power cord is firmly connected to the computer and plugged into a grounded electrical outlet, and that the outlet has power. If you are displaying video from your computer on a television screen, it is normal for your computer monitor to be dark. The screen image is off center. If the picture on your screen appears to be off center, use the centering controls on the back of the computer to adjust it. Use a small screwdriver to turn the controls. The computer’s clock keeps time inaccurately. Your computer has a clock that runs continuously. When the computer is turned off, a battery keeps the clock running. If your clock begins to keep time inaccurately, have your Apple-authorized service provider replace the battery. Vertical centering control Horizontal centering control Troubleshooting 55When you start up, a disk icon with a blinking question mark appears in the middle of the screen. This icon indicates that your Macintosh cannot find the system software it needs to start up. One of the following is probably the cause: m Your computer may be having a problem recognizing external SCSI equipment, such as hard disks, CD-ROM drives, and scanners. (SCSI stands for Small Computer System Interface.) Turn off all external SCSI equipment and disconnect the first SCSI device in the chain from your computer’s SCSI port. Then restart the computer. If the computer starts up after you disconnect your SCSI equipment, refer to the manuals that came with the equipment for information on the proper way to connect SCSI equipment and assign SCSI ID numbers. If you have a printer connected to your computer’s SCSI port, make sure your printer is connected properly. Most printers connect to the printer port, not the SCSI port. Check the manuals that came with your printer for information on how to connect it properly. m System software is not installed on the startup hard disk, the system software is damaged, or the hard disk is not working properly. Insert the Macintosh Performa CD. Then follow the instructions in “Repairing a Damaged Disk” to test your startup hard disk and repair any damage. If repairing the disk doesn’t help, follow the instructions in the Macintosh Performa CD booklet to reinstall system software on your startup hard disk. 56 Chapter 6A disk icon with an X appears in the middle of the screen and a floppy disk is ejected from the disk drive. This icon indicates that the floppy disk you tried to start up from is not a startup disk. When you turn on your computer, it looks first in the floppy disk drive for a disk containing system software. If the disk in the drive does not contain system software, the computer ejects the disk and looks on its internal hard disk for system software. Wait a few seconds. The computer should start up from its internal hard disk. Make sure you insert floppy disks only after the computer has begun starting up. A “sad Macintosh” icon appears and the computer won’t start up. This icon indicates that your Macintosh cannot start up because of a problem with the system software or the computer hardware. Eject any floppy disks by turning off the computer and then holding down the mouse button while you turn the computer on again. Try starting up with the Macintosh Performa CD. (For instructions on how to start up your computer from the CD-ROM disc, see the Macintosh Performa CD booklet, which came with your computer.) If the “sad Macintosh” icon appears again, consult the service and support information that came with your computer for information on contacting an Apple-authorized service provider or Apple for assistance. Troubleshooting 57The hard disk icon does not appear on the desktop. If you don’t see a hard disk icon on the desktop, try the following: m Use the Drive Setup program to make the disk available. Drive Setup is located in the Apple Extras folder. For instructions, start Drive Setup, then choose Drive Setup Guide from the Guide (h) menu. m If the hard disk is internal, shut down your computer, wait at least 10 seconds, and then turn it on again. m If the hard disk is external, make sure that it is turned on and that its cable is connected firmly; then restart the Macintosh. m Check the ID numbers of all SCSI equipment connected to your computer. See the manuals that came with your SCSI equipment for information on setting SCSI ID numbers. m If the hard disk is your startup disk, start your computer with the Macintosh Performa CD. (For instructions on how to start up your computer from the CD-ROM disc, see the Macintosh Performa CD booklet.) Then follow the rest of the instructions on repairing a disk to test your startup hard disk and repair any damage. If repairing the disk doesn’t help, follow the instructions in “Installing or Reinstalling System Software” later in this chapter to reinstall system software on your startup hard disk. Icons do not appear correctly on your screen. You need to rebuild the desktop—a process that helps your Macintosh keep track of files and folders on your hard disks. For instructions, see “Rebuild Your Desktop Regularly” in the section “If You Have Trouble” earlier in this chapter. If icons do not appear correctly after you rebuild the desktop, restart your computer while pressing the Shift key to temporarily turn off system extensions. When you see the “Welcome to Macintosh—extensions off” message, release the Shift key and press the Option and x keys until you see a message asking if you want to rebuild the desktop. 58 Chapter 6Your Macintosh can’t read a floppy disk. If you see a message that a floppy disk is unreadable, try one of the following: m If the disk has never been used, you may simply need to initialize it. For instructions, see the “Disks” topic of Macintosh Guide, available in the Guide (h) menu. m The disk may be damaged. See “Repairing a Damaged Disk” later in this chapter for information on testing and repairing disks. m If the disk is a high-density disk previously used on another computer, the disk may have been formatted incorrectly as an 800K disk rather than as a 1440K (high-density) disk. If so, use the other computer to copy the disk’s contents onto a properly formatted disk. m The disk may have been formatted for use on another kind of computer. You may be able to use a program that lets you work with such disks on your Macintosh. If you are trying unsuccessfully to use a DOS floppy disk, consider the following: m When formatting floppy disks on a DOS computer for use in a Macintosh, you need to format standard double-sided disks as 720K disks and highdensity disks as 1440K disks. Double-sided disks formatted in 1440K format and high-density disks formatted in 720K format may not work in a Macintosh. If you think your DOS floppy disk might have a format that doesn’t work in a Macintosh, use a DOS computer to copy the contents of the disk onto a properly formatted disk. Troubleshooting 59You can’t start an application program or it quits unexpectedly. Or, when you try to open a program, you see a message that not enough memory is available. One of the following is probably the cause: m The Macintosh ran out of memory. Quit the programs that you have open and then open the program you want to use, or restart your Macintosh. Use the Memory control panel to turn on virtual memory. For more information on virtual memory, see the “Memory” topic of Macintosh Guide, available in the Guide (h) menu. m The program needs more memory. Use the program’s Info window to give it more memory. For more information on increasing a program’s memory, see the “Memory” topic of Macintosh Guide, available in the Guide (h) menu. m The program is incompatible with your Macintosh. Contact the program’s publisher to see if there is an upgrade available for the program. You see a message that you need to have an FPU installed. Your computer has a floating-point unit (FPU) installed. If you see this message, the program is probably incompatible with your Macintosh. Contact the program’s publisher to see if there is an upgrade available for the program. 60 Chapter 6A dialog box with a bomb appears. There is a software problem. m Write down what you were doing when the message appeared, and write down the text of the message. m Restart your Macintosh. (See “Start Over” in the section “If You Have Trouble” earlier in this chapter for instructions.) Most software problems are temporary, and restarting usually corrects the problem. m If the problem recurs, check the startup disk and application program you were using when the dialog box appeared. Make sure that all programs, desk accessories, and system extensions you’re using are compatible with the system software. Reinstalling the system software may correct the problem. m Sometimes incompatible system extensions or control panels can cause system software problems. Restart while holding down the Shift key; this temporarily turns off all system extensions. If your computer works normally after you do this, use the Extensions Manager control panel to turn on extensions and control panels one at a time. Restart after you turn on each extension. This procedure should identify incompatible extensions and control panels. For information on using the Extensions Manager control panel to manage system extensions, see the “Setting Options” topic of Macintosh Guide, available in the Guide (h) menu. m If the problem recurs, you may need to reinstall system software. See the Macintosh Performa CD booklet for instructions. Troubleshooting 61The pointer (8) doesn’t move when you move the mouse. One of the following situations is probably the cause. m There is a software problem. Try the following: Press x-Option-Esc to quit the application program in use when the problem occurred. If this works, you can save the documents open in other programs before restarting. Restart your Macintosh. See “Start Over” in the section “If You Have Trouble” earlier in this chapter for instructions. m Follow the suggestions in the previous section, “A Dialog Box With a Bomb Appears.” m The mouse is not connected properly. Turn the computer off using the power switch, check that the mouse and keyboard cables are connected properly, and then restart the computer. IMPORTANT Do not connect or disconnect the mouse while the computer is turned on. You may damage your computer. m Signals from the mouse are not reaching the computer, either because the mouse needs cleaning or because there is something wrong with the mouse. Clean the mouse according to the instructions in Appendix A of this book. If you have another mouse or pointing device, try connecting and using it. (Turn the computer off before connecting it.) If the new device works, there is probably something wrong with the mouse you replaced. If none of these procedures solves the problem, consult the service and support information that came with your computer for instructions on how to contact an Apple-authorized service provider or Apple for assistance. 62 Chapter 6Typing on the keyboard produces nothing on the screen. One of the following is probably the cause: m Some system software features are turned on that affect the way the keyboard works. Use the Easy Access control panel to turn off Sticky Keys, Slow Keys, and Mouse Keys. m There is a software problem. Restart your Macintosh. For instructions, see “Start Over” in the section “If You Have Trouble” earlier in this chapter. Check the startup disk and application program you were using when the problem occurred. Make sure that all programs, desk accessories, and system extensions you’re using are compatible with the system software. If the problem recurs, you may need to reinstall system software. See the Macintosh Performa CD booklet for instructions. m You haven’t selected any text or set the insertion point (i). Make sure the program you want to type in is the active program. Then place the pointer (8) in the active window and click to set an insertion point (i) or drag to select text (if you want to replace the text with your typing). m The keyboard is not connected properly. Turn off the computer using the power switch, then check that the keyboard cable is connected properly at both ends. If you have a keyboard with an ADB port (marked with the × icon) on each end, turn off the Macintosh using the power switch and plug the keyboard cable into the other ADB port on the keyboard. (You may have to unplug the mouse to do this.) Then restart the computer. m The keyboard is damaged. If you have access to another keyboard, try using it instead. (Turn the computer off before connecting it.) If the new keyboard works, there is probably something wrong with the one you replaced. If none of these procedures solves the problem, consult the service and support information that came with your computer for instructions on how to contact an Apple-authorized service provider or Apple for assistance. Troubleshooting 63You can’t open a document, or you see a message that an application program can’t be found. m Some documents can be opened by more than one application program. Try starting a program that you think might be able to open the document, then choose Open from the program’s File menu to try to open the document. m Purchase and install the correct software to use the document, or find out if the creator of the document can convert it to a form that one of your programs can use. m Don’t try to open the files in your System Folder. Most of the files in your System Folder are used by your computer for internal purposes and are not intended to be opened. m Rebuild your desktop by holding down the Option and x keys while starting up your computer. Keep holding down the keys until you see a message asking whether you want to rebuild the desktop. Click OK. m If the document is from a DOS computer, use the PC Exchange control panel to specify which Macintosh program will open the document. For information about working with DOS documents on your Macintosh, see the “Using DOS Files & Disks” topic of Macintosh Guide, available in the Guide (h) menu. 64 Chapter 6You experience problems using a document from a DOS computer. If you can’t open a DOS document using a Macintosh program, try the following: m Open the document from within the program by choosing Open in the program’s File menu. m Use the PC Exchange control panel to specify which Macintosh program will open the document. If a DOS document is displayed incorrectly, or you see strange codes or characters in the document, try one of the following: m Your application program may have special procedures for opening and saving documents with different file formats. See the information that came with your program, or call the program’s publisher. m Try opening the document in another program. Note: Some characters that can be displayed on the Macintosh are not accurately displayed on DOS computers. For more information about working with DOS documents on your Macintosh, see the “Using DOS Files & Disks” topic of Macintosh Guide, available in the Guide (h) menu. Troubleshooting 65You see a message that your application program can’t be opened because a file can’t be found. Macintosh programs designed specifically for the PowerPC microprocessor (also called “native” applications) use special files called shared libraries. Any necessary shared libraries should be installed automatically when you install these special Macintosh programs. Follow the directions that came with your program to reinstall the program. If the shared library is still missing, contact the software program’s manufacturer for assistance. You experience problems using an older Macintosh program. Some older Macintosh programs are not completely compatible with Macintosh computers that have the PowerPC microprocessor. m Contact the program’s publisher to see if an upgrade is available. m Open the Memory control panel and turn off Modern Memory Manager. For more detailed instructions, see the “Working with Programs” topic of Macintosh Guide, available in the Guide (h) menu. 66 Chapter 6Solutions to CD-ROM problems Problems using the CD-ROM drive The CD-ROM disc icon does not appear on screen. m If you have other SCSI devices attached to your computer, make sure that each device has a unique SCSI ID number (your CD-ROM drive has SCSI ID 3). Refer to the documentation that came with your SCSI devices if you need to reset SCSI ID numbers. Your computer starts up and you see large folder-shaped areas, containing labeled pictorial buttons, instead of the usual Macintosh desktop. m Your computer may have started up from a CD-ROM disc containing At Ease, an alternative to the Macintosh desktop. You need to have the Macintosh desktop on your screen before you can use any of the installation instructions in this manual. To return to the Macintosh desktop, choose Shut Down from the Special menu. When your computer is off, press the Open/Close button of your CD-ROM drive to open the tray, then remove the CD-ROM disc. Close the tray. Then start up your computer again. To avoid having the computer start up from a CD-ROM disc, remember to remove any disc in the drive before you shut down your computer. The tray of your CD-ROM drive won’t open. If a CD-ROM disc icon appears on your screen: m Drag the disc icon to the Trash, or select it and choose Put Away from the File menu. If the AppleCD Audio Player is active, choose Eject CD from the File menu. If you see a message that a disc can’t be put away because it is being shared, turn off file sharing, then try again to put away the disc. If no CD-ROM disc icon appears on your screen: m Press the Open/Close button for your CD-ROM drive. Troubleshooting 67m The signal to open the tray may not be reaching the computer. Turn off your computer and locate the small pinhole to the lower right of the CD-ROM tray opening. Insert the end of a large straightened paper clip firmly and horizontally into the pinhole. Push gently until the tray is released, then carefully pull the tray open. Do not force the tray open; wait until the paper clip has dislodged it or you may break the front of the tray. If neither of these suggestions works, your CD-ROM drive may be damaged. Contact an Apple-authorized service provider or Apple for further assistance. Your computer won’t restart, and a CD-ROM disc is in the CD-ROM drive. m Your computer may be trying to start up from the CD-ROM disc. Press the Open/Close button of your CD-ROM drive to open the tray, and remove the CD-ROM disc. Close the tray, then restart your computer. Problems using CD-ROM discs You insert a CD-ROM disc, but its icon doesn’t appear on the Macintosh desktop. m Make sure that the disc label is facing up and the disc is centered in the tray. If you’re using a small (8 cm) disc, make sure it is within the tray’s inner ring. m Make sure the tray is closed all the way. m Try restarting your computer. WARNING Turn off your computer before you attempt to eject the tray using a paper clip. If you don’t, you may damage the CD-ROM drive. 68 Chapter 6Your computer displays the message “This is not a Macintosh disk: Do you want to initialize it?” when you insert a CD-ROM disc in the CD-ROM drive. m The disc may use a format that the Macintosh cannot recognize. Your computer ejects a CD-ROM disc without giving you any error message. m Make sure the disc is flat in the tray and the disc label is facing up. If you’re using a small (8 cm) disc, make sure it’s centered within the tray’s inner ring. m The disc may need to be cleaned. (See “Handling CD-ROM Discs” in Appendix A.) If there are visible scratches on the shiny side of the disc, you may be able to remove them with a CD polishing kit (available from your audio CD dealer). If the scratches can’t be removed, you’ll need to replace the disc. m The disc may be damaged. Try another disc in the drive, and try the original disc in another drive. If the original drive reads other discs or if the original disc also doesn’t work in another drive, the disc is probably damaged. You’ll need to replace the disc. You can’t open a document on a CD-ROM disc. m Try opening the application program first; then open the document. m Read the manual that came with your CD-ROM disc. Some discs come with software that you need to install on your computer before using the disc. You can’t save changes you make to information on a CD-ROM disc. m CD-ROM is a read-only medium. This means that information can be read (retrieved) from it, but not written (stored) on it. You can save the changed information on a hard disk or floppy disk. Problems using ISO 9660 or High Sierra discs You cannot access files on a CD-ROM disc that uses the ISO 9660 or High Sierra format. m Discs in the ISO 9660 and High Sierra disc formats have version numbers attached to file names. Some application programs need these version numbers in order to work with files. To make the version numbers available to programs on your computer, follow these instructions. Troubleshooting 69Drag the CD icon to the Trash. When the tray opens, hold down the Option key and push the tray back in. Continue to hold down the Option key until the disc is in the drive. The program you are using should now be able to locate file names on that CD-ROM disc. Problems playing audio CDs You don’t hear any sound when you play an audio CD or an audio track on a CD-ROM disc using the AppleCD Audio Player. m If you have headphones or speakers connected to the computer, adjust the connector to make sure they are firmly connected. Make sure the column control on your headphones or speakers is not turned down too low. m If you do not have headphones or speakers connected to the computer, make sure that nothing else is plugged into the sound output port on your computer. m Some programs change the sound options to suit their needs. You may need to reset the sound options in the Sound control panel. Refer to the “Sound” topic of Macintosh Guide available in the Guide (h) menu. m If you are using a CD-ROM disc over a network, you won’t be able to hear the audio portion. m Make sure the volume is turned up in the AppleCD Audio Player. With the Audio Player open, drag the volume control slider up or press the Up Arrow key on your keyboard. m The CD may have been paused. Click the Play/Pause button in the AppleCD Audio Player once or twice. While playing an audio track on a CD-ROM disc that combines audio tracks and data, you double-click the disc icon and the audio track stops playing. m You can’t open data files on a CD-ROM disc and listen to audio tracks on that disc at the same time. You are unable to record sound from an audio CD. m Check your computer’s sound input port to see if a microphone or other device is connected. m You may need to reset the sound options in the Sound control panel. Refer to the “Sound” topic of Macintosh Guide, available in the Guide (h) menu. 70 Chapter 6Problems using Photo CDs You can’t open Photo CDs that are in your CD-ROM drive. m Reinstall the CD-ROM and QuickTime software (available through the “MultiMedia Software” option in Custom Install). Your computer does not display color icons for individual images on a Photo CD. m Your computer may be low on memory. To view color icons, restart your computer and then reopen the Photos folder. See the “Memory” topic of Macintosh Guide, available in the Guide (h) menu for more information on managing memory. After you open an image on a Photo CD, the image is scrambled, colors are displayed incorrectly, or no image appears in the window. m The program you are using may not be designed to work with large (highresolution) image files. You can open the image with another program or you can assign more memory to the program. (See the “Memory” topic of Macintosh Guide, available in the Guide (h) menu for more information on managing memory.) After you open an image on a Photo CD, your system is “frozen” and does not respond to any input, or you have a “bomb” message on your screen. m Restart your Macintosh. The program you are using may not be designed to work with large (high-resolution) image files. You can open the image with another program or you can assign more memory to the program (see the “Memory” topic of Macintosh Guide available in the Guide (h) menu, for more information on managing memory.) Troubleshooting 71If your computer’s performance decreases If you notice a decrease in your computer’s speed and general performance after you add special software (a control panel, system extension, or custom utility), it may be because the software does not work well with Macintosh computers built with the PowerPC microprocessor. m To find out if the new software is the problem, hold down the Shift key while you restart the computer. This temporarily turns off control panels and extensions. If the computer performs better without this software, one of these items is likely to be the problem. m Use the Extensions Manager control panel to turn off a system extension or set of extensions. For detailed instructions, see the “Setting Options” topic of Macintosh Guide, available in the Guide (h) menu. If the computer performs better when an extension is turned off, contact the extension’s manufacturer for information or an upgrade. m Use the Memory control panel to turn off virtual memory. For more information on virtual memory, see the “Memory” topic of Macintosh Guide, available in the Guide (h) menu. m If you use several application programs at the same time, your computer’s performance will increase if you install more RAM (random-access memory). See “Expanding Memory” in Chapter 3. If you still do not notice an improvement, you may want to reinstall system software on your startup hard disk. See the Macintosh Performa CD booklet for instructions. 72 Chapter 6Repairing a damaged disk If you see a message reporting that a disk is damaged or unreadable, you may need to repair the disk. Try these suggestions first If you can’t start up from a hard disk or you don’t see the hard disk icon on the desktop, try the following: m If the hard disk is internal, shut down your Macintosh, wait at least 10 seconds, and then turn it on again. m If the hard disk is external, make sure that it is turned on and that its cable is connected firmly; then restart the Macintosh. m If the hard disk is your startup disk, start up with a different startup disk. (See the following section, “Starting Up From a CD-ROM Disc.”) If, after you start up from a different disk, your hard disk’s icon appears on your desktop, reinstall system software on the hard disk. (See “Installing or Reinstalling System Software” later in this chapter). m Check the ID numbers of all SCSI equipment connected to your computer. Each device must have a unique ID number. The computer itself has the ID number 7 and the internal CD-ROM drive has the ID number 3. The ID numbers 0, 1, 2, 4, 5, and 6 are available for additional SCSI devices. Also check that the chain of devices is terminated properly. For information on setting SCSI ID numbers and terminating a SCSI chain, see the manuals that came with your SCSI equipment. m If none of these suggestions solves the problem, test the disk by following the instructions given later in this section. Troubleshooting 73Starting up from a CD-ROM disc To test, repair, or initialize a hard disk, or to install system software on a hard disk, you need to start up your computer from another disk. You can start up your computer using the Macintosh Performa CD that came with your computer. The procedure for starting up from the CD varies depending on the condition of the system software on your hard disk. To find out which procedure to use, you must turn on your Macintosh. The steps that follow tell how to start up from a CD-ROM disc, depending on what you see on your screen. If you see a blinking question mark on your screen The blinking question mark means that your Macintosh is unable to find usable system software on your hard disk. 1 Press the Open/Close button of your CD-ROM drive to open the CD-ROM tray. 2 Place the Macintosh Performa CD disc in the tray with the disc label facing up. Make sure the disc is lying flat in the tray. 3 Push the tray in, or press the Open/Close button, to close the tray. Your Macintosh recognizes the CD as a startup disk, and in a few seconds the Macintosh desktop with a Launcher appears. 74 Chapter 6If you see the Macintosh desktop 1 Press the Open/Close button of your CD-ROM drive to open the CD-ROM tray. 2 Place the Macintosh Performa CD disc in the tray with the disc label facing up. Make sure the disc is lying flat in the tray. 3 Push the tray in, or press the Open/Close button, to close the tray. If the Macintosh Performa CD icon does not appear on your screen, follow the steps in the next section, “Problems Starting Up From the CD?” If the Macintosh Performa CD icon appears on the right side of your screen, continue with these steps. 4 Choose Control Panels from the Apple (K) menu. 5 Double-click the Startup Disk icon. The Startup Disk control panel window appears. 6 Click the CD icon to select it as your startup disk. 7 Choose Restart from the Special menu. Your computer recognizes the CD as its startup disk, and in a few seconds the Macintosh desktop with a Launcher appears. Troubleshooting 75Problems starting up from the CD? If you’ve followed the steps in the previous sections and the Macintosh Performa CD icon does not appear on your screen, follow these steps: 1 Insert the CD into the tray. 2 Choose Restart from the Special menu. 3 Immediately press and hold down the Command (x), Shift, Option, and Delete keys. The computer bypasses the internal hard disk, and the Macintosh Performa CD icon appears on the desktop. If the Macintosh Performa CD icon still does not appear on the desktop, continue with these steps: 4 Choose Control Panels from the Apple (K) menu. 5 Double-click the Startup Disk icon. The Startup Disk control panel appears. 6 Click the CD icon to select it as your startup disk. 7 Close the Startup Disk control panel. 8 Choose Restart from the Special menu (or the Apple menu). The computer starts up using the CD, and in a few moments the Macintosh desktop with a Launcher appears. 76 Chapter 6Checking for damage on your hard disk You can test a hard disk for damage with the Drive Setup program, which is on the Macintosh Performa CD that came with your computer. 1 Start up your computer from the Macintosh Performa CD. See “Starting Up From a CD-ROM Disc” earlier in this section. 2 Open the Drive Setup program. You may need to look in a folder called Utilities to find Drive Setup. 3 In the list of drives, click the disk you want to test. 4 Choose Test Disk from the Functions menu. 5 When a message tells you that the testing is complete, click Quit. If the test reveals a problem, you may be able to correct it by using Disk First Aid or another disk repair program (see the instructions in the next section), or you may need to reinitialize the disk (see “Initializing a Hard Disk” later in this chapter). Consult an Apple-authorized service provider for assistance if necessary. If you had a hard disk from another manufacturer installed after you bought your computer, use the software that came with the disk or contact the disk vendor to get the latest version of software. Troubleshooting 77How to repair a hard disk or floppy disk You can repair some types of disk damage by using the Disk First Aid program, which is on the Macintosh Performa CD that came with your computer. 1 Start up your computer from the Macintosh Performa CD. See “Starting Up From a CD-ROM Disc” earlier in this section. 2 Open the Disk First Aid icon. 3 Click the icon of the disk you want to test. Disk icons appear in a box at the top of the Disk First Aid window. 78 Chapter 64 Click Repair to begin testing and repairing the disk. If you want to test and repair another disk, click its icon and then click Repair. 5 When testing and repair are done, choose Quit from the File menu. If Disk First Aid cannot correct the problem m Try repairing the disk again. Sometimes repeating the process corrects the problem. m Use another disk repair or recovery program. Some disk repair programs let you recover information from a damaged disk. m Consult an Apple-authorized service provider for help. m If you can’t repair the disk, you’ll need to reinitialize it, which erases all the information on it. Before you reinitialize, be sure you recover all the information you can and back it up. Then erase (reinitialize) the disk. For instructions on reinitializing a floppy disk, see the “Disks” topic of Macintosh Guide, available in the Guide (h) menu. For instructions on reinitializing a hard disk, see the next section, “Initializing a Hard Disk.” If initialization doesn’t work, discard the damaged disk (if it’s a floppy disk), or take it to your Apple-authorized service provider for repair (if it’s a hard disk). Bring the Macintosh Performa CD (which you received with your computer) with you to the service provider. Initializing a hard disk The hard disk inside your computer was initialized (formatted for use) at the factory, so you shouldn’t need to initialize it. You need to initialize a hard disk only if m you purchase an uninitialized hard disk from another manufacturer m your hard disk is damaged If a hard disk needs to be initialized, the disk’s icon does not appear on the desktop when you start up the computer using another disk. You initialize your internal hard disk using a program called Drive Setup, which is on the Macintosh Performa CD that came with your computer. Troubleshooting 791 Start up your computer from the Macintosh Performa CD. See “Starting Up From a CD-ROM Disc” in the section “Repairing a Damaged Disk,” earlier in this chapter. 2 Open the Drive Setup program. You may need to look in a folder called Utilities to find Drive Setup. 3 In the list of drives, click the disk you want to initialize. 4 Click Initialize to initialize the hard disk. 5 When you see a message reporting that initialization was successful, click Quit. If a message reports that initialization failed, try again. If initialization fails a second time, take the disk to your Apple-authorized service provider for repair. WARNING Initializing a disk erases any information that may be on it. Before you initialize a damaged disk, try to repair it as described in “Repairing a Damaged Disk” earlier in this chapter. 80 Chapter 6 Click the drive you want to initialize... ...then click Initialize.Installing or reinstalling system software System software is the set of programs and other files that your computer uses to start itself up, keep track of your files, and run the application programs you use. System software is kept in the System Folder. When you turn on your computer, it looks for a startup disk, which is a disk that contains the system software. The startup disk is usually the hard disk that’s inside your computer, though another hard disk or a floppy disk can also be a startup disk. When should you install or reinstall system software? Your Macintosh came with all the necessary system software installed on its internal hard disk, so you don’t need to install system software on that disk unless you encounter software problems. If you have a new hard disk or a newly initialized hard disk that doesn’t contain system software, or if you want to upgrade to a more recent version of system software on a hard disk, you’ll need to install system software. You can install or reinstall system software by following the instructions in the Macintosh Performa CD booklet that came with your computer. If your hard disk already has system software installed on it but there is a problem with the disk or the software, you may see this icon in the middle of the screen: If this icon appears, first try testing your startup hard disk and repairing any damage. To do this, follow the instructions in “Repairing a Damaged Disk” earlier in this chapter. If repairing the disk doesn’t help, you may need to reinstall system software. You can install or reinstall system software by following the instructions in the Macintosh Performa CD booklet that came with your computer. If you’ve used Apple Backup to back up the contents of your hard disk, you can use Apple Restore to reinstall system software. See “Restoring the Information on Your Hard Disk” in the section “Protecting the Information on a Disk” in Chapter 4. Troubleshooting 81For your own safety and that of your equipment, follow all the instructions in this chapter. Keep these instructions available for reference by you and others. Health-related information about computer use Muscle soreness, eye fatigue, and other discomforts and injuries sometimes associated with using computers can occur from performing any number of activities. In fact, misuse of the same muscles during multiple activities can create a problem that might not otherwise exist. For example, if you engage in nonwork activities that involve repetitive stress on the wrist—such as bicycling—and also use your computer’s keyboard improperly, you may increase your likelihood of developing wrist problems. Some individuals are at greater risk of developing these problems because of their health, physiology, lifestyle, and general exposure to stress. Work organization and conditions, such as workstation setup and lighting, also play a part in your overall health and comfort. Preventing health problems is a multifaceted task that requires careful attention to the way you use your body every hour of every day. The most common health effects associated with using a computer are musculoskeletal discomfort and eye fatigue. We’ll discuss each area of concern below. 83 Appendix A Health, Safety, and Maintenance Tips Read this appendix for important health and safety instructions, as well as tips on keeping your computer in good working order.Musculoskeletal discomfort As with any activity that involves sitting for long periods of time, using a computer can make your muscles sore and stiff. To minimize these effects, set up your work environment carefully, using the guidelines that follow, and take frequent breaks to rest tired muscles. To make working with your computer more comfortable, allow enough space in your work area so that you can change position frequently and maintain a relaxed posture. Another type of musculoskeletal concern is repetitive stress injuries (RSIs), also known as cumulative trauma disorders (CTDs). These problems can occur when a certain muscle or tendon is repeatedly overused and forced into an unnatural position. The exact causes of RSIs are not totally understood, but in addition to awkward posture, such factors as the amount of repetition, the force used in the activity, the individual’s physiology, workplace stress level, and lifestyle may affect the likelihood of experiencing an RSI. RSIs did not suddenly arise when computers were invented; tennis elbow and writer’s cramp, for example, are two RSIs that have been with us for a long time. Although less common than other RSIs, one serious RSI discussed more often today is a wrist problem called carpal tunnel syndrome, which may be aggravated by improper use of computer keyboards. This nerve disorder results from excessive pressure on the median nerve as it passes through the wrist to the hand. This section offers advice on setting up your work area to enhance your comfort while you use your computer. Since the effects of repetitive movements associated with using a computer can be compounded by those of other work and leisure activities to produce or aggravate physical problems, proper use of your computer system must be considered as just one element of a healthy lifestyle. No one, of course, can guarantee that you won’t have problems even when you follow the most expert advice on using computer equipment. You should always check with a qualified health specialist if muscle, joint, or eye problems occur. 84 Appendix AEye fatigue Eye fatigue can occur whenever the eyes are focused on a nearby object for a long time. This problem occurs because the eye muscles must work harder to view an object that’s closer than about 20 feet (6 meters). Improper lighting can hasten the development of eye fatigue. Although eye fatigue is annoying, there’s no evidence that it leads to permanent damage. Whenever you’re engaged in an activity that involves close-up work—such as reading a magazine, doing craft work, or using a computer—be sure to have sufficient glare-free lighting and give your eyes frequent rest breaks by looking up and focusing on distant objects. Remember to have your eyes examined regularly. To prevent discomfort and eye fatigue: m Arrange your work space so that the furniture is properly adjusted for you and doesn’t contribute to an awkward working posture. m Take frequent short breaks to give your muscles and eyes a chance to rest. Arranging your office Here are some guidelines for adjusting the furniture in your office to accommodate your physical size and shape. m An adjustable chair that provides firm, comfortable support is best. Adjust the height of the chair so your thighs are horizontal and your feet flat on the floor. The back of the chair should support your lower back (lumbar region). Follow the manufacturer’s instructions for adjusting the backrest to fit your body properly. m When you use the computer keyboard, your shoulders should be relaxed. Your upper arm and forearm should form an approximate right angle, with your wrist and hand in roughly a straight line. Health, Safety, and Maintenance Tips 85You may have to raise your chair so your forearms and hands are at the proper angle to the keyboard. If this makes it impossible to rest your feet flat on the floor, you can use a footrest with adjustable height and tilt to make up for any gap between the floor and your feet. Or you may lower the desktop to eliminate the need for a footrest. Another option is to use a desk with a keyboard tray that’s lower than the regular work surface. m Position the mouse at the same height as your keyboard. Allow adequate space to use the mouse comfortably. m Arrange the monitor so the top of the screen is slightly below your eye level when you’re sitting at the keyboard. The best distance from your eyes to the screen is up to you, although most people seem to prefer 18 to 28 inches (45 to 70 cm). m Position the computer to minimize glare and reflections on the screen from overhead lights and windows. Thighs horizontal Shoulders relaxed Screen positioned to avoid reflected glare Forearms and hands in a straight line Forearms level or tilted up slightly Lower back supported Feet flat on the floor Top of the screen at or slightly below eye level (You may need to adjust the height of your computer by placing something under it or by raising your work surface.) Clearance under work surface 45–70 cm (18–28 in.) 86 Appendix AAvoiding fatigue m Change your seated position, stand up, or stretch whenever you start to feel tired. Frequent short breaks are helpful in reducing fatigue. m Use a light touch when typing or using a mouse and keep your hands and fingers relaxed. m Some computer users may develop discomfort in their hands, wrists, or arms after intensive work without breaks. If you begin to develop chronic pain or discomfort in your hands, wrists, or arms, consult a qualified health specialist. m Allow adequate workspace so that you can use your keyboard and mouse comfortably. Place papers or other items so you can view them easily while using your computer. A document stand may make reading papers more comfortable. m Eye muscles must work harder to focus on nearby objects. Occasionally focus your eyes on a distant object, and blink often while you work. m Clean your screen regularly. Keeping the screen clean helps reduce unwanted reflections. What about electromagnetic emissions? There has been recent public discussion of the possible health effects of prolonged exposure to extremely low frequency (ELF) and very low frequency (VLF) electromagnetic fields. Such fields are associated with electromagnetic sources such as television sets, electrical wiring, and some household appliances—as well as computer monitors. Apple has reviewed scientific reports and sought the counsel of government regulatory agencies and respected health organizations. Based on the prevailing evidence and opinions, Apple believes that the electric and magnetic fields produced by computer monitors do not pose a health risk. In response to those customers who wish to reduce their exposure to electromagnetic fields, Apple has lowered the emission levels of our products. We are also actively encouraging further scientific research so we can continue to promote the health and safety of our customers and employees. Health, Safety, and Maintenance Tips 87Safety instructions For your own safety and that of your equipment, always take the following precautions. Turn off the computer completely and disconnect the power plug (by pulling the plug, not the cord) if any of the following conditions exists: m the power cord or plug becomes frayed or otherwise damaged m you spill something into the case m your Macintosh is exposed to rain or any other excess moisture m your Macintosh has been dropped or the case has been otherwise damaged m you suspect that your Macintosh needs service or repair m you want to clean the case (use only the recommended procedure described later in this chapter) Be sure that you always do the following: m Keep your Macintosh away from sources of liquids, such as wash basins, bathtubs, shower stalls, and so on. m Protect your Macintosh from dampness or wet weather, such as rain, snow, and so on. m Read all the installation instructions carefully before you plug your Macintosh into a wall socket. m Keep these instructions handy for reference by you and others. m Follow all instructions and warnings dealing with your system. WARNING Electrical equipment may be hazardous if misused. Operation of this product, or similar products, must always be supervised by an adult. Do not allow children access to the interior of any electrical product and do not permit them to handle any cables. 88 Appendix AHandling your computer equipment Follow these guidelines for handling your computer and its components: m When setting up your computer, place components on a sturdy, flat surface, and carefully follow all setup instructions. m When connecting or disconnecting a cable, always hold the cable by its connector (the plug, not the cord). m Turn off your computer and all its components before connecting or disconnecting any cables to add or remove any component. Failure to do so could seriously damage your equipment. m Never force a connector into a port. If the connector and port do not join with reasonable ease, they probably don’t match. Make sure that the connector matches the port and that you have positioned the connector correctly in relation to the port. m Take care not to spill any food or liquid on the computer, keyboard, mouse, or other components. If you do, turn your computer off immediately and unplug it before cleaning up the spill. Depending on what you spilled and how much of it got into your equipment, you may have to bring your equipment to an Apple-authorized service provider. m Protect the computer and its components from direct sunlight and rain or other moisture. m Keep all ventilation openings clear and unobstructed. Without proper air circulation, components can overheat, causing damage or unreliable operation. WARNING This equipment is intended to be electrically grounded. Your Macintosh is equipped with a three-wire grounding plug—a plug that has a third (grounding) pin. This plug will fit only a grounded AC outlet. This is a safety feature. If you are unable to insert the plug into the outlet, contact a licensed electrician to replace the outlet with a properly grounded outlet. Do not defeat the purpose of the grounding plug! Health, Safety, and Maintenance Tips 89Handling the built-in monitor Follow these procedures for handling the built-in monitor: m Turn down the screen brightness control if you leave the computer turned on for extended periods. If the brightness is not turned down, the image on the screen could “burn in” and damage the screen. You can also use a “screen saver” program, which dims or varies the image on the screen when the computer has been idle for a specified period of time. These programs are available from independent suppliers and user groups. m If there is interference on the monitor’s screen or on a television or radio near your computer, move the affected equipment farther away. Handling the keyboard Take care not to spill any liquid on the keyboard. If you do, turn off your computer immediately. m If you spill liquid that is thin and clear, unplug the keyboard, turn it upside down to let the liquid drain out, and let it dry for 24 hours at room temperature. If, after you take these steps, the keyboard doesn’t work, take it to your Apple-authorized service provider for repair. m If you spill liquid that is greasy, sweet, or sticky, unplug the keyboard and take it to your Apple-authorized service provider for repair. 90 Appendix AHandling floppy disks Handling CD-ROM discs Keep these important safety instructions in mind as you use CD-ROM discs: m Hold a disc by the edges or by one edge and the center hole. Do not touch the disc surface. m To clean discs, wipe the shiny surface with a soft damp cloth, working in straight lines from center to edge. Do not use any form of cleaning agent. 125° F (52° C) 50° F (10° C) Keep disks dry. Do not use a pencil or an eraser on a disk or disk label. Store disks at temperatures between 50° F and 125° F. Do not touch the exposed part of the disk behind the metal shutter. Keep disks away from magnets. Avoid exposing disks to extremely hot temperatures. Health, Safety, and Maintenance Tips 91m To avoid damage to your discs, keep these points in mind: Other important safety instructions to keep in mind as you use your CD-ROM drive: m Position your computer so that when the tray opens, it doesn’t bump into anything. m Do not leave the disc tray open. If dust gets on the lens of the CD-ROM drive, the drive may have problems reading your compact discs. m Do not put anything (for instance, a cup) on top of the tray when it is open. m Do not force the tray open by hand. m Do not wipe the lens with a paper towel or other abrasive surface. If you need to clean the lens, see an Apple-authorized service provider for a lens cleaner. m Never transport your computer with a disc inside the CD-ROM drive. m Keep your computer equipment away from any source of liquid (such as wash basins, bathtubs, and shower stalls). If you drink coffee or other beverages while you’re at your computer, take care not to spill. m Avoid exposing your equipment to damp or wet weather. If your system is near a window, be sure the window is closed in rainy weather. The tray on your CD-ROM drive automatically closes when you shut down your computer. You may want to open the tray and take out your CD-ROM disc before shutting down. Do not put tape on discs. Do not scratch discs. Do not write on discs. Do not spill liquids on discs. Do not get dust on discs. Do not expose discs to direct sunlight. 92 Appendix AEjecting a disk For instructions on ejecting any disk (a floppy disk, a CD-ROM disc, or a removable media disk), see the “Disks” topic of Macintosh Guide, available in the Guide (h) menu. If you can’t eject a floppy disk If you can’t eject a floppy disk in the usual way, try the following in order: m Hold down the x and Shift keys and press the number 1 key on your keyboard to eject a disk in the internal disk drive. m Shut down the computer. If the disk isn’t ejected, then hold down the button on your mouse or other pointing device while you turn the computer on again. m Locate the small hole near the disk drive’s opening, and carefully insert the end of a large straightened paper clip into it. Push gently until the disk is ejected. Do not use excessive force. If nothing works, take the computer or disk drive to your Apple-authorized service provider to have the disk removed. Power supply The power supply in your computer is a high-voltage component and should not be opened for any reason, even when the computer is off. If the power supply needs service, contact your Apple-authorized dealer or service provider. Health, Safety, and Maintenance Tips 93Cleaning your equipment Follow these general rules when cleaning the outside of your computer and its components: m Use a damp, soft, lint-free cloth to clean the computer’s exterior. Avoid getting moisture in any openings. m Don’t use aerosol sprays, solvents, or abrasives. Cleaning the computer case To clean the case, do the following: 1 Turn off the computer completely and then disconnect the power plug. (Pull the plug, not the cord.) 2 Wipe the surfaces lightly with a clean, soft cloth dampened with water. Cleaning the monitor To clean the screen, put household glass cleaner on a soft cloth and wipe the screen. Don’t spray the cleaner directly on the screen, because the liquid might drip into the monitor or computer. Cleaning the mouse The mouse contains a small ball that must roll smoothly for the mouse to work properly. You can keep this ball free of dirt and grease by using the mouse on a clean, lint-free surface and cleaning it occasionally. You need a few cotton swabs and a clean, soft, lint-free cloth. 1 Turn off your computer. 94 Appendix A2 Turn the mouse upside-down and turn the plastic ring on the bottom counterclockwise to disengage it. If you have an older mouse, you may need to press the plastic ring (rather than turn it) to disengage it. If the mouse is locked, see the next section, “Locking and Unlocking the Mouse,” for instructions on how to unlock it. 3 Turn the mouse right-side up with one hand and catch the ring and the ball with your other hand. 4 Clean the three small rollers inside the mouse with a cotton swab moistened with water. Rotate the rollers to clean all around them. 5 Wipe the mouse ball with a clean, soft, dry, and lint-free cloth. 6 If necessary, wash the mouse ball with warm soapy water (use a mild soap such as a dishwashing liquid) and then dry the mouse ball thoroughly. 7 Gently blow into the mouse case to remove any dust that has collected there. 8 Put the ball and the ring back in place. Your mouse should roll smoothly across your mouse pad or desk. If it doesn’t, repeat these instructions carefully. Health, Safety, and Maintenance Tips 95Locking and unlocking the mouse Some mouse devices can be locked so that the ball can’t be removed. A locking mouse has a small hole on the plastic ring. To lock the mouse, follow these steps: 1 Insert a straightened paper clip into the hole on the plastic ring. 2 Press down on the paper clip while you turn the ring clockwise. Turn the ring a very short distance, until it stops. When the recessed area on the ring is not lined up with the recessed area surrounding the ring, the mouse is locked. The mouse ring is locked when the recessed area on the ring does not line up with the recessed area surrounding the ring. Recessed area on ring Recessed area surrounding ring Insert a straightened paper clip into this hole. (The hole may be located here on your mouse.) 96 Appendix ATo unlock the mouse, follow these steps: 1 Insert a straightened paper clip into the hole on the plastic ring. 2 Press down on the paper clip while you turn the ring counterclockwise. Turn the ring a very short distance. When the recessed area on the ring is lined up with the recessed area surrounding the ring, the mouse is unlocked. The mouse ring is unlocked when the recessed area on the ring lines up with the recessed area surrounding the ring. Recessed area on ring Recessed area surrounding ring Insert a straightened paper clip into this hole. (The hole may be located here on your mouse.) Health, Safety, and Maintenance Tips 97Expansion cards are printed circuit boards that can be installed in your computer to give it special features, such as enhanced video capabilities, networking and communications, and additional processing power. Your Macintosh has slots available for three different kinds of expansion cards: m an LC-processor-direct slot (LC-PDS) for most expansion cards m a communication slot for an internal modem or Ethernet card m a video-in slot for a card that brings signals into the computer from a videocassette recorder (VCR), laserdisc player, video camera, or similar device You can also install the following additional options in your Macintosh: m an external video connector kit that allows video mirroring on an external monitor m a TV tuner card that allows you to watch TV on your Macintosh Video-in slot LC-processor-direct slot (LC-PDS) Monitor-out slot Communication slot (You may have a communication card—such as an internal modem— installed in this slot.) Vertical plate 99 Appendix B Installing an Expansion Card Read this appendix for instructions on installing an expansion card in your computer. This appendix contains instructions for installing an LC-PDS card or a communication card. To install a video input card, an external video connector kit, or a TV tuner card, follow the instructions that came with the kit or card. Installing any expansion card involves three steps: m opening the computer m inserting the card into a specific slot m closing the computer WARNING To avoid damaging your computer and expansion card, do not attempt to install any expansion card without first checking the documentation for that card. If the documentation specifies that an Apple-certified technician must install the card (usually because the installation requires special training or tools), consult the service and support information that came with your computer for instructions on how to contact an Apple-authorized service provider or Apple for assistance. If you attempt to install the card yourself, any damage you may cause to your computer or card will not be covered by the limited warranty on your computer. If the card is not an Apple-labeled product, check with an Apple-authorized dealer or service provider to see if you can install it yourself. 100 Appendix BOpening the computer 1 Shut down your computer by pressing the Power key on the keyboard. You can also choose Shut Down from the Special menu or the Apple (K) menu. 2 Turn the computer completely off by pressing the power switch at the back of the computer. Press the side of the switch marked with the j symbol. 3 Unplug the cable that connects your keyboard to the computer. 4 Remove the security screws on either side of the computer’s back panel with a screwdriver. Remove both security screws. Installing an Expansion Card 1015 With your fingertips, find the two latches on the underside of the computer’s case. 6 Pull gently on the latches. 7 Swing the panel up and slip it out. Set the panel aside. Pulling gently, swing the panel up, and slip it out. Locate the two latches on the underside of the computer’s case with your fingertips. 102 Appendix B8 Gently pull down on the wire handle and swing it out to unlock it from its storage position. Then grasp the handle and pull the logic board out of the computer. The vertical plate and the logic board to which it’s attached slide all the way out of the computer. Carefully support the logic board as it comes out, and put it on a stable, clean, flat surface. Wire handle Installing an Expansion Card 103Installing an LC-PDS card 1 Remove the plastic access cover from the vertical plate. 2 Remove the LC-PDS expansion card from its static-proof bag. Hold the card by its edges to avoid touching the connectors on the card. 3 Align the card over the LC-processor-direct slot. LC-PDS access port LC-processor-direct slot (LC-PDS) Vertical plate Squeeze the two plastic tabs together and pull off the metal retainer so the access cover can come off. LC-processor-direct slot (LC-PDS) Vertical plate Metal retainer 104 Appendix B4 Press down on the card until the connector is solidly in place. Don’t force the card. If you meet resistance, pull the card out and try again. To see if the card is properly connected, lift it gently. If it resists and stays in place, it’s connected. Installing a communication card 1 Remove the plastic access cover from the vertical plate. 2 Remove the communication card from its static-proof bag. Hold the card by its edges to avoid touching the connectors on the card. Communication slot Push the two plastic tabs apart and pull off the metal retainer so the access cover can come off. Vertical plate Metal retainer Installing an Expansion Card 1053 Align the card over the communication slot. The communication slot is the rightmost slot on the logic board as you face the vertical plate. 4 Press down on the card until the connector is solidly in place. Don’t force the card. If you meet resistance, pull the card out and try again. To see if the card is properly connected, lift it gently. If it resists and stays in place, it’s connected. Communication slot Vertical plate Communication card access hole 106 Appendix BClosing the computer 1 Slip the base of the logic board into the guide rails inside the computer’s case and swing the wire handle back into its storage position. Make sure the logic board slides into the guides that are on both sides of the computer’s interior. Swing the handle up, into its storage position. Installing an Expansion Card 1072 Press the reset button on the logic board and then slide the logic board back into the computer. Note: When you press the reset button, some of your computer’s software settings will change. You may want to open the control panels for the date and time, keyboard, and mouse to make sure that they are set the way you want them. For more information about working with control panels, see the “Setting Options” topic of Macintosh Guide, available in the Guide (h) menu. 3 Slip the three tabs at the top of the back panel into the grooves in the computer’s case. Slip the three tabs on the back panel into the grooves in the computer case. 1 Press the reset button. 2 Gently but firmly push on the vertical plate until the logic board is solidly back in place. 108 Appendix B4 Snap the base of the back panel into place. 5 Reinsert the security screws. WARNING Never turn on your computer unless all of its internal and external parts are in place. Operating the computer when it is open or missing parts can be dangerous, and can damage your computer. Reinsert both security screws. Snap the plastic back panel into place. Installing an Expansion Card 109111 Your computer keyboard contains certain special keys that typewriter keyboards don’t have. Many of these keys allow you to give commands to the computer without using the mouse. For example, in many application programs, pressing the x (Command) key at the same time as the Q key lets you quit a program. The following table describes what you can do with the special keys on your keyboard. The special keys on your keyboard depend on the model of keyboard you have; some keyboards do not have all the keys listed. Special keys on Apple keyboards Arrow keys Use to move the insertion point, as an alternative to using the pointer. In some programs, the arrow keys have other functions. Caps Lock key Use to capitalize a series of letters (numbers and symbols aren’t affected). Clear key Use to delete the current selection (or use the Delete key). In some programs, Clear has other functions. x (Command) key Use in combination with other keys as an alternative to choosing a menu command. continued . num lock clear caps lock Read this appendix to learn how to use the special keys on your keyboard. Appendix C Special Keys on Your KeyboardSpecial keys on Apple keyboards (continued) Control key In combination with other keys, this key provides shortcuts or modifies other actions. Delete key Use to delete selected material, or the character to the left of the insertion point. Enter key In a dialog box, pressing Enter is the same as clicking the outlined button. In some programs, pressing this key confirms information you have provided. Escape key The function of this key depends on the program you’re using. Function keys Some programs allow you to use the 12 function keys to give commands. You can assign commands or action sequences to function keys with special utility programs. Option key Use in combination with other keys to produce special characters or modify actions. Numeric keys Use to produce numbers and mathematical symbols; some programs use these keys as function keys to initiate actions. Power key On some models, press to turn on the computer. Also press to shut down the computer on certain models. Return key Use to move the insertion point to the beginning of the next line. In a dialog box, pressing Return is the same as clicking the outlined button. Shift key Use to produce capital letters (or the upper character on the key). Tab key Use to move the insertion point to the next stopping place (such as a tab stop or field in a dialog box or program). Other special keys The function of these keys depends on the operating system and program you’re using. help home end ins del page up page down tab shift return num lock clear = / * 7 4 0 8 5 2 9 6 3 enter 1 . option alt F1 esc enter delete control 112 Appendix CTyping special characters and symbols You can type a variety of international and other special symbols and characters (including characters with diacritical marks, such as accents) by pressing combinations of keys. The Key Caps program, which is installed with your system software, shows you the characters produced when you type certain keys and key combinations in the fonts available on your computer. Choose Key Caps from the Apple (K) menu, then choose the font from the Key Caps menu. To have Key Caps show more options for special characters, press each of these keys or key combinations: Option, Shift, Shift-Option, Shift-x, and Option-x. If you press the Option key, Key Caps outlines lightly the keys that you can use in combination with letter keys to type letters with accents or other diacritical marks. Special Keys on Your Keyboard 113 Characters available in the Chicago font Characters appear here when you press keys on the keyboard or click them in the window. Characters available in the Chicago font when the Option key is pressed The highlighted key represents the key held down on the keyboard— in this case, the Option key.If you see rectangles: If you see rectangles instead of diacritical marks on some of the pictures of keys in Key Caps, try pressing Option-x to see the diacritical marks. However, use the Option key (not Option-x) in combination with the other keys to type letters with diacritical marks. If you press the Option key at the same time as a key for a specific diacritical mark and then release both keys, Key Caps outlines in bold the keys for letters that can be typed with that mark. (You’ll see that most key combinations for diacritical marks can be used with the Space bar as well as letter keys—producing the mark without a letter.) The most common diacritical marks and how to create them are summarized next. Diacritical mark Key combination Grave accent ( ` ) Option–`, then type the character Acute accent ( ´ ) Option–e, then type the character Circumflex (^) Option–i, then type the character Tilde (~) Option–n, then type the character Umlaut ( ¨ ) Option–u, then type the character The letter “c” with a cedilla (ç) Option–c m To type a letter or a space with a specific diacritical mark, press the Option key and the key for the mark simultaneously. Then type the letter that needs the mark. If you are having trouble getting a mark and letter to appear together, try again. Be sure to press the Option key before (or at the same time as) the key for the mark; then, after you release both keys, type the letter to be marked. Special key combinations If difficulties with your mouse or computer don’t allow you to use standard methods of quitting a program or restarting your computer, you can try using these special key combinations. To do this … … press this key combination Force a program to quit x-Option-Esc Force the computer to restart x-Control–Power key 114 Appendix C115 Appendix D If You Purchase Additional Equipment This chapter contains information that is useful only if you purchase m an Ethernet card m a second monitor Connecting to an Ethernet network This section contains information for people whose computers are connected to other computers through a local area network. (Using a modem is not the same as being connected to a local area network. If you have an internal modem, you do not need an Ethernet card.) If you buy and install an Ethernet card, you can connect your Macintosh to an existing high-speed Ethernet network that uses thin coaxial cables, 10BASE-T twisted pair cables, thick coaxial cables, or other standard cables. Depending on the type of cables used in the Ethernet network you’re connecting to, you may need to purchase an Apple Ethernet media adapter or other compatible media adapter to connect your Macintosh. (Consult the service and support information that came with your computer for instructions on how to contact an Apple-authorized service provider or Apple for more information on Apple Ethernet media adapters.)To use Ethernet, you need to change the network connection in the Network control panel. (For instructions on how to select a network connection and other information about using your Macintosh on a network, see the “Networks & Telecommunications” topic of Macintosh Guide, available in the Guide [h] menu.) IMPORTANT Your Macintosh supports EtherTalk Phase 2 (AppleTalk Phase 2 Protocols for Ethernet networks) and TCP/IP (via MacTCP software). Your Macintosh does not support EtherTalk Phase 1 (AppleTalk Phase 1 protocols for Ethernet networks). CAUTION The use of an Ethernet card will make your Macintosh a Class A computing device, according to FCC regulations. 116 Appendix DConnecting a second monitor for video mirroring You can connect a second, external monitor to your computer to display the same images that are on the computer’s built-in monitor. Displaying your computer’s images on a second monitor, called video mirroring, is useful for presentations. If you want to use video mirroring, you need an external video connector with an external monitor attached. (If your computer doesn’t have a connector, you can install one.) The built-in monitor must use the same resolution and timing (refresh rate) as the external monitor. Depending on the type of monitor you have added, you may need to change the built-in monitor’s setting to one that the external monitor is capable of displaying. If you want to display your built-in monitor’s images on a television or record them using a VCR, you’ll need the Apple Presentation System, which adds these capabilities when used with the external video connector kit. The external video connector kit and the Apple Presentation System are available for purchase from Apple-authorized dealers. Apple external video connector installed If You Purchase Additional Equipment 117For more information about the monitors that you can connect to your computer for video mirroring, see the Technical Information booklet that came with your computer. 118 Appendix Dx (Command) key 111 x (Command)-Option-Esc, for restarting computer 53 ? (question mark icon), blinking at startup 56, 74. See also Guide (h) menu. A accent marks, typing letters with 113, 114 active program, checkmark as indicator of 18 answers to questions 16 AppleCD Audio Player program 43 ejecting CDs using 45, 67 unable to hear discs played with 70 Apple customer support hotline 16 Apple Desktop Bus (ADB) icon 5, 6 Apple Desktop Bus (ADB) port 5, 6, 31 Apple Extras folder, pre-installed programs in 37 Apple (K) menu AppleCD Audio Player program in 43 Key Caps 113–114 Shut Down 14 Apple Presentation System 117 AppleTalk Phase 2 Protocols for Ethernet networks 116 Apple Video Player program 37 Application menu 13 active programs listed in 39 Hide Others/Show All 40 application programs 37–42 forcing to quit or restart 114 increasing memory for 60 installing 38 older Macintosh 42, 66 opening DOS documents from 64, 65 for PowerPC microprocessor 42, 66 pre-installed 37 quitting unexpectedly 60 119 Index If you can’t find what you’re looking for in this index, look in Macintosh Guide— available in the Guide (h) menu on your computer.troubleshooting 38, 60, 62, 64, 66 unable to find or open 60 unable to start 57 working with several at a time 39–40 arrow, on screen. See pointer arrow keys 111 arrows, scroll 13 assistance when you have questions 16 audio compact discs (CDs) 43, 46 playing 47 troubleshooting problems with 70 audio tracks on CD-ROM discs 46, 47, 70 opening data files and 70 unable to hear 70 B backing up 40 backup copy, restoring information from 41 Balloon Help 26 basic skills with mouse 12–13 tutorial review 12–13 bomb icon 51 Photo CD causing 71 bomb in dialog box 61 C cables for Ethernet network 115 safety precautions 89 Caps Lock key 111 carrying the computer 2 case cleaning 94 opening 101–103 CD-ROM disc. See Macintosh Performa CD disc audio tracks on 43, 70 automatically ejected without error message 69 avoiding startup from 67, 68 cleaning 69, 91 document on won’t open 69 ejecting 45, 67–68, 93 handling 91–92 inserting 44 not recognized as Macintosh 69 shared 45, 50, 66 software for non-standard formats for 46 standard file formats for 46 troubleshooting problems with 68–71 CD-ROM disc icon 44 ejecting disc and 45, 69 not on desktop 45, 67 120 IndexIndex 121 CD-ROM drive 30, 43–50. See also CD-ROM disc; compact disc failure of tray to open and 67–68 Open/Close button for 30, 44, 45 replacing 35 safety warning about vii troubleshooting problems with 67–68 CD-ROM drive icon, not appearing on screen 67 cleaning the equipment 94–97 Clear key 111 clock, troubleshooting 55 close box 13 closing the computer 107–109 color display 30 Command (x) key 111 Command key x-Option-Esc, for restarting computer 53 communication card, installing 105–106 communication card access cover 31 communication slot 99 communications regulation information vi-vii compact disc. See also CD-ROM disc audio 43, 46, 47, 70 cleaning 69, 91 handling 91–92 Photo 43, 47, 48–50 types that can be used 46–47 compact disc read-only memory drive. See CD-ROM drive computer case cleaning 94 opening 101–103 connecting cables, safety precautions 89 Control key 112 cumulative trauma disorders (CTDs), avoiding 84 cursor. See pointer customer support hotline 16 D definitions of items on screen 13, 16 Delete key 112 desk accessories, switching between programs and 39 desktop 9 At Ease (alternative), returning to Macintosh desktop from 67 rebuilding 54 diacritical marks, typing letters with 113–114 dialog boxes 53 disc, CD-ROM. See Macintosh Performa CD disc disc tray (CD), failure to open 67–68 disk. See floppy disk or hard disk disk drive. See floppy disk drive; hard disk drive Disk First Aid, using 78–79 Disk First Aid icon 78DOC statement vii documents backing up 40 on CD-ROM disc, unable to open 69 unable to find or open 64 DOS disk, unable to read 59 DOS document, unable to open 64, 65 Drive Setup program hard disk icon doesn’t appear 58 initializing a hard disk 79–80 testing a hard disk 77 E Eject CD command 45, 67 ejecting CD-ROM discs 45, 67–68, 69, 93 ejecting a floppy disk 38 electromagnetic emissions 87 electronic mail (e-mail), PowerTalk program for 37 Enter key 112 error messages, responding to 51, 52. See also troubleshooting Escape key 112 Ethernet network, connecting to 115–116 EtherTalk Phase 2 support 116 expansion cards, installing 99–109 closing the computer 107–109 communication card 105–106 LC-PDS card 104–105 opening the computer 101–103 types of cards 99 Extensions Manager control panel, for turning off extensions 54, 61 external monitor, connecting 117–118 external video connector 31 external video connector kit 99, 117 eye fatigue, avoiding 85 F fatigue, avoiding 87 FCC statement vi Ethernet card and 116 file formats for CD-ROM discs 46–47 not recognized by Macintosh 69 problems with 69–71 files, backing up 40 files on CD-ROM discs 46 Finder, making active program 18 floating-point unit (FPU), requirement for 60 floppy disk backing up files on 40, 41 ejection problems 93 handling 91 inserting and ejecting 38 rebuilding desktop of 54 repairing 78–79 startup problems with 56 unable to read 59 122 Indexfloppy disk drive 30 adding or replacing 35 fonts, in QuickDraw GX program 37 foreign languages, typing in 113–114 frozen pointer 51, 62 function keys 112 G graphics, Photo CD images as source of 48 grounding plug 1, 4, 89 Guide (h) menu 16 Drive Setup Guide 58 icon for 13 Macintosh Guide 17–25 Shortcuts 27–28 Show/Hide Balloons 26 H hard disk backing up files on 40, 41 initializing 79–80 installing application programs on 38 installing system software on 81 rebuilding desktop of 54 reinitializing 79–80 repairing 78–79 hard disk drive (internal) adding or replacing 35 location of 31 reinitializing 79–80 repairing 78–79 troubleshooting 73, 77 hard disk icon 13 not on desktop 58 hardware carrying 2 cleaning 94–98 connecting other equipment 7, 31 described ix, x, 30–31 for Ethernet connection 115 safety precautions 88, 89 hardware requirements floating-point unit (FPU) 62 for PowerPC applications 42 headphone jack 30 health-related information 83–87 help 17–28 Balloon 26 Guide (h) menu for 17 Macintosh Guide for 18–25. See also Macintosh Guide Performa Tutorial for 12 Shortcuts 27–28 sources for 16 Hide Balloons (Guide menu) 26 Hide Others (Application menu) 40 hiding windows 40 Hierarchical File System (HFS) format for CD-ROM discs 46 High Sierra format for CD-ROM discs 46 problems using discs with 69–70 hotline for support 16 “Huh?” button 25 Index 123I, J icons 13 Apple Desktop Bus (ADB) 5 blinking question mark 56, 74 bomb 51 CD-ROM disc 43, 44, 67–68 CD-ROM drive 67 color, for images on Photo CD, not displayed 71 Disk First Aid 78–79 Drive Setup 77, 80 Guide menu 13 hard disk 13 Installer 37 not appearing correctly on screen 58 review of most common 13 “sad Macintosh” 57 Trash 13 identifying screen objects 13, 26 Index button (Macintosh Guide window) 19, 21–22 initializing a hard disk 79–80 reinitializing 79–80 inserting a CD-ROM disc 44 inserting a floppy disk 38 Installer icon, using 37 installing application programs 38 installing expansion cards 99–109 closing the computer 107–108 communication card 99–100 LC-PDS card 99–100 opening the computer 101–102 installing or reinstalling system software 81 internal drives, adding or replacing 35 K keyboard 30 connecting 5–6 handling 90 positioning 86, 87 Power key on 8 shortcuts with 27–28 special keys on 111–112 troubleshooting 63 Key Caps (Apple menu) 113–114 L LC-processor direct slot (LC-PDS) expansion card 99–100 access cover for 31 installing 104–106 learning basics 12–13 sources of 16 local area network connecting to 115–116 PowerTalk program for 37 Look For button (Macintosh Guide window) 23–24 124 IndexM Macintosh desktop 9 rebuilding 54 returning to from At Ease 67 starting up from CD-ROM disc and 74 Macintosh Guide 18–25 looking for specific topic in 23–24 tips for using 25 viewing list of topics in 19–20 viewing topics alphabetically in 21–22 Macintosh Guide window 18–19, 25 Index button 19, 21–22 Look For button 19, 23–24 Topics button 19–20 Macintosh Performa system 30–31 Macintosh Performa CD disc 41 checking for damaged disk with 77 installing system software from 81 reinitializing hard disk with 79–80 repairing a damaged disk with 78–79 starting up from 74–76 startup problems with 76 Macintosh Performa Tutorial 12–13 Macintosh programs older 42 PowerPC programs 42 Macintosh Shortcuts 27–28 MacTCP software 116 memory, expanding 35 Memory control panel older Macintosh programs and 42, 66 virtual memory and 60, 66 memory insufficiency 60, 72 memory requirements for application programs 37 for PowerPC applications 42 menu bar 13 microphone, built-in 30 using 34 microprocessor, described ix mirroring, video 117–118 modem, internal, location of 31 modem port 31 Modern Memory Manager, older Macintosh programs and 42, 66 monitor. See also screen display adjusting angle of 7 cleaning 94 electromagnetic emissions and 87 external, connecting 117–118 handling 89 positioning 86 monitor-out slot 99 mouse 30 cleaning 94–97 connecting keyboard and 5, 6 locking and unlocking 96–97 troubleshooting 62 using 12–13 mouse cable, connecting 5, 6 musculoskeletal discomfort, avoiding 83, 84, 85–87 Index 125N “native” applications, using 42, 66 network backing up files on 40 CD-ROM disc shared over 45, 50, 66 connecting to 115–116 PowerTalk program for 37 Network control panel, Ethernet and 116 numeric keys 112 O office arrangement guidelines 85–87 on/off switch 3 Open/Close button on CD-ROM drive 30, 44, 45 opening the computer 101–103 open programs, indentifying 39 open windows, hiding or showing 40 Option key 112 P PC Exchange control panel, for opening DOS document 64, 65 Performa system 30–31 performance problems 72 Performa Tutorial 12–13 starting 12–13 Photo compact discs (CDs) 43, 47 obtaining 49 opening 49 resolution of 49–50 system errors caused by 71 troubleshooting problems with 71 unable to open 71 photographs, putting on Photo CD 49 pictures, on CD. See also photo compact discs plugging in the computer 1, 3–4 pointer freezing on screen 51, 62 moving with mouse 12 power cord, connecting to computer 3–4 Power key 8, 30, 112 power-on light 30 PowerPC applications, using 42 PowerPC microprocessor ix power socket 31 power supply, safety precautions 88 power switch 3, 31 PowerTalk program 37 presentations, video mirroring for 117–118 printer port 31 printing, QuickDraw GX program and 37 programs. See application programs Q question mark icon (h) blinking at startup 56, 74 as Guide menu indicator 13 QuickDraw GX program 37 quitting an application special key combination for 114 unexpectedly 60 126 IndexR radio interference vi random-access memory (RAM), expanding 35 rebuilding the desktop 54 recording from audio CD, troubleshooting problems with 70 recording sound 34 Reduced Instruction Set Computing (RISC) microprocessor ix remote control sensor 30 repairing a damaged disk 73, 78–79 repetitive stress injuries (RSIs), avoiding 83, 84 resolution, viewing Photo CDs and 49–50 restarting the computer, with special key combination 53, 114 problems with, with CD-ROM disc in drive 67–68 Restart (Special menu) 53 restoring information from backup copy 41 Return key 112 reviewing the basics 13 S “sad Macintosh” icon 57 safety precautions CD-ROM drive vii disconnecting the computer 89, 95 grounding plug 1, 4, 89 power supply 93 saving changes to information on CD-ROM disc 69 screen control buttons 30, 33 screen display 30. See also monitor adjusting light and dark on 33 basics 13 bomb on 51, 61, 71 connecting to external monitor 117–118 dark 55 identifying objects on 26 off center 55 pointer freezing on 51, 62 scroll arrows 13 SCSI devices, troubleshooting 56, 58, 67, 73 SCSI port 31 searching, for help topics 19–24 security lock port 31 Index 127setting up 1–11 adjusting screen angle 7 connecting mouse and keyboard 5–6 connecting other equipment 7, 31 connecting to network 115–116 plugging in the computer 1, 3–4 troubleshooting startup problems 10 turning on computer 8–9 shared CD-ROM disc 50 ejecting 45, 66 shared libraries 66 Shift key 112 Shortcuts 27–28 Show All (Application menu) 40 Show Balloons (Guide menu) 26 Shut Down (Apple menu) 14 Shut Down (Special menu) 14 Simple Text program 47 single-session discs 49 size box 13 slots 99 Small Computer System Interface. See SCSI devices software. See application programs software compatibility ix Extensions Manager control panel and 61 floating-point unit (FPU) and 60 older Macintosh programs 42, 66 sound adjusting 32 recording 34 recording from audio CD, troubleshooting problems with 70 sound control buttons 30, 32 sound input port 31 sound output port 31 special characters, typing 113–114 special key combinations 114 special keys 111–112 Special menu locating 14 Restart 53 Shut Down 14 speed, problems with 72 starting the computer 8–9, 15 from a CD-ROM disc 74–76 for eliminating a problem 56 troubleshooting 10, 67–71 startup disk, rebuilding desktop of 54 stereo speakers 30 support, sources of 16 switching between programs 39 symbols, typing 113–114 system extensions, startup problems and 54, 58, 61 System Folder backing up and restoring 41 extra copy warning 38 system software installing or reinstalling 81 problems with 56, 57, 62, 63 128 IndexT, U Tab key 112 tape drive, backing up to 40 TCP/IP support 116 telephone support 16 television displaying images on 117 watching on computer 37 television interference vi tilt-and-swivel base 7, 30 title bar 13 Topics button (Macintosh Guide window) 19–20, 25 Trash icon 13 troubleshooting 51–81 application programs 38, 60, 62, 64, 66 Balloon Help for 26 CD-ROM disc ejection problems 45, 67–68 CD-ROM problems 67–71 clock problems 55 diagnosing the problem 52 document can't be found or opened 64 ejecting a floppy disk 93 floppy disk unreadable 59 Guide (h) menu for 13 hard disk 73, 77 hard disk icon not on desktop 58 icons not appearing correctly 58 information sources 16 keyboard 63 Macintosh Guide for 18–25, 43 mouse 62 older Macintosh programs 42, 56 performance problems 72 pointer freezing on screen 51, 61 pointer not moving 62 screen dark 55 screen image off center 55 SCSI devices 56, 58, 67, 73 shared library missing 66 starting over 53 starting up from CD 74–76 startup problems 10, 67–71 system software 81 turning the computer off 14 turning the computer on 15 for the first time 8–9 tutorial program, starting 12–13 TV tuner card 99 Apple Video Player and 37 location of 31 V VCCI statement vii VCR displaying on computer from 37 recording from computer to 117 version numbers, for using CD-ROM discs 69–70 video connector (external) 31 video input card 31 Apple Video Player and 37 video-in slot 99 video mirroring 117–118 volume, in AppleCD Audio Player 70 Index 129W, X, Y, Z warranty considerations, installing additional RAM 35 windows 13 changing size of 13 hiding and showing on desktop 40 Macintosh Guide 18–19, 25 130 IndexApple Computer, Inc. 1 Infinite Loop Cupertino, California 95014-2084 408.996.1010 030-8235-A Printed in U.S.A. ð ð Macintosh Performa User’s Guide Includes setup, troubleshooting, and health-related information for Macintosh Performa 6200CD and 6300CD series computersK Apple Computer, Inc. © 1995 Apple Computer, Inc. All rights reserved. Under the copyright laws, this manual may not be copied, in whole or in part, without the written consent of Apple. Your rights to the software are governed by the accompanying software license agreement. The Apple logo is a trademark of Apple Computer, Inc., registered in the U.S. and other countries. Use of the “keyboard” Apple logo (Option-Shift-K) for commercial purposes without the prior written consent of Apple may constitute trademark infringement and unfair competition in violation of federal and state laws. Every effort has been made to ensure that the information in this manual is accurate. Apple is not responsible for printing or clerical errors. Apple Computer, Inc. 1 Infinite Loop Cupertino, CA 95014-2084 (408) 996-1010 Apple, the Apple logo, AppleScript, AppleTalk, EtherTalk, LaserWriter, LocalTalk, Macintosh, MacTCP, Performa, and PowerTalk are trademarks of Apple Computer, Inc., registered in the U.S. and other countries. AppleCD, Apple Desktop Bus, Apple Extra, Balloon Help, Disk First Aid, Extensions Manager, Finder, Macintosh PC Exchange, Power Macintosh, and QuickDraw GX are trademarks of Apple Computer, Inc. Adobe, Adobe Illustrator, Adobe Photoshop, and PostScript are trademarks of Adobe Systems Incorporated, which may be registered in certain jurisdictions. ExposurePro is a registered trademark of Baseline Publishing, Inc. Helvetica and Times are registered trademarks of Linotype-Hell Company. IBM is a registered trademark, and PowerPC and the PowerPC logo are trademarks, of International Business Machines Corporation, used under license therefrom. Motorola is a registered trademark of Motorola Corporation. QMS is a registered trademark of QMS, Inc. QuarkXPress is a registered trademark of Quark, Inc. SuperPaint is a registered trademark of Aldus Corporation. Tektronix is a registered trademark of Tektronix, Inc. Simultaneously published in the United States and Canada. Mention of third-party products is for informational purposes only and constitutes neither an endorsement nor a recommendation. Apple assumes no responsibility with regard to the performance or use of these products.iii Contents Communications regulation information vi Preface Welcome to Macintosh ix 1 Getting Started 1 Plugging in the computer 1 Installing an expansion card 3 Connecting a monitor 3 Connecting the mouse and keyboard 6 Connecting other equipment 8 Turning the computer on 8 Problems starting up? 10 What’s next? 11 Learning the basics 12 Reviewing the basics 13 Turning the computer off 14 Where to find answers 152 Getting Help 17 Getting answers to your questions 18 Identifying objects on the screen 26 Learning useful shortcuts 27 3 Connecting Additional Equipment 29 Where to connect additional equipment 30 Connecting an Apple PlainTalk Microphone 31 Connecting external stereo speakers 32 Expanding memory 33 Connecting to an Ethernet network 33 Installing internal drives 34 4 Using Programs and Backing Up Disks 35 Installing application programs 36 Working with several programs at a time 37 Protecting the information on a disk 38 Using application programs designed for the PowerPC microprocessor 39 Using older Macintosh programs 39 5 Using the CD-ROM Drive 41 Inserting a CD-ROM disc 42 Ejecting a CD-ROM disc 43 Types of compact discs you can use 44 Playing audio CDs 45 Working with Photo CDs 46 Sharing a CD-ROM disc over a network 48 iv Contents6 Troubleshooting 49 When you have questions 49 If you have trouble 49 Solutions to common problems 53 Solutions to CD-ROM problems 65 If your computer’s performance decreases 70 Repairing a damaged disk 71 Initializing a hard disk 77 Installing or reinstalling system software 79 A Health, Safety, and Maintenance Tips 81 Health-related information about computer use 81 Safety instructions 86 Handling your computer equipment 87 Cleaning your equipment 92 Locking and unlocking the mouse 94 B Installing an Expansion Card 97 Opening the computer 99 Installing an LC-PDS card 101 Installing a communication card 102 Closing the computer 104 C Special Keys on Your Keyboard 107 Typing special characters and symbols 109 Special key combinations 110 Index 111 Contents vvi Communications Regulation Information Communications regulation information FCC statement This equipment has been tested and found to comply with the limits for a Class B digital device in accordance with the specifications in Part 15 of FCC rules. See instructions if interference to radio or television reception is suspected. Radio and television interference The equipment described in this manual generates, uses, and can radiate radio-frequency energy. If it is not installed and used properly—that is, in strict accordance with Apple’s instructions—it may cause interference with radio and television reception. This equipment has been tested and found to comply with the limits for a Class B digital device in accordance with the specifications in Part 15 of FCC rules. These specifications are designed to provide reasonable protection against such interference in a residential installation. However, there is no guarantee that interference will not occur in a particular installation. You can determine whether your computer system is causing interference by turning it off. If the interference stops, it was probably caused by the computer or one of the peripheral devices. If your computer system does cause interference to radio or television reception, try to correct the interference by using one or more of the following measures: m Turn the television or radio antenna until the interference stops. m Move the computer to one side or the other of the television or radio. m Move the computer farther away from the television or radio. m Plug the computer into an outlet that is on a different circuit from the television or radio. (That is, make certain the computer and the television or radio are on circuits controlled by different circuit breakers or fuses.) If necessary, consult an Apple-authorized service provider or Apple. See the service and support information that came with your Apple product. Or, consult an experienced radio/television technician for additional suggestions. You may find the following booklet helpful: Interference Handbook (stock number 004-000-00493-1). This booklet, prepared by the Federal Communications Commission, is available from the U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, DC 20402. IMPORTANT Changes or modifications to this product not authorized by Apple Computer, Inc., could void the FCC Certification and negate your authority to operate the product. This product was tested for FCC compliance under conditions that included the use of Apple peripheral devices and Apple shielded cables and connectors between system components. It is important that you use Apple peripheral devices and shielded cables and connectors between system components to reduce the possibility of causing interference to radios, television sets, and other electronic devices. You can obtain Apple peripheral devices and the proper shielded cables and connectors through an Apple-authorized dealer. For non-Apple peripheral devices, contact the manufacturer or dealer for assistance. DOC statement DOC Class B Compliance This digital apparatus does not exceed the Class B limits for radio noise emissions from digital apparatus as set out in the interference-causing equipment standard entitled “Digital Apparatus,” ICES-003 of the Department of Communications. Observation des normes—Classe B Cet appareil numérique respecte les limites de bruits radioélectriques applicables aux appareils numériques de Classe B prescrites dans la norme sur le matériel brouilleur: “Appareils Numériques”, NMB-003 édictée par le ministre des Communications. VCCI statement CD-ROM drive WARNING Making adjustments or performing procedures other than those specified in your equipment’s manual may result in hazardous exposure. WARNING Do not attempt to disassemble the cabinet containing the laser. The laser beam used in this product is harmful to the eyes. The use of optical instruments, such as magnifying lenses, with this product increases the potential hazard to your eyes. For your safety, have this equipment serviced only by an Apple-authorized service provider. If you have an internal Apple CD-ROM drive in your computer, your computer is a Class 1 laser product. The Class 1 label, located either on the computer or on the CD-ROM drive inside the computer, indicates that the drive meets minimum safety requirements. (Note that the label on your computer may look slightly different from the label pictured below.) A service warning label is on the CD-ROM drive inside the computer. Communications Regulation Information viiCongratulations on the purchase of your new Macintosh. Your computer is designed to give you the highest performance combined with real ease of use—it’s easy to set up, easy to use, and easy to expand. This book will guide you through the setup procedure, tell you how to expand your Macintosh, and provide many tips on using your new system. Your Macintosh computer is powered by the new  microprocessor (or “chip”). This microprocessor was designed by Apple Computer, Inc., Motorola, Inc., and IBM Corporation. The  microprocessor uses Reduced Instruction Set Computing (RISC) technology to deliver very high performance at the lowest possible cost. The  RISC microprocessor represents the state of the art in microprocessor design. Your new Power Macintosh will run almost all of your existing Macintosh software, but for best performance and greatest speed, look for the new  software programs designed especially for computers that contain the microprocessor. You’ll find  microprocessor–compatible programs at any software store that carries products for the Macintosh computer. ix Welcome to MacintoshMonitor cable (sometimes built into the monitor) Monitor power cord Computer power cord Keyboard Microphone (optional) Macintosh Performa computer Monitor (You may have a different monitor than shown.) Mouse Keyboard cable (permanently attached to the keyboard)The illustration on the facing page shows all the equipment you will need to set up your computer and begin using it. Place your equipment on a sturdy, flat surface near a grounded wall outlet. Before following the setup instructions in this chapter, you may want to read “Arranging Your Office” in Appendix A (in the section on health-related information) for tips on adjusting your work furniture so that you’re comfortable when using the computer. If you used the setup poster: The poster included with your Macintosh Performa computer was designed to help you start using your computer as quickly as possible. This chapter contains more detailed information than the poster. If you have already set up your computer using the poster, you may want to turn to the section “What’s Next?” later in this chapter. Plugging in the computer Before you plug your Macintosh into a wall socket, carefully read all the setup instructions in this chapter. Then, before you connect anything to your Macintosh, follow the instructions in this section to plug it in. The plug grounds the computer and protects it from electrical damage while you are setting up. 1 1 Getting Started Follow the instructions in this chapter to set up your computer and learn the basics.When you are ready to begin, follow these steps: 1 Plug the socket end of the computer’s power cord into the recessed power cord socket (marked with the symbol ²) on the back of the computer. 2 Plug the other end of the power cord into a three-hole grounded outlet or power strip. Choose a power outlet to which you have easy access. IMPORTANT Be sure that at least one end of the power cord is within easy reach so that you can unplug the computer when you need to. If the computer starts up: If you hear a tone, the computer has started up and you need to turn it off before proceeding. Press the power button (also called the standby power button) located on the back of the computer to turn the computer off. WARNING This equipment is intended to be electrically grounded. Your Macintosh is equipped with a three-wire grounding plug—a plug that has a third (grounding) pin. This plug will fit only a grounded AC outlet. This is a safety feature. If you are unable to insert the plug into the outlet, contact a licensed electrician to replace the outlet with a properly grounded outlet. Do not defeat the purpose of the grounding plug! Power cord plug Power cord socket Standby power button 2 Chapter 1Installing an expansion card If you purchased any expansion cards for your Macintosh, you may want to install them now. (For instructions, see Appendix B, “Installing an Expansion Card,” as well as the documentation that came with the cards.) If you don’t have an expansion card, go on to the next section, “Connecting a Monitor.” Connecting a monitor You can connect many types of monitors to your Macintosh. To connect a monitor, refer to the instructions that came with the monitor. Connecting the monitor power cord Monitors have two cords to connect—a power cord and a monitor cable. To connect the monitor power cord, follow these steps: 1 Place the monitor where you will be using it. You may place it on top of your computer. Keep these considerations in mind: m Allow a few inches for air circulation around the sides of the computer and monitor. m Make sure that the top of the screen is slightly below eye level when you’re sitting at the keyboard. m Position the monitor to minimize glare and reflections on the screen from overhead lights and windows. m Consult “Arranging Your Office” in Appendix A for suggestions on locating your computer equipment. Getting Started 32 Connect the monitor power cord to the monitor. On some monitors, the cord is already attached. 3 Plug in the monitor power cord. Be sure to plug the power cord into a three-hole grounded outlet or power strip. Monitor power cord Monitor power socket 4 Chapter 1Connecting the monitor cable After you plug in the monitor power cord, you connect the monitor cable to the computer’s monitor port. To connect the monitor cable, follow these steps: 1 Attach the monitor cable to the monitor. On some monitors the cable is already attached (as shown below). 2 Attach the monitor cable to the monitor port on the back panel of the computer. The monitor port is marked with the ª icon (symbol). If your monitor has a microphone or speakers, you may need to connect additional cables. See the documentation that came with the monitor. Monitor cable ª Monitor port Getting Started 5Connecting the mouse and keyboard 1 Plug the mouse cable into the recessed port on the back of the keyboard. The plug and the port are marked with the × icon (symbol). The positions of the port and icon on your keyboard may be different from those pictured. By the way: A port marked with the × icon is called an Apple Desktop Bus (ADB) port. This cable plugs into the Apple Desktop Bus (ADB) port, marked with the × icon, on the back of the computer. Plug the mouse into the recessed port on the keyboard. The flat part of the plug should be pointing down, as shown here. 6 Chapter 12 Plug the keyboard cable into the port marked with the × icon on the back of the computer. Some monitors have a port to which you can connect the keyboard or mouse. See the information that came with your monitor. 3 If you want to adjust the keyboard angle, lower the feet on the keyboard. To adjust the keyboard angle, lower the feet until they snap into position. V ADB port Getting Started 7Connecting other equipment If you are new to the Macintosh, it’s a good idea to get some experience using your computer before you connect other equipment, such as a printer or scanner. To learn basic Macintosh skills, continue with the instructions in this chapter. When you’re ready to connect other equipment to your Macintosh, see the instructions in Chapter 3. Turning the computer on Follow these steps to turn the computer on: 1 Turn on the monitor. See the information that came with your monitor for the location of the power button. 2 Turn on your computer by pressing the Power key. The Power key is at the top of the keyboard. You can recognize this key by the triangle outline on it (¹). You hear a tone from the computer as it starts up. 8 Chapter 13 Check to see what’s on your screen. m You will see a welcome screen that gives you a choice about what to do next. If you’re new to the Macintosh or would like to review some of the basics, you’ll want to go through the Performa Tutorial, a program that teaches how to use your computer. Press the Return key on your keyboard to go to the tutorial. If you already know how to use your Macintosh and you don’t want to use the tutorial, you can leave the welcome screen (by clicking Go To Desktop) and go to the Macintosh desktop. m When you see the Macintosh desktop, as in the illustration below, your system software has already been installed, and your computer is ready to use. Skip now to the section “What’s Next?” later in this chapter. m If your screen doesn’t have anything on it, see the next section, “Problems Starting Up?” Getting Started 9 Macintosh desktop Hard disk icon Your Launcher has more items in it than are shown in this illustration.Problems starting up? If you don’t see anything on the screen, check these items to see if you can identify the problem: m Is the computer plugged into a power source? If it is plugged into a power strip, is the power strip plugged in and turned on? m Is the computer turned on? The power-on light on the front panel should be on. If it isn’t on, press the standby power button on the computer’s back panel (marked with the symbol ¨). m Are the keyboard and mouse cables connected correctly? (Don’t disconnect the keyboard or mouse cable while the computer is on. You could damage your equipment.) m Is the monitor power cord plugged in? m Is the monitor turned on? (Check the power-on light on the front of the monitor.) m Is the monitor cable attached firmly to both the monitor and computer? m Is the brightness control on the monitor adjusted correctly? (On Apple monitors, the brightness control is marked with the symbol Û.) If you see a blinking question mark on the screen, turn to “Solutions to Common Problems” in Chapter 6. 10 Chapter 1What’s next? Congratulations! You’ve finished setting up your computer. Now continue with one of the following steps: m If you are new to the Macintosh, turn to the next section, “Learning the Basics.” m If you are an experienced Macintosh user, turn to Chapter 2, “Getting Help,” to learn about Macintosh Guide, your main source of information when you’re working with the Macintosh. m If you want to connect other equipment, such as a printer, to your computer, see Chapter 3, “Connecting Additional Equipment.” m If you want to install application software on your computer, see Chapter 4 of this book for information on setting up your programs and managing memory. You’ll need this information to properly set up software programs specifically designed for computers with PowerPC microprocessors. Before you begin working with your computer, be sure to read the important health and safety information in Appendix A. IMPORTANT If you need to turn off your computer at any point, please see “Turning the Computer Off” later in this chapter. It is very important to use the correct procedure for shutting down your Macintosh before turning it off. Getting Started 11Learning the basics If you are new to the Macintosh, you should begin by looking at the easyto-use program called Performa Tutorial. The tutorial teaches you the basic skills you’ll need to use your computer. To start the tutorial once you are past the welcome sequence, follow these steps: 1 Slide your mouse along your mouse pad or desk. Hold the mouse as shown, with the cable pointing away from you. Don’t press the mouse button (under your index finger). Notice that the arrow (8) on the screen moves in the same direction that you move the mouse. If the arrow doesn’t move, make sure that the cables connecting the mouse and keyboard are secure and that your mouse is positioned as shown in the illustration. 2 Move the mouse so that the arrow (8) is over the picture labeled “Performa Tutorial.” 12 Chapter 1If you don’t see the Performa Tutorial picture on your screen, put the arrow on the word “Learning” and click (press and release) the mouse button. If you run out of room on your mouse pad or desk while moving the mouse, pick up the mouse and place it where there’s more room. (The arrow on the screen moves only when the mouse is in contact with the mouse pad or desk.) 3 Without moving the mouse, click the mouse button. A window appears welcoming you to the tutorial. You can set this book aside for now and follow the instructions on the screen. When you have completed both parts of the tutorial, return to this book. Reviewing the basics The following illustration summarizes many of the basic skills and terms you learned from the tutorial. Getting Started 13 To throw away an item you no longer want, drag it to the Trash and choose Empty Trash from the Special menu. This icon represents your computer’s internal hard disk. To change the size or shape of a window, drag the size box. To bring hidden portions of a window’s contents into view, click the scroll arrows. The strip across the top of the screen is called the menu bar. The symbols and words in it represent menus that contain commands. Icons are small pictures that represent disks, folders, programs, and documents. To open an icon, click the icon twice quickly. Windows are boxes that display text, graphics, or icons. To bring a partially covered window to the front, click anywhere in the window. To close a window, click the close box. You can have several application programs open at once. To see which program is active or to switch from one program to another, use this menu (called the Application menu). To find an answer to a question, look in the Guide (h) menu. To move a window, drag it by the title bar.Turning the computer off To turn the computer off: 1 Press the Power key (marked with a triangle) on the keyboard. You will see a message asking whether you want to shut down or continue working. 2 Click Shut Down. The computer is now off. To turn the computer back on, you can simply press the Power key again. You can also turn off your computer by choosing Shut Down from the Apple (K) menu. Detailed instructions follow. (Note: The Shut Down command is also available in the Special menu.) 1 Move the tip of the arrow to the Apple (K) menu at the top left of the screen. 2 With the tip of the arrow on the apple, press and hold down the mouse button. 3 While holding down the mouse button, move the arrow down the list of choices until the words “Shut Down” are highlighted, then release the mouse button. 14 Chapter 1Where to find answers When you have questions about using your Macintosh, there are several places you can look for answers. In this book Use this book to help you set up your computer and learn about it, or to find solutions to problems with your equipment. In the Guide menu The Guide menu (marked with the h icon) is your main source of information about the Macintosh. To learn how to get different kinds of help from the Guide menu, see Chapter 2 in this book. In other manuals For answers to questions about other equipment or about application programs you have purchased, see the manuals that came with the equipment or programs. In documents in the Apple Extras folder The Apple Extras folder (in your System Folder) on your hard disk contains documents with important information about some of the application programs included with your computer. From Apple’s customer support hotline If you can’t find an answer in any of the materials provided, call the customer support hotline. The phone number for the hotline is in the service and support information that came with your computer. (Note: If you have problems with an application program not published by Apple, call the program’s publisher. Click the Phone Numbers button in the Service/Support area of the Launcher to see phone numbers for software publishers.) User’s Guide Macintosh Performa Getting Started 1517 The Guide menu is your main source of information when you’re working with your computer. The menu is identified by a question mark (h) in the upper-right corner of the screen. 2 Getting Help Use the instructions in this chapter to learn about the help available to you in the Guide menu.Getting answers to your questions When you have a question while working with your computer, you can get the answer by choosing Macintosh Guide from the Guide menu. 1 Pull down the Application menu (in the upper-right corner of the screen) and choose Finder to make it the active application program. A checkmark in the menu indicates that the Finder is the active program. 2 Pull down the Guide menu (marked with the h icon) and choose Macintosh Guide. The Macintosh Guide window appears. Whenever you use Macintosh Guide, its window remains in front of other windows. If the window gets in your way, you can move it by dragging its title bar (the gray bar across the top of the window). 18 Chapter 23 Notice the three buttons at the top of the window: Topics, Index, and Look For. Macintosh Guide gives you three ways of finding information: m Topics lets you choose from a list of general subjects; it is like the table of contents in a book. m Index lets you choose from an alphabetical list of more specific subjects; it is like the index in a book. m Look For lets you search for information related to a specific word or phrase that you type. In the following sections you will practice using each method. If you have problems while using Macintosh Guide, see “Tips for Using Macintosh Guide” later in this chapter. Getting answers with the Topics button 1 In the Macintosh Guide window, click the Topics button. A list of general topics appears on the left side of the Macintosh Guide window. (Depending on the hardware and software you have, the list of topics may look different.) Getting Help 192 Click “Setting Options” in the list of topics. When you click any topic area, a list of related questions appears on the right side of the Macintosh Guide window. 3 Click the question “How do I set the time and date?” and then click OK. Or double-click the question. A small window appears with instructions for you to follow. 4 Read and follow the instructions in this window. Macintosh Guide provides step-by-step instructions to answer the question you selected. When you have completed each step, click the right arrow in the lower-right corner to see the next step. 5 When you have completed all the steps, click the Topics button in the lower-left corner to return to the main Macintosh Guide window. Now continue with the next section. 20 Chapter 2 Click here to see the next step (if there is one). To get instructions, click a question… …and then click OK. If you want to return to the main Macintosh Guide window, click here.Getting answers with the Index button 1 In the Macintosh Guide window, click the Index button. An alphabetical list of subjects appears on the left side of the window. 2 Scroll through the alphabetical list until the phrase “background pattern” is visible. You can scroll through the list either by dragging the slider to the letter B or by using the scroll bar at the right of the list. 3 Click the phrase “background pattern” in the alphabetical list. When you click any index entry, a list of related questions appears on the right side of the Macintosh Guide window. Getting Help 21 Scroll bar Slider To get instructions, click a question… …and then click OK.4 Click the question “How do I change the background pattern?” and then click OK. Or double-click the question. A small window appears with instructions for you to follow. 5 Read and follow the instructions in the window. Macintosh Guide provides step-by-step instructions to answer the question you selected. When you have completed each step, click the right arrow in the lower-right corner to see the next step. 6 When you have completed all the steps, click the Topics button in the lower-left corner to return to the main Macintosh Guide window. Now continue with the next section. 22 Chapter 2 Click here to see the next step (if there is one). If you want to return to the main Macintosh Guide window, click here.Getting answers with the Look For button 1 In the Macintosh Guide window, click the Look For button. A small box appears on the left side of the window, where you can type text. 2 Click the arrow button to activate the text box. 3 Type “trash” in the text box and then click Search. When you click Search, a list of questions related to the word or phrase you typed appears on the right side of the Macintosh Guide window. Getting Help 23 To activate the text box, click here. Type a word or phrase in the text box… …and then click here. To get instructions, click a question… …and then click OK.4 Click the question “How do I change the beep sound?” and then click OK. Or doubleclick the question. A small window appears with instructions for you to follow. 5 Read and follow the instructions in the window. Macintosh Guide provides step-by-step instructions to answer the question you selected. When you have completed each step, click the right arrow in the lower-right corner to display the next step. 6 When you have completed all the steps, click the close box in the upper-left corner to close Macintosh Guide. 24 Chapter 2 If you want to close Macintosh Guide, click here. Click here to see the next step (if there is one).Tips for using Macintosh Guide Here are a few tips for using Macintosh Guide effectively: m Macintosh Guide is available only when you are in the Finder—the desktop area where you can see the icons of disks, folders, and files. (Other programs may also have help available in the Guide menu, however.) If you don’t see Macintosh Guide in the Guide menu, pull down the Application menu (to the right of the Guide menu) and choose Finder. m Follow the steps when you’re instructed to; don’t skip ahead or read ahead. That way the computer can check to make sure you’ve done a step correctly. m Unlike most windows, the Macintosh Guide window stays in front of other windows on the screen so that your instructions are never covered. If you need to move the Guide window out of the way, drag it by the title bar at the top of the window. You can also move the window out of the way by clicking the zoom box. Click the box once to shrink the window; click it a second time to expand the window to its original size. m If you need more information about an instruction or a term, click the button labeled “Huh?” to get further explanation. (The “Huh?” button is dimmed when no additional information is available.) m If you want to return to the main Macintosh Guide window, click the Topics button in the lower-left corner of the Guide window. m When you’re finished using Macintosh Guide, click the close box in the upper-left corner of the window. Getting Help 25 “Huh?” button Right arrow Title bar Zoom box Topics button Close boxIdentifying objects on the screen Sometimes you’ll see an unfamiliar item on the screen and ask yourself, “What’s that?” You can get an answer by using a Macintosh feature known as Balloon Help. Balloon Help explains the function of icons, menus, commands, and other items on the Macintosh screen in balloons like those you see in comic strips. Follow these steps to use Balloon Help: 1 Pull down the Guide menu (marked with the h icon) and choose Show Balloons. 2 Point to any object on the screen that you want to identify. A balloon appears next to the object. In the following illustration, for example, pointing to the Trash displays a balloon that explains how to use the Trash to throw items away. Although balloons appear next to items when you point to them, the way you work does not change; you can still select icons, choose commands, and so on. 3 When you’re finished using Balloon Help, choose Hide Balloons from the Guide menu. 26 Chapter 2Learning useful shortcuts You can perform many tasks in the Finder more quickly if you use keyboard or mouse shortcuts. For example, instead of clicking an icon and choosing Open from the File menu, you can simply double-click the icon to open it. Follow these steps to learn keyboard and mouse shortcuts: 1 Pull down the Guide menu (marked with the h icon) and choose Shortcuts. The main Macintosh Shortcuts window appears. 2 Click one of the category buttons. Another window appears, describing shortcuts for that category. Getting Help 27 If you want to close the window, click here. Click here to see the next window (if there is one). Click here to return to the main Macintosh Shortcuts window for more categories.3 Read about the shortcuts available for the category you selected. Click the right arrow in the lower-right corner of the window to display the next window (if there is one). 4 When you finish reading about the shortcuts for your category, click the Topics button in the lower-left corner to return to the main Macintosh Shortcuts window. Or click the close box in the upper-left corner to close the window. 28 Chapter 229 The illustration below shows a basic Macintosh Performa system. You can expand your computer system by connecting additional hardware (such as a printer, a modem, or external stereo speakers). Mouse Monitor (You may have a different monitor than the one shown here.) Computer Keyboard Hard disk drive (internal) Floppy disk drive CD-ROM drive Volume buttons Use these buttons to change the volume of the computer’s sound. CD-ROM drive Open/Close button Power-on light Microphone (optional) Headphone jack Remote control sensor - f 3 Connecting Additional Equipment Read this chapter for information on expanding your computer system with additional hardware.Where to connect additional equipment The illustration on this page shows where equipment should be connected to your computer. (These items can be purchased from Apple-authorized dealers.) For instructions on connecting additional equipment such as a printer or scanner, see the manual that came with the equipment. - Sound output port W Modem port [ Printer port Connects your Macintosh to a printer or LocalTalk network. V Apple Desktop Bus (ADB) port Connects your Macintosh to input equipment, such as a keyboard or a trackball. g SCSI port Å Sound input port Connects your Macintosh to SCSI equipment, such as external hard disk drives and scanners. *If your computer has an internal modem, this port is covered. Don’t remove the cover or connect anything to this port if you have an internal modem. Connects an external modem to your Macintosh. * Connects your Macintosh to headphones, externally powered (amplified) speakers, or other audio output equipment. Connects your Macintosh to a professional-quality microphone or other audio input equipment. F Security lock port Standby power button ² Power socket ª Monitor port Connects your monitor to your Macintosh. Internal modem (optional) You may have an internal modem or other communication card installed. PDS card access cover Covers port for optional processor-direct slot (PDS) expansion card. Video input card (optional) Connects your Macintosh to a video camera, VCR, or other video equipment. TV tuner card (optional) Connects your Macintosh to an external TV antenna or cable TV service. ¨ WARNING Before you connect any equipment—such as a mouse, keyboard, or external SCSI device—to your computer, make sure that your computer is plugged in (in order to ground the computer) and turned off. If you connect equipment with the computer turned on, you can damage your computer and your equipment. 30 Chapter 3Connecting an Apple PlainTalk Microphone Your computer has a sound input port, which you can use to connect an Apple PlainTalk Microphone. The Apple PlainTalk Microphone is included with some computer models. If your computer did not include an Apple PlainTalk Microphone, you can purchase one at an Apple-authorized dealer. Use PlainTalk only: You should connect only the Apple PlainTalk Microphone. Other models of microphone will not work with your Macintosh. To connect the microphone, do this: m Plug the microphone’s connector into the sound input port (marked with the icon X) on the back of the computer. Sound input port Sound output port Connecting Additional Equipment 31Connecting external stereo speakers You can take advantage of your computer’s stereo sound output by attaching externally powered (amplified) speakers. 1 Assemble the speakers and the cable you need. You need a cable with stereo miniplugs at each end to connect one or both speakers to the computer. (Some speakers require a dual-plug adapter. Others, like those shown here, accept a single stereo miniplug and are joined by standard speaker wires.) The following illustration shows the equipment configuration and the connections for a computer sound system. 2 Turn off the Macintosh. 3 Plug a stereo miniplug into the sound output port on the Macintosh. 4 Plug a stereo miniplug into the Audio In port on one of the speakers. If the speakers take a dual-plug cable, connect both plugs to the speakers’ Audio In ports. Stereo miniplug Audio In port - Sound output port Externally powered speakers 32 Chapter 35 Connect the speakers together with speaker wires, if necessary. 6 Turn on the computer. You hear the computer’s sound through the external speakers. Note: To control the volume of your external speakers, use the volume button on the front of the computer. If you are playing an audio compact disc (CD), you may also need to adjust the volume control in the program you’re using to play CDs. For more information on sound and playing audio CDs, see the “Sound” topic of Macintosh Guide, available in the Guide (h) menu. Expanding memory The random-access memory (RAM) in your computer can be expanded. Installing additional RAM adds more memory chips to your computer and expands its capabilities. The Technical Information booklet that came with your computer describes how much additional memory can be installed in your Macintosh. Connecting to an Ethernet network This section contains information for people whose computers are connected to other computers through a local area network. (Using a modem is not the same as being connected to a local area network. If you have an internal modem, you do not need an Ethernet card.) WARNING To avoid damage to your computer, Apple recommends that only an Apple-certified technician install additional RAM. Consult the service and support information that came with your computer for instructions on how to contact an Apple-authorized service provider or Apple for service. If you attempt to install additional RAM yourself, any damage you may cause to your equipment will not be covered by the limited warranty on your computer. See an Apple-authorized dealer or service provider for information about this or any other warranty question. Connecting Additional Equipment 33If you buy and install an Ethernet card, you can connect your Macintosh to an existing high-speed Ethernet network that uses thin coaxial cables, 10BASE-T twisted pair cables, thick coaxial cables, or other standard cables. Depending on the type of cables used in the Ethernet network you’re connected to, you may need to purchase an Apple Ethernet media adapter or other compatible media adapter to connect your Macintosh. (Consult the service and support information that came with your computer for instructions on how to contact an Apple-authorized service provider or Apple for more information on Apple Ethernet media adapters.) To use Ethernet, you need to change the network connection in the Network control panel. (For instructions on how to select a network connection and other information about using your Macintosh on a network, see the “Networks & Telecommunications” topic of Macintosh Guide, available in the Guide [h] menu.) IMPORTANT Your Macintosh supports EtherTalk Phase 2 (AppleTalk Phase 2 Protocols for Ethernet networks) and TCP/IP (via MacTCP software). Non-Apple products that you can use to communicate over Ethernet using protocols are also available. Your Macintosh does not support EtherTalk Phase 1 (AppleTalk Phase 1 protocols for Ethernet networks). Installing internal drives Your Macintosh comes with three internal storage devices—a floppy disk drive, a CD-ROM (compact disc read-only memory) drive, and a hard disk drive (several capacities are available). If you want to replace an internal drive, see your Apple-authorized dealer. CAUTION The use of an Ethernet card will make your Macintosh a Class A computing device, according to FCC regulations. 34 Chapter 335 Your computer came with several application programs already installed. You can open these programs by clicking their buttons in the Launcher. The Apple Extras folder on your hard disk (and on the Macintosh Performa CD) contains additional programs, including the following: m QuickDraw GX gives your computer more powerful printing and font capabilities. You’ll want to install QuickDraw GX only if you purchased another program that requires it. Your computer needs at least 8 megabytes of random-access memory (RAM) to use QuickDraw GX. You can install it by opening the QuickDraw GX folder and double-clicking the Installer icon. m PowerTalk provides an open collaboration environment with a universal mailbox and other electronic mail services. You’ll want to install PowerTalk only if you use your computer on a local area network (connected to other computers) and if you purchased another program that requires it. Your computer needs at least 8 megabytes of RAM to use PowerTalk. You can install it by opening the PowerTalk folder and double-clicking the Installer icon. m Apple Video Player lets you watch video or TV on your computer. With Apple Video Player and a video input card, you can watch video on your computer. With Apple Video Player, a video input card, and a TV tuner card, you can watch video and TV. For instructions on using Apple Video Player, open AppleVideo Player and then choose Apple Video Player Guide from the Guide (h) menu. 4 Using Programs and Backing Up Disks Read this chapter to learn how to work with application programs and protect the information on your disks.Installing application programs You may want to buy and install additional application programs. See the manuals you receive with your programs for instructions on installing and using them. In most cases, you’ll install an application program on your internal hard disk from floppy disks that contain the program. The following illustration shows how to insert a floppy disk in your computer’s floppy disk drive. For instructions on how to eject floppy disks, see the “Disks” topic of Macintosh Guide, available in the Guide (h) menu. To use your programs most effectively, follow these guidelines: m Put only one copy of each program on your hard disk. Having more than one copy can cause errors. m Whenever you copy a program disk to your hard disk, be careful not to copy a System Folder. Always check to see what you’ve copied, and drag any extra System Folders to the Trash. m If you have problems using a program, read the manuals you received with the program. m If a program malfunctions consistently, try installing a fresh copy. If that doesn’t help, find out from the software manufacturer whether your version of the program is compatible with your computer model and the system software you’re using. To put a program into the Launcher, simply drag the program’s icon (or its alias) into the Launcher window, or onto the Applications category button in the Launcher. Insert the floppy disk, metal end first, into the floppy disk drive of your computer. 36 Chapter 4Working with several programs at a time You can open as many application programs and desk accessories as your computer’s memory allows. All open programs are listed in the Application menu at the right end of the menu bar. The name of the active program (the one you’re using right now) has a checkmark next to it, and its icon appears in the menu bar. Finding out which programs are open If you have several programs and windows open, you can find out which program is active and which other programs are open by pulling down the Application menu. Switching programs You can switch to another open program or desk accessory by choosing its name from the Application menu. If a program’s icon is dimmed in the menu, that means its windows are hidden. Choosing the program from the Application menu displays its windows. You can also switch to another program by clicking in a window that belongs to an open program, by double-clicking a program icon, or by double-clicking the icon of a document that was created with the program. Using Programs and Backing Up Disks 37 The Finder icon Commands to hide or display open windows Programs that are open A checkmark indicates the active program.Hiding and showing windows on the desktop You can hide all windows except those of the active program by choosing Hide Others from the Application menu. The other programs remain open even though their windows are hidden. When you switch to another program, its windows become visible again. If you want to see all the open windows, choose Show All from the Application menu. Protecting the information on a disk When you have a valuable document like a birth certificate, you probably make an extra copy of it for safekeeping. Similarly, you should make a copy of the documents you create on your computer. The extra copy is called a backup, and the process of making the copy is called backing up. Once you have a backup, you’re protected from accidentally losing the information on your hard disk. In the unlikely event that something happens to your hard disk, you can easily get the information back. Your computer’s hard disk comes with a lot of valuable information already stored on it, including system software and some application programs. The Macintosh Performa CD contains a backup copy of all the system software and application programs that came with your computer. See the Macintosh Performa CD booklet for instructions on using the CD to reinstall software. Making backup copies of the documents you create m You can back up files stored on your hard disk by copying them to floppy disks. m You can back up an entire floppy disk by copying it to another floppy disk of the same capacity or larger, or by copying it to a hard disk. m You can use a commercial backup program to copy new and changed files from a hard disk to another hard disk, to a tape drive, or to a series of floppy disks. m If your computer is on a network, you may be able to back up files by copying them to a shared disk on the network. 38 Chapter 4Restoring the information on your hard disk If information on your hard disk becomes damaged or lost, you can restore it if you have a backup copy of the information. The Macintosh Performa CD contains copies of all the system software and application programs that came with your computer. See the Macintosh Performa CD booklet for instructions on using the Macintosh Performa CD. Using application programs designed for the PowerPC microprocessor Your Macintosh is compatible with most application programs intended for use with Macintosh computers. But certain programs are designed especially for use with computers that have the PowerPC microprocessor. (These programs are sometimes called “native” applications.) You’ll find that these programs take best advantage of your computer’s speed. Special memory requirements Some native applications may be slightly larger than other programs and may take up more memory. If you find that you are running out of memory when you use one of these programs, you can use space on your computer’s hard disk as additional memory. For instructions on how to use hard disk space as memory, see the “Memory” topic of Macintosh Guide, available in the Guide (h) menu. You can also add more memory to your computer, as described in “Expanding Memory” in Chapter 3. Using older Macintosh programs If you experience problems using an older Macintosh program, it may be incompatible with your Macintosh. You may be able to use your older program if you change the Modern Memory Manager setting in your Memory control panel. For detailed instructions on using older programs with your Macintosh, see the “Working with Programs” topic of Macintosh Guide, available in the Guide (h) menu. Using Programs and Backing Up Disks 3941 5 Using the CD-ROM Drive This chapter provides information on the CD-ROM drive (also called a CD-ROM player). Refer to Appendix A, “Health, Safety, and Maintenance Tips” for information on the proper handling of these discs. Your internal CD-ROM drive for Macintosh computers works with CD-ROM discs, standard audio compact discs (CDs), and single-session or multisession Photo CDs. Your CD-ROM drive provides access to large amounts of information. However, you cannot save information on CD-ROM discs. ROM stands for read-only memory, meaning that the drive cannot “write” information onto CD-ROM discs. A wide selection of CD-ROM discs is available for entertainment, education, and business. A typical disc can hold over 650 megabytes (MB) of information—the equivalent of 270,000 pages of text, up to 8 hours of speech or music (depending on the sound quality), hundreds of highresolution images, or any combination of text, sound, and graphics. Read this chapter for information about your computer’s built-in CD-ROM drive.Inserting a CD-ROM disc Follow these instructions to insert a CD-ROM disc into your CD-ROM drive. Then follow the instructions provided with your disc, as well as the instructions in this manual. 1 Start up your Macintosh computer, if it’s not already on. 2 Press the Open/Close button to open the tray of the CD-ROM drive. The tray opens. 3 Place a CD-ROM disc in the tray, with the disc label facing up. Make sure the disc is lying flat and centered in the tray. If you are using a small (8cm) disc, make sure it is centered within the inside ring on the tray. 4 Push the tray in, or press the Open/Close button, to close the tray. In a few moments, an icon for the CD-ROM disc appears on your screen. Open/Close button 42 Chapter 5Using the CD-ROM Drive Ejecting a CD-ROM disc Follow these instructions to open the tray and eject a CD-ROM disc from your computer. IMPORTANT You may not be able to eject a disc if it is being shared. To turn off file sharing, use the Sharing Setup control panel. 1 Open the tray. There are several ways to open the tray of your CD-ROM drive. If a CD-ROM disc icon appears on your screen: m Select the disc icon on your screen and drag the icon to the Trash. m Click the disc icon, then choose the Put Away command in the File menu. m While the AppleCD Audio Player window is active, choose Eject CD from the File menu, or simultaneously press the x and E keys. (AppleCD Audio Player is a program that allows you to control your CD-ROM player and is available in the Apple [K] menu.) If no CD-ROM disc icon appears on your screen: m Press the Open/Close button for your CD-ROM drive. 2 Take the CD-ROM disc out of the tray. Store your disc in a safe place, away from heat, dust, and moisture. 3 Push the tray in, or press the Open/Close button, to close the tray. To avoid possible damage to the tray or the CD-ROM drive, keep the tray closed when you are not using it. 43Types of compact discs you can use Not all CD-ROM discs store information in the same way. A disc stores and displays information according to a given file format. Your computer’s system software must understand the file format in order to use the contents of the disc. Standard file formats You can use CD-ROM discs with these standard file formats: m HFS (Hierarchical File System)—the standard format used by the Macintosh. m ISO 9660—the International Standards Organization’s file format for CD-ROM discs. This format has been adopted by many CD manufacturers to make their discs compatible with a variety of computers. It is also the format that allows you to use Photo CDs in your CD-ROM drive. m The High Sierra format, a predecessor of the ISO 9660 format. m Photo CDs m Audio CDs The software that lets you use discs with these file formats is already installed on your computer. Other CD-ROM formats Your CD-ROM drive also works with file formats other than the ones listed above (for example, CD-ROM XA), provided that you install the appropriate software on your Macintosh. To find out about the availability of Macintosh software for additional file formats, contact the publisher of a particular disc. Audio CDs Your CD-ROM drive can play audio CDs and audio tracks on CD-ROM discs using your computer’s built-in speaker. You can also attach headphones or speakers to your computer for stereo sound. For further information, see the “Disks” topic of Macintosh Guide, available in the Guide (h) menu. 44 Chapter 5Using the CD-ROM Drive Photo CDs With your CD-ROM drive, you can use QuickTime to open digitized images stored on Photo CDs. For further information on Photo CDs, see the “Disks” topic of Macintosh Guide, available in the Guide (h) menu. Playing audio CDs With your CD-ROM drive and your computer’s built-in speaker, you can play audio compact discs (CDs) or audio tracks on CD-ROM discs. You can also attach headphones or speakers to the computer to listen to audio CDs and audio tracks. See Chapter 3 for information on connecting sound equipment to your computer. To start, stop, and otherwise control audio discs, use the AppleCD Audio Player program, available in the Apple (?) menu, Your audio CD software will only play tracks that contain audio information. You can listen to an audio CD or audio tracks in the background while you do other work on your computer. For more information about playing audio CDs, see the “Disks” topic of Macintosh Guide, available in the Guide (h) menu. You can listen to an audio CD or CD-ROM disc with audio tracks in the background while you use your computer for other work. 45Working with Photo CDs You can use your CD-ROM drive to open Photo CD images stored on Photo CDs. A Photo CD image is a digitized version of a standard photograph that you can open and view on your computer screen. You can do many things with the images on your Photo CDs: m Open and view the images individually on your computer screen. m View the images on your computer screen in a series, as you would view a slide presentation. m Copy and save the images, print them, paste them into word-processing documents or other documents that accept graphics, and edit them with a graphics application program. Photo CD images are an excellent source of graphics for desktop publishing, multimedia presentations, business documents, and professional-quality graphic design. For more information on working with Photo CD images, see the “Disks” topic of Macintosh Guide, available in the Guide (h) menu. 46 Chapter 5Obtaining Photo CDs Your own photographs can be recorded as Photo CD images on a Photo CD. To obtain a Photo CD of your own photographs, take your standard 35-mm film to a photofinisher who has a Photo CD system. The photofinisher develops your film, digitizes the photographs, and gives you back a Photo CD containing your Photo CD images. A single Photo CD can hold approximately a hundred images. If your Photo CD isn’t full, you can take it back to the photofinisher and have more photos added until the disc is full. Such discs are called multisession discs because they contain images added after the first session. Your CD-ROM drive can read both single-session and multisession Photo CDs. (Other CD-ROM drives can read only single-session discs and are unable to read the additional images placed on a multisession disc.) Before viewing the contents of a Photo CD Normally, you open Photo CD images with the SimpleText program that came with your computer. If you wish, you can use a graphics or image-editing program instead of SimpleText to open images. For instructions, see the “Working with Programs” topic of Macintosh Guide, available in the Guide (h) menu. If you use SimpleText to view high-resolution images, you should increase the amount of memory that SimpleText uses. For more information on memory, see the “Memory” topic of Macintosh Guide, available in the Guide (h) menu. A note about resolution When a Photo CD image is created, it’s recorded at five different levels of resolution. The higher the resolution, the more information is recorded about the image, and the sharper the image appears when displayed or printed at larger sizes. However, high-resolution images take up a lot of memory—up to 18 MB of data for one photograph—which affects file size, as well as the amount of time it takes to display or print an image. It’s best to work with a resolution appropriate for your monitor or printer. Some monitors and printers cannot display or print very high-resolution images. Using the CD-ROM Drive 47For most work, a resolution of 768 x 512 pixels or smaller is suitable. For detailed work or very high-quality reproductions, you may want to use a higher resolution. Make sure to open high-resolution images with application programs designed to handle large image files. SimpleText cannot open very large files. Sharing a CD-ROM disc over a network You can share a CD-ROM disc using the file-sharing feature of System 7.5. If the disc has audio portions, you will be able to hear the audio yourself, but other people on the network will not. Likewise, you cannot hear the audio portions of discs you access over a network. For further information about file sharing in System 7.5, see the “Networks and Telecommunications” topic of Macintosh Guide, available in the Guide (h) menu. 48 Chapter 549 Consult this chapter if you experience problems using your computer. When you have questions If you want to know how to do a particular task with your computer, refer to Macintosh Guide in the Guide (h) menu. For instructions on using Macintosh Guide, see Chapter 2 of this manual. If you have trouble While you’re using your computer, you may occasionally see a bomb icon or an error message, or the pointer (8) may “freeze” on the screen. If you have trouble with your computer, take a few minutes to read the information in this chapter. If your problem is related to a particular procedure, you should also look for information on that procedure in Macintosh Guide, available in the Guide (h) menu. For additional troubleshooting information and a list of common questions relating to your system software, see the “Troubleshooting” topic of Macintosh Guide. If you are unable to access Macintosh Guide (for example, if your screen is “frozen”), refer to this chapter to see if you can resolve the problem. 6 TroubleshootingTake your time When you see an error message, you don’t have to take action immediately. The message stays on the screen until you click the OK (or Restart) button or turn off the Macintosh. To help diagnose and correct the problem, follow the suggestions in this section. Gather as much information on the situation as you can. Then follow the instructions in the next section, “Start Over.” m Make a note of exactly what you were doing when the problem occurred. Write down the message on the screen. List the programs you were using and the names of any items you know have been added to the System Folder since the system software was installed. This information will help a service person diagnose the problem. (It is helpful to keep a printed copy of the items in your System Folder. For instructions on printing the contents of a folder, see the “Printing & Fonts” topic of Macintosh Guide, available in the Guide [h] menu.) m Check the screen for any clues. Is a menu selected? What programs and document icons are open? Note anything else that seems relevant. m If you were typing text and were not able to save it before the problem occurred, you can write down the parts of the text still visible on the screen so that some of your work will be easy to replace. m Ask other Macintosh users about the problem you’re having; they may have a solution for it. If you need repair service, consult the service and support information that came with your computer for instructions on how to contact an Appleauthorized service provider or Apple for assistance. 50 Chapter 6Start over Often you can eliminate a problem simply by clearing the computer’s memory and starting over. If you can, save any open documents before restarting the Macintosh. If your system is frozen and does not respond to anything you do, or if you have a “bomb” message on the screen, saving may not be possible. You can try pressing x-Option-Esc to quit the program in use when the problem occurred; if this works, you can then save the documents open in other programs before restarting. (Note: Use this key combination to force a program to quit only when you can’t choose Quit from the File menu.) To restart your Macintosh, try the following steps: 1 If you can, choose Restart from the Special menu or from the dialog box that’s on screen. Dialog boxes contain messages from the computer. If something goes wrong, a message may appear on the screen, asking you to restart the computer. 2 If you can’t choose Restart, hold down the x and Control keys while you press the Power key (marked with a triangle). This key combination restarts the computer. (Use this key combination only when you can’t choose Restart from the Special menu.) 3 If nothing happens, turn off your computer with the standby power button, wait at least 10 seconds, and then turn it on again. 4 If the standby power button doesn’t turn off the computer, unplug your Macintosh. If you suspect that the problem is with other equipment, such as a printer or an external hard disk that’s attached to your computer, turn that equipment off for 10 seconds or longer, then turn it on again and restart the Macintosh. Troubleshooting 51Rebuild your desktop regularly A process known as “rebuilding the desktop” helps your Macintosh keep track of data on your disks. It’s a good idea to rebuild the desktop of your disks once a month or so, especially your startup disks. (Although you usually use the hard disk in your computer as a startup disk, you can also start up from any other disk that has system software installed.) To rebuild the desktop of your internal hard disk disk, follow these steps: 1 Hold down the Option and x keys while you start up your computer. Do not release the keys until you see a message asking whether you want to rebuild the desktop. 2 Click OK. You can also use this procedure to rebuild the desktop of an external hard disk or a floppy disk. Simply turn on the external hard disk or insert the floppy disk into a floppy disk drive before you turn on the computer. If icons do not appear correctly after you rebuild the desktop, restart your computer while pressing the Shift key to temporarily turn off system extensions. When you see the “Welcome to Macintosh—extensions off” message, release the Shift key and press the Option and x keys until you see a message asking if you want to rebuild the desktop. 52 Chapter 6Solutions to common problems This section contains descriptions of problems you could experience with your computer. Some problems may be caused by your CD-ROM drive, so if you don’t find your problem here, be sure to check the section “Solutions to CD-ROM Problems,” later in this chapter. The computer is turned on but the screen is dark. One of the following is probably the cause: m You have a screen saver program that darkens the screen when the computer has not been used for a certain period. Press a key or move the mouse to turn off the screen saver. m The brightness (Û) and contrast (O) buttons are not adjusted properly. Adjust the brightness and contrast of your monitor. m The Macintosh or the monitor is not getting power. Check that the monitor is plugged in and turned on, and that the monitor cable is firmly connected to both the computer and the monitor. Check that the computer’s power cord is firmly connected to the computer and plugged into a grounded electrical outlet, and that the outlet has power. If you have more than one monitor and only one is dark, check that it is set up correctly in the Monitors control panel. For information on using more than one monitor, see the “Monitors” topic of Macintosh Guide, available in the Guide (h) menu. The computer’s clock keeps time inaccurately. Your computer has a clock that runs continuously. When the computer is turned off, a battery keeps the clock running. If your clock begins to keep time inaccurately, have your Apple-authorized service provider replace the battery. Troubleshooting 53When you start up, a disk icon with a blinking question mark appears in the middle of the screen. This icon indicates that your Macintosh cannot find the system software it needs to start up. One of the following is probably the cause: m Your computer may be having a problem recognizing external SCSI equipment, such as hard disks, CD-ROM drives, and scanners. (SCSI stands for Small Computer System Interface.) Turn off all external SCSI equipment and disconnect the first SCSI device in the chain from your computer’s SCSI port. Then restart the computer. If the computer starts up after you disconnect your SCSI equipment, refer to the manuals that came with the equipment for information on the proper way to connect SCSI equipment and assign SCSI ID numbers. If you have a printer connected to your computer’s SCSI port, make sure your printer is connected properly. Most printers connect to the printer port, not the SCSI port. Check the manuals that came with your printer for information on how to connect it properly. m System software is not installed on the startup hard disk, the system software is damaged, or the hard disk is not working properly. Insert the Macintosh Performa CD. Then follow the instructions in “Repairing a Damaged Disk” to test your startup hard disk and repair any damage. If repairing the disk doesn’t help, follow the instructions in the Macintosh Performa CD booklet to reinstall system software on your startup hard disk. 54 Chapter 6A disk icon with an X appears in the middle of the screen and a floppy disk is ejected from the disk drive. This icon indicates that the floppy disk you tried to start up from is not a startup disk. When you turn on your computer, it looks first in the floppy disk drive for a disk containing system software. If the disk in the drive does not contain system software, the computer ejects the disk and looks on its internal hard disk for system software. Wait a few seconds. The computer should start up from its internal hard disk. Make sure you insert floppy disks only after the computer has begun starting up. A “sad Macintosh” icon appears and the computer won’t start up. This icon indicates that your Macintosh cannot start up because of a problem with the system software or the computer hardware. Eject any floppy disks by turning off the computer and then holding down the mouse button while you turn the computer on again. Try starting up with the Macintosh Performa CD. (For instructions on how to start up your computer from the CD-ROM disc, see the Macintosh Performa CD booklet, which came with your computer.) If the “sad Macintosh” icon appears again, consult the service and support information that came with your computer for information on contacting an Apple-authorized service provider or Apple for assistance. Troubleshooting 55The hard disk icon does not appear on the desktop. If you don’t see a hard disk icon on the desktop, try the following: m Use the Drive Setup program to make the disk available. Drive Setup is located in the Apple Extras folder. For instructions, start Drive Setup, then choose Drive Setup Guide from the Guide (h) menu. m If the hard disk is internal, shut down your computer, wait at least 10 seconds, and then turn it on again. m If the hard disk is external, make sure that it is turned on and that its cable is connected firmly; then restart the Macintosh. m Check the ID numbers of all SCSI equipment connected to your computer. See the manuals that came with your SCSI equipment for information on setting SCSI ID numbers. m If the hard disk is your startup disk, start your computer with the Macintosh Performa CD. (For instructions on how to start up your computer from the CD-ROM disc, see the Macintosh Performa CD booklet.) Then follow the rest of the instructions on repairing a disk to test your startup hard disk and repair any damage. If repairing the disk doesn’t help, follow the instructions in “Installing or Reinstalling System Software” later in this chapter to reinstall system software on your startup hard disk. Icons do not appear correctly on your screen. You need to rebuild the desktop—a process that helps your Macintosh keep track of files and folders on your hard disks. For instructions, see “Rebuild Your Desktop Regularly” in the section “If You Have Trouble” earlier in this chapter. If icons do not appear correctly after you rebuild the desktop, restart your computer while pressing the Shift key to temporarily turn off system extensions. When you see the “Welcome to Macintosh—extensions off” message, release the Shift key and press the Option and x keys until you see a message asking if you want to rebuild the desktop. 56 Chapter 6Your Macintosh can’t read a floppy disk. If you see a message that a floppy disk is unreadable, try one of the following: m If the disk has never been used, you may simply need to initialize it. For instructions, see the “Disks” topic of Macintosh Guide, available in the Guide (h) menu. m The disk may be damaged. See “Repairing a Damaged Disk” later in this chapter for information on testing and repairing disks. m If the disk is a high-density disk previously used on another computer, the disk may have been formatted incorrectly as an 800K disk rather than as a 1440K (high-density) disk. If so, use the other computer to copy the disk’s contents onto a properly formatted disk. m The disk may have been formatted for use on another kind of computer. You may be able to use a program that lets you work with such disks on your Macintosh. If you are trying unsuccessfully to use a DOS floppy disk, consider the following: m When formatting floppy disks on a DOS computer for use in a Macintosh, you need to format standard double-sided disks as 720K disks and highdensity disks as 1440K disks. Double-sided disks formatted in 1440K format and high-density disks formatted in 720K format may not work in a Macintosh. If you think your DOS floppy disk might have a format that doesn’t work in a Macintosh, use a DOS computer to copy the contents of the disk onto a properly formatted disk. Troubleshooting 57You can’t start an application program or it quits unexpectedly. Or, when you try to open a program, you see a message that not enough memory is available. One of the following is probably the cause: m The Macintosh ran out of memory. Quit the programs that you have open and then open the program you want to use, or restart your Macintosh. Use the Memory control panel to turn on virtual memory. For more information on virtual memory, see the “Memory” topic of Macintosh Guide, available in the Guide (h) menu. m The program needs more memory. Use the program’s Info window to give it more memory. For more information on increasing a program’s memory, see the “Memory” topic of Macintosh Guide, available in the Guide (h) menu. m The program is incompatible with your Macintosh. Contact the program’s publisher to see if there is an upgrade available for the program. You see a message that you need to have an FPU installed. Your computer has a floating-point unit (FPU) installed. If you see this message, the program is probably incompatible with your Macintosh. Contact the program’s publisher to see if there is an upgrade available for the program. 58 Chapter 6A dialog box with a bomb appears. There is a software problem. m Write down what you were doing when the message appeared, and write down the text of the message. m Restart your Macintosh. (See “Start Over” in the section “If You Have Trouble” earlier in this chapter for instructions.) Most software problems are temporary, and restarting usually corrects the problem. m If the problem recurs, check the startup disk and application program you were using when the dialog box appeared. Make sure that all programs, desk accessories, and system extensions you’re using are compatible with the system software. Reinstalling the system software may correct the problem. m Sometimes incompatible system extensions or control panels can cause system software problems. Restart while holding down the Shift key; this temporarily turns off all system extensions. If your computer works normally after you do this, use the Extensions Manager control panel to turn on extensions and control panels one at a time. Restart after you turn on each extension. This procedure should identify incompatible extensions and control panels. For information on using the Extensions Manager control panel to manage system extensions, see the “Setting Options” topic of Macintosh Guide, available in the Guide (h) menu. m If the problem recurs, you may need to reinstall system software. See the Macintosh Performa CD booklet for instructions. Troubleshooting 59The pointer (8) doesn’t move when you move the mouse. One of the following situations is probably the cause. m There is a software problem. Try the following: Press x-Option-Esc to quit the application program in use when the problem occurred. If this works, you can save the documents open in other programs before restarting. Restart your Macintosh. See “Start Over” in the section “If You Have Trouble” earlier in this chapter for instructions. m Follow the suggestions in the previous section, “A Dialog Box With a Bomb Appears.” m The mouse is not connected properly. Turn the computer off using the standby power button, check that the mouse and keyboard cables are connected properly, and then restart the computer. IMPORTANT Do not connect or disconnect the mouse while the computer is turned on. You may damage your computer. m Signals from the mouse are not reaching the computer, either because the mouse needs cleaning or because there is something wrong with the mouse. Clean the mouse according to the instructions in Appendix A of this book. If you have another mouse or pointing device, try connecting and using it. (Turn the computer off before connecting it.) If the new device works, there is probably something wrong with the mouse you replaced. If none of these procedures solves the problem, consult the service and support information that came with your computer for instructions on how to contact an Apple-authorized service provider or Apple for assistance. 60 Chapter 6Typing on the keyboard produces nothing on the screen. One of the following is probably the cause: m Some system software features are turned on that affect the way the keyboard works. Use the Easy Access control panel to turn off Sticky Keys, Slow Keys, and Mouse Keys. m There is a software problem. Restart your Macintosh. For instructions, see “Start Over” in the section “If You Have Trouble” earlier in this chapter. Check the startup disk and application program you were using when the problem occurred. Make sure that all programs, desk accessories, and system extensions you’re using are compatible with the system software. If the problem recurs, you may need to reinstall system software. See the Macintosh Performa CD booklet for instructions. m You haven’t selected any text or set the insertion point (i). Make sure the program you want to type in is the active program. Then place the pointer (8) in the active window and click to set an insertion point (i) or drag to select text (if you want to replace the text with your typing). m The keyboard is not connected properly. Turn off the computer using the standby power button, then check that the keyboard cable is connected properly at both ends. If you have a keyboard with an ADB port (marked with the × icon) on each end, turn off the Macintosh using the standby power button and plug the keyboard cable into the other ADB port on the keyboard. (You may have to unplug the mouse to do this.) Then restart the computer. Some monitors have one or two ADB ports. Turn off the Macintosh using the standby power button and connect your keyboard cable to a different ADB port on the computer or monitor. Then restart the computer. Troubleshooting 61m The keyboard is damaged. If you have access to another keyboard, try using it instead. (Turn the computer off before connecting it.) If the new keyboard works, there is probably something wrong with the one you replaced. If none of these procedures solves the problem, consult the service and support information that came with your computer for instructions on how to contact an Apple-authorized service provider or Apple for assistance. You can’t open a document, or you see a message that an application program can’t be found. m Some documents can be opened by more than one application program. Try starting a program that you think might be able to open the document, then choose Open from the program’s File menu to try to open the document. m Purchase and install the correct software to use the document, or find out if the creator of the document can convert it to a form that one of your programs can use. m Don’t try to open the files in your System Folder. Most of the files in your System Folder are used by your computer for internal purposes and are not intended to be opened. m Rebuild your desktop by holding down the Option and x keys while starting up your computer. Keep holding down the keys until you see a message asking whether you want to rebuild the desktop. Click OK. m If the document is from a DOS computer, use the PC Exchange control panel to specify which Macintosh program will open the document. For information about working with DOS documents on your Macintosh, see the “Using DOS Files & Disks” topic of Macintosh Guide, available in the Guide (h) menu. 62 Chapter 6You experience problems using a document from a DOS computer. If you can’t open a DOS document using a Macintosh program, try the following: m Open the document from within the program by choosing Open in the program’s File menu. m Use the PC Exchange control panel to specify which Macintosh program will open the document. If a DOS document is displayed incorrectly, or you see strange codes or characters in the document, try one of the following: m Your application program may have special procedures for opening and saving documents with different file formats. See the information that came with your program, or call the program’s publisher. m Try opening the document in another program. Note: Some characters that can be displayed on the Macintosh are not accurately displayed on DOS computers. For more information about working with DOS documents on your Macintosh, see the “Using DOS Files & Disks” topic of Macintosh Guide, available in the Guide (h) menu. Troubleshooting 63You see a message that your application program can’t be opened because a file can’t be found. Macintosh programs designed specifically for the PowerPC microprocessor (also called “native” applications) use special files called shared libraries. Any necessary shared libraries should be installed automatically when you install these special Macintosh programs. Follow the directions that came with your program to reinstall the program. If the shared library is still missing, contact the software program’s manufacturer for assistance. You experience problems using an older Macintosh program. Some older Macintosh programs are not completely compatible with Macintosh computers that have the PowerPC microprocessor. m Contact the program’s publisher to see if an upgrade is available. m Open the Memory control panel and turn off Modern Memory Manager. For more detailed instructions, see the “Working with Programs” topic of Macintosh Guide, available in the Guide (h) menu. 64 Chapter 6Solutions to CD-ROM problems Problems using the CD-ROM drive The CD-ROM disc icon does not appear on screen. m If you have other SCSI devices attached to your computer, make sure that each device has a unique SCSI ID number (your CD-ROM drive has SCSI ID 3). Refer to the documentation that came with your SCSI devices if you need to reset SCSI ID numbers. Your computer starts up and you see large folder-shaped areas, containing labeled pictorial buttons, instead of the usual Macintosh desktop. m Your computer may have started up from a CD-ROM disc containing At Ease, an alternative to the Macintosh desktop. You need to have the Macintosh desktop on your screen before you can use any of the installation instructions in this manual. To return to the Macintosh desktop, choose Shut Down from the Special menu. When your computer is off, press the Open/Close button of your CD-ROM drive to open the tray, then remove the CD-ROM disc. Close the tray. Then start up your computer again. To avoid having the computer start up from a CD-ROM disc, remember to remove any disc in the drive before you shut down your computer. The tray of your CD-ROM drive won’t open. If a CD-ROM disc icon appears on your screen: m Drag the disc icon to the Trash, or select it and choose Put Away from the File menu. If the AppleCD Audio Player is active, choose Eject CD from the File menu. If you see a message that a disc can’t be put away because it is being shared, turn off file sharing, then try again to put away the disc. If no CD-ROM disc icon appears on your screen: m Press the Open/Close button for your CD-ROM drive. Troubleshooting 65m The signal to open the tray may not be reaching the computer. Turn off your computer and locate the small pinhole to the lower right of the CD-ROM tray opening. Insert the end of a large straightened paper clip firmly and horizontally into the pinhole. Push gently until the tray is released, then carefully pull the tray open. Do not force the tray open; wait until the paper clip has dislodged it or you may break the front of the tray. If neither of these suggestions works, your CD-ROM drive may be damaged. Contact an Apple-authorized service provider or Apple for further assistance. Your computer won’t restart, and a CD-ROM disc is in the CD-ROM drive. m Your computer may be trying to start up from the CD-ROM disc. Press the Open/Close button of your CD-ROM drive to open the tray, and remove the CD-ROM disc. Close the tray, then restart your computer. Problems with CD-ROM discs You insert a CD-ROM disc, but its icon doesn’t appear on the Macintosh desktop. m Make sure that the disc label is facing up and the disc is centered in the tray. If you’re using a small (8 cm) disc, make sure it is within the tray’s inner ring. m Make sure the tray is closed all the way. m Try restarting your computer. WARNING Turn off your computer before you attempt to eject the tray using a paper clip. If you don’t, you may damage the CD-ROM drive. 66 Chapter 6Your computer displays the message “This is not a Macintosh disk: Do you want to initialize it?” when you insert a CD-ROM disc in the CD-ROM drive. m The disc may use a format that the Macintosh cannot recognize. Your computer ejects a CD-ROM disc without giving you any error message. m Make sure the disc is flat in the tray and the disc label is facing up. If you’re using a small (8 cm) disc, make sure it’s centered within the tray’s inner ring. m The disc may need to be cleaned. (See “Handling CD-ROM Discs” in Appendix A.) If there are visible scratches on the shiny side of the disc, you may be able to remove them with a CD polishing kit (available from your audio CD dealer). If the scratches can’t be removed, you’ll need to replace the disc. m The disc may be damaged. Try another disc in the drive, and try the original disc in another drive. If the original drive reads other discs or if the original disc also doesn’t work in another drive, the disc is probably damaged. You’ll need to replace the disc. You can’t open a document on a CD-ROM disc. m Try opening the application program first; then open the document. m Read the manual that came with your CD-ROM disc. Some discs come with software that you need to install on your computer before using the disc. You can’t save changes you make to information on a CD-ROM disc. m CD-ROM is a read-only medium. This means that information can be read (retrieved) from it, but not written (stored) on it. You can save the changed information on a hard disk or floppy disk. Problems using ISO 9660 or High Sierra discs You cannot access files on a CD-ROM disc that uses the ISO 9660 or High Sierra format. m Discs in the ISO 9660 and High Sierra disc formats have version numbers attached to file names. Some application programs need these version numbers in order to work with files. To make the version numbers available to programs on your computer, follow these instructions. Troubleshooting 67Drag the CD icon to the Trash. When the tray opens, hold down the Option key and push the tray back in. Continue to hold down the Option key until the disc is in the drive. The program you are using should now be able to locate file names on that CD-ROM disc. Problems playing audio CDs You don’t hear any sound when you play an audio CD or an audio track on a CD-ROM disc using the AppleCD Audio Player. m If you have headphones or speakers connected to the computer, adjust the connector to make sure they are firmly connected. Make sure the column control on your headphones or speakers is not turned down too low. m If you do not have headphones or speakers connected to the computer, make sure that nothing else is plugged into the sound output port on your computer. m Some programs change the sound options to suit their needs. You may need to reset the sound options in the Sound control panel. Refer to the “Sound” topic of Macintosh Guide available in the Guide (h) menu. m If you are using a CD-ROM disc over a network, you won’t be able to hear the audio portion. m Make sure the volume is turned up in the AppleCD Audio Player. With the Audio Player open, drag the volume control slider up or press the Up Arrow key on your keyboard. m The CD may have been paused. Click the Play/Pause button in the AppleCD Audio Player once or twice. While playing an audio track on a CD-ROM disc that combines audio tracks and data, you double-click the disc icon and the audio track stops playing. m You can’t open data files on a CD-ROM disc and listen to audio tracks on that disc at the same time. You are unable to record sound from an audio CD. m Check your computer’s sound input port to see if a microphone or other device is connected. m You may need to reset the sound options in the Sound control panel. Refer to the “Sound” topic of Macintosh Guide, available in the Guide (h) menu. 68 Chapter 6Problems using Photo CDs Your CD-ROM drive will not open Photo CDs. m Reinstall the CD-ROM and QuickTime software (available through the “MultiMedia Software” option in Custom Install). Your computer does not display color icons for individual images on a Photo CD. m Your computer may be low on memory. To view color icons, restart your computer and then reopen the Photos folder. See the “Memory” topic of Macintosh Guide, available in the Guide (h) menu for more information on managing memory. After you open an image on a Photo CD, the image is scrambled, colors are displayed incorrectly, or no image appears in the window. m The program you are using may not be designed to work with large (highresolution) image files. You can open the image with another program or you can assign more memory to the program. (See the “Memory” topic of Macintosh Guide, available in the Guide (h) menu for more information on managing memory.) After you open an image on a Photo CD, your system is “frozen” and does not respond to any input, or you have a “bomb” message on your screen. m Restart your Macintosh. The program you are using may not be designed to work with large (high-resolution) image files. You can open the image with another program or you can assign more memory to the program (see the “Memory” topic of Macintosh Guide available in the Guide (h) menu, for more information on managing memory.) Troubleshooting 69If your computer’s performance decreases If you notice a decrease in your computer’s speed and general performance after you add special software (a control panel, system extension, or custom utility), it may be because the software does not work well with Macintosh computers built with the PowerPC microprocessor. m To find out if the new software is the problem, hold down the Shift key while you restart the computer. This temporarily turns off control panels and extensions. If the computer performs better without this software, one of these items is likely to be the problem. m Use the Extensions Manager control panel to turn off a system extension or set of extensions. For detailed instructions, see the “Setting Options” topic of Macintosh Guide, available in the Guide (h) menu. If the computer performs better when an extension is turned off, contact the extension’s manufacturer for information or an upgrade. m Use the Memory control panel to turn off virtual memory. For more information on virtual memory, see the “Memory” topic of Macintosh Guide, available in the Guide (h) menu. m If you use several application programs at the same time, your computer’s performance will increase if you install more RAM (random-access memory). See “Expanding Memory” in Chapter 3. If you still do not notice an improvement, you may want to reinstall system software on your startup hard disk. See the Macintosh Performa CD booklet for instructions. 70 Chapter 6Repairing a damaged disk If you see a message reporting that a disk is damaged or unreadable, you may need to repair the disk. Try these suggestions first If you can’t start up from a hard disk or you don’t see the hard disk icon on the desktop, try the following: m If the hard disk is internal, shut down your Macintosh, wait at least 10 seconds, and then turn it on again. m If the hard disk is external, make sure that it is turned on and that its cable is connected firmly; then restart the Macintosh. m If the hard disk is your startup disk, start up with a different startup disk. (See the following section, “Starting Up From a CD-ROM Disc.”) If, after you start up from a different disk, your hard disk’s icon appears on your desktop, reinstall system software on the hard disk. (See “Installing or Reinstalling System Software” later in this chapter). m Check the ID numbers of all SCSI equipment connected to your computer. Each device must have a unique ID number. The computer itself has the ID number 7 and the internal CD-ROM drive has the ID number 3. The ID numbers 0, 1, 2, 4, 5, and 6 are available for additional SCSI devices. Also check that the chain of devices is terminated properly. For information on setting SCSI ID numbers and terminating a SCSI chain, see the manuals that came with your SCSI equipment. m If none of these suggestions solves the problem, test the disk by following the instructions given later in this section. Troubleshooting 71Starting up from a CD-ROM disc To test, repair, or initialize a hard disk, or to install system software on a hard disk, you need to start up your computer from another disk. You can start up your computer using the Macintosh Performa CD that came with your computer. The procedure for starting up from the CD varies depending on the condition of the system software on your hard disk. To find out which procedure to use, you must turn on your Macintosh. The steps that follow tell how to start up from a CD-ROM disc, depending on what you see on your screen. If you see a blinking question mark on your screen The blinking question mark means that your Macintosh is unable to find usable system software on your hard disk. 1 Press the Open/Close button of your CD-ROM drive to open the CD-ROM tray. 2 Place the Macintosh Performa CD disc in the tray with the disc label facing up. Make sure the disc is lying flat in the tray. 3 Push the tray in, or press the Open/Close button, to close the tray. Your Macintosh recognizes the CD as a startup disk, and in a few seconds the Macintosh desktop with a Launcher appears. 72 Chapter 6If you see the Macintosh desktop 1 Press the Open/Close button of your CD-ROM drive to open the CD-ROM tray. 2 Place the Macintosh Performa CD disc in the tray with the disc label facing up. Make sure the disc is lying flat in the tray. 3 Push the tray in, or press the Open/Close button, to close the tray. If the Macintosh Performa CD icon does not appear on your screen, follow the steps in the next section, “Problems Starting Up From the CD?” If the Macintosh Performa CD icon appears on the right side of your screen, continue with these steps. 4 Choose Control Panels from the Apple (K) menu. 5 Double-click the Startup Disk icon. The Startup Disk control panel window appears. 6 Click the CD icon to select it as your startup disk. 7 Choose Restart from the Special menu. Your computer recognizes the CD as its startup disk, and in a few seconds the Macintosh desktop with a Launcher appears. Troubleshooting 73Problems starting up from the CD? If you’ve followed the steps in the previous sections and the Macintosh Performa CD icon does not appear on your screen, follow these steps: 1 Insert the CD into the tray. 2 Choose Restart from the Special menu. 3 Immediately press and hold down the Command (x), Shift, Option, and Delete keys. The computer bypasses the internal hard disk, and the Macintosh Performa CD icon appears on the desktop. If the Macintosh Performa CD icon still does not appear on the desktop, continue with these steps: 4 Choose Control Panels from the Apple (K) menu. 5 Double-click the Startup Disk icon. The Startup Disk control panel appears. 6 Click the CD icon to select it as your startup disk. 7 Close the Startup Disk control panel. 8 Choose Restart from the Special menu (or the Apple menu). The computer starts up using the CD, and in a few moments the Macintosh desktop with a Launcher appears. 74 Chapter 6Checking for damage on your hard disk You can test a hard disk for damage with the Drive Setup program, which is on the Macintosh Performa CD that came with your computer. 1 Start up your computer from the Macintosh Performa CD. See “Starting Up From a CD-ROM Disc” earlier in this section. 2 Open the Drive Setup program. You may need to look in a folder called Utilities to find Drive Setup. 3 In the list of drives, click the disk you want to test. 4 Choose Test Disk from the Functions menu. 5 When a message tells you that the testing is complete, click Quit. If the test reveals a problem, you may be able to correct it by using Disk First Aid or another disk repair program (see the instructions in the next section), or you may need to reinitialize the disk (see “Initializing a Hard Disk” later in this chapter). Consult an Apple-authorized service provider for assistance if necessary. If you had a hard disk from another manufacturer installed after you bought your computer, use the software that came with the disk or contact the disk vendor to get the latest version of software. Troubleshooting 75How to repair a hard disk or floppy disk You can repair some types of disk damage by using the Disk First Aid program, which is on the Macintosh Performa CD that came with your computer. 1 Start up your computer from the Macintosh Performa CD. See “Starting Up From a CD-ROM Disc” earlier in this section. 2 Open the Disk First Aid icon. 3 Click the icon of the disk you want to test. Disk icons appear in a box at the top of the Disk First Aid window. 76 Chapter 64 Click Repair to begin testing and repairing the disk. If you want to test and repair another disk, click its icon and then click Repair. 5 When testing and repair are done, choose Quit from the File menu. If Disk First Aid cannot correct the problem m Try repairing the disk again. Sometimes repeating the process corrects the problem. m Use another disk repair or recovery program. Some disk repair programs let you recover information from a damaged disk. m Consult an Apple-authorized service provider for help. m If you can’t repair the disk, you’ll need to reinitialize it, which erases all the information on it. Before you reinitialize, be sure you recover all the information you can and back it up. Then erase (reinitialize) the disk. For instructions on reinitializing a floppy disk, see the “Disks” topic of Macintosh Guide, available in the Guide (h) menu. For instructions on reinitializing a hard disk, see the next section, “Initializing a Hard Disk.” If initialization doesn’t work, discard the damaged disk (if it’s a floppy disk), or take it to your Apple-authorized service provider for repair (if it’s a hard disk). Bring the Macintosh Performa CD (which you received with your computer) with you to the service provider. Initializing a hard disk The hard disk inside your computer was initialized (formatted for use) at the factory, so you shouldn’t need to initialize it. You need to initialize a hard disk only if m you purchase an uninitialized hard disk from another manufacturer m your hard disk is damaged If a hard disk needs to be initialized, the disk’s icon does not appear on the desktop when you start up the computer using another disk. You initialize your internal hard disk using a program called Drive Setup, which is on the Macintosh Performa CD that came with your computer. Troubleshooting 771 Start up your computer from the Macintosh Performa CD. See “Starting Up From a CD-ROM Disc” in the section “Repairing a Damaged Disk,” earlier in this chapter. 2 Open the Drive Setup program. You may need to look in a folder called Utilities to find Drive Setup. 3 In the list of drives, click the disk you want to initialize. 4 Click Initialize to initialize the hard disk. 5 When you see a message reporting that initialization was successful, click Quit. If a message reports that initialization failed, try again. If initialization fails a second time, take the disk to your Apple-authorized service provider for repair. WARNING Initializing a disk erases any information that may be on it. Before you initialize a damaged disk, try to repair it as described in “Repairing a Damaged Disk” earlier in this chapter. 78 Chapter 6 Click the drive you want to initialize... ...then click Initialize.Installing or reinstalling system software System software is the set of programs and other files that your computer uses to start itself up, keep track of your files, and run the application programs you use. System software is kept in the System Folder. When you turn on your computer, it looks for a startup disk, which is a disk that contains the system software. The startup disk is usually the hard disk that’s inside your computer, though another hard disk or a floppy disk can also be a startup disk. When should you install or reinstall system software? Your Macintosh came with all the necessary system software installed on its internal hard disk, so you don’t need to install system software on that disk unless you encounter software problems. If you have a new hard disk or a newly initialized hard disk that doesn’t contain system software, or if you want to upgrade to a more recent version of system software on a hard disk, you’ll need to install system software. You can install or reinstall system software by following the instructions in the Macintosh Performa CD booklet that came with your computer. If your hard disk already has system software installed on it but there is a problem with the disk or the software, you may see this icon in the middle of the screen: If this icon appears, first try testing your startup hard disk and repairing any damage. To do this, follow the instructions in “Repairing a Damaged Disk” earlier in this chapter. If repairing the disk doesn’t help, you may need to reinstall system software. You can install or reinstall system software by following the instructions in the Macintosh Performa CD booklet that came with your computer. If you’ve used Apple Backup to back up the contents of your hard disk, you can use Apple Restore to reinstall system software. See “Restoring the Information on Your Hard Disk” in the section “Protecting the Information on a Disk” in Chapter 4. Troubleshooting 7981 For your own safety and that of your equipment, follow all the instructions in this chapter. Keep these instructions available for reference by you and others. Health-related information about computer use Muscle soreness, eye fatigue, and other discomforts and injuries sometimes associated with using computers can occur from performing any number of activities. In fact, misuse of the same muscles during multiple activities can create a problem that might not otherwise exist. For example, if you engage in nonwork activities that involve repetitive stress on the wrist—such as bicycling—and also use your computer’s keyboard improperly, you may increase your likelihood of developing wrist problems. Some individuals are at greater risk of developing these problems because of their health, physiology, lifestyle, and general exposure to stress. Work organization and conditions, such as workstation setup and lighting, also play a part in your overall health and comfort. Preventing health problems is a multifaceted task that requires careful attention to the way you use your body every hour of every day. The most common health effects associated with using a computer are musculoskeletal discomfort and eye fatigue. We’ll discuss each area of concern below. Appendix A Health, Safety, and Maintenance Tips Read this appendix for important health and safety instructions, as well as tips on keeping your computer in good working order.Musculoskeletal discomfort As with any activity that involves sitting for long periods of time, using a computer can make your muscles sore and stiff. To minimize these effects, set up your work environment carefully, using the guidelines that follow, and take frequent breaks to rest tired muscles. To make working with your computer more comfortable, allow enough space in your work area so that you can change position frequently and maintain a relaxed posture. Another type of musculoskeletal concern is repetitive stress injuries (RSIs), also known as cumulative trauma disorders (CTDs). These problems can occur when a certain muscle or tendon is repeatedly overused and forced into an unnatural position. The exact causes of RSIs are not totally understood, but in addition to awkward posture, such factors as the amount of repetition, the force used in the activity, the individual’s physiology, workplace stress level, and lifestyle may affect the likelihood of experiencing an RSI. RSIs did not suddenly arise when computers were invented; tennis elbow and writer’s cramp, for example, are two RSIs that have been with us for a long time. Although less common than other RSIs, one serious RSI discussed more often today is a wrist problem called carpal tunnel syndrome, which may be aggravated by improper use of computer keyboards. This nerve disorder results from excessive pressure on the median nerve as it passes through the wrist to the hand. This section offers advice on setting up your work area to enhance your comfort while you use your computer. Since the effects of repetitive movements associated with using a computer can be compounded by those of other work and leisure activities to produce or aggravate physical problems, proper use of your computer system must be considered as just one element of a healthy lifestyle. No one, of course, can guarantee that you won’t have problems even when you follow the most expert advice on using computer equipment. You should always check with a qualified health specialist if muscle, joint, or eye problems occur. 82 Appendix AEye fatigue Eye fatigue can occur whenever the eyes are focused on a nearby object for a long time. This problem occurs because the eye muscles must work harder to view an object that’s closer than about 20 feet (6 meters). Improper lighting can hasten the development of eye fatigue. Although eye fatigue is annoying, there’s no evidence that it leads to permanent damage. Whenever you’re engaged in an activity that involves close-up work—such as reading a magazine, doing craft work, or using a computer—be sure to have sufficient glare-free lighting and give your eyes frequent rest breaks by looking up and focusing on distant objects. Remember to have your eyes examined regularly. To prevent discomfort and eye fatigue: m Arrange your workspace so that the furniture is properly adjusted for you and doesn’t contribute to an awkward working posture. m Take frequent short breaks to give your muscles and eyes a chance to rest. Arranging your office Here are some guidelines for adjusting the furniture in your office to accommodate your physical size and shape. m An adjustable chair that provides firm, comfortable support is best. Adjust the height of the chair so your thighs are horizontal and your feet flat on the floor. The back of the chair should support your lower back (lumbar region). Follow the manufacturer’s instructions for adjusting the backrest to fit your body properly. m When you use the computer keyboard, your shoulders should be relaxed. Your upper arm and forearm should form an approximate right angle, with your wrist and hand in roughly a straight line. Health, Safety, and Maintenance Tips 83You may have to raise your chair so your forearms and hands are at the proper angle to the keyboard. If this makes it impossible to rest your feet flat on the floor, you can use a footrest with adjustable height and tilt to make up for any gap between the floor and your feet. Or you may lower the desktop to eliminate the need for a footrest. Another option is to use a desk with a keyboard tray that’s lower than the regular work surface. m Position the mouse at the same height as your keyboard. Allow adequate space to use the mouse comfortably. m Arrange the monitor so the top of the screen is slightly below your eye level when you’re sitting at the keyboard. The best distance from your eyes to the screen is up to you, although most people seem to prefer 18 to 28 inches (45 to 70 cm). m Position the monitor to minimize glare and reflections on the screen from overhead lights and windows. You may want to use a tiltable monitor stand. The stand lets you set the monitor at the best angle for viewing, helping to reduce or eliminate glare from lighting sources you can’t move. Thighs horizontal Shoulders relaxed Screen positioned to avoid reflected glare Forearms and hands in a straight line Forearms level or tilted up slightly Lower back supported Feet flat on the floor Top of the screen at or slightly below eye level (You may need to adjust the height of your monitor by placing something under it or by raising your work surface.) Clearance under work surface 45–70 cm (18–28 in.) 84 Appendix AAvoiding fatigue m Change your seated position, stand up, or stretch whenever you start to feel tired. Frequent short breaks are helpful in reducing fatigue. m Use a light touch when typing or using a mouse and keep your hands and fingers relaxed. m Some computer users may develop discomfort in their hands, wrists, or arms after intensive work without breaks. If you begin to develop chronic pain or discomfort in your hands, wrists, or arms, consult a qualified health specialist. m Allow adequate work space so that you can use your keyboard and mouse comfortably. Place papers or other items so you can view them easily while using your computer. A document stand may make reading papers more comfortable. m Eye muscles must work harder to focus on nearby objects. Occasionally focus your eyes on a distant object, and blink often while you work. m Clean your screen regularly. Keeping the screen clean helps reduce unwanted reflections. What about electromagnetic emissions? There has been recent public discussion of the possible health effects of prolonged exposure to extremely low frequency (ELF) and very low frequency (VLF) electromagnetic fields. Such fields are associated with electromagnetic sources such as television sets, electrical wiring, and some household appliances—as well as computer monitors. Apple has reviewed scientific reports and sought the counsel of government regulatory agencies and respected health organizations. Based on the prevailing evidence and opinions, Apple believes that the electric and magnetic fields produced by computer monitors do not pose a health risk. In response to those customers who wish to reduce their exposure to electromagnetic fields, Apple has lowered the emission levels of our products. We are also actively encouraging further scientific research so we can continue to promote the health and safety of our customers and employees. Health, Safety, and Maintenance Tips 85Safety instructions For your own safety and that of your equipment, always take the following precautions. Turn off the computer completely and disconnect the power plug (by pulling the plug, not the cord) if any of the following conditions exists: m the power cord or plug becomes frayed or otherwise damaged m you spill something into the case m your Macintosh is exposed to rain or any other excess moisture m your Macintosh has been dropped or the case has been otherwise damaged m you suspect that your Macintosh needs service or repair m you want to clean the case (use only the recommended procedure described later in this chapter) Be sure that you always do the following: m Keep your Macintosh away from sources of liquids, such as wash basins, bathtubs, shower stalls, and so on. m Protect your Macintosh from dampness or wet weather, such as rain, snow, and so on. m Read all the installation instructions carefully before you plug your Macintosh into a wall socket. m Keep these instructions handy for reference by you and others. m Follow all instructions and warnings dealing with your system. WARNING Electrical equipment may be hazardous if misused. Operation of this product, or similar products, must always be supervised by an adult. Do not allow children access to the interior of any electrical product and do not permit them to handle any cables. 86 Appendix AHandling your computer equipment Follow these guidelines for handling your computer and its components: m When setting up your computer, place components on a sturdy, flat surface, and carefully follow all setup instructions. m When connecting or disconnecting a cable, always hold the cable by its connector (the plug, not the cord). m Turn off your computer and all its components before connecting or disconnecting any cables to add or remove any component. Failure to do so could seriously damage your equipment. m Never force a connector into a port. If the connector and port do not join with reasonable ease, they probably don’t match. Make sure that the connector matches the port and that you have positioned the connector correctly in relation to the port. m Take care not to spill any food or liquid on the computer, keyboard, mouse, or other components. If you do, turn your computer off immediately and unplug it before cleaning up the spill. Depending on what you spilled and how much of it got into your equipment, you may have to bring your equipment to an Apple-authorized service provider. m Protect the computer and its components from direct sunlight and rain or other moisture. m Keep all ventilation openings clear and unobstructed. Without proper air circulation, components can overheat, causing damage or unreliable operation. WARNING This equipment is intended to be electrically grounded. Your Macintosh is equipped with a three-wire grounding plug—a plug that has a third (grounding) pin. This plug will fit only a grounded AC outlet. This is a safety feature. If you are unable to insert the plug into the outlet, contact a licensed electrician to replace the outlet with a properly grounded outlet. Do not defeat the purpose of the grounding plug! Health, Safety, and Maintenance Tips 87Handling the monitor Follow these procedures for handling a monitor: m Turn down the screen brightness control if you leave the computer turned on for extended periods. If the brightness is not turned down, the image on the screen could “burn in” and damage the screen. You can also use a “screen saver” program, which dims or varies the image on the screen when the computer has been idle for a specified period of time. These programs are available from independent suppliers and user groups. m Make sure that the ventilation openings on the computer and the monitor are clear and unobstructed. m Some large monitors cannot safely be placed on top of the computer. Check the instructions that came with the monitor for setup information. m If there is interference on the monitor’s screen or on a television or radio near your computer, move the affected equipment farther away. Handling the keyboard Take care not to spill any liquid on the keyboard. If you do, turn off your computer immediately. m If you spill liquid that is thin and clear, unplug the keyboard, turn it upside down to let the liquid drain out, and let it dry for 24 hours at room temperature. If, after you take these steps, the keyboard doesn’t work, take it to an Apple-authorized service provider for repair. m If you spill liquid that is greasy, sweet, or sticky, unplug the keyboard and take it to an Apple-authorized service provider for repair. 88 Appendix AHandling floppy disks Handling CD-ROM discs Keep these important safety instructions in mind as you use CD-ROM discs: m Hold a disc by the edges or by one edge and the center hole. Do not touch the disc surface. m To clean discs, wipe the shiny surface with a soft damp cloth, working in straight lines from center to edge. Do not use any form of cleaning agent. 125° F (52° C) 50° F (10° C) Keep disks dry. Do not use a pencil or an eraser on a disk or disk label. Store disks at temperatures between 50° F and 125° F. Do not touch the exposed part of the disk behind the metal shutter. Keep disks away from magnets. Avoid exposing disks to extremely hot temperatures. Health, Safety, and Maintenance Tips 89m To avoid damage to your discs, keep these points in mind: Other important safety instructions to keep in mind as you use your CD-ROM player: m Position your computer so that when the tray opens, it doesn’t bump into anything. m Do not leave the disc tray open. If dust gets on the lens of the CD-ROM drive, the drive may have problems reading your compact discs. m Do not put anything (for instance, a cup) on top of the tray when it is open. m Do not force the tray open by hand. m Do not wipe the lens with a paper towel or other abrasive surface. If you need to clean the lens, see an Apple-authorized service provider for a lens cleaner. m Never transport your computer with a disc inside the CD-ROM drive. m Keep your computer equipment away from any source of liquid (such as wash basins, bathtubs, and shower stalls). If you drink coffee or other beverages while you’re at your computer, take care not to spill. m Avoid exposing your equipment to damp or wet weather. If your system is near a window, be sure the window is closed in rainy weather. Do not put tape on discs. Do not scratch discs. Do not write on discs. Do not spill liquids on discs. Do not get dust on discs. Do not expose discs to direct sunlight. 90 Appendix AThe tray on your CD-ROM drive automatically closes when you shut down your computer. You may want to open the tray and take out your CD-ROM disc before shutting down. Ejecting a disk For instructions on ejecting a floppy disk, a CD-ROM disc, or a removable media disk, see the “Disks” topic of Macintosh Guide, available in the Guide (h) menu. If you can’t eject a floppy disk If you can’t eject a floppy disk in the usual way, try the following in order: m Hold down the x and Shift keys and press the number 1 key on your keyboard to eject a disk in the internal disk drive. m Turn off the computer. If the disk isn’t ejected, then hold down the button on your mouse or other pointing device while you turn the computer on again. m Locate the small hole near the disk drive’s opening, and carefully insert the end of a large straightened paper clip into it. Push gently until the disk is ejected. Do not use excessive force. If nothing works, take the computer or disk drive to your Apple-authorized service provider to have the disk removed. Health, Safety, and Maintenance Tips 91Power supply The power supply in your computer is a high-voltage component and should not be opened for any reason, even when the computer is off. If the power supply needs service, contact your Apple-authorized dealer or service provider. Cleaning your equipment Follow these general rules when cleaning the outside of your computer and its components: m Use a damp, soft, lint-free cloth to clean the computer’s exterior. Avoid getting moisture in any openings. m Don’t use aerosol sprays, solvents, or abrasives. Cleaning the computer case To clean the case, do the following: 1 Turn off the computer completely and then disconnect the power plug. (Pull the plug, not the cord.) 2 Wipe the surfaces lightly with a clean, soft cloth dampened with water. Cleaning the monitor To clean the screen, put household glass cleaner on a soft cloth and wipe the screen. Don’t spray the cleaner directly on the screen, because the liquid might drip into the monitor or computer. Cleaning the mouse The mouse contains a small ball that must roll smoothly for the mouse to work properly. You can keep this ball free of dirt and grease by using the mouse on a clean, lint-free surface and cleaning it occasionally. You need a few cotton swabs and a clean, soft, lint-free cloth. 1 Turn off your computer. 92 Appendix A2 Turn the mouse upside-down and turn the plastic ring on the bottom counterclockwise to disengage it. On some mouse devices, you may need to press the plastic ring (rather than turn it) to disengage it. If you cannot disengage the ring, the mouse may be locked. See the next section, “Locking and Unlocking the Mouse.” 3 Turn the mouse right-side up with one hand and catch the ring and the ball with your other hand. 4 Clean the three small rollers inside the mouse with a cotton swab moistened with water. Rotate the rollers to clean all around them. 5 Wipe the mouse ball with a clean, soft, dry, and lint-free cloth. 6 If necessary, wash the mouse ball with warm soapy water (use a mild soap such as a dishwashing liquid) and then dry the mouse ball thoroughly. 7 Gently blow into the mouse case to remove any dust that has collected there. 8 Put the ball and the ring back in place. Your mouse should roll smoothly across your mouse pad or desk. If it doesn’t, repeat these instructions carefully. Health, Safety, and Maintenance Tips 93Locking and unlocking the mouse Some mouse devices can be locked so that the ball can’t be removed. A locking mouse has a small hole on the plastic ring. To lock the mouse, follow these steps: 1 Insert a straightened paper clip into the hole on the plastic ring. 2 Press down on the paper clip while you turn the ring clockwise. Turn the ring a very short distance, until it stops. When the recessed area on the ring is not lined up with the recessed area surrounding the ring, the mouse is locked. The mouse ring is locked when the recessed area on the ring does not line up with the recessed area surrounding the ring. Recessed area on ring Recessed area surrounding ring Insert a straightened paper clip into this hole. (The hole may be located here on your mouse.) 94 Appendix ATo unlock the mouse, follow these steps: 1 Insert a straightened paper clip into the hole on the plastic ring. 2 Press down on the paper clip while you turn the ring counterclockwise. Turn the ring a very short distance. When the recessed area on the ring is lined up with the recessed area surrounding the ring, the mouse is unlocked. The mouse ring is unlocked when the recessed area on the ring lines up with the recessed area surrounding the ring. Recessed area on ring Recessed area surrounding ring Insert a straightened paper clip into this hole. (The hole may be located here on your mouse.) Health, Safety, and Maintenance Tips 95Expansion cards are printed circuit boards that can be installed in your computer to give it special features, such as enhanced video capabilities, networking and communications, and additional processing power. Your Macintosh has three slots available for the following kinds of expansion cards: m an LC-PDS (processor-direct) slot for most cards m a communications slot for an internal modem or Ethernet card m a video-in slot for a card that brings signals into the computer from a videocassette recorder (VCR), laserdisc player, video camera, or similar device You can also install a TV tuner card that allows you to watch TV on your Macintosh. Video-in slot LC-processor-direct slot (LC-PDS) Communication slot (You may have a communication card—such as an internal modem— installed in this slot.) Vertical plate 97 Appendix B Installing an Expansion Card Read this appendix for instructions on installing an expansion card in your computer. This appendix contains instructions for installing an LC-PDS card or a communication card. To install a video input card or a TV tuner card, follow the instructions that come with the card. Installing an expansion card involves three steps: m opening the computer m inserting the card into a specific slot m closing the computer WARNING To avoid damaging your computer and expansion card, do not attempt to install any expansion card without first checking the documentation for that card. If the documentation specifies that an Apple-certified technician must install the card (usually because the installation requires special training or tools), consult the service and support information that came with your computer for instructions on how to contact an Apple-authorized service provider or Apple for assistance. If you attempt to install the card yourself, any damage you may cause to the computer or card will not be covered by the limited warranty on your computer. If the card is not an Apple-labeled product, check with an Apple-authorized dealer or service provider to see if you can install it yourself. 98 Appendix BOpening the computer 1 Shut down your computer by choosing Shut Down from the Special menu. You can also press the Power key on the keyboard. 2 Unplug all the cables except the power cord from your computer. Leaving the power cord plugged in helps protect the computer from electrostatic discharge. IMPORTANT To avoid generating static electricity that may damage components, do not walk around the room until you have completed the installation of the expansion card and closed the computer. Additionally, move the logic board as little as possible while it is outside the computer case. 3 Place your thumbs on the two tabs at the top of the computer’s back panel, and press down. 4 Pulling gently, swing the panel down, and slip it out. Remove the back panel. Installing an Expansion Card 995 If there are security screws on the vertical plate on the back of the computer, remove them with a screwdriver. 6 Unplug the power cord from your computer. 7 Swing the handle out from its storage position. Then grasp the handle and gently but firmly pull it toward you. The vertical plate and the logic board to which it’s attached slide all the way out of the computer. Carefully support the logic board as it comes out, and put it on a clean, flat, stable surface. What you do next depends on the type of expansion card you want to install. If there are security screws, remove both screws from the vertical plate. 100 Appendix BInstalling an LC-PDS card 1 If your LC-PDS card has ports for connecting equipment, remove the plastic access cover from the vertical plate. 2 Remove the LC-PDS card from its static-proof bag. Hold the card by its edges to avoid touching any connectors on the card. 3 Align the card over the LC-PDS slot. LC-PDS access port LC-processor-direct slot (LC-PDS) Vertical plate Squeeze the two plastic tabs together and pull off the metal retainer so the access cover can come off. LC-processor-direct slot (LC-PDS) Vertical plate Metal retainer Installing an Expansion Card 1014 Press down on the card until the connector is solidly in place. Don’t force the card. If you meet resistance, pull the card out and try again. To see if the card is properly connected, lift it gently. If it resists and stays in place, it’s connected. Installing a communication card Some Macintosh computers come with a communication card already installed. 1 If your communication card has ports for connecting equipment, remove the plastic access cover from the vertical plate. 2 Remove the communication card from its static-proof bag. Hold the card by its edges to avoid touching any connectors on the card. Communication slot Push the two plastic tabs apart and pull off the metal retainer so the access cover can come off. Vertical plate Metal retainer 102 Appendix B3 Align the card over the communication slot. The communication slot is the rightmost slot on the logic board. 4 Press down on the card until the connector is solidly in place. Don’t force the card. If you meet resistance, pull the card out and try again. To see if the card is properly connected, lift it gently. If it resists and stays in place, it’s connected. Communication slot Vertical plate Communication card access hole Installing an Expansion Card 103Closing the computer 1 Slip the base of the logic board into the guide rails inside the computer case and swing the handle back into its storage position. Make sure the logic board slides into the guides that are on both sides of the computer’s interior. Swing the handle up, into its storage position. 104 Appendix B2 Press the reset button on the logic board, and then slide the logic board back into the computer. When you press the reset button, some of your computer’s software settings will change. You may want to open the control panels for the date and time, keyboard, and mouse to make sure that they are set the way you want them. For more information about working with control panels, see the “Setting Options” topic of Macintosh Guide, available in the Guide (h) menu. 3 If you removed security screws earlier, reinsert them now. Reinstall security screws here. 1 Press the reset button. 2 Gently but firmly push on the vertical plate until the logic board is solidly back in place. Installing an Expansion Card 1054 Slip the three hooks at the base of the back panel into the grooves on the computer case. 5 Swing the back panel up and snap it into place. 6 Plug the cables back into the computer. 7 Reconnect the power cord. Your computer is now ready to turn on and use. WARNING Never turn on your computer unless all of its internal and external parts are in place. Operating the computer when it is open or missing parts can be dangerous, and can damage your computer. Snap the plastic back panel into place. Slip the three hooks on the back panel into the grooves in the computer case. 106 Appendix B107 Your computer keyboard contains certain special keys that typewriter keyboards don’t have. Many of these keys allow you to give commands to the computer without using the mouse. For example, in many application programs, pressing the x (Command) key at the same time as the Q key lets you quit a program. The following table describes what you can do with the special keys on your keyboard. The special keys on your keyboard depend on the model of keyboard you have; some keyboards do not have all the keys listed. Special keys on Apple keyboards Arrow keys Use to move the insertion point, as an alternative to using the pointer. In some programs, the arrow keys have other functions. Caps Lock key Use to capitalize a series of letters (numbers and symbols aren’t affected). Clear key Use to delete the current selection (or use the Delete key). In some programs, Clear has other functions. x (Command) key Use in combination with other keys as an alternative to choosing a menu command. continued . num lock clear caps lock Read this appendix to learn how to use the special keys on your keyboard. Appendix C Special Keys on Your KeyboardSpecial keys on Apple keyboards (continued) Control key In combination with other keys, this key provides shortcuts or modifies other actions. Delete key Use to delete selected material, or the character to the left of the insertion point. Enter key In a dialog box, pressing Enter is the same as clicking the outlined button. In some programs, pressing this key confirms information you have provided. Escape key The function of this key depends on the program you’re using. Function keys Some programs allow you to use the 12 function keys to give commands. You can assign commands or action sequences to function keys with special utility programs. Option key Use in combination with other keys to produce special characters or modify actions. Numeric keys Use to produce numbers and mathematical symbols; some programs use these keys as function keys to initiate actions. Power key On some models, press to turn on the computer. Also press to shut down the computer on certain models. Return key Use to move the insertion point to the beginning of the next line. In a dialog box, pressing Return is the same as clicking the outlined button. Shift key Use to produce capital letters (or the upper character on the key). Tab key Use to move the insertion point to the next stopping place (such as a tab stop or field in a dialog box or program). Other special keys The function of these keys depends on the operating system and program you’re using. help home end ins del page up page down tab shift return num lock clear = / * 7 4 0 8 5 2 9 6 3 enter 1 . option alt F1 esc enter delete control 108 Appendix CTyping special characters and symbols You can type a variety of international and other special symbols and characters (including characters with diacritical marks, such as accents) by pressing combinations of keys. The Key Caps program, which is installed with your system software, shows you the characters produced when you type certain keys and key combinations in the fonts available on your computer. Choose Key Caps from the Apple (K) menu, then choose the font from the Key Caps menu. To have Key Caps show more options for special characters, press each of these keys or key combinations: Option, Shift, Shift-Option, Shift-x, and Option-x. If you press the Option key, Key Caps outlines lightly the keys that you can use in combination with letter keys to type letters with accents or other diacritical marks. Special Keys on Your Keyboard 109 Characters appear here when you press keys on the keyboard or click them in the window. Characters available in the Chicago font The highlighted key represents the key held down on the keyboard—in this case, the Option key. Characters available in the Chicago font when the Option key is pressedIf you see rectangles: If you see rectangles instead of diacritical marks on some of the pictures of keys in Key Caps, try pressing Option-x to see the diacritical marks. However, you only need to use the Option key (not Option-x) in combination with the other keys to type letters with diacritical marks. If you press the Option key at the same time as a key for a specific diacritical mark and then release both keys, Key Caps outlines in bold the keys for letters that can be typed with that mark. (You’ll see that most key combinations for diacritical marks can be used with the Space bar as well as letter keys—producing the mark without a letter.) The most common diacritical marks and how to create them are summarized next. Diacritical mark Key combination Grave accent ( ` ) Option–`, then type the character Acute accent ( ´ ) Option–e, then type the character Circumflex (^) Option–i, then type the character Tilde (~) Option–n, then type the character Umlaut ( ¨ ) Option–u, then type the character The letter “c” with a cedilla (ç) Option–c m To type a letter or a space with a specific diacritical mark, press the Option key and the key for the mark simultaneously. Then type the letter that needs the mark. If you are having trouble getting a mark and letter to appear together, try again. Be sure to press the Option key before (or at the same time as) the key for the mark; then, after you release both keys, type the letter to be marked. Special key combinations If difficulties with your mouse or computer don’t allow you to use standard methods of quitting a program or restarting your computer, you can try using these special key combinations. To do this . . . . . . press this key combination Force a program to quit x-Option-Esc Force the computer to restart x-Control–Power 110 Appendix CA accent marks, key combinations for 109–110 active program, checkmark indicating 37 acute accent, key combinations for 110 answers. See help AppleCD Audio Player program 45 ejecting CDs using 43, 65 unable to hear discs played with 68 Apple customer support hotline 15 Apple Desktop Bus (ADB) icon 6 Apple Desktop Bus (ADB) port 6, 7, 30 troubleshooting keyboard problems and 61 Apple Ethernet media adapter 34 Apple Extras folder answers to questions in 15 application programs in 35 Apple menu AppleCD Audio Player program in 45 Key Caps program in 109–110 Shut Down command in 14 Apple PlainTalk Microphone x, 29 connecting 31 AppleTalk Phase 2 Protocols, for Ethernet communication 34 Apple Video Player program 35 Application menu 13 active programs listed in 37 Hide Others on 38 Show All on 38 switching among programs using 37 application programs 35–39 active 37 backing up 38–39 crashing. See “bomb” icon/message forcing to quit 51, 110 hiding and showing windows for 38 incompatible 36, 59, 70 increasing memory for 33 installing 36 “native” 39, 64 older Macintosh, problems working with 39, 64 open 37 opening DOS documents from 63 for PowerPC microprocessor ix, 39, 64 pre-installed 35 quitting unexpectedly 58 switching among 37 troubleshooting 58 unable to find or open 64 unable to start 58 working with several at a time 37–38 111 Indexarrow keys 107 arrow pointer “frozen” (not moving) 49, 60 moving with mouse 12–13 arrows, scroll 13 At Ease (alternative desktop), returning to Macintosh desktop from 65 audio compact discs (CDs) 41, 44 playing 45 troubleshooting problems with 68 Audio In port, on external speaker 32 audio tracks on CD-ROM discs 44, 45, 68 opening data files and 68 unable to hear 68 B backing up 38 back panel, removing 99 backup copy making 38 restoring information from 39 Balloon Help 26 basic skills with mouse 12–13 tutorial for teaching 12–13 blank screen (dark screen) 53 at startup 9, 10 blinking question mark icon 54, 79 when starting up from CD-ROM disc 72 body position, for computer use 83–84 “bomb” icon/message 51, 59 Photo CD causing 69 booting up. See starting up brightness control 10, 53 avoiding screen “burn in” and 88 C cables for Ethernet network connection 34 handling 87 keyboard x monitor x with stereo miniplug 32 Caps Lock key 107 carpal tunnel syndrome, computer use and 82 CD. See compact disc CD-ROM disc 41–48. See also compact disc; Macintosh Performa CD audio tracks on 44, 45, 68 automatically ejected without error message 67 avoiding startup from 65, 66 cleaning 67, 89 document on won’t open 67 ejecting 43, 65–66, 91 handling 89–91 inserting 42 not recognized as Macintosh 67 shared 43, 48, 65 software for nonstandard formats for 44 standard file formats for 44 starting up from 72–74 troubleshooting problems with 66–68 CD-ROM disc icon 42 ejecting disc and 43, 65–66 not appearing on screen 65 not on desktop 43, 66 CD-ROM drive/player 29, 41–48. See also CD-ROM disc; compact disc failure of tray to open and 65–66 Open/Close button for 29, 42, 43 replacing 34 safety warning about vii troubleshooting problems with 65–66 112 Indexcedilla, key combinations for 110 chair, for maximum comfort 83 chips, memory. See memory circumflex, key combinations for 110 cleaning computer equipment 92–93 Clear key 107 clock, troubleshooting problems with 53 close box 13 closing the computer 104–106 color icons, for images on Photo CD, not displayed 69 Command key 107 in Key Caps program 109, 110 Command-Option-Esc, for restarting computer 51 communication card, installing 102–103 communication slot 97, 102, 103 communications regulation information vi-vii compact disc. See also CD-ROM disc audio 41, 44, 45, 68 cleaning 67, 89 handling 89–91 Photo 41, 45, 46–48 types that can be used 44–45 compact disc read-only memory disc. See CD-ROM disc compact disc read-only memory drive/player. See CD-ROM drive/player computer case, cleaning 92 computer/computer system x, 29 arranging components of 1, 3, 7, 83–84 basic 29 cleaning 92–93 closing 104–106 connecting additional hardware to 8, 29–34 disconnecting before attempting repair 30, 60, 66, 87 handling 87–92 health-related information about use of 81–85 opening 99–100 performance decreases and 70 setting up 1–11 troubleshooting problems with 49–79 turning off 11, 14 turning on 8–9 computer “crash.” See “bomb” icon/message computer power cord x connecting 2 computer power socket 2 connecting. See also installing additional equipment 8, 29–34 Apple PlainTalk Microphone 31 cables, safety precautions for 87 computer power cord 2 external speakers 32–33 keyboard 7 keyboard cable 7 to local area network 33–34 monitor 3–5 monitor cable 5 monitor power cord 3–4 mouse and keyboard 6–7 contrast control (screen) 53 Control key 108 control panels Easy Access 61 Extensions Manager, for turning off extensions 59, 70 incompatible 59, 70 Memory 39, 58, 64, 70 Network, changing for Ethernet use 34 PC Exchange, for opening DOS document 62, 63 resetting after installing expansion card 105 Index 113copying for backup 38 System Folder, warning about 36 crash. See “bomb” icon/message cumulative trauma disorders (CTDs), computer use and 82 cursor. See pointer cursor keys. See arrow keys customer support hotline 15 D damaged disk, repairing 71–77 checking for damage and 75 with Disk First Aid program 76–77 starting up from CD-ROM disc and 72–74 dark screen (blank screen) 53 at startup 9, 10 data recovery programs 77. See also Disk First Aid program date. See clock Delete key 108 deleting by dragging item to Trash 13 with Zero Out Data command 78 desktop 9 At Ease (alternative), returning to Macintosh desktop from 65 hiding and showing windows on 38 pictorial buttons on instead of usual appearance 65 rebuilding 52, 56, 62 starting up from CD-ROM disc and 73 diacritical marks, key combinations for 109–110 disconnecting computer 86 before attempting repair 30, 60, 66, 87 disc tray (CD), failure to open 65–66 disk. See floppy disk; hard disk disk drive. See floppy disk drive; hard disk drive Disk First Aid icon 76 Disk First Aid program 76–77 disk icon with “X,” troubleshooting 55 disk repair programs 77. See also Disk First Aid program DOC statement vii documents backing up 38 on CD-ROM disc, unable to open 67 unable to find or open 62, 63 DOS disk formatting for use in Macintosh 57 unreadable 57 DOS document problems using 63 unable to open 62, 63 Drive Setup program hard disk icon doesn’t appear 56 initializing a hard disk 77–78 testing a hard disk 75 E Easy Access control panel 61 Eject CD command 43, 65 ejecting CD-ROM discs 43, 65–66, 67, 91 floppy disks 36, 91 electrical grounding 2, 87 electrical safety 86 electromagnetic emissions 85 electronic mail (e mail), PowerTalk providing 35 Empty Trash command, in Special menu 13 Enter key 108 erasing disks. See initializing by dragging item to Trash 13 error messages, responding to 50. See also troubleshooting Escape key 108 Ethernet card 33, 34 Ethernet network, connecting to 33–34 114 IndexEtherTalk Phase 2 protocols, for Ethernet communication 34 exiting forcing, for program with problem 51, 110 quitting unexpectedly and 58 expansion cards, installing 3, 97–106 closing computer after 104–106 a communication card 102–103 an LC-PDS card 101–102 opening computer for 99–100 safety warning about 98 extensions, system performance decreases and 70 startup problems and 56, 59 Extensions Manager control panel, for turning off extensions 59, 70 external stereo speakers, connecting 32–33 extremely low frequency (ELF) electromagnetic fields 85 eye fatigue, computer use and 83 F fatigue, avoiding 85 FCC statement vi Ethernet card use and 34 file formats for CD-ROM discs 44 not recognized by Macintosh 67 problems with 67–68 files backing up 38 on CD-ROM discs 67–68 file-sharing in System 7.5, for sharing CD-ROM disc 48 Finder Macintosh Guide in 25 making active program 18, 25 floating-point unit (FPU) 58 floppy disc icon, with an “X,” troubleshooting 55 floppy disk backing up 38 ejecting 36, 91 formatting on DOS computer for use in Macintosh 57 handling 89 inserting 36 rebuilding desktop of 52 reinitializing 77 repairing 76–77 startup problems and 55 unreadable 57 floppy disk drive 29 replacing 34 folders Apple Extras 15, 35 System, warning about copying from application program 36 fonts, in QuickDraw GX program 35 foreign characters, Key Caps program for 109–110 formatting. See also initializing on DOS computer for use in Macintosh 57 FPU. See floating-point unit “frozen” pointer 49, 60 “frozen” screen 49 Function keys 108 G glare, eliminating 84 graphics, Photo CD images as source of 46 grave accent, key combinations for 110 grounding plug 2, 87 Guide menu 13, 15, 17–25 Drive Setup Guide in 56 icon for 17 Macintosh Guide in 18–25 Shortcuts in 27 Show/Hide Balloons in 26 Index 115H hard disk backing up 38 checking for damage on 75 initializing 77–78 installing application programs on 36 installing/reinstalling system software on 54, 79 rebuilding desktop of 52, 56, 62 reinitializing 77–78 repairing 71–77 hard disk drive (internal) 29 replacing 34 hard disk icon 13 not on desktop 56, 71 hardware. See also computer/computer system for Ethernet connection 34 headphone jack 29 health-related information 81–85 help 17–28. See also Guide menu; troubleshooting Balloon 26 from Macintosh Guide 18–25. See also Macintosh Guide Shortcuts and 27–28 sources of 15 HFS (Hierarchical File System) format for CD-ROM discs 44 Hide Balloons command, in Guide menu 26 Hide Others command, in Application menu 38 hiding windows 38 Hierarchical File System (HFS) format for CD-ROM discs 44 High Sierra format for CD-ROM discs 44 problems using discs with 67–68 hotline, customer support 15 “Huh?” button 25 I icons 13 Apple Desktop Bus (ADB) 6 blinking question mark 54, 72, 79 “bomb” 51, 59, 69 CD-ROM disc 42, 43, 65–66 CD-ROM player 65 color, for images on Photo CD, not displayed 69 disk, with an “X” 55 Disk First Aid 76 Drive Setup 75, 78 Guide menu 17 hard disk 13, 56, 71 Macintosh Performa CD 74 not appearing correctly on screen 56 “sad Macintosh” 55 Trash 13 identifying screen objects 26 image “burn in,” avoiding 88 incompatibility, software 36, 59, 70. See also software compatibility Index button, in Macintosh Guide window 19, 21–22 initializing. See also formatting floppy disk 77 internal hard disk (reinitializing) 77–78 inserting CD-ROM disc 42 floppy disk 36 installing. See also connecting additional memory 33 application programs 36 communication card 102–103 expansion cards 3, 97–106 internal drives 34 LC-processor-direct slot (PDS) card 101–102 system software 54, 79 116 Indexinsufficient memory 58, 69, 70 performance decreases and 70 for Photo CDs 69 for PowerPC applications 39 interference, on monitor screen/radio/television 88 internal drives, installing 34 internal hard disk. See hard disk internal modem 30 international symbols/characters, key combinations for 109–110 ISO 9660 format for CD-ROM discs 44 problems with discs using 67–68 J jack, headphone 29 K keyboard x, 29 adjusting angle of 7 connecting 7 handling 88 liquid spills on 88 no response to typing on 61–62 positioning 7, 83–84 Power key on 8, 14 special keys on 107–108 troubleshooting problems with 61–62 keyboard cable x connecting 7 keyboard shortcuts 27–28 Key Caps program, in Apple menu 109–110 key combinations, special 110 keys, special 107–108 L LAN. See local area network Launcher opening applications from 35 putting program into 36 Service/Support area of 15 at startup 9 LC-processor-direct slot (LC-PDS) 97, 101 LC-processor-direct slot (PDS) card 30 access cover for 30 installing 101–102 libraries, shared 64 local area network connecting to 33–34 PowerTalk program for 35 locking mouse 94–95 “lock up,” keyboard (no response to typing) 61–62 logic board removing 100 replacing 104–105 Look For button, in Macintosh Guide window 19, 23–24 M Macintosh desktop 9 hiding and showing windows on 38 pictorial buttons on instead of usual appearance 65 rebuilding 52, 56, 62 returning to from At Ease 65 starting up from CD-ROM disc and 73 Macintosh Guide 18–25 tips for using 25 Macintosh Guide window 18–19 Index button in 19, 21–22 Look For button in 19, 23–24 moving 18, 25 Topics button in 19, 19–20 Index 117Macintosh Performa system 29. See also computer/computer system Macintosh Performa CD 38, 39. See also CD-ROM disc backup copies on 39 checking for damaged disk with 75 reinitializing hard disk with 77–78 reinstalling system software from 54, 79 repairing damaged disk with 54, 76–77 starting up from 72–74 startup problems with 74 Macintosh Performa CD icon, not on screen 74 Macintosh programs. See also application programs older, problems working with 39, 64 for PowerPC microprocessor 39 Macintosh Shortcuts 27–28 MacTCP software, for Ethernet communication 34 mailbox, PowerTalk providing 35 media adapter, Apple Ethernet 34 memory expanding 33, 70 insufficient 39, 58, 69, 70 requirements for for special programs 35 virtual 58, 70 Memory control panel older Macintosh programs and 39, 64 virtual memory and 58, 70 menu bar 13 microphone x, 29 connecting 31 microprocessor, PowerPC ix application programs designed for 39 miniplug, stereo 32 modem, internal 30 modem port 30 Modern Memory Manager, older Macintosh programs and 39, 64 monitor x, 29. See also screen display adjusting angle of 3, 84 cleaning 92 connecting 3–5 electromagnetic emissions and 85 handling 88 positioning 3, 84, 88 troubleshooting problems with 53 turning on 8 monitor brightness control 10, 53 avoiding screen “burn in” and 88 monitor cable x, 5 connecting 5 monitor control buttons for brightness 10, 53, 88 for contrast 53 monitor port 5, 30 monitor power cord x connecting 3–4 monitor power socket 4 mouse x, 29 cleaning 92–93 connecting keyboard to ADB port on 6 locking and unlocking 94–95 positioning of for maximum comfort 84 troubleshooting problems with 60 using 12–13 mouse cable, connecting 6 mouse shortcuts 27–28 multisession discs 47 musculoskeletal discomfort, computer use and 82 118 IndexN “native” applications 39 shared libraries needed for 64 network backing up and 38 CD-ROM disc shared over 43, 48, 65 connecting to 33–34 PowerTalk program for 35 Network control panel, changing for Ethernet use 34 numeric keys 108 O office furniture and equipment, arranging 83–84 on/off switch. See power button Open/Close button, on CD-ROM drive 29, 42, 43 opening the computer 99–100 open programs, identifying 37 open windows, hiding and showing 38 Option key 108 in Key Caps program 109, 110 P PC Exchange control panel, for opening DOS document 62, 63 PDS expansion card. See LC-processordirect slot (PDS) card Performa system x, 29 connecting additional hardware to 8, 29–34 performance decreases 70 Performa Tutorial, for learning basics 9, 12–13 Photo compact discs (CDs) 41, 45 obtaining 47 opening 47 resolution of 47–48 system errors caused by 69 troubleshooting problems with 69 unable to open 69 working with 46–48 photographs, putting on Photo CD 47 pictures, on CD. See Photo compact discs PlainTalk Microphone x, 29 connecting 31 plugging in computer 1–2 pointer “frozen” (not moving) 49, 60 moving with mouse 12–13 ports Apple Desktop Bus (ADB) 6, 7, 30, 61 Audio In, on external speaker 32 modem 30 monitor 5, 30 printer 30 SCSI 30 security lock 30 sound input 30, 31 sound output 30, 31, 32 posture, for maximum comfort while using computer 83–84 power button (standby power button) 2, 30, 51 power cord computer x, 2 monitor x, 3–4 Power key 8, 14, 108 power-on light 29 PowerPC microprocessor ix application programs designed for 39 software affecting performance of 70 power socket computer 2 monitor 4 power supply, safety precautions and 92 PowerTalk program 35 pre-installed application programs 35 printer port 30 printing, QuickDraw GX program enhancing 35 programs. See application programs Put Away command 43 Index 119Q question mark, Guide menu identified by 17 question mark icon, blinking 54, 79 when starting up from CD-ROM disc 72 questions. See help; troubleshooting QuickDraw GX program 35 QuickTime 45 quitting application special key combinations for 51, 110 unexpectedly 58 R radio interference vi, 88 random-access memory (RAM). See also memory expanding 33 requirements for for special programs 35 rebuilding desktop 52, 56, 62 recording, from audio CD, troubleshooting problems with 68 recovery programs 77. See also Disk First Aid program rectangles, instead of diacritical marks, in Key Caps 110 Reduced Instruction Set Computing (RISC) technology ix reinitializing disks 77–78 reinstalling system software 54, 79 remote control sensor 29 repairing damaged disk 71–77 checking for damage and 75 with Disk First Aid program 76–77 starting up from CD-ROM disc and 72–74 repetitive stress injuries (RSIs), computer use and 82 reset button, on logic board 105 resolution, viewing Photo CDs and 47–48 Restart command, in Special menu or dialog box 51 restarting computer after “bomb” message 59 eliminating problems by 51 problems with, with CD-ROM disc in player 66 with special key combination 51, 110 restoring information from backup copy 39 Return key 108 RSIs. (repetitive stress injuries) 82 S “sad Macintosh” icon 55 safety instructions 86 CD-ROM drive vii disconnecting computer 30, 60, 66, 86, 87 grounding plug 2, 87 power supply 92 saving changes to information on CD-ROM disc 67 scanning disk for defects 75 screen control buttons for brightness 10, 53, 88 for contrast 53 screen display. See also monitor adjusting light and dark on 10, 53, 88 blank 9, 10, 53 “bomb” on 51, 59, 69 identifying objects on 26 introductory 9 pointer freezing on 49, 60 protecting from “burn in” 88 at startup 9 screen saver 88 causing screen to go dark 53 120 Indexscroll arrows 13 SCSI chain, incorrect termination of, start up problems caused by 71 SCSI devices, troubleshooting problems with 54, 71 SCSI ID numbers, incorrect setting of CD-ROM player problems and 65 missing hard disk icon and 56, 71 SCSI port 30 searching, for help topics, with Look For button 23–24 security lock port 30 security screws 100, 105 Service/Support area, of Launcher 15 service and support (customer support) 15 setting up the computer 1–11 connecting additional equipment 8, 29–34 connecting monitor 3–5 connecting mouse and keyboard 6–7 connecting to network 33–34 plugging computer in 1–2 turning computer on 8–9 shared CD-ROM disc 48 ejecting 43, 65 shared libraries 64 Shift key 108 in Key Caps program 109 Shortcuts 27–28 Show All command, in Application menu 38 Show Balloons command, in Guide menu 26 showing windows on desktop 38 Shut Down command in Apple menu 14 in Special menu 14 Shut Down message 14 shutting computer down. See turning computer off SimpleText program 47 single-session discs 47 size box 13 Small Computer System Interface. See SCSI devices software. See application programs; system software software compatibility 36, 59, 70 Extensions Manager control panel and 59, 70 floating-point unit (FPU) message and 58 older Macintosh programs and 39, 64 performance decreases and 70 sound adjusting 33 recording from audio CD, troubleshooting problems with 68 sound control (volume control) buttons 29, 33 sound input port 30, 31 sound output port 30, 31, 32 space, diacritical mark with, key combinations for 110 speakers, external, connecting 32–33 special characters, key combinations for 109–110 special key combinations 110 special keys 107–108 Special menu Empty Trash command in 13 Restart command in 51 Shut Down command in 14 speed, decreases in 70 spills, handling keyboard and 88 standard file formats for CD-ROM discs 44 standby power button (power button) 2, 30, 51 starting over. See restarting computer starting up 8–9 from CD-ROM disc 72–74 troubleshooting problems with 10, 54, 55, 71, 79 startup disk. See also starting up rebuilding desktop of 52, 56 Index 121static electricity 99 stereo miniplug, for connecting external speakers 32 stereo speakers, external, connecting 32–33 storage devices, internal, installing 34 support, customer 15 switching among application programs 37 symbols, key combinations for 109–110 system error. See “bomb” icon/message system extensions, incompatible performance decreases and 70 startup problems and 56, 59 System Folder, warning about copying from application program 36 system software installing/reinstalling, with Macintosh Performa CD 54, 79 problems with 54, 55, 71, 79 T Tab key 108 TCP/IP protocols, for Ethernet communication 34 television interference with reception on vi, 88 watching on computer 35 three-wire grounding plug 2, 87 tilde, key combinations for 110 time. See clock title bar 13 Topics button, in Macintosh Guide window 19, 19–20 Trash, emptying 13 Trash icon 13 troubleshooting 49–79. See also help for application program problems 58, 64 for blank screen 53 for blinking question mark icon 54, 72, 79 for “bomb” message 59, 69 for CD-ROM disc ejection problems 43, 65–66 for CD-ROM problems 65–69 for clock problems 53 for disk icon with “X” on startup 55 disk repair and 71–77 for document that can’t be found or opened 62, 63 for DOS document problems 63 for floating-point unit (FPU) missing message 59 for floppy disk ejection problems 91 for floppy disk that’s unreadable 57 Guide menu for 17–25 for hard disk damage 75, 76–77 for hard disk icon not on desktop 56, 71 for icons incorrect on screen 56 information sources and 15 initializing/reinitializing hard disk and 77–78 for keyboard problems 61–62 for mouse problems 60 for older Macintosh programs 39, 64 for performance decreases 70 for pointer “frozen” (not moving) 49, 60 rebuilding desktop and 52, 56, 62 repairing damaged disk and 71–77 for “sad Macintosh” icon 55 for screen dark 53 for screen “frozen” 49 for shared library missing 64 starting over and 51 starting up from CD-ROM disc and 72–74 for startup problems 10, 54, 55 for unreadable DOS disk 57 122 Indexturning computer off 11, 14 before attempting repair 30, 60, 66, 86, 87 before connecting equipment 30 turning computer on 8–9 turning monitor on 8 tutorial program, for learning basics 9, 12–13 TV. See television TV tuner card 30, 98 Apple Video Player and 35 typing. See also keyboard nothing produced on screen by 61–62 special characters and symbols 109–110 U umlaut, key combinations for 110 unlocking mouse 94–95 unreadable DOS disk 57 V VCCI statement vii version numbers, for using CD-ROM discs 67–68 vertical plate 97, 100, 102 very low frequency (VLF) electromagnetic fields 85 video, watching on computer 35 video input card 30, 98 Apple Video Player and 35 video-in slot 97 virtual memory 58, 70 volume, in AppleCD Audio Player 68 volume buttons 29, 33 W, X, Y, Z warranty considerations, installing additional RAM and 33 windows 13. See also specific type of windows hiding and showing on desktop 38 work area, arranging 83–84 wrist problems, computer use and 82 Index 123Apple Computer, Inc. 1 Infinite Loop Cupertino, California 95014-2084 408.996.1010 030-8236-A Printed in U.S.A. ð About This Guide This guide tells you how to configure your Workgroup Server, use software programs, use its built-in CD-ROM drive and optional tape-backup unit, and troubleshoot hardware and software problems. For information about your server’s hardware, see the setup guide that came with your server. About your Workgroup Server and Power Macintosh software Your Workgroup Server is powered by the PowerPC™ microprocessor (or “chip”). This microprocessor was designed by Apple Computer, Inc., Motorola, Inc., and IBM Corporation. The PowerPC microprocessor uses Reduced Instruction Set Computer (RISC) technology to deliver very high performance at the lowest possible cost. The PowerPC RISC microprocessor represents the state of the art in microprocessor design. Your Workgroup Server will run almost all of your existing Macintosh software, but for best performance and greatest speed, look for software programs designed especially for Power Macintosh computers. Who should read this guide This guide is intended for the person who administers the server on a dayto-day basis. You should be familiar with basic Macintosh terms, concepts, and techniques. If you’re new to the Macintosh environment, see Appendix A, “Getting Help,” after you turn on your server system. You also need to know some details of your existing network to choose the appropriate procedures for connecting the server to your network. 1What this guide contains Here’s a brief summary of what you’ll find in this guide: m Chapter 1, “Configuring Your Server,” describes how to set the system time and date, how to choose a printer, how to configure your monitor, and how to configure the Energy Saver control panel so that your server restarts automatically after a power failure. m Chapter 2, “Configuring Your Network Connection,” explains when you need to configure your network connection and how to do it. This chapter also describes Open Transport and the features of the AppleTalk and TCP/IP control panels. m Chapter 3, “Using Application Software,” discusses running Power Macintosh software and server application programs. m Chapter 4, “Managing Hard Disks,” describes routine maintenance procedures associated with hard disk drives. This chapter also explains how to reinstall system software. m Chapter 5, “Using the CD-ROM Drive,” explains how to use the built-in CD-ROM drive. m Chapter 6, “Using a DAT Drive and Tape Cassettes,” explains the use of the optional DAT drive and describes the types of tape cassettes that are appropriate for use with the drive. m Chapter 7, “Troubleshooting,” helps you solve problems with the server. m Appendix A, “Getting Help,” describes how to use the various kinds of on-screen help available in the Guide menu. m Appendix B, “Special Keys on Your Keyboard,” describes the use of key combinations as shortcuts for menu commands and alternatives to using the mouse. m Appendix C, “Obtaining Updated Apple Software,” explains how to obtain software updates from a variety of online services. 2How to use this guide If you are new to Macintosh: Refer to Appendix A, “Getting Help,” to learn how to use the features of Mac OS and application programs. Configure your server’s system software. See Chapter 1, “Configuring Your Server,” for information about how to configure your server’s system software for optimal performance. If necessary, configure your server’s network connection. Your server automatically uses the built-in Ethernet port for AppleTalk connections. See Chapter 2, “Configuring Your Network Connection,” for information about how to configure your server to use a different port for AppleTalk or how to configure your server’s TCP/IP network connections. Learn about application software. See Chapter 3, “Using Application Software,” for information about Power Macintosh programs and the shared libraries that they use and for information about running older Macintosh programs. See Appendix C for information about obtaining updates for Apple software products. Learn about hard disk management. See Chapter 4, “Managing Hard Disks,” for information about initializing hard disks and installing system software. Familiarize yourself with the server’s built-in CD-ROM drive and optional DAT drive. See Chapter 5, “Using the CD-ROM Drive,” and Chapter 6, “Using a DAT Drive and Tape Cassettes.” Review troubleshooting techniques. See Chapter 7, “Troubleshooting,” for steps you can take to prevent the occurrence of problems and for solutions when problems occur. 3For on-screen help and information There are several valuable sources of help and information that you can view directly on your server’s monitor screen, as described in this section. Workgroup Server Read Me It’s important that you read the Workgroup Server Read Me file, which contains late-breaking information about your server. This file is located on the server’s hard disk and on the Workgroup Server Software CD-ROM disc. You may want to print this file for future reference. The Guide menu Starting with Mac OS version 7.5, you have instant access to new kinds of help when using your system and application programs. You can see your options in the Guide (h) menu in the upper-right corner of the screen. You’ll find the instructions available in Macintosh Guide particularly useful when you have questions or encounter problems with your system software. For more details on the types of on-screen help available, refer to Appendix A, “Getting Help,” and explore your options in the Guide menu. Workgroup Server Electronic Library For your convenience, electronic versions of your server’s documentation are provided on your server’s hard disk and on the Workgroup Server Software CD-ROM disc. You’ll find these documents in a folder called the WS Electronic Library. You’ll find on-screen help available in the document. 4The WS Electronic Library folder contains electronic versions of the following documents: m this book, the Administrator’s Guide, in an Adobe™ Acrobat file that has been specially formatted for easy on-screen readability m other user’s guides for software that may have come with your server Other reference material In addition to this guide, you may need to consult the following sources of information. m For information about your server’s hardware setup and capabilities, see the setup guide that came with your server. m For late-breaking information about your server and system software, see the Workgroup Server Read Me file, located on the server’s hard disk and on the Workgroup Server Software CD-ROM disc. m For information about server application programs included with your Workgroup Server, such as Apple RAID Software and Retrospect Remote, refer to the documentation for those programs included in the server accessory kit. m A number of network services, such as AppleShare, AppleSearch, and Apple Remote Access, may be included with your server or can be installed on your server. Refer to the documentation included with those services for installation and operation information. m If you purchased an Apple Internet Server, see the setup booklet included in the Apple Internet Server Solution for the World Wide Web package. m If you need a better understanding of how to configure your network, the following books from Apple Computer, published by Addison Wesley, are available at computer bookstores: Understanding Computer Networks gives an overview of networking basics. Planning and Managing AppleTalk Networks provides in-depth information on setting up, maintaining, and troubleshooting AppleTalk networks. 5Where to find answers When you have questions about using your server, there are several places you can look for answers. In this book Use this book to help you set up your server and learn about it, or to find solutions to problems with your equipment. In the setup guide Use this book to help you set up and expand your server system, and to connect it to a network. Also use this book to check your server’s technical specifications. In the Read Me files Your Workgroup Server’s startup disk and the Workgroup Server Software CD-ROM disc contain several SimpleText documents that are known as Read Me files. Read Me files contain important information about your server and its software that may not be included in the setup guide or the administrator’s guide. In the Guide menu The Guide menu (marked with the h icon) is your main source of information about the Mac OS. To learn how to get different kinds of help from the Guide menu, see Appendix A in this book. In other manuals For answers to questions about other equipment or about application programs you have purchased, see the manuals that came with the equipment or programs. 6In the About Apple Extras file The Apple Extras folder on your startup disk contains a SimpleText document called About Apple Extras with important information about some of the application programs included with your server. Read Me files can also be found inside application folders. From Apple’s customer support hotline If you can’t find an answer in any of the materials provided, call the customer support hotline. (See the information about technical support in the Apple Resource Guide that came with your server.) On Apple’s online support pages Apple provides a number of online resources that can give you helpful information. See Appendix C for a listing of these resources. 781 Con?guring Your Server This chapter tells you how to con?gure your server’s software so you can take advantage of your server’s hardware and software features. Most of the con?guration tasks are optional, but some of them allow the server to deliver the highest performance. The tasks are: m con?guring the system time and date (required) m installing device drivers (required only if you have installed an expansion card or attached to your server a non-Apple hard disk drive or a SCSI device other than a hard disk drive) m choosing a printer (optional) m con?guring your monitor (optional) m choosing sound devices (optional) m con?guring the Energy Saver control panel (optional) Note: This chapter assumes that a keyboard, monitor, and mouse are connected to your server and that your server is turned on. If you need to connect these devices or if you don’t know how to turn the server on, see the setup guide that came with your server. 9Con?guring the system time and date It’s important that you set the current time and date for your server so that the system can correctly log system events and record ?le activity. You set the time and date in the Date & Time control panel. To set the system date and time: 1 Open the Date & Time control panel. The Date & Time control panel is in the Control Panels submenu in the Apple (K) menu. 2 To set the current date, click each number in the “Current date” box and type the number you want to set for the month, day, or year. Or, click the arrows that appear until the number you want to set is displayed. Changes take effect immediately. 3 To display the date in a different format, click the Date Formats button. A dialog box appears that allows you to select from a variety of date formats. The new format takes effect when you click OK. 4 To set the time zone, click the Set Time Zone button. A dialog box appears that allows you to select a city and country that represents your time zone. The time zone you select takes effect immediately. 5 If daylight savings time is in effect in your time zone, click the Daylight Savings Time box so that an “X” appears. 106 To set the current time, click each number in the “Current time” box and type the number you want to set for the hour, month, or second. Or, click the arrows that appear until the number you want to set is displayed. Changes take effect immediately. 7 To display the time in a different format, click the Time Formats button. A dialog box appears that allows you to select from a variety of time formats including a 12-hour or a 24-hour clock. The new format takes effect when you click OK. 8 To display the time in the menu bar, make sure that the On button in the Menubar Clock section of the Date & Time window is selected. Or, click the Off button to turn off this feature. Your changes take effect the next time you restart the server. 9 To customize the way that time is displayed in the menu bar, click the Clock Options button. A dialog box appears that allows you to customize the way the time is displayed in the menu bar. You can also con?gure the server to sound a chime at regular intervals. 10 Close the Date & Time control panel. Installing device drivers Your Workgroup Server comes with three expansion slots in which you can install Peripheral Component Interconnect (PCI) cards. PCI cards allow you to expand the capability of your Workgroup Server, for example, by generating additional SCSI buses or by providing additional network interfaces. You can also attach additional SCSI devices to your Workgroup Server’s internal/external SCSI bus. With the exception of Apple hard disks, you need to install a device driver for any PCI cards or SCSI devices that you add to your Workgroup Server. A device driver is software that lets the server communicate with a card or a SCSI device. The device driver is usually on a ?oppy disk that comes with the card or device. To install a device driver, see the documentation that came with the card or device. 11Choosing a printer You use the Chooser to indicate the port (printer port or modem port) you used to connect your printer, or to select a printer on the network. To choose a printer: 1 Open the Chooser. The Chooser is in the Apple (K) menu. 2 In the upper- left corner of the Chooser window, click the icon for the type of printer you want to use. 3 If zones appear in the AppleTalk Zones list, click the zone in which the printer resides. 4 In the list on the right side of the Chooser window, click the name of the printer you want to use. 5 Close the Chooser. Your changes take effect immediately. 12Con?guring your monitor This section tells you how use the Monitors & Sound control panel to con?gure your server’s monitor. Follow these steps to con?gure your server’s monitor: 1 Open the Monitors & Sound control panel. The Monitors & Sound control panel is in the Control Panels submenu in the Apple (K) menu. 2 If you have a color monitor, click 256 in the Color Depth list. Your server performs best when the smallest number of colors is selected. 3 Click an item in the Gamma list to adjust the intensity and luminance of your monitor’s screen. 4 Close the Monitors & Sound control panel. 13Choosing sound devices and alert sounds This section tells you how to use the Monitors & Sound control panel to choose your server’s sound input and output devices and to con?gure the system alert sound and its volume. Follow these steps to choose the sound input and output devices for your server and to con?gure the system alert sound: 1 If you want to use an external device for sound input, connect it to the sound input port, as described in the setup guide that came with your server. 2 Open the Monitors & Sound control panel. The Monitors & Sound control panel is in the Control Panels submenu in the Apple (K) menu. 3 At the top of the Monitors & Sound control panel, click the Sound button. The following dialog box appears: 144 Use the sliders to adjust sound output level, sound output balance, computer speaker volume, and computer speaker balance. 5 To change the selected sound input device, click an item in the Sound Input pop-up menu. To use a microphone connected to the sound input port for spoken commands, select the External Microphone. The server records sounds in the same way as other Macintosh models: in 16- bit mono sound, at a sample rate of 44.100 kilohertz (kHz). This makes the sounds you record compatible with all Macintosh computers. For instructions on recording a sound, see the “Sound” topic of Macintosh Guide, available in the Guide (h) menu. 6 If you want to use an external device for sound output, connect it to the sound output port, as described in the setup guide that came with your server. About the sample rate: Most of the time, you will not need to change the sample rate. You should change the sample rate only if the sound you wish to play was recorded at a sample rate different from the current setting. (The available rates are 11.025 kHz, 22.050 kHz, and 44.100 kHz.) For instance, if you play a QuickTime movie containing sound recorded at 44.100 kHz, set the sample rate in the Sound Output Quality pop-up menu to 44.100 kHz to hear the full quality of the sound. Increasing the sample rate slows performance. m Do not set the sample rate higher than the sample rate of the sound you are playing because this slows your server’s performance without improving sound quality. m Do not change the sample rate for sound coming from a device connected to the sound input port. If you use a program that provides sound recording in mono format, you can use its mono setting. 157 To con?gure the sound that occurs when an alert box appears on the screen, click the Alerts button. 8 Click an item in the Alert Sound list to select a sound. 9 Use the slider to adjust the volume of alert sounds. 10 Close the Monitors & Sound control panel. Your changes take effect immediately. Con?guring the Energy Saver control panel Your Workgroup Server comes with the Energy Saver control panel, which provides a variety of energy-saving features. Because most servers run continuously, energy-saving features are turned off when you ?rst start up your Workgroup Server. You may want to use the Energy Saver control panel to con?gure the server to m restart automatically after a power failure m dim the monitor when it has not been used for several minutes 16To con?gure the Energy Saver control panel to dim the monitor or to cause the server to restart automatically after a power failure: 1 Open the Energy Saver control panel. The Energy Saver control panel is in the Control Panels submenu in the Apple (K) menu. An abbreviated form of the control panel appears. 2 In the Energy Saver control panel, click the Show Details button. The full Energy Saver control panel appears. WARNING It is possible to con?gure the Energy Saver control panel so that the server shuts down when it’s inactive for a short period of time or so that it enters a reduced power mode (called sleep mode) when it’s inactive. Both behaviors are undesirable for servers. To avoid accidentally con?guring these behaviors, follow the instructions in this section carefully. 173 To dim the monitor when the keyboard is inactive for a period of time, click the “Separate timing for display sleep” box so that an “X” appears. If you con?gure the Energy Saver control panel to dim the monitor, you don’t need to use a screen saver. Complicated screen savers require a considerable amount of processing power, thereby reducing server performance. 4 Adjust the slider for the “Separate timing for display sleep” control to the desired number of minutes. 5 If you want to con?gure the server so that it restarts automatically after a power failure, choose Server Settings from the Preferences menu. The following dialog box appears: 6 Click the box labeled “Restart automatically after a power failure” so that an “X” appears. 7 Make sure that an “X” appears in the “Never put the hard disk to sleep” box. If the hard disk is put into sleep mode, the server cannot perform optimally. 8 Click OK. 9 Make certain that the slider for the box labeled “Put the system to sleep whenever it’s inactive for” is set to “Never.” 10 Close the Energy Saver control panel. Your changes take effect immediately. WARNING The slider for the box labeled “Put the system to sleep whenever it’s inactive for” should always be “Never.” If this control is set to any other value, the server will shut down or sleep when it is inactive for the speci?ed period of time and will not be available for use by clients. 182 Configuring Your Network Connection Your Workgroup Server is preconfigured to connect to an AppleTalk network through its built-in Ethernet interface. In addition, your server automatically senses the type of connector (10BASE-T or AAUI) that connects to the network. Because of the way your server is preconfigured, most network administrators do not need to perform any additional network configuration tasks. You need to read this chapter if you want to m configure your server to use LocalTalk over one of the server’s serial ports m configure AppleTalk to use a network interface other than the built-in Ethernet network interface m configure your server to use the Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) Otherwise, you can proceed to Chapter 3. 19About Open Transport Your Workgroup Server comes with Open Transport preinstalled. Open Transport is new networking and communications software for the Mac OS that supports industry standards. Open Transport allows your server to run AppleTalk applications over more than one network segment at the same time. Open Transport includes separate control panels for AppleTalk and TCP/IP. You use the AppleTalk control panel to configure your connection to an AppleTalk network. You use the TCP/IP control panel to configure your connection to a TCP/IP network, an industry-standard protocol that allows computers of different types to communicate with each other. The AppleTalk control panel and the TCP/IP control panel replace the Network control panel and the MacTCP control panel, respectively, which were part of previous versions of Mac OS. Both the AppleTalk control panel and the TCP/IP control panel have modes that limit the information that is displayed. The modes are “Basic,” “Advanced,” and “Administration.” The procedures in this chapter require you to use Administration mode so that you can see all of the information that can be configured in each control panel. About the default port Before Open Transport became available, AppleTalk applications could only work with one network interface at a time. With Open Transport, new AppleTalk applications that have been written for Open Transport can work simultaneously with more than one network interface (a technique known as multihoming). (The version of Open Transport that comes with your server supports multihoming for AppleTalk, but not for TCP/IP.) Your Workgroup Server comes with several network interfaces: the built-in Ethernet interface, the modem port, and the printer port. You can also install additional network interface cards. 20All TCP/IP applications and those AppleTalk applications that are not able to use multihoming use the network interface that is configured as the default port. When you first start up the Workgroup Server, the built-in Ethernet interface is the default port. The AppleTalk control panel sets the default port for AppleTalk applications, and the TCP/IP control panel sets the default port for TCP/IP applications. (Note that the default port for AppleTalk and TCP/IP can be different.) In both control panels, the “Connect via” pop-up menu sets the default port. Whenever you want a non-multihoming networking application to work with a network interface other than the current default port, you need to make that network interface the default port. Both the AppleTalk and the TCP/IP control panels allow you to save and restore configurations (including the setting of the default port), which makes it easy to change and restore specific settings. For information about saving and restoring configurations, see “Working With Network Configurations” later in this chapter. Configuring your AppleTalk network connection When you first start up the server, its AppleTalk network connection is through the built-in Ethernet interface. If you want to change the default port for AppleTalk, use the AppleTalk control panel. If your server connects to a network segment for which only one AppleTalk zone has been assigned, the AppleTalk control panel automatically selects that zone for you. (An AppleTalk zone is a logical grouping of nodes on a network segment.) If more than one AppleTalk zone is available on the network segment to which your server is connected, you can use the AppleTalk control panel to assign your server to an AppleTalk zone. To use the AppleTalk control panel: 1 Open the AppleTalk control panel. The AppleTalk control panel is in the Control Panels submenu in the Apple (K) menu. The AppleTalk control panel opens. 212 Choose User Mode from the Edit menu and click the Administration button. Then click OK. In Administration mode, the AppleTalk control panel looks like this: In Administration mode, you can do the following: m Lock certain settings by clicking the lock icon so that only a user with access to Administration mode can change them. m Click the Options button to turn AppleTalk on and off. (For information, see “Turning Networking On and Off” later in this chapter.) m Set a password for Administration mode. (For information, see “Setting a Password” later in this chapter.) For information about the other user modes, see “User Modes” later in this chapter. 223 To change the default port, choose a new port from the “Connect via” pop-up menu. 4 To choose the zone you want, choose a new zone from the “Current zone” pop-up menu (if available). 5 Close the AppleTalk control panel. 6 If you have made configuration changes, an alert box asks if you want to save changes. Click the Save button. If you have changed the default port, the alert box also tells you that the change will interrupt any AppleTalk services that are established. Your changes are saved as the default configuration and take effect immediately. 23 You can connect to an AppleTalk network through the printer port, the modem port, the built-in Ethernet interface, or any additional network interface cards installed in your server.Configuring your TCP/IP network connection You use the TCP/IP control panel to specify the default port for TCP/IP as well as other information that TCP/IP requires. In particular, your server must have an Internet Protocol (IP) address. It may also need a subnet mask number, depending on the way TCP/IP is implemented on your network. IMPORTANT If you have an Apple Internet Server, refer to the Getting Started booklet that came in your Apple Internet Server Solution package for details about configuring your TCP/IP connection. You can enter this information manually, or you can use a server on your network to provide this information automatically. The types of servers that can configure TCP/IP automatically are BootP (for Boot Protocol), RARP (for Reverse Address Resolution Protocol), DHCP (for Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol), and MacIP (for Macintosh Internet Protocol) servers. Note: MacIP is both a type of server and a protocol for sending Internettype packets of information over an AppleTalk network. RARP and MacIP servers can provide an IP address only for your server. DHCP and BootP servers can provide an IP address for your server as well as the IP address of name servers that are present in your network. To use the TCP/IP control panel: 1 Open the TCP/IP control panel. The TCP/IP control panel is in the Control Panels submenu in the Apple (K) menu. The TCP/IP control panel appears. 2 Choose User Mode from the Edit menu, and click the Administration button. Then click OK. In Administration mode, the TCP/IP control panel looks like this: 24If your network has a BootP, DHCP, RARP, or MacIP server, continue to the next section, “Configuring via a Server.” If you are configuring the TCP/IP control panel manually, see “Configuring TCP/IP Manually” later in this chapter. Configuring via a server The procedure for using a server varies depending on whether the server that you are going to use is a BootP, DHCP, RARP, or MacIP server. If you are going to use a BootP, DHCP, or RARP server, see “Configuring via a BootP, DHCP, or RARP Server” later in this chapter. Configuring via a MacIP server To configure TCP/IP using a MacIP server: 1 Choose AppleTalk (MacIP) from the “Connect via” pop-up menu. 2 Choose “Using MacIP Server” from the Configure pop-up menu. 253 If you want to specify a MacIP server in a particular zone, click Select Zone to choose the zone of the MacIP server you want to use. Otherwise, go to step 6. 4 In the dialog box that appears, choose the zone in which your MacIP server is located. 5 Click OK to close the dialog box. 6 Close the TCP/IP control panel. Your TCP/IP configuration information is obtained from the MacIP server the next time you open a networking connection (for example, by opening a networking application, such as Netscape, Eudora, or NCSA Telnet). If, after configuring your TCP/IP control panel, you see an error message such as “Unable to locate host” or “Could not create a socket,” your software is unable to reach the network. This indicates a problem in the TCP/IP configuration. For troubleshooting information, see Chapter 7. 26 Click here if the MacIP server is in the same zone as your Workgroup Server. Click here to display only those zones that have MacIP servers. It may take a few moments for this box to become available because TCP/IP searches for MacIP servers in all zones first. Click here to choose a different zone.Configuring via a BootP, DHCP, or RARP server To configure TCP/IP using a BootP, DHCP, or RARP server: 1 Choose Ethernet from the “Connect via” pop-up menu. 2 From the Configure pop-up menu, select the server type that is appropriate for your network. In this example, a BootP server is selected. The next time you make a TCP/IP connection, an IP address will be assigned to the server. If you open the TCP/IP control panel, your assigned IP address will appear in the “IP Address” box. If you close the TCP/IP connection and don’t make another connection for a period of time, the BootP or DHCP server may take back the IP address and assign it to another host. The next time you make a TCP/IP connection, the BootP or DHCP server will assign a different IP address. BootP and DHCP servers can provide your IP address and the addresses of name servers that may be available on your network. RARP servers can provide your IP address only. You may have additional TCP/IP configuration information to enter (such as a subnet mask, the IP address of a router, or domain name information). Go to step 5 in the next section, “Configuring TCP/IP Manually.” 27Configuring TCP/IP manually You must configure TCP/IP manually if your server connects to a network in which a BootP, DHCP, RARP, or MacIP server is not present, or if the server does not provide all the configuration information that you need to configure your Workgroup Server. To configure TCP/IP manually: 1 Choose Ethernet from the “Connect via” pop-up menu. 2 If your network uses the IEEE 802.3 variant of the Ethernet standard, click the Use 802.3 box to the right of the “Connect via” pop-up menu. 3 Choose Manually from the Configure pop-up menu. 4 Type your server’s IP address in the “IP Address” box. An IP address is a set of four numbers from 0 to 255, separated by dots (for example, 140.140.54.2). It identifies your server on the network. IMPORTANT Make sure you enter the correct IP address. Each IP address must be unique. Entering an incorrect address or the IP address that another computer uses can cause problems with your server and with the network. 5 If you have a subnet mask number, type it in the “Subnet mask” box. Some organizations use a subnet mask number to increase the number of IP addresses that are available for their network. If your network uses a subnet mask, you must enter it for your server to work correctly on the network. Like an IP address, a subnet mask is a set of numbers from 0 to 255, separated by dots (for example, 255.255.255.252). 286 If you have the IP address for a router, type it in the “Router address” box. A router is a device that directs information along the most efficient or appropriate network path. It connects two or more network cables, thereby allowing computers and other network devices on each cable to communicate with each other. The router maintains a table that contains the address of each device on each network. When a packet of information reaches the router, the router checks the destination address on the packet and sends it to the cable on which the destination device resides. If you have a dial-up connection to the Internet using SLIP (Serial Line Internet Protocol) or PPP (Point-to-Point Protocol) software, you do not need to enter a router address. 7 If you have the IP address of a name server, type it in the “Name server addr” box. A name server is a computer that associates a computer’s name (called a host name) with an IP address. By associating names with IP addresses, users don’t have to remember IP addresses when they need to identify a particular computer. For example, an E-mail message can be addressed to “john@planetX” (if “planetX” is the host name of John’s computer) instead of “john@140.140.54.2” (if 140.140.54.2 is the IP address of John’s computer). Before the mail application sends the message, it asks the name server to find the IP address of “planetX.” You can enter more than one name server address in the “Name server addr” box. (The first address that you enter becomes your default name server.) Press Return after each address. You can specify as many name servers as you want as long as you do not type more than 255 characters. 8 If you have created a hosts file and want to use it, click the Select Hosts File button. (The Select Hosts File button appears only when the control panel is in Advanced or Administration mode.) Otherwise, go to step 9. A dialog box appears that allows you to locate a hosts file that already exists. When you locate the hosts file that you want to use, select its name and click the Open button. A dialog box appears that asks you if you want to replace the current hosts file with the contents of the selected hosts file. Click the OK button. 29The hosts file contains a list of host names and associated IP addresses. The hosts file provides a subset of the functionality of a name server. Because maintaining the hosts file can become difficult in a network that has many hosts, you should use a name server if one is available. If you use a name server and a hosts file, the hosts file is checked before the name server. For information about the format of the hosts file, see “Hosts File Format” later in this chapter. 9 If you want to take advantage of implicit domain searching, enter your domain name information. TCP/IP applications can automatically search for computers you identify by host name (for example, when you send mail to “john@planetX.com”). To configure information that makes the search possible, type your local domain name in the “Starting domain name” box and type your administrative domain in the “Ending domain name” box. The local domain is the name of your own local network domain. For example, if your server is named “server.mktng.east.xyzcorp.com,” your local domain name is “mktng.east.xyzcorp.com.” The administrative domain is the name of the larger domain that contains your local domain. It must match the end of the local domain. For example, if your local domain is “mktng.east.xyzcorp.com,” your administrative domain is “xyzcorp.com.” The names you type in the two boxes define a range of domain names. When you use a host name, TCP/IP tries to resolve the name by appending each possible suffix in the range. For example, if your local domain is “mktng.east.xyzcorp.com” and your administrative domain is “xyzcorp.com,” and you specify that you want to search for a computer named “eng,” TCP/IP will search for computers that have these names: eng.mktng.east.xyzcorp.com eng.east.xyzcorp.com eng.mktng.xyzcorp.com eng.xyzcorp.com 3010 Enter in the “Additional Search domains” box the names of any other domains that you want to search. You can enter more than one domain name. Press Return after each domain name. You can specify as many domain names as you want as long as you do not type more than 255 characters. The domain names that you enter are used exactly as you type them and are not put together in different combinations. For example, if you specify “apple.com,” “university.edu,” and “nowhere.org” in the “Additional Search domains” box, and you specify that you want to search for a computer named “eng,” TCP/IP will search for these computers: eng.apple.com eng.university.edu eng.nowhere.org 11 Close the TCP/IP control panel. 12 If you have made configuration changes, an alert box asks if you want to save changes. Click the Save button. If you have changed the default port, the alert box also tells you that the change will interrupt any TCP/IP services that are established. Your changes are saved as the default configuration and take effect immediately. If, after configuring the TCP/IP control panel, you see an error message such as “Unable to locate host” or “Could not create a socket,” your software is unable to reach the network. This indicates a problem in the TCP/IP configuration. For troubleshooting information, see Chapter 7. 31Turning networking on and off Both the AppleTalk control panel and the TCP/IP control panel allow you to turn off AppleTalk and TCP/IP, respectively. To turn off AppleTalk or TCP/IP: 1 Open the appropriate control panel. To turn off TCP/IP, open the TCP/IP control panel. To turn off AppleTalk, open the AppleTalk control panel. 2 Choose User Mode from the control panel’s File menu and click the Advanced or the Administration button. Then click OK. 3 In the control panel, click the Options button. The TCP/IP Options dialog box appears. (The AppleTalk Options dialog box appears if you opened the AppleTalk control panel in step 1.) Note: The TCP/IP Options dialog box allows you to configure TCP/IP so that it loads only when it is needed. For Workgroup Servers that frequently connect to TCP/IP networks, the “Load only when needed” option should not be selected (an “X” should not appear in the box). That is, TCP/IP should be configured so that it is always loaded. 4 To make the protocol inactive, click the Inactive button and then click OK. AppleTalk or TCP/IP (depending on the control panel that you opened) becomes inactive immediately. To turn AppleTalk or TCP/IP on again, click the Active button. 32User modes The AppleTalk and TCP/IP control panels support three different modes: Basic, Advanced, and Administration. This section shows you what each control panel looks like in each mode and describes the differences between the modes. AppleTalk control panel user modes In Basic mode, the AppleTalk control panel looks like this: In Basic mode, you can use the AppleTalk control panel to do the following: m Use the “Connect via” pop-up menu to change the interface that is set as the default port (if it is not locked). m Use the “Current zone” pop-up menu to change the server’s AppleTalk zone (if it is not locked). In Advanced mode, the AppleTalk control panel looks like this: 33In Advanced mode, you can use the AppleTalk control panel to do everything that can be done in Basic mode, plus the following: m Display the server’s node and network numbers and the network range. AppleTalk dynamically assigns the node number when it starts up. m Click the Options button to display a dialog box that can be used to turn AppleTalk off or on again. m Click the Info button to display details about the server’s AppleTalk settings. m Click the “User defined” box so that an “X” appears, allowing you to change the node and network numbers. You should not do this unless you are sure the new address information is correct. In Administration mode, the AppleTalk control panel looks like this: In Administration mode, you can do everything that you can do in Advanced mode, plus you can lock settings so they can’t be changed. To lock a setting, click the lock button. To unlock it, click again. 34 LockTCP/IP control panel user modes In Basic mode, the TCP/IP control panel looks like this: In Basic mode, the TCP/IP control panel allows you to do the following (if the settings are not locked): m Use the “Connect via” pop-up menu to change the default port for TCP/IP. m Use the Configure pop-up menu to select a configuration method. m Enter the server’s IP address (if you are configuring manually). m Enter the server’s subnet mask number. m Enter the IP address of one or more name servers. m Enter the names of domains that are to be searched in order to locate a remote host. m Enable the IEEE 802.3 variant of Ethernet (this option is available only when Ethernet is selected in the “Connect via” pop-up menu). 35In Advanced mode, the TCP/IP control panel looks like this: In Advanced mode, you can do everything that can be done in Basic mode, plus the following (if the settings are not locked): m Select a Hosts file (if you are configuring manually or if you are using a BootP, DHCP, or RARP server). For information about the content and format of this file, see “Hosts File Format” later in this chapter. m Enter your local and administrative domain in the “Starting domain name” and “Ending domain name” boxes, respectively (if you are configuring manually or if you are using a BootP, DHCP, or RARP server). m Click the Options button to display a dialog box that can be used to turn TCP/IP off or on again. m Click the Info button to display details about the server’s TCP/IP settings. In Administration mode, the TCP/IP control panel looks like this: 36In Administration mode, you can do everything that can be done in Advanced mode, plus lock (by clicking the lock icon) every setting except the current Hosts file. Setting a password You can set a password that limits access to Administration mode for both the AppleTalk control panel and the TCP/IP control panel. To set a password: 1 With the AppleTalk or TCP/IP control panel open, choose User Mode from the Edit menu. 2 In the box that appears, click the Administration button and then click the Set Password button. 373 Type the password you want to use in the Password box. When you type the password, you see dots (•) instead of the letters you type. 4 Type the password again in the Verify Password box, then click OK. The password is set. The next time any one tries to enter Administration mode for this control panel, he or she must enter the password that you set. Getting information about your configuration For information about the addresses and software versions currently in effect for Open Transport, follow these steps: 1 Open the control panel for which you want to see configuration information. For information about your AppleTalk configuration, open the AppleTalk control panel. For information about your TCP/IP configuration, open the TCP/IP control panel. 2 Choose Get Info from the File menu. If the control panel is in Advanced or Administration mode, you can also click the Info button. The Info window opens. You can see information in this window, but you cannot change it. The AppleTalk Info window looks like this: 38The top half of the Info window displays the following: m The AppleTalk network number (in this case, 35404) and the node number (in this case, 240). m The Media Access Control (MAC) address of the default port (in this case, 08 00 07 BF B5 17). m The AppleTalk network and node number of the AppleTalk router that is present on the cable connected to the current default port. The bottom half of the AppleTalk Info window displays the version numbers for Open Transport, AppleTalk, and the AppleTalk driver. The TCP/IP Info window looks like this: The top half of the Info window displays the following: m The IP address (in this case, 192.22.23.28). m The Media Access Control (MAC) address of the default port (in this case, 08 00 07 BF B5 17). m The IP address of the TCP/IP router that is present on the cable connected to the current default port (in this case, 192.22.23.52). The bottom half of the TCP/IP Info window displays the version numbers for Open Transport and TCP/IP. 39Working with network configurations The AppleTalk and TCP/IP control panels allow you to save configurations. An “AppleTalk configuration” is the collection of settings that you make in the AppleTalk control panel, and a “TCP/IP configuration” is a collection of settings that you make in the TCP/IP control panel. You can save settings for each control panel so that it is easy to transport a setting to another computer or so that you can easily switch between settings. Creating a new configuration To create a new AppleTalk or TCP/IP configuration: 1 Open the control panel for which you want to create a new configuration. 2 Choose Configurations from the File menu. The Configurations window appears. 3 With the default configuration highlighted, click Duplicate. 4 In the window that appears, type a name for the new configuration. 405 Click OK. The name of the new configuration appears in the configuration list. 6 With the name of the new configuration highlighted, click Make Active. The settings in the new configuration appear in the control panel. 7 Make any changes that you want for the new configuration. 8 Close the control panel. An alert box appears: Once saved, the new configuration will become the current configuration. If the changes you made will disrupt a network service, such as AppleTalk in this example, the alert box warns you that services will be disrupted. 9 Click the Save button. Your changes take effect immediately. The saved configuration becomes the new current configuration. 41Using a different configuration To use a different configuration: 1 Open the control panel for which you want to use a different configuration. 2 Choose Configurations from the File menu. The Configurations window appears. 3 Click the name of the file that contains the configuration you want to use. 4 Click Make Active. The control panel becomes active, and the settings from the selected configuration file appear in it. 5 Close the control panel. If the new configuration changes the default port, an alert notifies you that networking services that are already established will be interrupted. Click OK. The settings of the configuration selected in step 3 take effect immediately. 42Exporting a configuration You may want use a configuration (possibly with some small modification) on another computer. You do this by exporting the configuration to a file and copying the file to the other computer. To export a configuration to a file: 1 Open the control panel for which you want to export a configuration. 2 Choose Configurations from the File menu. The Configurations window appears. 3 Click the name of the configuration that you want to export. 4 Click Export. 5 In the dialog box that appears, type a name for the file in which the configuration is to be saved, and locate the disk or folder in which you want the file to reside. 6 Click Save. The configuration is saved in the specified file and folder. To use the configuration on another computer, copy the file to that computer and import it, as described in the next section. 43Importing a configuration To import a configuration from another computer: 1 Copy the configuration file to the computer on which you want to use it. 2 On that computer, open the control panel for which you want to import a configuration. 3 Choose Configurations from the File menu. The Configurations window appears. 4 Click Import. 5 In the dialog box that appears, locate the file that contains the configuration you want to import. 6 Click Open. The name of the new configuration appears in the list of configurations: 7 If you want to make the new configuration active (that is, appear in the control panel), click its name to select it, and click the Make Active button. Depending on the type of control panel (AppleTalk or TCP/IP), you may want to change some settings. For example, if it is a TCP/IP control panel, you should change the IP address. 448 Close the control panel. 9 If you have made configuration changes, an alert box asks if you want to save changes. Click the Save button. If the imported configuration changes the default port, an alert notifies you that networking services already established will be interrupted. Click OK. The imported configuration becomes the current configuration. Your changes take effect immediately. Hosts file format A hosts file is a list of IP addresses and the names (host names and domain names) that are associated with them. The hosts file can be stored anywhere on your server’s hard drive, but it is usually stored in the Preferences folder in your active System Folder. To make a particular hosts file active, locate it through the Select Hosts file button in the TCP/IP control panel. The information in the hosts file consists of a series of records whose fields must be in the following format: name data ; comment The name field can be an alias or a fully qualified domain name (that is, it contains at least one dot). For example, “apple.com” is a fully qualified domain name; “apple” is not. The data field in a hosts file record includes the following subfields, each separated by one or more space characters. WARNING If you do not change the IP address, you may cause the same IP address to be used by two different computers on the network, which causes network errors. 45The ttl (time to live) subfield specifies the number of seconds for which the record is valid. This subfield is optional. If it is not present, or if it is “-1”, the record is always valid. The class subfield is optional. The only value that is currently supported is “IN” (Internet domain). The type subfield is required and describes the type of identifier that follows. Use “A” to indicate that an IP address follows. Use “CNAME” to indicate that the identifier that follows is a canonical (“real”) name. Use “NS” to indicate that the identifier that follows is a name server. The identifier subfield is required and can be an IP address or a canonical name. Examples of valid hosts file records are: apple.com A 130.43.2.2 ; address of host apple.com foobar CNAME barfoo.apple.com ; canonical name for the host whose local alias is “foobar” xyzcorp.com 86400 NS biglist.xyzcorp.com ; name server for xyz corp (valid for one week) The MacTCP application also allows you to use a hosts file. The format requirements for the MacTCP hosts file are slightly different from the format requirements for an Open Transport hosts file. If you want to use a MacTCP hosts file from another computer, make sure that all of the listed domain names are fully qualified. MacTCP allows the hosts file to contain domain names that are not fully qualified. When used with Open Transport, a domain name that is not fully qualified will cause an error unless it is an alias. 46To use a domain name that is not fully qualified in the TCP/IP hosts file, you can use two records. The first record associates a local alias with a fully qualified domain name, and the second record resolves the domain name to an IP address. For example, you might have the following entry in a MacTCP hosts file: bigcomputer A 128.1.1.1 To accomplish the same effect of associating “bigcomputer” with the address 128.1.1.1, an Open Transport hosts file needs these two records: bigcomputer CNAME largedomain.xyzcorp.com largedomain.xyzcorp.com A 128.1.1.1 The first record associates the alias “bigcomputer” with the fully qualified domain name “largedomain.xyzcorp.com.” The second record resolves that domain name to the IP address 128.1.1.1. 47483 Using Application Software This chapter provides important information you need to know about using your Workgroup Server with application programs. For instance, although your server is compatible with most programs intended for use with Macintosh computers, certain programs are designed especially for Power Macintosh computers. These kinds of programs take best advantage of your server’s speed. In addition, the order in which certain programs start up affects a server’s performance. Be sure to read the information in this chapter before setting up your server’s application programs. 49Using Power Macintosh programs Programs designed for the PowerPC–based Workgroup Server provide improved performance for your server. However, to get the full bene?t of this software, you need to know about two important items—virtual memory and shared libraries. Virtual memory Virtual memory is a feature of Macintosh computers that lets you use space on a hard disk as additional memory. This feature helps you run large programs when the computer does not contain enough dynamic randomaccess memory (DRAM). However, virtual memory may adversely affect the performance of some server application programs, such as AppleShare. Refer to the documentation that came with your application to see if the application works well with virtual memory turned on. Shared libraries Power Macintosh programs use special ?les called shared libraries. These ?les help Power Macintosh programs to run more ef?ciently, and can be used by more than one Power Macintosh program simultaneously. Any necessary shared libraries are installed automatically in the System Folder when you install Power Macintosh programs. W2@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@6X?g? 7< ?B1?g? @?e?@@6K? @?g? @?e?@@@@@@@@@@6X?he@?g? @?e?@@@g?I/Khe@?g? @?e?@@@hV46Xh@?g? @?e?@@@heI/X?g@?g? @?e?@@@he?V/Xg@?g? @W-X?@@@L?eW2@@6KeN1g@?g? @(R1e?B)Xe7@@@@@6K?@g@W-Xf? (Y?@e?J@)X?3@fI4@@L?f@(R1f? ?@eW.MI/XV'L?fI4)Kf(Y?@f? ?@?W.YeV/XN1?gI46Xf?@f? ?@?7H?e?V/T5?hS,f?@f? ?@?@?@fV+Y?g?W&Hf?@f? ?@?@e?@hfW&@?f?@f? ?@?@f?@h?W&@@Lf?@f? ?@?3=?f?@fW-T&@@>,f?@f? ?@?V46K?f?@?W&R'@@>(Yf?@f? ?@e?I46K?f?&@?V'>(Y?f?@f? ?@f?I'6K?e?N@L?V'Uf)X?@f? )X?@gN@@6K?e@)X?V/X?e@)T5f? @)T5g?@?I46K?@S,??V/Ke@V+Yf? @V+Yg?3L??I4@@0Y?eN@@?@?g? @?h?V/Xhe?@@?@?g? @?heV/K?h?@@?@?g? @?he?V46X?g?@@?@?g? @?hf?I/Kg?@@?@?g? @? V4@@@@@@@@@?@?g? @? I4@?@?g? 3= ?:5?g? V4@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@0Y?g? Shared libraries are represented by icons like this. 50 Shared libraries are represented by icons like thisIf a Power Macintosh program requires a shared library and there is not enough memory available for the shared library, you’ll see a message that the program could not be opened because there is not enough system memory available for the shared library. If this happens, quit programs not in use or install more memory in your server. (For more information, see the information on expanding memory in the setup guide that came with your server.) If a required shared library is missing, you’ll see a message that the program could not be opened because the shared library could not be found. If this happens, follow the directions that came with your program to reinstall the program. If the shared library is still missing, contact the software program’s manufacturer for assistance. Using older Macintosh programs If you experience problems using an older Macintosh program, it may be incompatible with your Workgroup Server. You may be able to use your older program if you change the Modern Memory Manager setting in your Memory control panel. Follow these steps to change the Modern Memory Manager setting: 1 Choose Control Panels from the Apple (K) menu and open the Memory control panel. WARNING If your Workgroup Server is running AppleShare, do not change the Modern Memory Manager setting. For AppleShare to work properly, Modern Memory Manager must be turned on. If you want to run other applications that do not work when Modern Memory Manager is turned on, check with the application’s vendor to see if an update is available. 512 Turn off Modern Memory Manager. When you are ?nished using the program, open the Memory control panel again and turn Modern Memory Manager back on. For best performance, contact the program’s manufacturer for an upgrade. Using server application programs Speci?c server application programs or services, such as AppleShare, AppleSearch, Apple Remote Access, or Apple RAID Software, may have been included with your server. Review the documentation that came with the software before you install these services; you may be required to perform special procedures that can affect your server system before you use a particular service. IMPORTANT See the Workgroup Server Read Me for information about the versions of application programs from Apple that are compatible with your Workgroup Server. Click here to turn off Modern Memory Manager. 52 Click here to turn off Modem Memory ManagerUsing desktop application programs You can also use your Workgroup Server as a desktop personal computer to run some personal application programs. Running such programs, however, may degrade the performance of your server application programs or network services. Order of installing and starting programs Though your server may have come with server application programs or network services, you may want to install additional software. Note that the order in which server application programs are installed and started is important. Be sure to review the documentation, especially product Read Me ?les, for all the server application programs you plan to use before installing and running them. Also, refer to the Workgroup Server Read Me ?le on your server system’s hard disk for the most up-to-date news about installing server application programs. Setting up your server to restart programs automatically You can set the Workgroup Server to start server application programs (including network services) automatically whenever you start up the server or whenever the server automatically restarts after a temporary power outage. To set up your server to restart server application programs automatically: 1 Create an alias for each program that you want the server to start automatically. You create an alias by selecting the icon of the program on the desktop and choosing Make Alias from the File menu. 532 Drag the aliases to the Startup Items folder, located in the System Folder on your startup disk. Macintosh computers and servers automatically open documents and programs (or their aliases) located in the Startup Items folder whenever the server starts up. Note: The server opens documents and programs located in the Startup Items folder in alphabetical or numerical order. Because the order in which server application programs are started may be important (as described in the program documentation), you may want to rename the aliases so that the programs start in the desired order. For example, you can insert a number at the beginning of each ?lename. The following ?gure shows a sample setup. Setting up your server to run programs at shutdown The Shutdown Items folder in the System Folder allows you to specify scripts or programs that automatically run during the shutdown process. This folder works much like the Startup Items folder. To specify an item to run during shutdown, put the item or its alias in the Shutdown Items folder. Add numbers to the program aliases to set the order of startup. 54 Add numbers to the program aliases to set the order of startup.Note: The server opens scripts and programs located in the Shutdown Items folder in alphabetical or numerical order. Because the order in which server application programs are run may be important, you may want to rename the aliases so that the programs are run in the desired order. The next time you choose Shut Down or Restart from the Special menu, the scripts and programs are run. If you choose Shut Down from the Apple menu, the items in the Shutdown Items folder are not run. Additional capabilities for your server system You have the option to install two programs included with your server that provide additional capabilities for your system software: m PowerTalk, which provides built-in mail and collaboration services m QuickDraw GX, which gives your computer more powerful printing capabilities Because these programs are not designed speci?cally for use on server systems, they may reduce your server’s performance. Keep this possibility in mind when deciding if you want to add these capabilities to your Workgroup Server. IMPORTANT If you use the AppleShare Print Server with your server and you want to use QuickDraw GX also, be sure to see the AppleShare Read Me ?le. You’ll ?nd Installers for these optional programs in the System Software Installers folder on the Workgroup Server Software CD-ROM disc. IMPORTANT AppleScript, which allows you to automate many actions you perform repeatedly on your server, is already installed in your system. To review the available automated tasks, look in the Apple (K) menu. To learn how to create new scripts for your server, see the “Using AppleScript” documents in the AppleScript folder in the Apple Extras folder on your hard disk. 55Working with several programs at a time You can open as many application programs and desk accessories as your server’s memory allows. Finding out which programs are open All open programs are listed in the Application menu at the right end of the menu bar. The name of the active program (the one you’re using right now) has a checkmark next to it, and its icon appears in the menu bar. Switching programs You can switch to another open program or desk accessory by choosing its name from the Application menu. If a program’s icon is dimmed in the menu, that means its windows are hidden. Choosing the program from the Application menu displays its windows. You can also switch to another program by clicking in a window that belongs to an open program or by double-clicking a program icon (or the icon of a document that was created with the program). Hiding and showing windows on the desktop You can hide all windows except those of the active program by choosing Hide Others from the Application menu. The other programs remain open even though their windows are hidden. When you switch to another program, its windows become visible again. If you want to see all the open windows, choose Show All from the Application menu. 56 A checkmark indicates the active program. Commands to hide or display open windows Open programs The Finder icon4 Managing Hard DIsks This chapter tells you how to perform common disk maintenance tasks, such as mounting volumes, initializing hard disks, and installing system software. When working with your Workgroup Server’s startup disk, you often need to start up from a different disk, such as the Workgroup Server Software CD-ROM disc. This chapter tells you how. 57Backing up your ?les Making backup copies of important server ?les is good protection against possible damage to the originals. If a backup program was included with your server, be sure to use it (or another backup program if you prefer) to set up and schedule a regular, automatic backup of your ?les. You can also back up your ?les manually, by making copies on another hard disk or even on ?oppy disks, but such methods are less convenient. Using Apple RAID Software Your Workgroup Server comes with Apple RAID Software, which you can use to increase the performance of your hard disk drives. To use Apple RAID Software with a disk, you must install the Apple RAID driver on it. For information about managing hard drives that have been prepared for Apple RAID, see the Apple RAID Software Administrator’s Guide. IMPORTANT Drive Setup, the disk utility from Apple Computer, cannot be used on drives on which the Apple RAID driver has been installed. When a drive is used with Apple RAID, you use Apple RAID Software to manage the drive. Mounting volumes Each time you start up your Workgroup Server, it automatically searches the SCSI buses for volumes and mounts any that it ?nds. Any SCSI devices that are not turned on when you start up your Workgroup Server are not found, so their volumes are not mounted. If you later turn on a SCSI device, you can use Drive Setup to mount any volume it contains. 58To use Drive Setup to mount volumes: 1 Open the Drive Setup icon. The Drive Setup program resides in the Utilities folder in the Apple Extras folder on your startup disk. When Drive Setup starts up, it automatically scans the SCSI bus for devices that contain volumes. 2 In the list of drives, click the umounted volume that you want to mount. 3 Choose Mount Volumes from the Functions menu. The selected volume is mounted, and its icon appears on the desktop. 4 Choose Quit from the File menu. Starting up from a CD-ROM disc To test, repair, or initialize your startup hard disk, or to install system software on your startup hard disk, you need to start up your server from another disk, such as the Workgroup Server Software CD-ROM disc that came with the server. To start up the server using the Workgroup Server Software CD-ROM disc, follow these steps: 1 Turn your server on. 2 When you see the desktop on your screen, press the Open/Close button on your CD-ROM drive, and insert the CD-ROM disc containing system software into the drive. 3 Hold down the “c” key on your keyboard and restart your server. To ensure that the CD-ROM disc remains in the CD-ROM drive, continue to hold down the “c” key until you see the “Welcome to Macintosh” message. 59Initializing a hard disk Before you can use a new disk, the disk must be prepared so that the server knows where to store information on the disk. This preparation is called initializing (or formatting) the disk. When do you need to initialize a hard disk? The hard disk inside your server was initialized at the factory, so you probably won’t need to initialize it. You need to initialize a hard disk only if one of the following is true: m The disk is new and uninitialized. Your internal hard disk and most external hard disks are initialized at the factory and do not have to be initialized again. If you are adding a new non-Apple hard disk to your server, check your owner’s manual to see if it needs to be initialized. m You’ve experienced repeated errors using this disk. If problems persist after you initialize the disk, the disk is in need of servicing. m You want your disk to be partitioned in a different way. If a hard disk hasn’t been initialized, the disk’s icon does not appear on the desktop when you start up the server using another disk. How to initialize a hard disk You initialize an Apple SCSI hard disk by using the Drive Setup program, which is available on your server’s hard disk and on the Workgroup Server Software CD-ROM disc that came with your server. (To initialize a hard disk from another manufacturer, use the utility software that came with the hard disk.) WARNING Initializing a disk erases any information that may be on it. Before you initialize a damaged disk, try to repair it as described in “Repairing a Damaged Disk” later in this chapter. 601 If the disk that you need to initialize is your startup disk, start up your server from the Workgroup Server Software CD-ROM disc. For details, see “Starting Up From a CD-ROM Disc” earlier in this chapter. 2 Open the Drive Setup icon. The Drive Setup program resides in the Utilities folder in the Apple Extras folder on your startup disk and on the Workgroup Server Software CD-ROM disc. 3 In the list of drives, click the disk you want to initialize. 4 Click Initialize to initialize the hard disk. 5 Click Quit when you see a message reporting that initialization was successful. If a message reports that initialization failed, try again. If initialization fails a second time, take the disk to your Apple-authorized service provider for repair. 61Installing system software System software is the set of programs and other ?les that your server uses to start itself up, keep track of your ?les, and run the application programs you use. System software is kept in the folder called the System Folder. When you turn on your server, it looks for a startup disk, which is a disk that contains the system software. The startup disk is usually an internal hard disk, although another hard disk or a ?oppy disk can also be a startup disk. If you’re installing system software on a hard disk for the ?rst time, make sure that your hard disk has been initialized, a process that prepares the disk to store information. If you see the hard disk’s icon on the desktop when you start up the server, the disk has been initialized. If no disk icon appears when you start up, see “Initializing a Hard Disk” earlier in this chapter for instructions. When should you reinstall system software? If you have a problem with your system software, you may see this icon in the middle of the screen: If this icon appears, follow the instructions in “Solving Hard Disk Problems” in Chapter 7 to test your startup hard disk and repair any damage. If repairing the disk doesn’t help, reinitialize it as described in “Initializing a Hard Disk” earlier in this chapter. Then follow the steps in this section to do what is commonly called a “normal” installation of system software. Doing a normal installation of system software To do a normal installation, follow these steps: 1 If the disk on which you want to install system software is your startup disk, start up your server from the Workgroup Server Software CD-ROM disc. For details, see “Starting Up From a CD-ROM Disc” earlier in this chapter. 622 Find and open the Disk First Aid icon. The Disk First Aid program resides in the Utilities folder in the Apple Extras folder on your startup disk and on the Workgroup Server Software CDROM disc. After Disk First Aid starts, follow the instructions on the screen. Disk First Aid checks your hard disk for any problems. 3 When Disk First Aid has ?nished checking your hard disk, choose Quit from the File menu. 4 Open the Drive Setup program. The Drive Setup program resides in the Utilities folder. You use the Drive Setup program to update your hard disk. 5 In the list of drives, click your startup disk. 6 Pull down the Functions menu and choose Update Driver. 7 When the update process is ?nished, quit Drive Setup. 8 Shut down your server. 9 If the disk on which you are installing system software is your startup disk, start up your server from the Workgroup Server Software CD-ROM disc. For details, see “Starting Up From a CD-ROM Disc” earlier in this chapter. The Installer’s Welcome screen may appear or you may have to doubleclick the System Software Installer icon to open the Installer program. 10 Click OK. The Easy Install dialog box appears. 6311 Make sure that the hard disk named in the box is the one on which you want to install system software. If it isn’t, click Switch Disk until the correct disk name appears. 12 Click Install. 13 Follow the instructions that appear on the screen. If you’re installing system software from ?oppy disks, you see messages asking you to insert different disks. 14 When you see a message reporting that the installation was successful, click Restart (or “Quit,” if you’re installing from the CD-ROM disc). Don’t forget to eject the CD-ROM disc containing system software. If a message reports that installation was not successful, try installing again. (Follow the instructions on the screen.) If, after reinstalling system software by doing a normal installation, you still experience problems with your server, follow the steps in the next section for doing a “clean” installation of system software. IMPORTANT Certain system extensions or application programs that were originally on your hard disk may not be installed with the Installer program. If you notice that a certain extension or program was not installed, you need to install it separately. You can ?nd these additional extensions and programs on the Workgroup Server Software CD-ROM disc. (Application programs from other vendors can be reinstalled from backup copies you made.) 64 This is the disk on which system software will be installed. Click to indicate a different disk.Doing a clean installation of system software The steps in this section outline a “clean” installation of system software. A clean installation allows you to discover which item in your System Folder is causing a problem. A clean installation creates a brand new System Folder and saves everything in your original System Folder in a different location. You can then follow the instructions in “Replacing Special Software,” later in this chapter, to reinstall system extensions, control panels, and other special software one at a time from the old System Folder to the new System Folder. This procedure allows you to determine which item in the old System Folder was the source of the problem. Do a clean installation if you can’t determine what is damaged in your System Folder (especially if you think any special software, such as control panels, system extensions, or custom utilities, may be causing the problems you’re experiencing). You should also do a clean installation if you’re still having problems with your server after you’ve reinstalled system software by doing a normal installation. To do a clean installation, follow these steps: 1 If the disk on which you are installing system software is your startup disk, start up your server from the Workgroup Server Software CD-ROM disc. For details, see “Starting Up From a CD-ROM Disc” earlier in this chapter. 2 Find and open the Disk First Aid icon. The Disk First Aid program resides in the Utilities folder in the Apple Extras folder on your startup disk and on the Workgroup Server Software CDROM disc. After Disk First Aid starts, follow the instructions on the screen. Disk First Aid checks your hard disk for any problems. 3 When Disk First Aid has ?nished checking your hard disk, choose Quit from the File menu. 654 Open the Drive Setup program. You use the Drive Setup program to update your hard disk. 5 In the list of drives, click your startup disk. 6 Pull down the Functions menu and choose Update Driver. 7 When the update process is ?nished, quit Drive Setup. 8 Shut down your server. 9 If you are installing system software on your startup disk, start up your server from the Workgroup Server Software CD-ROM disc. The Installer’s Welcome screen may appear or you may have to doubleclick the System Software Installer icon to open the Installer program. 10 Click OK. The Easy Install dialog box appears. 66 If you need to install on a different disk, click this button. Disk on which system software will be installed. For a clean installation, DO NOT click the Install button.11 Make sure that the hard disk named in the Destination Disk box is the one on which you want to install system software. If it isn’t, click Switch Disk until the correct disk name appears. 12 Hold down Shift–x–K to start the clean installation. The following dialog box appears. 13 Make sure that the Install New System Folder button is selected and click OK. The Easy Install dialog box appears. The Install button has changed to Clean Install, and the contents of your old System Folder have been moved to a new folder named Previous System Folder. 14 Click Clean Install. 67 Click here to install the software you need.15 Follow the instructions that appear on the screen. It takes a few minutes to complete the installation. 16 When you see a message reporting that the installation was successful, you may need to click Restart. You need to click Restart only if you installed software onto the startup disk. If a message reports that installation was not successful, try repeating the clean installation procedure. IMPORTANT Certain system extensions or application programs that were originally on your hard disk may not be installed with the Installer program. If you notice that a certain extension or program was not installed, you may need to install it separately. You can ?nd these additional extensions and programs on the Workgroup Server Software CDROM disc. (Application programs from other vendors can be reinstalled from backup copies you made.) Replacing special software Special software consists of items such as control panels, system extensions, custom utilities, fonts, or Apple menu items that you may have had in your old System Folder. To make sure that special software does not create any con?icts with other programs on your server, follow this procedure to replace these items in your new System Folder: 1 Copy any special software items from the Previous System Folder back to your System Folder one item at a time, restarting the server after copying each item. IMPORTANT Be very careful not to replace (copy over) any of the ?les in the System Folder with ?les from the Previous System Folder. 2 Check after each restart to make sure your server is not having any software problems. If any of your special software items cause software problems, contact the software manufacturer for assistance or an upgrade. 68Doing a custom installation of system software The Easy Install procedure described in the previous sections is usually appropriate, because it automatically installs all the items you need. However, if you’d like to select a combination of system software ?les for your speci?c needs, you can customize your system software installation. You use custom installation to install or update one or more speci?c ?les, or to save space on your hard disk by installing only the ?les you want. To install customized system software, follow these steps: 1 If you are installing system software on your startup disk, start up your server from the Workgroup Server Software CD-ROM disc. For details, see “Starting Up From a CD-ROM Disc” earlier in this chapter. The Installer’s Welcome screen may appear or you may have to doubleclick the System Software Installer icon to open the Installer program. 2 Click OK. The Easy Install dialog box appears. 3 Choose Custom Install from the pop-up menu. The Custom Install dialog box appears, listing all available system software components. 694 Scroll through the list of components, clicking the checkbox next to each component you want to install. You can see and select individual items within each component by clicking the arrow to the left of the component, then clicking the item you want to install. To get additional information about each component listed, click the box with the letter i in it to the right of the component. 5 Click Install. 6 Follow the instructions that appear on the screen. 7 When you see a message reporting that the installation was successful, click Quit. If a message reports that installation was not successful, try installing again. (Follow the instructions on the screen.) 8 Restart your server. The system software is installed and your server is ready to use. Don’t forget to eject the CD-ROM disc containing system software when you are ?nished. 705 Using the CD-ROM Drive Read this chapter for information on using your server’s internal CD-ROM (Compact Disc Read-Only Memory) drive. (CD-ROM drives are also sometimes called CD-ROM players.) For information on the proper handling of CD-ROM discs, refer to Appendix A in the setup guide that came with your server. 71Your internal CD-ROM drive works with CD-ROM discs, standard audio compact discs (CDs), and single-session or multisession Photo CDs. Your CD-ROM drive provides access to large amounts of information. However, you cannot save information on CD-ROM discs. ROM stands for read-only memory, meaning that the player cannot “write” information onto CD-ROM discs. A wide selection of CD-ROM discs is available for entertainment, education, and business. A typical disc can hold over 650 megabytes (MB) of information— the equivalent of 270,000 pages of text, up to 8 hours of speech or music (depending on the sound quality), hundreds of highresolution images, or any combination of text, sound, and graphics. Inserting a CD-ROM disc Follow these instructions to insert a CD-ROM disc into your CD-ROM drive. Then follow the instructions provided with your disc, as well as the instructions in this manual. 1 Turn on your server, if it’s not already on. 2 Press the Open/Close button to open the tray of the CD-ROM drive. The tray opens. Open/Close button 723 Place a CD-ROM disc in the tray, with the disc label facing up. Make sure the disc is lying flat and centered in the tray. If you are using a small (8 cm) disc, make sure it is centered within the inside ring on the tray. 4 Push the tray in, or press the Open/Close button, to close the tray. In a few moments, an icon for the CD-ROM disc appears on your screen. Ejecting a CD-ROM disc Follow these instructions to open the tray and eject a CD-ROM disc from your computer. IMPORTANT You may not be able to eject a disc if it is being shared. 731 Open the tray. There are several ways to open the tray of your CD-ROM drive. If a CD-ROM disc icon appears on your screen: m Select the disc icon on your screen and drag the icon to the Trash. m Click the disc icon, then choose the Put Away command in the File menu. m While the AppleCD Audio Player window is active, choose Eject CD from the File menu, or simultaneously press the x and E keys. (AppleCD Audio Player is a program that allows you to control your CD-ROM drive and is available in the Apple [K] menu.) If no CD-ROM disc icon appears on your screen: m Press the Open/Close button for your CD-ROM drive. 2 Take the CD-ROM disc out of the tray. Store your disc in a safe place, away from heat, dust, and moisture. 3 Push the tray in, or press the Open/Close button, to close the tray. To avoid possible damage to the tray or the CD-ROM drive, keep the tray closed when you are not using it. Playing audio CDs With your CD-ROM drive and your computer’s built-in speaker, you can play audio compact discs (CDs) or audio tracks on CD-ROM discs. You can also attach headphones or speakers to the computer to listen to audio CDs and audio tracks. For information on connecting sound equipment to your server, see Chapter 3 in the setup guide that came with your server. You may need to set control panel options in order to play audio CD-ROM discs. See “Choosing Sound Devices and Alert Sounds” in Chapter 1. To start, stop, and otherwise control audio discs, use the AppleCD Audio Player program, available in the Apple (K) menu. Your audio CD software will only play tracks that contain audio information. You can listen to an audio CD or audio tracks in the background while you do other work on your server. For more information about playing audio CDs, see the “CDROM Discs” topic of Macintosh Guide, available in the Guide (h) menu. 74Working with Photo CDs You can use your CD-ROM drive to open Photo CD images stored on Photo CDs. A Photo CD image is a digitized version of a standard photograph that you can open and view on your screen. You can do many things with the images on your Photo CDs: m Open and view the images individually on your screen. m View the images on your screen in a series, as you would view a slide presentation. m Copy and save the images, print them, paste them into word-processing documents or other documents that accept graphics, and edit them with a graphics application program. Photo CD images are an excellent source of graphics for desktop publishing, multimedia presentations, business documents, and professional-quality graphic design. For more information on working with Photo CD images, see the “CD-ROM Discs” topic of Macintosh Guide, available in the Guide (h) menu. 756 Using a DAT Drive and Tape Cassettes You need to read this chapter only if your server includes an internal tapebackup unit. This chapter describes the types of tape cassettes that work with the internal tape-backup unit, tells you how to insert and remove tape cassettes, explains the DAT drive status lights, and tells you how to clean the tape-drive heads. The internal DDS-2 DAT drive and accompanying software can perform full or partial backup and restore procedures for all of the data on your hard disks. In addition, the drive automatically performs error correction and data compression of the ?les that you back up and restore. The errorcorrection feature helps ensure a high level of data integrity. The datacompression feature allows more data to ?t on a cassette than do conventional backup mechanisms. Use Retrospect Remote (or some other backup utility) to back up and restore data. For more information, see the utility’s documentation. 77Compatible tapes Your internal DAT (digital audio tape) drive is compatible with MRSquality DDS (digital data storage) tape cassettes. MRS (Media Recognition System) cassettes are the highest-quality digital data tape available. Your internal tape drive requires this level of quality to perform backup operations successfully. See your Apple-authorized service provider for more MRS-quality DDS tape cassettes or their compatible substitutes. Compatible cassettes are typically stamped “Digital Data Storage” and longer-length cassettes (120 meters) need the “DDS2” designation. If you use cassettes not approved by your Apple-authorized service provider, you void the warranty on your tape drive. IMPORTANT Some vendors of computer products may refer to DDS cassettes as digital audio tape (DAT) cassettes. However, DAT (audio) cassettes have a different mechanical speci?cation from DDS cassettes. For backing up your server ?les, be sure to use only those DAT cassettes designed for MRS. Tapes supplied with the server Two cassettes are supplied with your Workgroup Server. The ?rst is a blank DDS cassette for backup and restore operations. (The blank tape included with your system has a maximum storage capacity of 10–14 gigabytes of compressed data.) The second is a cleaning cassette; its operation is discussed later in this chapter. Starting up the tape drive The tape drive receives power and performs a self-test when you start up your server. During the test, both status lights next to the tape drive opening are solid green; then the light on the left ?ashes green and the light on the right turns off. If no tape is loaded in the tape drive, both status lights turn off. If a tape is loaded in the tape drive, the light on the left becomes solid green. 78There are two conditions that indicate the self-test has failed. If the light on the right ?ashes amber, you may need to clean the tape-drive head, as described in the section “Cleaning the Tape-Drive Heads” later in this chapter. Or, if a tape is loaded in the tape drive, a ?ashing amber light may indicate that the tape is worn and needs to be replaced. If the light on the right becomes solid amber, the tape drive did not successfully complete its self-test and should not be used; consult an Apple-authorized service provider. The status lights are discussed in greater detail later in this chapter. Inserting tape cassettes To use a cassette: m Insert it into the tape slot in the front panel of the server, as shown in this ?gure: As you insert the cassette, the drive pulls it into place and performs a loading sequence, which includes threading and rewinding the tape and checking for error conditions. The loading procedure takes about 30 seconds. 79Status lights Located next to the tape drive opening are two lights that inform you of the status of tape operations. The light on the left is the tape light, and the light on the right is the clean light. A solid green tape light indicates normal operation and a solid amber clean light indicates a warning condition. A ?ashing green tape light indicates activity between the tape drive and the SCSI bus. A ?ashing amber clean light indicates the tape in the drive is worn or the tape-drive head needs to be cleaned. The following table lists all the possible meanings of the status lights. Tape light Clean light (left side) (right side) Meaning Normal operation Flash green* Off Cassette loading or unloading, or self-test in progress Fast ?ash green † Off Cassette loaded/read or write activity Green Off Cassette loading/drive online Error states Any Flash amber* Media wear (caution), or clean required Any Amber Error condition *Flash means the light ?ashes 1 /2 second on, 1 /2 second off. † Fast ?ash means the light ?ashes 1 /4 second on, 1 /4 second off. 80The caution signal If your tape drive detects problems, it displays a caution signal: the clean light ?ashes amber. You can clear the caution signal by ejecting the cassette. The caution signal may be caused by dirty tape-drive heads. If this signal appears, clean the heads and insert the tape again. (Head-cleaning instructions are given in “Cleaning the Tape-Drive Heads,” later in this chapter.) The caution signal may also indicate a worn-out tape. If the tape is old or worn, you should copy its data to a new tape and discard it. If you’re trying to restore data from a worn tape and the caution signal appears, clean the tape-drive heads, then try the restore operation again. Removing tape cassettes You can remove a tape cassette at any time by pressing the eject button located under the tape slot on the right side. You should not press the eject button while the tape is in use. Check the Retrospect Remote (or other backup utility’s) documentation to learn about additional methods for ejecting cassettes while using the backup software. Forcing the ejection of a tape cassette If you need to force the ejection of a tape cassette: m Hold the eject button down for at least 5 seconds (perform this step after the server has started up). The drive waits 35 seconds for the normal eject procedure to occur, and, if it does not occur, unthreads the tape and ejects the cartridge. WARNING If you force an eject while the drive is busy, you may lose data or cause the tape to be invalidly formatted. 81Locking a cassette You can lock a DDS cassette by sliding the tab on the back of the cassette so that the hole is visible. Once a tape cassette is locked, data can be read from the cassette but not written to it. Avoiding high humidity Whenever your tape drive detects water condensation, both status lights glow solid amber. This warning signal cancels any commands in progress. Furthermore, any commands that access the tape are rejected. The tape drive then unthreads the tape to prevent tape and tape-head damage. To minimize the chance of condensation, adhere to the environmental require-ments described in the safety, health, and maintenance information in the setup guide that came with your server and follow these general cassette guidelines: m Use tape cassettes at temperatures between 5° C (40° F) and 40° C (104° F). m If you expose the tape cassettes to temperatures outside the operating limits, you can stabilize them by leaving them in the proper operating temperature for a minimum of two hours. Follow these guidelines to avoid temperature problems: m Avoid exposing cassettes to severe temperature conditions. For example, don’t store a cassette in a car in bright sunlight. m Avoid transferring data to or from a tape cassette when the temperature is changing by more than 10° F per hour (roughly 5° C per hour). 82Cleaning the tape-drive heads The most common reason for the display of a caution signal on the front panel is that the tape-drive heads are dirty. Although your tape drive has a built-in roller for cleaning the heads during normal operation, you still need to perform a separate cleaning step as part of preventive maintenance. Your system comes with a cleaning cassette that you should use to clean the tape-drive heads after every 25 hours of running time. The Apple cleaning cassette P/N 654-0002 is approved for use with the Workgroup Server DDS-2 DAT drive. This cleaning tape is the “dry” type. Don’t use the “wet,” alcohol-style cleaning tapes. Note that, in general, cleaning tapes that work with DDS-2 drives also work with DDS drives, but DDS cleaning tapes should not be used with DDS-2 drives. When you insert the cleaning cassette into the drive, the drive automatically loads it and cleans the heads. When the cleaning process is completed, the drive automatically ejects the cassette. Keep a record of how many times you use the cleaning cassette. After 25 uses, replace it. The interval at which you clean the tape drive depends on how often you use it. In general, if you back up daily, you should clean the drive weekly. If you back up weekly, you should clean the tape drive once a month. For more information about using the cleaning cassette, refer to the instructions that came with it. For additional cleaning cassettes, see your Appleauthorized service provider. 83847 Troubleshooting If you have trouble with your server, review the solutions to typical problems listed in this chapter. If you have a question or encounter a problem while your system is still running, you can also check the “Troubleshooting” topic of Macintosh Guide, available in the Guide (h) menu. For more information on the kinds of on-screen help available, see Appendix A, “Getting Help,” in this guide. 85When you run into trouble When you see an error message, you don’t have to take action immediately. The message stays on the screen until you click the OK button or turn off the server. To help diagnose and correct the problem, gather as much information about the situation as you can before starting over. m Make a note of exactly what you were doing when the problem occurred. Write down the message on the screen and its ID number (if any). Also list the programs you were using and the names of any items you know have been added to the System Folder since the system software was installed. This information will help a service person diagnose the problem. (It is helpful to keep a printed copy of the items in your System Folder. See instructions for printing a list of ?les in a window in the “Printing” topic of Macintosh Guide, available in the Guide h menu.) m Check the screen for any clues. Is a menu selected? What programs and document icons are open? Note anything else that seems relevant. m If you were typing text and were not able to save it before the problem occurred, you can write down the parts of the text still visible on the screen so that some of your work will be easy to replace. m Ask other Macintosh users about the problem you’re having; they may have a solution for it. m Find out what actions users were performing on the server (such as copying large ?les, launching programs on the server, or installing programs over the network). If you need repair service, consult the service and support information that came with your server for instructions on how to contact an Appleauthorized service provider or Apple for assistance. 86Start over Often you can eliminate a problem simply by clearing the server’s memory and starting over. If you can, save any open documents before restarting the server. If your system is “frozen” and does not respond to any input, or if you have a “bomb” message on the screen, saving may not be possible. You can try pressing x-Option-Esc to quit the program in use when the problem occurred; if this works, you can then save the documents open in other programs before restarting. (Be sure to restart the server immediately after you save your documents—quitting a program using x-Option-Esc may leave corrupted data in the server’s memory. This corrupted data is erased when you restart the server.) WARNING If you have a problem with your server and nothing presented in this chapter solves it, consult the service and support information that came with your server for instructions on how to contact an Apple-authorized service provider or Apple for assistance. If you attempt to repair the server yourself, any damage you may cause to the server will not be covered by the limited warranty on your server. Contact an Apple-authorized dealer or service provider for additional information about this or any other warranty question. 87To restart your server, try the following steps: 1 If you can, choose Restart from the Special menu or from the dialog box that’s on screen. 2 If you can’t choose Restart, press x-Control-Power key. This key combination restarts the server. (Use this key combination only when you can’t choose Restart from the Special menu.) 3 Turn off your server with the power button on the front panel of the server, wait at least 10 seconds, and then turn it on again. If the server does not turn off, try pressing and holding down the power button for 3 to 4 seconds. 4 If the power button doesn’t turn off the server, unplug your server. 5 If you suspect that the problem is with a peripheral device, such as a printer or external hard disk, turn it off for 10 seconds or more, then turn it on again and restart the server. Rebuild your desktop A process known as “rebuilding the desktop” helps your server keep track of data on your startup disks. (Although the hard disk in your server is usually the startup disk, you can start up from any other disk that has system software installed.) Rebuilding your desktop can solve a number of problems. For example, when application documents are no longer represented by applicationspeci?c icons (and are instead represented by generic icons on the desktop), rebuilding the desktop ?xes the problem. Afterward, appropriate icons should appear for all documents. Some extensions may interfere with rebuilding your desktop. To prevent problems, you’ll need to turn off all extensions except Macintosh Easy Open before you rebuild your desktop. When you ?nish rebuilding the desktop, turn the extensions you normally use back on. 88To rebuild the desktop of a startup disk, follow these steps: 1 Save your set of currently selected extensions. a. Open the Extensions Manager control panel by choosing Extensions Manager from the Control Panels submenu of the Apple (K) menu. b. From the Sets pop-up menu, choose Save Set. c. In the Save Set dialog box, type a name for your currently selected extensions (for example, “My Extensions”) and click OK. The name of your set is added to the Sets pop-up menu. 2 Choose All Off from the Sets pop-up menu to turn off all extensions. 3 Turn on Macintosh Easy Open by clicking it in the list (under Control Panels) so that a checkmark appears beside it. 4 Restart your server while holding down the Command (x) and Option keys. Hold down the x and Option keys until you see the dialog box that asks if you’re sure you want to rebuild your desktop ?le. When the dialog box appears, you can release the keys. 5 Click OK. The desktop is rebuilt. IMPORTANT Do not stop the desktop-rebuilding process. Doing so could corrupt your system ?les. 6 Turn your original set of extensions back on. a. Open the Extensions Manager control panel by choosing Extensions Manager from the Control Panels submenu of the Apple (K) menu. b. From the Sets pop-up menu, choose the name you gave your set of extensions in step 1. 7 Restart your server to activate the extensions. 89Solving typical problems This section contains descriptions of problems your server may experience. Some problems may be caused by your CD-ROM drive, so if you don’t ?nd your problem here, be sure to check the section “Solving CD-ROM Problems” later in this chapter. IMPORTANT Be sure to review the information in the Workgroup Server Read Me ?le located on your server’s hard disk and on the Workgroup Server Software CD-ROM disc. This ?le contains late-breaking information and tips. The following table lists problems and the page number for each problem. Problem Page Your server’s performance decreases 91 You cannot turn on the server 91 The server is turned on but the screen is dark 92 A disk icon with a blinking question mark appears 92 A disk icon with an X appears 93 A “sad” Macintosh icon appears 93 You hear a prolonged beep as the server starts up 93 Your server won’t start up after you install CD-ROM drive software 94 Your server won’t restart, and a CD-ROM disc is in the CD-ROM drive 94 Your server changes to LocalTalk at startup 94 Your server starts up from the wrong hard disk 94 Your server’s clock keeps time inaccurately 95 Icons do not appear correctly on your screen 95 Your server can’t read a ?oppy disk 96 You can’t eject a ?oppy disk 96 You can’t start an application program 97 A dialog box with a “bomb” appears 98 The pointer doesn’t move when you move the mouse 98 Typing on the keyboard produces nothing on the screen 99 An application program can’t be found 100 You experience problems using a document from a DOS computer 101 90Problem Page Your application program can’t be opened because a ?le can’t be found 101 You experience problems using an older Macintosh program 101 CD-ROM problems 102 Printer connectivity problems 110 AppleTalk problems 111 TCP/IP problems 112 Hard disk problems 113 Your server’s performance decreases. If you notice a decrease in your server’s speed and general performance after adding special software (a control panel, a system extension, or a custom utility), it may be because your special software does not work well with Power Macintosh computers. To see if this is the problem, use the Extensions Manager control panel to turn off individual programs and extensions, one at a time, and then restart the server. (For information on using the Extensions Manager control panel, see the “Customizing Your Computer” topic of Macintosh Guide, available in the Guide h menu.) If your server performs better when a special program or extension is removed, contact the software’s manufacturer for information or an upgrade. If you still do not notice an improvement after removing all special programs, try doing a “clean” installation of system software, as described in “Doing a Clean Installation of System Software” in Chapter 4. You cannot turn on the server. See the section about turning on your server in the setup guide that came with your server. 91The server is turned on but the screen is dark. The server or the monitor is not getting power, a program has darkened the screen, or the monitor controls are not adjusted properly. m If you use a screen-saver program or the Energy Saver control panel to dim the screen, press a key or move the mouse. m Check the monitor’s brightness and contrast controls and turn them up if necessary. m Check that the monitor is turned on. m Check that the power cord and monitor cable are plugged in and ?rmly connected to the server and that the electrical outlet has power. The power light on the server’s front panel should be on. m If you have more than one monitor, and only one is dark, check that it is set up correctly in the Monitors & Sound control panel. m If none of these steps solves the problem, you may need to reset your server’s parameter RAM (PRAM). Reset PRAM by turning off the server and disconnecting all external SCSI devices. Next, restart the server while holding down the key combination x-Option-p-r. Wait for the second startup chime, then release the keys. (Note that the Caps Lock key must be in the up position. This procedure won’t work with the uppercase “P” and “R” keys.) A disk icon with a blinking question mark appeared when you started your server. The blinking question mark indicates that your server cannot ?nd system software. You may need to repair a damaged disk, or reinstall system software. m Your server may be having a problem recognizing a SCSI device. Turn off external SCSI devices and restart. If the server starts up after you turn off your SCSI devices, read the section on SCSI devices in the setup guide that came with your server for information on connecting SCSI devices and assigning SCSI ID numbers. 92m The system software is not installed on the startup hard disk, the system software is damaged, or the hard disk is not working properly. Start up your server with the Workgroup Server Software CD-ROM disc (see “Starting Up From a CD-ROM Disc” in Chapter 4). Then refer to “Solving Hard Disk Problems” at the end of this chapter. If repairing the disk doesn’t help, follow the instructions in “Installing System Software” in Chapter 4. A disk icon with an X appeared and the ?oppy disk was ejected. Your server ejected a ?oppy disk that is not a startup disk. m Wait a few seconds. The server should start up from its internal hard disk. Make sure you insert ?oppy disks only after the server has begun starting up. A “sad Macintosh” icon appeared and the server won’t start up. Your server cannot start up because of a problem with the system software or the server hardware. m Eject any ?oppy disks (or CD-ROM discs) by turning off the server and then holding down the mouse button while you turn the server on again. Try starting up with a different startup disk (such as the Workgroup Server Software CD-ROM disc). If the “sad Macintosh” icon appears again, consult the service and support information that came with your server for instructions on how to contact an Apple-authorized service provider or Apple for assistance. You hear a prolonged beep during the startup process. Sometimes during heavy network traf?c, a server may not start up correctly. Disconnect the Ethernet cable before you try to start up again, and reconnect it after the server starts up. Open the AppleTalk control panel to make sure that Ethernet is still selected. 93You installed a CD-ROM drive after you bought your server and your server won’t restart after you’ve copied software for your CD-ROM drive to the System Folder. m If you attempt to install software for your CD-ROM drive without using the Installer, you may not be able to restart your server. Restart the server while holding down the Shift key (to turn off system extensions) and then remove any CD-ROM software ?les you copied by dragging them to the Trash. Reinstall the software according to the instructions that came with the drive. If this procedure doesn’t solve the problem, restart your server using the Workgroup Server Software CD-ROM disc that came with your server. (For instructions on starting your server using a CD-ROM disc, see “Starting Up From a CD-ROM Disc” in Chapter 4.) Your server won’t restart, and a CD-ROM disc is in the CD-ROM drive. m Your server may be trying to start up from the CD-ROM disc. Press the Open/Close button of your CD-ROM drive to open the tray and remove the CD-ROM disc. Close the tray, then restart your server. You see an error message at startup telling you that the system will use the LocalTalk port. There may be a problem with the cable that connects your server to the network—it may be loose or damaged. Verify the connection, as described in the setup guide that came with your server, and restart your server. The server starts up from the wrong hard disk, or the hard disk icon does not appear on the desktop. m The startup disk may be slow to start up. During startup, your server’s operating system ?nds and mounts attached SCSI devices that are up and running within 20 seconds. Some very large hard disk drives (such as 2-gigabyte drives) may take longer than 20 seconds to come up to speed and therefore may not be recognized by the operating system when the server is ?rst turned on. Use the Drive Setup program to make the disk available. Drive Setup is located in the Utilities folder in the Apple Extras folder. For instructions, see the section “Mounting Volumes” in Chapter 4. 94If you still have a problem, try the following: m If the hard disk is external, make sure it is turned on and its cable is connected ?rmly and properly terminated; then restart the server. m Check the ID numbers of all SCSI equipment connected to your server. See the information on SCSI devices in the setup guide that came with your server. m If the hard disk is your startup disk, start up your server with the Workgroup Server Software CD-ROM disc (see “Starting Up From a CDROM Disc” in Chapter 4). Then see “Solving Hard Disk Problems” (later in this chapter). If repairing the disk doesn’t help, follow the instructions in “Installing System Software” in Chapter 4. IMPORTANT If the hard disk in question has been initialized for use with Apple RAID volumes, you won’t see an icon for it on the desktop until you create at least one RAID volume on that disk. The server’s clock keeps time inaccurately. m Your server has a clock that runs continuously. When the server is turned off, a battery keeps the clock running. If your clock begins to keep time inaccurately, have your Apple-authorized service provider replace the battery. Consult the service and support information that came with your server for instructions on how to contact an Apple-authorized service provider or Apple for assistance. Icons do not appear correctly on your screen. You need to “rebuild the desktop”—a process that helps your server keep track of ?les and folders on your hard disks. For instructions, see “Rebuild Your Desktop” earlier in this chapter. 95Your server can’t read a ?oppy disk. If you see a message that a ?oppy disk is unreadable, try one of the following: m Insert the disk again—sometimes that’s all it takes. m If the disk has never been used, you may simply need to initialize it. See the instructions for preparing a disk listed in the “Disks” topic of Macintosh Guide, available in the Guide (h) menu. m Insert the disk in another computer’s disk drive. If that computer can use the disk, make a copy of the data and put the copy on a different ?oppy disk. m You may need to repair the disk because it is damaged. For information on testing and repairing disks, see “How to Repair a Hard Disk or Floppy Disk” later in this chapter. If you are trying to use a DOS disk: m The disk may have been formatted incorrectly on a DOS computer. On DOS computers it’s possible to format a standard double-sided disk in a high-density (1440K) format, and vice versa. Disks formatted this way cannot be read by a Macintosh computer. When formatting disks on a DOS computer, always format standard double-sided disks in the 720K format. Always format high-density disks in the 1440K format. If a disk has been formatted incorrectly, use a DOS computer to copy its contents onto another disk that has been properly formatted. You can’t eject a ?oppy disk. If you can’t eject a ?oppy disk in the usual way, try the following in order: m Hold down the x and Shift keys and press the number 1 key on your keyboard to eject a disk in the internal disk drive. m Turn off the server. If the disk isn’t ejected, then hold down the button on your mouse or other pointing device while you turn the server on again. m Locate the small hole near the disk drive’s opening, and carefully insert the end of a large straightened paper clip into it. Push gently until the disk is ejected. Do not use excessive force. 96If none of these solutions works, take the server or disk drive to your Apple-authorized service provider to have the disk removed. You can’t start your program or it quits unexpectedly. When you try to open a program, you see a message that not enough memory is available. The program needs more memory or the server ran out of memory. m Quit the programs that you have open and then open the program you want to use, or restart your server. m Use the program’s Info window to give it more memory. For more information see the instructions for making more memory available in the “Application Programs” topic of Macintosh Guide, available in the Guide (h) menu. m The program is a non–Power Macintosh application program running in emulation mode that requires a separate ?oating-point unit (FPU). It cannot use the built-in FPU on your server’s microprocessor. Check the documentation that came with the program or contact the program’s manufacturer to ?nd out if the program requires the FPU found in a non–Power Macintosh chip. If it does, you may need to upgrade to a Power Macintosh version of the program, or install software that emulates a non–Power Macintosh FPU. (See your dealer for this software.) m Sometimes incompatible system extensions or control panels can cause software problems. Restart while holding down the Shift key to turn off all system extensions temporarily. If your program works normally after you do this, use the Extensions Manager control panel to turn off individual extensions and control panels. For detailed instructions, see the “Customizing Your Computer” topic of Macintosh Guide, available in the Guide (h) menu. If your program performs better when a particular extension or control panel is turned off, contact the software’s manufacturer for information or an upgrade. 97A dialog box with a “bomb” icon appears. Your system has a software problem. m Write down what you were doing when the dialog box appeared, and write down the number on the message, if there is one. m Restart your server (see “Start Over” earlier in this chapter). Most software problems are temporary and restarting usually corrects the problem. m If the problem recurs, check the startup disk and program you are using when the message appears. Make sure that all programs, desk accessories, and system extensions you’re using are compatible with the system software. Reinstalling the system software may correct the problem. m If the bomb only occurs in one application program, try reinstalling the program from the original disks. If reinstalling doesn’t solve the problem, contact the manufacturer of the program. m Sometimes incompatible system extensions or control panels can cause system software problems. To see if this is the problem, use the Extensions Manager control panel to turn off individual extensions and then restart the server. For information on using this control panel to manage system extensions, see the “Customizing Your Computer” topic of Macintosh Guide, available in the Guide (h) menu. If turning off these programs doesn’t correct the problem, you may need to reinstall system software. The pointer doesn’t move when you move the mouse. The mouse is not connected properly, its signals are not reaching the server, or there is a software error. m Turn off the server by using the power button on the front panel of the server check that the mouse cable is connected properly, then restart the server. m Clean the mouse. (For information about cleaning the mouse, see the setup guide that came with your server). m If you have another mouse or pointing device, try connecting and using it. (Turn off the server ?rst.) If it works, there is probably something wrong with your mouse. m Restart the server with a different startup disk (such as the Workgroup Server Software CD-ROM disc). If the mouse works, reinstall system software on your startup disk. 98m If the problem recurs, it may be due to an incompatible program. Make sure that all programs, desk accessories, and system extensions you’re using are compatible with the system software. If none of these procedures solves the problem, consult the service and support information that came with your server for instructions on how to contact an Apple-authorized service provider or Apple for assistance. Typing on the keyboard produces nothing on the screen. The insertion point hasn’t been set, no text is selected, an application program is not active, the keyboard is not connected properly, the keyboard’s signals are not reaching the server, or there is a software error. m Make sure the program you want to use is the active program. m Place the pointer in the active window and click to set an insertion point or drag to select text (if applicable). m Easy Access may be turned on. (When Easy Access is turned on, the server beeps every time you press a key.) Open Easy Access from the control panels listed under the Apple (K) menu and turn it off. m Turn off the server by using the power button on the front panel of the server, then check that the keyboard cable is connected properly at both ends. m Turn off the server, then connect the keyboard cable to the other ADB port (marked with the V icon) on the keyboard. (You may have to unplug the mouse to do this.) If your keyboard cable is connected to your monitor, connect it to another ADB port on the monitor or directly to the server’s ADB port (on the back of the server). If typing still doesn’t work, the problem is most likely in the keyboard itself. m If you have access to another keyboard, try using it instead. (Turn off the server before connecting it.) m Restart the server with a different startup disk (such as the Workgroup Server Software CD-ROM disc). If this solves the problem, reinstall system software on your startup disk. If none of these procedures solves the problem, consult the service and support information that came with your server for instructions on how to contact an Apple-authorized service provider or Apple for assistance. 99You see a message that an application program can’t be found. The following dialog box appears if you try to open a document created using software that is not on your hard disk. Normally, you see this message if you try to open a document that came from another computer with software that is different from yours. m Some documents can be opened by more than one application program. Try starting a program that you think might be able to open the document, then choose the Open command from the program’s File menu to try to open the document. (Or drag the document to the program’s icon. If the program can open the document, the program’s icon highlights.) m Purchase and install the correct software to use the document, or ?nd out if the original owner of the document can convert it to a form that one of your programs can use. m Don’t try to open the ?les in your System Folder. Most of the System Folder ?les are used by your server for internal purposes, and are not intended to be opened. m Rebuild your desktop. (Refer to “Rebuild Your Desktop” earlier in this chapter.) m The application program itself may be damaged. Try reinstalling it. m If the document is from a DOS computer, use the PC Exchange control panel. See the information on setting up your Macintosh to use DOS ?les in the “DOS, Windows, Apple II Files” topic of Macintosh Guide, available in the Guide (h) menu. m See the Workgroup Server Read Me ?le for additional information about Macintosh PC Exchange and DOS-formatted media. 100You experience problems using a document from a DOS computer. If you can’t open a DOS or Windows document using a Macintosh program, try the following: m Open the document from within the program by using the Open command in the program’s File menu. m Use the PC Exchange control panel to change the document’s type to one that can be opened by the program. See the information on setting up your Macintosh to use DOS ?les in the “DOS, Windows, Apple II Files” topic of Macintosh Guide, available in the Guide (h) menu. If a DOS document is displayed incorrectly, or you see strange codes or characters in the document: m Your application program may have special procedures for opening and saving documents with different ?le formats. See the information that came with your application program. m Try opening the document in another program. Note: Some characters that can be displayed on the server are not accurately displayed on DOS computers. You see a message that your application program can’t be opened because a ?le can’t be found. Power Macintosh programs use special ?les called shared libraries. Any necessary shared libraries should be installed automatically when you install Power Macintosh programs. m Follow the directions that came with your program to reinstall the program. If the shared library is still missing, contact the software program’s manufacturer for assistance. You experience problems using an older Macintosh program. Some older Macintosh programs are not completely compatible with the Power Macintosh computers. m Open the Memory control panel and turn off Modern Memory Manager. (Note that AppleShare cannot work properly when the Modern Memory Manager is turned off.) For more detailed instructions, see “Using Older Macintosh Programs” in Chapter 3 of this guide. 101Solving CD-ROM problems The following table lists CD-ROM problems by symptom and the page number for each problem. Symptom Page The CD-ROM drive icon does not appear on-screen 102 Your server won’t restart after you copied CD-ROM software to the System Folder 103 You see large folder-shaped areas on the screen 103 The tray of your CD-ROM drive won’t open 104 Your server won’t restart, and a CD-ROM disc is in the CD-ROM drive 104 You insert a CD-ROM disc, but its icon doesn’t appear on the Macintosh desktop 105 The message “This is not a Macintosh disk” appears 105 Your server ejects a CD-ROM disc without displaying an error message 106 You can’t open a document on a CD-ROM disc 106 You can’t access ?les on an ISO 9660 or High Sierra disc 106 You don’t hear sound when you play an audio CD 107 The audio track stops playing when you double-click the CD-ROM disc icon 107 You are unable to record sound from an audio CD 107 You can’t open a Photo CD 108 Your server does not display color icons for individual images on a Photo CD 108 An image on a Photo CD is displayed incorrectly 108 Your server “freezes” when you open a Photo CD image 108 Problems using the CD-ROM drive The CD-ROM drive icon does not appear on-screen. m If you attached additional SCSI devices to your server, make sure that each device has a unique SCSI ID number. See the setup guide that came with your server for the SCSI ID numbers of factory-installed devices. Refer to the documentation that came with your SCSI devices if you need to reset the SCSI ID number of a SCSI device that you attached to your server. 102Note: The Workgroup Server 7250 has one SCSI bus, and the Workgroup Server 8550 has two SCSI buses. On a Workgroup Server 7250, all SCSI devices must have unique ID numbers because they are on the same SCSI bus. On the Workgroup Server 8550, devices on different SCSI buses can have the same SCSI ID number. m If you installed an additional CD-ROM drive, make sure the CD-ROM software that came with the drive is installed. See the manual that came with the CD-ROM drive for software installation instructions. m If you reinstall the CD-ROM software, make sure to restart your server after you reinstall the software. You installed an additional CD-ROM drive and your server won’t restart after you’ve copied software for the additional CD-ROM drive to the System Folder. m If you attempt to install software for an additional CD-ROM drive without using the Installer, you may not be able to restart your server. Restart the server while holding down the Shift key (to turn off system extensions), and then remove any CD-ROM software ?les you copied by dragging them to the Trash. Reinstall the software according to the instructions that came with the drive. If this procedure doesn’t solve the problem, restart your server using the Workgroup Server Software CD-ROM disc. (For instructions on starting your server using a CD-ROM disc, see “Starting Up From a CD-ROM Disc” in Chapter 4.) Your server starts up and you see large folder-shaped areas, containing labeled pictorial buttons, instead of the usual Macintosh desktop. m Your server may have started up from a CD-ROM disc containing At Ease, an alternative to the Macintosh desktop. To return to the Macintosh desktop, choose Shut Down from the Special menu. When your server is off, press the Open/Close button of your CDROM drive to open the tray, then remove the CD-ROM disc. Close the tray. Then start up your server again. To avoid having the server start up from a CD-ROM disc, remember to remove any disc in the drive before you shut down your server. 103The tray of your CD-ROM drive won’t open. If a CD-ROM disc icon appears on your screen: m Drag the disc icon to the Trash, or select it and choose Put Away from the File menu. If the AppleCD Audio Player program is active, choose Eject CD from the File menu. If you see a message that a disc can’t be put away because it is being shared, turn off ?le sharing, then try again to put away the disc. If no CD-ROM disc icon appears on your screen: m Press the Open/Close button of your CD-ROM drive. m The signal to open the tray may not be reaching the computer. Turn off your server and locate the small pinhole to the lower right of the CDROM tray opening. Insert the end of a large, straightened paper clip ?rmly and horizontally into the pinhole. Push gently until the tray is released, then carefully pull the tray open. Do not force the tray open; wait until the paper clip has dislodged it, or you may break the front of the tray. If neither of these suggestions works, your CD-ROM drive may be damaged. Contact an Apple-authorized service provider or Apple for further assistance. Your server won’t restart, and a CD-ROM disc is in the CD-ROM drive. m Your server may be trying to start up from the CD-ROM disc. Press the Open/Close button of your CD-ROM drive to open the tray, and remove the CD-ROM disc. Close the tray, then restart your server. WARNING Turn off your server before you attempt to eject the tray using a paper clip. If you don’t, you may damage the CD-ROM drive. 104Problems using CD-ROM discs You insert a CD-ROM disc, but its icon doesn’t appear on the Macintosh desktop. m Make sure that the disc label is facing up and the disc is centered in the tray. If you’re using a small (8 cm) disc, make sure it is within the tray’s inner ring. m Make sure the tray is closed all the way. m Try restarting your server. m Try starting your server from the CD-ROM disc that contains system software while holding the “c” key down. If only the hard drive icon appears on the desktop, then there may be a hardware problem with your CD-ROM drive. If the CD-ROM icon appears above the hard drive icon, try reinstalling your CD-ROM software following the instructions in “Reinstalling CD-ROM Software” later in this chapter. m If you installed the CD-ROM drive after you bought your server, make sure the CD-ROM software is installed. (Refer to the documentation that came with the CD-ROM drive.) Software for the built-in CD-ROM is already installed on your server. You can reinstall it by following the procedure in “Reinstalling CD-ROM Software” later in this chapter. Your server displays the message “This is not a Macintosh disk: Do you want to initialize it?” when you insert a CD-ROM disc in the CD-ROM drive. m Make sure that the Foreign File Access and Audio CD Access CD-ROM extensions are installed in your Extensions Folder and are turned on. (If they are not turned on, use the Extensions Manager control panel to turn them on and then restart your server. m Make sure the CD-ROM software is installed. Software for the built-in CD-ROM is already installed on your server. If you installed another CDROM drive after buying your server, see the manual that came with your drive. m The disc may use a format that the Mac OS cannot recognize. 105Your server ejects a CD-ROM disc without giving you any error message. m Make sure the disc is ?at in the tray and the disc label is facing up. If you’re using a small (8 cm) disc, make sure it’s centered within the tray’s inner ring. m The disc may need to be cleaned. (For information on how to do this, see the section on handling CD-ROM discs in the setup guide that came with your server.) If there are visible scratches on the shiny side of the disc, you may be able to remove them with a CD polishing kit (available from your audio CD dealer). If the scratches can’t be removed, you’ll need to replace the disc. m The disc may be damaged. Try another disc in the drive, and try the original disc in another drive. If the original drive reads other discs or if the original disc doesn’t work in another drive, the disc is probably damaged. You’ll need to replace the disc. You can’t open a document on a CD-ROM disc. m Try opening the application program ?rst; then open the document. m Read the manual that came with your CD-ROM disc. Some discs come with software that you need to install on your computer before using the disc. Problems using ISO 9660 or High Sierra discs You can’t access ?les on a CD-ROM disc that uses the ISO 9660 or High Sierra format. m Discs in the ISO 9660 and High Sierra disc formats have version numbers attached to ?lenames. Some application programs need these version numbers in order to work with ?les. To make the version numbers available to programs on your server, follow these instructions: Drag the CD icon to the Trash. When the tray opens, hold down the Option key and push the tray back in, continuing to hold down the Option key until the disc is fully in the drive. The program you are using should now be able to locate ?lenames on that CD-ROM disc. m Make sure that Foreign File Access, ISO 9660 File Access, and High Sierra File Access are present in the Extensions folder in your System Folder. 106Problems playing audio CDs You don’t hear any sound when you play an audio CD or an audio track on a CD-ROM disc using the AppleCD Audio Player. m If the CD-ROM drive was installed after you bought your server, make sure the audio cable is properly connected. See the documentation that came with the CD-ROM drive for more information. m If you have headphones or speakers connected to the server, adjust the connector to make sure they are ?rmly connected. Make sure the volume control on your headphones or speakers is not turned down too low. m Some programs change the sound options to suit their needs. You may need to reset the sound options in the Monitors & Sound control panel. Refer to the “Sound” topic of Macintosh Guide, available in the Guide (h) menu. m If you are using a CD-ROM disc over a network, you won’t be able to hear the audio portion. m Make sure the volume is turned up in the AppleCD Audio Player. With the Audio Player open, drag the volume control slider up or press the Up Arrow key on your keyboard. m The CD may have been paused. Click the Play/Pause button in the AppleCD Audio Player once or twice. While playing an audio track on a CD-ROM disc that combines audio tracks and data, you double-click the disc icon and the audio track stops playing. m You can’t open data ?les on a CD-ROM disc and listen to audio tracks on that disc at the same time. You are unable to record sound from an audio CD. m Check your server’s sound input port to see if a microphone or other device is connected. m You may need to reset the sound options in the Monitors & Sound control panel. See “Choosing Sound Devices and Alert Sounds” in Chapter 1. 107Problems using Photo CDs Your CD-ROM drive will not open Photo CDs. m Reinstall the CD-ROM software. See “Reinstalling CD-ROM Software” later in this chapter. Your server does not display color icons for individual images on a Photo CD. m Your server may be low on memory. To view color icons, restart your server and then reopen the Photos folder. See the “Memory” topic of Macintosh Guide, available in the Guide (h) menu, for more information on managing memory. After you open an image on a Photo CD, the image is scrambled, colors are displayed incorrectly, or no image appears in the window. m The program you are using may not be designed to work with large (high-resolution) image ?les. You can open the image with another program or you can assign more memory to the program. (For more information on managing memory, see the “Memory” topic of Macintosh Guide, available in the Guide [h] menu.) After you open an image on a Photo CD, your system is “frozen” and does not respond to any input, or you have a “bomb” message on your screen. m Restart your server. The program you are using may not be designed to work with large (high-resolution) image ?les. You can open the image with another program, or you can assign more memory to the program. (See the “Memory” topic of Macintosh Guide, available in the Guide [h] menu, for more information on managing memory). Reinstalling CD-ROM software CD-ROM software is a set of programs and ?les that allow your CD-ROM drive to work correctly with your server and allow it to play different kinds of CDs, like Photo CDs or audio CDs. The CD-ROM software is part of system software and was preinstalled on your server’s hard disk. (It is also available on the Workgroup Server Software CD-ROM disc that came with your server.) 108If you added a CD-ROM drive after you bought your server, the CD-ROM software is probably on a ?oppy disk that came with the drive. If, for some reason, you need to reinstall the CD-ROM software for that drive, you should reinstall it from the ?oppy disk that came with the drive. Follow these steps to reinstall the CD-ROM software for the built-in CD-ROM drive: 1 Start up your server from the Workgroup Server Software CD-ROM disc. For details, see “Starting Up From a CD-ROM Disc” in Chapter 4. The Installer’s Welcome screen may appear automatically. Or, you may have to double-click the System Software Installer icon to open the Installer program. 2 Click OK. The Easy Install dialog box appears. 3 Choose Custom Install from the pop-up menu. The Custom Install dialog box appears, listing all available system software components. 1094 Select Multimedia Software by clicking the checkbox next to it. To get additional information about each component listed, click the box with the letter i in it to the right of the component. 5 Click Install. 6 Follow the instructions that appear on the screen. 7 When you see a message reporting that the installation was successful, click Quit. If a message reports that installation was not successful, try installing again. (Follow the instructions on the screen.) 8 Restart your server. The CD-ROM software is reinstalled and your server is ready to use. Don’t forget to eject the CD-ROM disc or ?oppy disk containing system software when you are ?nished. Solving printer connectivity problems The following suggestions should work for all printers. m Check your printer settings in the Chooser, making sure you have selected the correct printer. m Next, turn off the server and printer and check the printer cable connections. m If neither of these suggestions solves the problem, reinstall your printer driver. If your printer is an older model, do not use the driver that came with the printer. Instead, use the updated printer drivers provided on the system software CD-ROM that came with your server. These drivers are created especially for use with Power Macintosh computers, such as your server. Note that if the printer is being used in conjunction with the AppleShare Print Server software, the driver must be version 7.2 of the LaserWriter printer driver. 110Solving AppleTalk problems You can’t turn AppleTalk on. Make sure you turn on AppleTalk in the AppleTalk control panel. If you’re sure it’s turned on in the control panel, check to make sure AppleTalk is also turned on in the Chooser. If you have other software that can turn AppleTalk on or off, make sure that it’s turned on in that software as well. You can’t see any network devices in the Chooser. m Make sure AppleTalk is turned on. m If AppleTalk is turned on, make sure you have chosen the correct port in the “Connect via” pop-up menu in the AppleTalk control panel. m If your network number or node number has been set to User De?ned, turn off the User De?ned setting. Then restart your server. m Make sure your network is functioning correctly by making sure that other computers on your network can see network devices. You can’t switch from a serial to an Ethernet connection. m If you use an expansion card to connect to Ethernet, make sure the card is installed correctly. m Make sure your Ethernet cables are connected properly. m Make sure your network is functioning correctly by making sure that other computers on your network can see network devices. You can’t remember your Administration password. You can erase your Administration password (along with all of your AppleTalk settings and con?gurations) by dragging the AppleTalk Preferences ?le (inside the Preferences folder in your active System Folder) to the Trash. When you open the AppleTalk control panel again, you must reenter all your settings. 111Solving TCP/IP problems Your server can’t connect to devices outside its local network. Make sure your router address is correct. Your server can connect to hosts by IP address, but not by name. m Make sure you have entered valid domain names in the Additional Search Domains box. m If you have entered your local and administrative domain names, double-check to make sure they’re correct. Your server does not respond to a “ping.” m Make sure you have an active application on your server that uses TCP/IP and can respond to a ping from another computer. m Make sure your TCP/IP con?guration is correct. m Make sure your network cables are properly connected. m Make sure your network is functioning properly. You can’t remember your Administration password. You can erase your Administration password (along with all of your TCP/IP settings and con?gurations) by dragging the TCP/IP Preferences ?le (inside the Preferences folder in your active System Folder) to the Trash. When you open the TCP/IP control panel again, you must reenter all your settings. 112Solving hard disk problems If you can’t start up from a hard disk or you don’t see the hard disk icon on the desktop, try the following: m Shut down your server and turn off any external disk devices. m Check the ID numbers of all SCSI equipment connected to your server. The Workgroup Server 7250 has one SCSI bus, and the Workgroup Server 8550 has two SCSI buses. On a Workgroup Server 7250, all SCSI devices must have unique ID numbers because they are on the same SCSI bus. On the Workgroup Server 8550, devices on different SCSI buses can have the same SCSI ID number. See the setup guide that came with your server for information about SCSI ID assignments for factory-installed devices. m Check that each SCSI bus is terminated properly. For information about terminating a SCSI bus, see the setup guide that came with your server and the manuals that came with your SCSI equipment. m Remove devices that you do not use. Apple recommends that you remove SCSI devices that are turned off and are not used. Removing unused devices avoids signal strength problems for the remaining devices on the bus. m Remove SCSI-1 devices if you are also using SCSI-2 devices. Older disks, usually under 200 MB in size, cause problems when they are connected to a SCSI bus to which SCSI-2 devices are also connected. Most older disks are SCSI-1 compliant and are not always compatible with SCSI-2 devices. m If the hard disk is internal, wait at least 10 seconds, and then turn your server on again. m If the hard disk is external, make sure that it is turned on and that its cable is connected ?rmly; then restart the server. m If the hard disk is your startup disk, start up with a different startup disk. (For details, see “Starting Up From a CD-ROM Disc” in Chapter 4.) If the hard disk’s icon appears on your desktop, reinstall system software on the hard disk. See “Installing System Software” in Chapter 4. m Follow the instructions in the next section, “How to Test a Hard Disk.” 113How to test a hard disk You can test an Apple SCSI hard disk with the Drive Setup program. Note: Drive Setup can only test drives that were formatted by the Drive Setup program. It cannot test drives on which the Apple RAID driver is installed, or drives that were formatted by another utility. 1 If the disk that you need to test is your startup disk, start up your server from the Workgroup Server Software CD-ROM disc. For details, see “Starting Up From a CD-ROM Disc” in Chapter 4. 2 Open the Drive Setup icon. The Drive Setup program resides in the Utilities folder in the Apple Extras folder on your startup disk and on the Workgroup Server Software CD-ROM disc. 3 In the list of drives, click the disk you want to test. 4 Choose Test Disk from the Functions menu. 1145 When a message tells you that testing is complete, click Quit. If the test reveals a problem, you may be able to correct it by using Disk First Aid or another disk repair program (see the instructions in the next section), or you may need to initialize the disk (see “Initializing a Hard Disk” in Chapter 4). Consult an Apple-authorized service provider for assistance if necessary. If you have a hard disk from another manufacturer, use the software that came with the disk or contact the disk vendor to get the latest version of software. How to repair a hard disk or ?oppy disk You can repair some types of disk damage by using the Disk First Aid program. 1 If the disk that you need to repair is your startup disk, start up your server from the Workgroup Server Software CD-ROM disc. For details, see “Starting Up From a CD-ROM Disc” in Chapter 4. 2 Open the Disk First Aid icon. The Disk First Aid program resides in the Utilities folder in the Apple Extras folder on your startup disk and on the Workgroup Server Software CDROM disc. 3 Click the icon of the disk you want to test. Disk icons appear in a box at the top of the Disk First Aid window. 1154 Click Repair to begin testing and repairing the disk. If you want to test and repair another disk, click its icon and then click Repair. 5 When testing and repair are ?nished, choose Quit from the File menu. If Disk First Aid cannot correct the problem m Try repairing the disk again. Sometimes repeating the process corrects the problem. m Use another disk repair or recovery program. Some disk repair programs let you recover information from a damaged disk. m Consult a computer repair specialist for help. m Once you have recovered all the information you can, initialize the disk as described in Chapter 4. If initializing doesn’t work, discard the damaged disk (if it’s a ?oppy disk), or take it to your Apple-authorized service provider for repair (if it’s a hard disk). 116Appendix A Getting Help When you have questions about how your system software works, look to the Guide menu for access to on-screen help. The Guide menu is identified by a question mark (h) in the upper-right corner of the screen. This appendix provides information on the various kinds of on-screen help available in the Guide menu: m Macintosh Tutorial for learning the basics m Macintosh Guide for step-by-step assistance in using the Macintosh Operating System (Mac OS) m Balloon Help for quick definitions of on-screen objects m Shortcuts for increased desktop productivity Some application programs also put access to help information in the Guide menu. 117Learning the basics If you are a new Macintosh user, take a look at the Macintosh Tutorial, available in the Guide menu. The tutorial teaches you the basic skills you’ll need to use your server. To start the tutorial, follow these steps: 1 Slide your mouse along your mouse pad or desk. Hold the mouse as shown, with the cable pointing away from you. Don’t press the mouse button (under your index finger). Notice that the arrow (8) on the screen moves in the same direction that you move the mouse. If the arrow doesn’t move, make sure that the cables connecting the mouse and keyboard are secure and that your mouse is positioned as shown in the illustration. 2 Move the tip of the arrow (8) to the question mark (h) in the upper-right portion of the screen. If you run out of room on your mouse pad or desk while moving the mouse, pick up the mouse and place it where there’s more room. (The arrow on the screen moves only when the mouse is in contact with the mouse pad or desk.) Mouse button 1183 With the tip of the arrow on the question mark, press and hold down the mouse button. A list of choices (called a menu) appears. This is the Guide (h) menu, which is the place to go when you have a question about how to use your server. 4 While holding down the mouse button, move the arrow until the words “Macintosh Tutorial” are highlighted, then release the mouse button. A window appears welcoming you to the tutorial. You can set this book aside for now and follow the instructions on the screen. When you have completed the tutorial, return to this book. 119Reviewing the basics The following illustration summarizes many of the basic skills and terms you learned from the tutorial. 120 This icon represents your server’s internal hard disk. To change the size or shape of a window, drag the size box. To bring hidden portions of a window’s contents into view, click the scroll arrows. The strip across the top of the screen is called the menu bar. The symbols and words in it represent menus of commands. Icons are small pictures that represent disks, folders, programs, and documents. To open an icon, click the icon twice quickly. Windows are boxes that display text, graphics, or icons. To bring a partially covered window to the front, click anywhere in the window. To close a window, click the close box. You can have several application programs open at once. To see which program is active or to switch from one program to another, use this menu (called the Application menu). To find an answer to a question, look in the Guide (h) menu. To move a window, drag it by the title bar. To throw away an item you no longer want, drag it to the Trash and choose Empty Trash from the Special menu.Menus The strip across the top of the screen is called the menu bar. The symbols and words in it represent menus of commands. To open a menu, place the pointer on the symbol or word for the menu and press the mouse button. Icons Icons are small pictures that represent disks, programs, documents and folders. You can double-click any icon to open it and see what it contains. This icon represents your server’s internal startup disk. Icons like this one represent application programs, which you use to create documents and do other work. Icons like this one represent documents, which you can create and edit. Icons like this represent folders. A folder contains other icons. To throw away an item you no longer want, drag it to the Trash icon and choose Empty Trash from the Special menu. 121 Application menu You can have several application programs open at once. To see which program is active or to switch from one program to another, use this menu (called the Application menu). Guide menu To find an answer to a question, look in the Guide (h) menu.Windows Windows are boxes that display text, graphics, or icons. To change the shape or position of a window, or to close the window, use the elements shown here. Getting answers in Macintosh Guide When you have a question while working with your server, you can get the answer by choosing Macintosh Guide from the Guide menu. 1 Pull down the Application menu (in the upper-right corner of the screen) and choose Finder to make it the active application program. A checkmark in the menu indicates that the Finder is the active program. 122 Scroll arrow To bring hidden portions of a window’s contents into view, click one of the four scroll arrows. Close box To close a window, click the close box. Title bar To move a window, drag it by the middle of the title bar (anywhere in the bar except the small boxes). Size box To change the shape or size of a window, drag the size box. To bring a partially covered window to the front, click anywhere in it.2 Pull down the Guide menu (marked with the h icon) and choose Macintosh Guide. The Macintosh Guide window appears. Whenever you use Macintosh Guide, its window remains in front of other windows. If the window gets in your way, you can move it by dragging its title bar (the gray bar across the top of the window). 1233 Notice the three buttons at the top of the window: Topics, Index, and Look For. Macintosh Guide gives you three ways of finding information: m Topics lets you choose from a list of general subjects; it is like the table of contents in a book. m Index lets you choose from an alphabetical list of more specific subjects; it is like the index in a book. m Look For lets you search for information related to a specific word or phrase that you type. In the following sections you will practice using each method. If you have problems while using Macintosh Guide, see “Tips for Using Macintosh Guide” later in this chapter. 124Getting answers with the Topics button 1 In the Macintosh Guide window, click the Topics button. A list of general topics appears on the left side of the Macintosh Guide window. (Depending on the hardware and software you have, the list of topics may be different.) 2 Click “Customizing Your Computer” in the list of topics. When you click any topic area, a list of related questions appears on the right side of the Macintosh Guide window. 125 To get instructions, click a question ... ... then click OK.3 Click the question “How do I set the time and date?” and then click OK. Or double-click the question. A small window appears with instructions for you to follow. 4 Read and follow the instructions in this window. Macintosh Guide provides step-by-step instructions to answer the question you selected. When you have completed each step, click the right arrow in the lower-right corner to see the next step. 5 When you have completed all the steps, click the Topics button in the lower-left corner to return to the main Macintosh Guide window. Now continue with the next section. Getting answers with the Index button 1 In the Macintosh Guide window, click the Index button. An alphabetical list of subjects appears on the left side of the window. Scroll bar 126 Click here to see the next step (if there is one). If you want to return to the main Macintosh Guide window, click here. Slider Scroll bar2 Scroll through the alphabetical list until the phrase “background pattern” is visible. You can scroll through the list either by dragging the slider to the letter B or by using the scroll bar at the right of the list. 3 Click the phrase “background pattern” in the alphabetical list. When you click any index entry, a list of related questions appears on the right side of the Macintosh Guide window. 4 Click the question “How do I change the background pattern?” and then click OK. Or double-click the question. A small window appears with instructions for you to follow. 127 To get instructions, click a question ... ... then click OK. Click here to see the next step (if there is one). If you want to return to the main Macintosh Guide window, click here.5 Read and follow the instructions in the window. Macintosh Guide provides step-by-step instructions to answer the question you selected. When you have completed each step, click the right arrow in the lower-right corner to see the next step. 6 When you have completed all the steps, click the Topics button in the lower-left corner to return to the main Macintosh Guide window. Now continue with the next section. Getting answers with the Look For button 1 In the Macintosh Guide window, click the Look For button. A small box appears on the left side of the window, where you can type text. 2 Click the arrow button to activate the text box. 3 Type sound in the text box and then click Search. When you click Search, a list of questions related to the word or phrase you typed appears on the right side of the Macintosh Guide window. 128 To activate the text box, click here. Type a word or phrase in the text box… …and then click here.4 Click the question “How do I change the beep sound?” and then click OK. Or double-click the question. A small window appears with instructions for you to follow. 5 Read and follow the instructions in the window. Macintosh Guide provides step-by-step instructions to answer the question you selected. When you have completed each step, click the right arrow in the lower-right corner to display the next step. 6 When you have completed all the steps, click the close box in the upperleft corner to close Macintosh Guide. 129 To get instructions, click a question ... ... then click OK. If you want to close Macintosh Guide, click here. Click here to see the next step (if there is one).Tips for using Macintosh Guide Here are a few tips for using Macintosh Guide effectively: m Macintosh Guide is available only when you are in the Finder—the desktop area where you can see the icons of disks, folders, and files. (Other programs may also have help available in the Guide menu, however.) If you don’t see Macintosh Guide in the Guide menu, pull down the Application menu (to the right of the Guide menu) and choose Finder. m Follow the steps when you’re instructed to; don’t skip ahead or read ahead. That way the computer can check to make sure you’ve done a step correctly. m Unlike most windows, the Macintosh Guide window stays in front of other windows on the screen so that your instructions are never covered. If you need to move the Guide window out of the way, drag it by the title bar at the top of the window. You can also move the window out of the way by clicking the zoom box. Click the box once to shrink the window; click it a second time to expand the window to its original size. m If you need more information about an instruction or a term, click the button labeled “Huh?” to get further explanation. (The “Huh?” button is dimmed when no additional information is available.) m If you want to return to the main Macintosh Guide window, click the Topics button in the lower-left corner of the Guide window. m When you’re finished using Macintosh Guide, click the close box in the upper-left corner of the window. 130 Close box Topics button “Huh?” button Right arrow Zoom boxIdentifying objects on the screen Sometimes you’ll see an unfamiliar item on the screen and ask yourself, “What’s that?” You can get an answer by using a Macintosh feature known as Balloon Help. Balloon Help explains the function of icons, menus, commands, and other items on the Macintosh screen in balloons like those you see in comic strips. Follow these steps to use Balloon Help: 1 Pull down the Guide menu (marked with the h icon) and choose Show Balloons. 2 Point to any object on the screen that you want to identify. A balloon appears next to the object. In the following illustration, for example, pointing to the Trash displays a balloon that explains how to use the Trash to throw items away. Although balloons appear next to items when you point to them, the way you work does not change; you can still select icons, choose commands, and so on. 3 When you’re finished using Balloon Help, choose Hide Balloons from the Guide menu. 131Learning useful shortcuts You can perform many tasks in the Finder more quickly if you use keyboard or mouse shortcuts. For example, instead of clicking an icon and choosing Open from the File menu, you can simply double-click the icon to open it. Follow these steps to learn keyboard and mouse shortcuts: 1 Pull down the Guide menu (marked with the h icon) and choose Shortcuts. The main Macintosh Shortcuts window appears. 1322 Click one of the category buttons. Another window appears, describing shortcuts for that category. 3 Read about the shortcuts available for the category you selected. Click the right arrow in the lower-right corner of the window to display the next window (if there is one). 4 When you finish reading about the shortcuts for your category, click the Topics button in the lower-left corner to return to the main Macintosh Shortcuts window. Or click the close box in the upper-left corner to close the window. 133 Click here to return to the main Macintosh Shortcuts window for more categories. If you want to close the window, click here. Click here to see the next step (if there is one).134Appendix B Special Keys on Your Keyboard Your server keyboard contains certain special keys that typewriter keyboards don’t have. Many of these keys allow you to give commands to the server without using the mouse. For example, in many application programs, pressing the x (Command) key at the same time as the Q key is often an alternative method of quitting a program. The following table describes what you can do with the special keys on your keyboard. The number of special keys on your keyboard may vary from this list; it depends on the model of keyboard you have. Special keys on Apple keyboards Arrow keys Use to move the insertion point, as an alternative to using the mouse to move the pointer. In some programs, the arrow keys have other functions. Caps Lock key Use to capitalize a series of letters. (Numbers and symbols aren’t affected.) Clear key Use to delete the current selection (or use the Delete key). In some programs, Clear has other functions. x (Command) key Use in combination with other keys as an alternative to choosing a menu command. Control key In combination with other keys, this key provides shortcuts or modifies other actions. Delete key Use to delete selected material, or the character to the left of the insertion point. Enter key In a dialog box, pressing Enter is the same as clicking the outlined button. In some programs, pressing this key confirms information you have provided. Continued . 135 caps lock num lock clear control delete enterSpecial keys on Apple keyboards (continued) Escape key The function of this key depends on the program you’re using. Function keys Some programs allow you to use the 12 function keys to give commands. You can assign commands or action sequences to function keys with special utility programs. Option key Use in combination with other keys to produce special characters or modify actions. Numeric keys Use to produce numbers and mathematical symbols; some programs use these keys as function keys to initiate actions. Power On key Press to turn on the server. Return key Use to move the insertion point to the beginning of the next line. In a dialog box, pressing Return is the same as clicking the outlined button. Shift key Use to produce capital letters (or the upper character on the key). Other special keys The function of these keys depends on the operating system and program you’re using. Tab key Use to move the insertion point to the next stopping place (such as a tab stop or field in a dialog box or program). 136 esc F1 option alt num lock clear = / * 7 4 0 8 5 2 9 6 3 enter 1 . return shift help home end ins del page up page down tabTyping special characters and symbols You can type a variety of international and other special symbols and characters (including characters with diacritical marks, such as accents) by pressing combinations of keys. The Key Caps program, which is installed with your system software, shows you the characters produced when you type certain keys and key combinations in the fonts available on your server. Choose Key Caps from the Apple (K) menu, then choose the font from the Key Caps menu. To have Key Caps show more options for special characters, press each of these keys or key combinations: Option, Shift, Shift-Option, Shift-x, and Option-x. 137 Characters available in the Chicago font Characters appear here when you press keys on the keyboard or click them in the window. Characters available in the Chicago font when the Option key is pressed The highlighted key represents the key held down on the keyboard—in this case, the Option key.If you press the Option key, Key Caps outlines lightly the keys that you can use in combination with letter keys to type letters with accents or other diacritical marks. If you see rectangles: If you see rectangles instead of diacritical marks on some of the pictures of keys in Key Caps, try pressing Option-x to see the diacritical marks. However, you only need to use the Option key (not Option-x) in combination with the other keys to type letters with diacritical marks. If you press the Option key at the same time as a key for a specific diacritical mark and then release both keys, Key Caps outlines in bold the keys for letters that can be typed with that mark. (You’ll see that most key combinations for diacritical marks can be used with the Space bar as well as letter keys—producing the mark without a letter.) The most common diacritical marks and how to create them are summarized next. Diacritical mark Key combination Grave accent ( ` ) Option-`, then type the character Acute accent ( ´ ) Option-e, then type the character Circumflex (^) Option-i, then type the character Tilde (~) Option-n, then type the character Umlaut ( ¨ ) Option-u, then type the character The letter “c” with a cedilla (ç) Option-c m To type a letter or a space with a specific diacritical mark, press the Option key and the key for the mark simultaneously. Then type the letter that needs the mark. If you are having trouble getting a mark and letter to appear together, try again. Be sure to press the Option key before (or at the same time as) the key for the mark; then, after you release both keys, type the letter to be marked. 138Special key combinations If difficulties with your mouse or server don’t allow you to use standard methods of quitting a program or restarting your server you can try using these special key combinations. To do this... …press this key combination Force a program to quit x-Option-Esc Here are other key combinations you may find useful: To do this... …press this key combination Start a “debugging” program usedby software programmers* x-Power key Start the server from a CD-ROM disc C key (at startup) Ignore SCSI ID 0 (zero) x-Option-Shift-Delete Turn off system extensions Shift key (while starting up) Reset PRAM x-Option-p-r (while starting up with external SCSI devices disconnected) *If you do not have a debugging program installed, your screen displays a caret prompt (>). To return to the desktop, type “G.” 139Appendix C Obtaining Updated Apple Software Apple technical support information and software updates are available from many online services. Using these services, you can get troubleshooting and other important information. You can also get the latest versions of Apple software, including most printer drivers, system enablers, and updates to utilities, networking, and communication software. IMPORTANT Be sure to read the posted Apple Software License Agreement before installing any software. Currently, Apple posts support information and Apple software updates to the following online services: m America Online m AppleLink m CompuServe m eWorld m Internet: FTP servers m Internet: Gopher server m Internet: World Wide Web sites IMPORTANT Although specific paths for each service are provided in the sections that follow, online information is subject to change. If you have trouble finding Macintosh-related information online, see the service and support information that came with your server. 141America Online Apple software updates are posted to the USA Apple SW Updates area, which is located in the Apple Computer, Inc. folder. You can use the keyword applecomputer to go directly to the Apple Computer, Inc. folder, or follow this path to find the software updates: Computing window Company Connection window Technical Support window Hardware folder Hardware window Apple Computer, Inc. folder USA Apple SW Updates folder AppleLink Support information is posted to the Support area, located in the following path: AppleLink Services (main window) Support Apple software updates are posted to the Apple SW Updates board, located in the following path: AppleLink Services (main window) Software Sampler Apple SW Updates CompuServe The MacPlanet (GO PLANET) area provides access to Macintosh-related information on CompuServe. From MacPlanet, go to the Apple Online (GOAPLNEW) section for Apple product information, a database of technical support articles, a collection of popular software files, and software updates for U.S. and international customers. The address for the Apple systems operator on CompuServe is 74431,1472 (via the Internet: 74431.1472@compuserve.com). 142eWorld Support information and Apple software updates are posted to the Apple Technical Support area. You can use the shortcut support to go directly to this area, or follow this path: Computer Center Apple Customer Center Apple Technical Support Internet: FTP servers Support information and software updates are posted to two file transfer protocol (ftp) servers: ftp.info.apple.com and ftp.support.apple.com. ftp.info.apple.com m Host name: ftp.info.apple.com m IP number: 204.96.16.4 m Path: ftp/Apple.Support.Area/Apple.SW.Updates ftp.support.apple.com m Host name: ftp.support.apple.com m IP number: 130.43.6.3 m Path: /pub/Apple SW Updates Internet: Gopher server Support information and Apple software updates are posted to the Apple Computer Gopher Server, located in the following path: Home Gopher Server Computer Information Apple Computer Gopher Server m Host name: gopher.info.apple.com Apple recommends using TurboGopher client software to access the Apple Computer gopher server. TurboGopher client software is available via anonymous file transfer protocol (ftp) to boombox.micro.umn.edu in the /pub/gopher directory. 143IMPORTANT If you are downloading a software update from an FTP site, please note that the updates are self-extracting archive files (identified by having “.sea” at the end of the file name) that have been converted to a binhex file format. If your FTP client software or commercial online service gateway does not perform an automatic binhex to .sea file translation, you’ll need to obtain software to do this manually. Stuffit Expander and DiskDoubler Pro are two popular Mac OS applications that can perform this task for you. Internet: World Wide Web sites Support information and Apple software updates are available via Apple’s World Wide Web sites: m http://www.info.apple.com m http://www.support.apple.com 144Staying informed of Apple software updates You can receive notification and descriptions of each new Apple software update posted to the Apple Software Updates areas on Apple supported online services and Internet sites. We will also send you information on feebased Apple software upgrades not posted online. To subscribe 1 Send an E-mail message to swupdates@thing1.info.apple.com. 2 In the message SUBJECT field, type “subscribe yourrealname.” For example, if your name is Royce Walthrop, you would type Subscribe Royce Walthrop You’ll receive an automated reply letting you know you’ve been added to the list. To unsubscribe 1 Send an E-mail message to swupdates@thing1.info.apple.com. 2 In the message SUBJECT field, type “unsubscribe yourrealname.” For example, if your name were Royce Walthrop, you would type Unsubscribe Royce Walthrop You’ll receive an automated reply letting you know you’ve been removed from the list. 145146A AAUI connector 19 About Apple Extras file 7 accent marks, typing 137–138 address information. See IP addresses Administration user mode 20, 22 changing settings in AppleTalk control panel 34 changing settings in TCP/IP control panel 36–37 limiting access to 37–38 Administrator’s Guide electronic version 5 Adobe Acrobat file, for electronic documentation 5 Advanced user mode 20 changing settings in Appletalk control panel 33–34 changing settings in TCP/IP control panel 36 Alerts button 16 alert sounds 14–16 aliases 53–54 amber status light 79–80 America Online 142 AppleCD Audio Player program controlling CD-ROM player 74 problems using 107 Apple cleaning cassette 83 Apple customer support hotline 7 online support pages 7 software updates 141-145 Apple Extras folder 55, 65 Apple Internet Server 5, 24 AppleLink 142 Apple RAID Software Drive Setup disk utility warning 58 special procedures 52 Apple Remote Access installing 5 special procedures 52 AppleScript 55 AppleSearch 5 AppleShare installing 5 special procedures 52 warning about Memory Manager setting 51 warning about virtual memory 50 AppleShare Print Server 55 AppleTalk control panel 20, 23 changing settings in user modes 33–34 limiting access to Administration user mode 37–38 AppleTalk network. See also configuring the AppleTalk network connection changing zones 23, 33–34 default port 20–23 displaying settings 34 importing a configuration 44–45 Ethernet interface 19 exporting a configuration 43 multihoming 20–21 running with Open Transport 20 solving problems 111 turning on and off 32 Application icon 121 147 Indexapplication programs and software. See programs arrow keys 135 audio CDs playing 74 solving typical problems 102 B backing up files 58, 77 Balloon Help, identifying screen objects 131 Basic user mode 20 changing settings in AppleTalk control panel 33–34 changing settings in TCP/IP control panel 35 “bomb” icon, troubleshooting 98 BootP (Boot Protocol) servers 24 using to configure a TCP/IP network 27 C Caps Lock key 135 cassettes. See tape cassettes caution signal, tape drive 81 CD-ROM discs capacity 72 ejecting 73–74 inserting 72–73 server documentation on 4–5 solving typical problems 102 starting hard disk drive from 59, 61, 62–64 CD-ROM drives inserting a disc 72–73 internal 72 playing audio CDs 74 reinstalling software for 108–110 solving typical problems 102 working with Photo CDs 75 CD-ROM software 108–110 Chooser, choosing printer 12 class subfield in hosts file 46 cleaning tape-drive heads 83 clean installation of system software 65–68 clean light, tape drive 80 Clear key 135 color depth 13 Command (x) key 135 compressing files 77 CompuServe, information and support 142–143 condensation in tape drive 82 configuring the AppleTalk network connection 21–23 changing settings in user modes 33–34 creating new configurations 40–41 displaying settings information 38–39 exporting configurations 43 importing configurations 44–45 using different configurations 42 configuring the server choosing a printer 12–13 choosing sound devices and alert sounds 14–16 installing device drivers 11 setting time and date 10–11 setting up monitor 13 speaker volume and balance 15 using Energy Saver control panel 16–18 configuring the TCP/IP network connection 24–31 changing settings in user modes 35–37 creating new configurations 40–41 displaying settings information 38–39 exporting configurations 43 importing configurations 44–45 manually 28–31 148selecting configuration method 35 turning networking on and off 32 via a BootP, DHCP, or RARP server 27 via a MacIP server 25–26 connectors, network 19 Control key 135 customer support hotline 7 Custom Install dialog box 109 customizing system software 69–70 D data compression of files 77 data field in hosts file 45 DAT (digital audio tape) drive, compatible tape cassettes 78 Date & Time control panel 10–11 date, setting 10–11 DDS-2 DAT drive, compatible tape cassettes 78 DDS (digital data storage) tape cassettes 78 default ports about 20–21 changing for AppleTalk 23 for TCP/IP 24–25, 35 Delete key 135 desktop, rebuilding 88–89 device drivers, installing 11 DHCP (Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol) servers 24 using to configure a TCP/IP network 27 diacritical marks, typing 137–138 dialog boxes Custom Install 109 Easy Install 63–64, 66 Monitors & Sound 14 TCP/IP Options 32 dial-up connection to Internet 29 digital audio tape cassettes 78 Disk First Aid icon 63, 65, 115 program (Utilities folder) 115 documentation, electronic versions 4–5 Document icon 121 domain names assigning to server 28–31 entering in MacTCP hosts file 46–47 entering in TCP/IP control panel 35 DOS documents, problems using 101 Drive Setup disk utility 58, 60–61, 63, 114 Drive Setup icon 114 E Easy Install dialog box 63–64, 66 energy-saving features 16–18 Enter key 135 error correction of files 77 Escape key 136 Ethernet interface 19–21 IEEE 802.3 variant 28, 35 Eudora networking software 26 eWorld, for information and support 143 expansion slots 11 exporting configurations 43 F fields, in hosts file 45–46 files About Apple Extras 7 backing up 58 error correction 77 hosts 29–30 problems opening 100 Workgroup Server Read Me 4 floppy disks, reading 96 Folder icon 121 folders Apple Extra 55, 65 149Preferences 45 Previous System 67 Shutdown Items 54–55 Startup Items 54 System Folder 62 Utilities 61 WS Electronic Library 4 formatting a hard disk drive 60–61 function keys 136 G green status light (DAT drive) 78, 80 Guide (h) menu 4, 6, 120 H hard disk drives backing up files 58 increasing performance 58 initializing (formatting) 60–61 installing system software 62–64, 62–68 mounting volumes 58–59 putting to sleep warning 18 solving problems 113–116 starting up from CD-ROM disc 59 using Apple RAID Software 58 hardware. See servers help Balloon Help 131 getting 1, 6–7 identifying objects on the screen 131 Index button 126–128 Look For button 129 Macintosh Guide 122–124, 130 Macintosh shortcuts 132–133 Macintosh Tutorial 118–119 from online services 141–145 on-screen 4–5 reference material 5 reviewing basic skills 120–122 Topics button 125–126 using this guide 3 High Sierra discs 106 hosts file format for MacTCP application 46–47 format for Open Transport 45–47 using 29–30 hotline, customer support 7 humidity, affect on tape cassettes 82 I, J icons application 121 basic information 120–121 Disk First Aid 63, 115 disk with “X” 93 document 121 Drive Setup 114 folder 121 question mark 62 sad Macintosh 93 Server HD icon 121 Trash 121 identifier subfield in hosts file 46 IEEE 802.3 variant of Ethernet standard 28 implicit domain searching 30 importing configurations 44–45 Index button, for getting help 126–128 information about basic Macintosh skills 120–122 about configuration 38–39 about shortcuts 132–133 about updated Apple software 141–145 answering questions 6–7 in Balloon Help 131 customer support 7 in Macintosh Guide 122–124, 130 in Macintosh Tutorial 118–119 on-screen 4–5 in reference materials 5 in this guide 3 150using Index button 126–128 using Look For button 128–129 using Topics button 125–126 initializing a hard disk drive 60–61 installing CD-ROM software 108–110 device drivers 11 network services 5 system software 62–70 internal tape-backup units 77–83 Internet: FTP servers 143 Internet: Gopher server 144 Internet: World Wide Web sites 144 IP addresses assigning manually 28 assigning via servers 24, 27 displaying information 34, 39 entering in TCP/IP control panel 35 in hosts file 29–30, 45–47 for name server 29 ISO 9660 formatted discs 106 K keyboard characters in Chicago font 137 special keys 135–136 using instead of mouse 139 Key Caps program 137 L lights, status 80 local domain name 30 LocalTalk, configuring for 19 locking settings 22, 34 in Administration user mode 37 locking tape cassette 82 Look For button, for getting help 129 M Macintosh learning to use 118–119, 130 reviewing basic skills 120–122 using older programs 51–52 using shortcuts 132–132 Macintosh Guide Balloon Help 132–133 getting help in 122–124 Index button 126–128 Topics button 125–126 “Troubleshooting” topic 85 Macintosh Tutorial, starting 118–119 MacIP (Macintosh Internet Protocol) servers 24 using to configure a TCP/IP network 25–26 Mac OS, network and communications software for 19–20 mail systems 55 Media Access control (MAC) address of default port 39 memory Memory Manager 51–52 not enough 51, 97 for shared library 51 virtual 50 Memory Manager, in older Macintosh programs 51–52 menus 121 modem port interface 20–21 Monitors & Sound control panel 13–14 monitors configuring 13 dimming when not in use 17–18 mono sound 15 mouse learning to use 118–119 problems moving pointer 98–99 substituting key combinations 139 MRS (Media Recognition System) tape cassettes 78 multihoming 20–21 151N name field in hosts file 45 names, domain 30 name server, specifying 29, 35 NCSA Telnet networking software 26 Netscape networking software 26 network numbers 34, 39 networks. See also configuring the AppleTalk network connection; configuring the TCP/IP network connection configuring 19–47 installing cards 20 installing services 5 providing additional interfaces 11 software for Mac OS 19–20, 26 starting services automatically 53–54 using more than one interface 20–21 node numbers 34, 39 numeric keys 136 O online services 141–145 Open Transport about 20 information about configuration 38–39 Option keys 136 P passwords Administration mode 22, 111 forgotten 111 limiting access to Administration user mode 37–38 Peripheral Component Interconnect (PCI) cards, installing 11 personal computer, using server as 53 Photo CDs 75 Planning and Managing AppleTalk Networks, reference book 5 ports, default 20–21 power failures and restarting automatically 18 Power Macintosh programs, using 50–51 Power On key 136 PowerPC RISC microprocessor 1 PowerTalk software 55 PPP (Point-to-Point Protocol) software 29 Preferences folder 45 Previous System Folder 67–68 printer port interface 20–21 printers choosing 10–11 problems with 110 printing from servers 55 programs. See also individual program names; system software backup 58 communications for Mac OS 20 compatible with server 52 desktop applications 53 file missing 101 information about updates 141–145 installation order 53 installation unsuccessful 64, 68 network for Mac OS 20 not enough memory for 97 not found 100 older Macintosh 51–52, 101 open 56 order of installing and starting 53 for performance and speed 1 problem opening files 100 replacing special software 68–69 restarting automatically 53–54 running at shutdown 54–55 running on server 53 server applications 49–56 starting automatically on server 53–54 152switching 56 for using CD-ROM drive 108–110 using on server 53 using several at a time 56 Q QuickDraw GX 55 R RARP (Reverse Address Resolution Protocol) servers 24 using to configure a TCP/IP network 27 Read Me files 4, 6, 7, 52, 90 Reduced Instruction Set Computer (RISC) technology 1 reference books 5 reinstalling CD-ROM software 108–110 system software 62 repairs 87 restarting server automatically 17–18 problems 88 Retrospect Remote backup utility 77, 81 Return key 136 router IP address assigning to server 28–29 displaying 39 S sample rates, changing 15 screen savers 18 SCSI bus 103, 113 SCSI devices, adding 11 self test, tape drive 78–79 Server HD icon 121 servers built-in mail systems 55 CD-ROM software for 108–110 collaboration services 55 compatible application programs 52 names 29 order of installing and starting programs 53 printing from 55 repairs 87 restarting automatically 17 restarting programs automatically 53–54 setting up 9–18 setting up to run programs at shutdown 54–55 solving typical problems 90–91 starting from CD-ROM disc 59 status lights 78–79 tape cassettes supplied with 78 undesirable configurations 17 using as personal computer 53 service, customer 87 setting up the server 9–18 shared libraries 50–51 icon 50 Shift key 136 shutdown, scheduled 17 Shutdown Items folder 54–55 sleep mode, warnings 17, 18 SLIP (Serial Line Internet Protocol) software 29 software. See programs; system software sound, recording 15 Sound button 14 sound devices, choosing 14–16 speaker volume and balance 15 special keys 136 startup, scheduled 17 startup disk 62 Startup Items folder 54 status lights in self test 78–79 tape operations 80 153subnet mask assigning to server 28 entering number in TCP/IP control panel 35 support from Apple 7, 87 from online services 141–145 switching programs 56 symbols, typing 137–138 system error, troubleshooting 87–88 System Folder 62 determining damage 65–67 replacing special software 68 system software clean installation 65–68 custom installation 69–70 normal installation 62 reinstalling 62 replacing special software 68–69 T Tab key 136 tape cassettes cleaning the head 83 compatible with DAT drive 78 inserting 79 loading 78 locking 82 preventing condensation 82 removing 81 storage 82 supplied 78 using to back up data 77 tape drive caution signal 81 cleaning heads 83 effects of high humidity 82 self-test 78–79 starting up 78–79 tape light 80 TCP/IP control panel 20, 24–25 changing settings in user modes 35–37 limiting access to Administration user mode 37–38 TCP/IP network. See also configuring the TCP/IP network connection changing the default port for applications 21, 24–25 changing zones 26 exporting a configuration 43 importing a configuration 44–45 loading only when needed 32 solving problems 112 turning on and off 32 TCP/IP Options dialog box 32 technical support from Apple 7, 87 from online services 141–145 temperatures affecting tape cassettes 82 10BASE-T connector 19 time, setting 10–11 Topics button, for getting help 125 Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol (TCP/IP). See TCP/IP network Trash icon 121 troubleshooting CD-ROM disc problems audio CD produces no sound 107 audio track stops playing 107 icon not on desktop 105 opening a document 106 recording sound from audio CD 107 server ejects disc 106 This is not a Macintosh disk message 105 troubleshooting CD-ROM drive problems application program won’t open 101 icon doesn’t appear 102 154Macintosh desktop doesn’t appear 103 server won’t restart after adding CDROM drive 103 server won’t start with disc in drive 104 tray won’t open 104 using files in ISO 9660 or High Sierra format 106 using Photo CDs 108 troubleshooting network problems AppleTalk 111 TCP/IP 112 troubleshooting server problems application program not found 100 beep during startup 93 blinking question mark 92–93 clock 95 dark screen 92 diagnosing the problem 86 dialog box with “bomb” icon 98 disk with “X” icon 93 ejecting a floppy disk 96–97 hard disk icon not on desktop 94–95 incorrect icons 95 keyboard problems 99 making hard disk icon reappear 113 moving pointer 98–99 not enough memory 97 printer connectivity 110 program won’t start or quits 97 reading floppy disks 96 rebuilding the desktop 88–89 repairing disks 115–116 restarting after installing CD-ROM drive 94 sad Macintosh icon 93 server performance 91 solving typical server problems 90–91 starting from wrong hard disk 94–95 starting over 87–89 testing a hard disk 114–115 turning on server 91 using DOS documents 101 using LocalTalk port 94 using older Macintosh program 101 ttl (time to live) field in hosts file 46 turning Appletalk on and off 34 turning TCP/IP on and off 32 Tutorial, Macintosh 118–119 type subfield in hosts file 46 U Understanding Computer Networks, reference book 5 updates, notification 145 user modes 20 AppleTalk control panel 33–34 TCP/IP control panel 35–37 user’s guides, electronic versions 5 Utilities folder 61 V version numbers 39 virtual memory 50 volume, setting 15 volumes, unmounted 58–59 W, X, Y, Z windows 120, 122 hiding and showing 56, 120 Workgroup Server Electronic Library 4–5 Workgroup Server Read Me file 4, 6, 52, 90 Workgroup Server Software CD-ROM disc 59, 61 documentation on 4–5 starting server from 66, 109 WS Electronic Library folder 4–5 zones, changing 23, 26, 33–34 155156ð Workgroup Server Administrator’s Guide for the Workgroup Server 7250 and 8550© 1996 Apple Computer, Inc. All rights reserved. Under the copyright laws, this manual may not be copied, in whole or in part, without the written consent of Apple. Your rights to the software are governed by the accompanying software license agreement. The Apple logo is a trademark of Apple Computer, Inc., registered in the United States and other countries. Use of the “keyboard” Apple logo (Option-Shift-K) for commercial purposes without the prior written consent of Apple may constitute trademark infringement and unfair competition in violation of federal and state laws. Every effort has been made to ensure that the information in this manual is accurate. Apple is not responsible for printing or clerical errors. Apple Computer, Inc. 1 Infinite Loop Cupertino, CA 95014-2084 (408) 996-1010 Apple, the Apple logo, AppleLink, AppleShare, AppleScript, AppleSearch, AppleTalk, LaserWriter, LocalTalk, Macintosh, MacTCP, Power Macintosh, PowerTalk, and QuickTime are trademarks of Apple Computer, Inc., registered in the United States and other countries. AppleCD, Balloon Help, Disk First Aid, eWorld, Finder, Mac, and QuickDraw are trademarks of Apple Computer, Inc. Adobe, Adobe Illustrator, Adobe PhotoShop, and PostScript are trademarks of Adobe Systems Incorporated, which may be registered in certain jurisdictions. Helvetica and Times are registered trademarks of Linotype Company. IBM is a registered trademark of International Business Machines Corporation. Macintosh Basics was developed using VideoWorks Interactive. VideoWorks Interactive is a trademark of Macromedia, Inc. (formerly MacroMind, Inc.). Microsoft is a registered trademark, and Windows is a trademark of Microsoft Corporation. Motorola is a registered trademark of Motorola Corporation. NuBus is a trademark of Texas Instruments. PowerPC is a trademark of International Business Machines Corporation, used under license therefrom. Retrospect Remote is a trademark of Dantz Development Corporation. Simultaneously published in the United States and Canada. Mention of third-party products is for informational purposes only and constitutes neither an endorsement nor a recommendation. Apple assumes no responsibility with regard to the performance or use of these products. K Apple Computer, Inc. iiContents About This Guide / 1 About your Workgroup Server and Power Macintosh software / 1 Who should read this guide / 1 What this guide contains / 2 How to use this guide / 3 For on-screen help and information / 4 Workgroup Server Read Me / 4 The Guide menu / 4 Workgroup Server Electronic Library / 4 Other reference material / 5 Where to find answers / 6 1 Configuring Your Server / 9 Configuring the system time and date / 10 Installing device drivers / 11 Choosing a printer / 12 Configuring your monitor / 13 Choosing sound devices and alert sounds / 14 Configuring the Energy Saver control panel / 16 iii2 Configuring Your Network Connection / 19 About Open Transport / 20 About the default port / 20 Configuring your AppleTalk network connection / 21 Configuring your TCP/IP network connection / 24 Configuring via a server / 25 Configuring via a MacIP server / 25 Configuring via a BootP, DHCP, or RARP server / 27 Configuring TCP/IP manually / 28 Turning networking on and off / 32 User modes / 33 AppleTalk control panel user modes / 33 TCP/IP control panel user modes / 35 Setting a password / 37 Getting information about your configuration / 38 Working with network configurations / 40 Creating a new configuration / 40 Using a different configuration / 42 Exporting a configuration / 43 Importing a configuration / 44 Hosts file format / 45 3 Using Application Software / 49 Using Power Macintosh programs / 50 Virtual memory / 50 Shared libraries / 50 Using older Macintosh programs / 51 Using server application programs / 52 Using desktop application programs / 53 Order of installing and starting programs / 53 ivSetting up your server to restart programs automatically / 53 Setting up your server to run programs at shutdown / 54 Additional capabilities for your server system / 55 Working with several programs at a time / 56 Finding out which programs are open / 56 Switching programs / 56 Hiding and showing windows on the desktop / 56 4 Managing Hard Disks / 57 Backing up your files / 58 Using Apple RAID Software / 58 Mounting volumes / 58 Starting up from a CD-ROM disc / 59 Initializing a hard disk / 60 When do you need to initialize a hard disk? / 60 How to initialize a hard disk / 60 Installing system software / 62 When should you reinstall system software? / 62 Doing a normal installation of system software / 62 Doing a clean installation of system software / 65 Replacing special software / 68 Doing a custom installation of system software / 69 5 Using the CD-ROM Drive / 71 Inserting a CD-ROM disc / 72 Ejecting a CD-ROM disc / 73 Playing audio CDs / 74 Working with Photo CDs / 75 v6 Using a DAT Drive and Tape Cassettes / 77 Compatible tapes / 78 Tapes supplied with the server / 78 Starting up the tape drive / 78 Inserting tape cassettes / 79 Status lights / 80 The caution signal / 81 Removing tape cassettes / 81 Forcing the ejection of a tape cassette / 81 Locking a cassette / 82 Avoiding high humidity / 82 Cleaning the tape-drive heads / 83 7 Troubleshooting / 85 When you run into trouble / 86 Start over / 87 Rebuild your desktop / 88 Solving typical problems / 90 Solving CD-ROM problems / 102 Problems using the CD-ROM drive / 102 Problems using CD-ROM discs / 105 Problems using ISO 9660 or High Sierra discs / 106 Problems playing audio CDs / 107 Problems using Photo CDs / 108 Reinstalling CD-ROM software / 108 Solving printer connectivity problems / 110 Solving AppleTalk problems / 111 Solving TCP/IP problems / 112 Solving hard disk problems / 113 How to test a hard disk / 114 How to repair a hard disk or floppy disk / 115 If Disk First Aid cannot correct the problem / 116 viAppendix A Getting Help / 117 Learning the basics / 118 Reviewing the basics / 120 Menus / 121 Icons / 121 Windows / 122 Getting answers in Macintosh Guide / 122 Getting answers with the Topics button / 125 Getting answers with the Index button / 126 Getting answers with the Look For button / 128 Tips for using Macintosh Guide / 130 Identifying objects on the screen / 131 Learning useful shortcuts / 132 Appendix B Special Keys on Your Keyboard / 135 Typing special characters and symbols / 137 Special key combinations / 139 Appendix C Obtaining Updated Apple Software / 141 America Online / 142 AppleLink / 142 CompuServe / 142 eWorld / 143 Internet: FTP servers / 143 ftp.info.apple.com / 143 ftp.support.apple.com / 143 Internet: Gopher server / 144 Internet: World Wide Web sites / 144 Staying informed of Apple software updates / 145 To subscribe / 145 To unsubscribe / 145 Index / 147 vii iPod nano Guide de l’utilisateur2 1 Table des matières Préface 4 À propos de l’iPod nano Chapitre 1 6 Fonctions de base de l’iPod nano 6 Vue d’ensemble de l’iPod nano 7 Utilisation des commandes de l’iPod nano 11 Utilisation des menus de l’iPod nano 14 Désactivation des commandes de l’iPod nano 14 Connexion et déconnexion de l’iPod nano 18 À propos de la batterie de l’iPod nano Chapitre 2 21 Configuration de l’iPod nano 21 Utilisation d’iTunes 22 Importation de musique dans votre bibliothèque iTunes 26 Organisation de votre musique 27 Utilisation de Genius dans iTunes 28 Achat ou location de vidéos et téléchargement de podcasts vidéo 29 Ajout de musique à l’iPod nano 33 Ajout de vidéos à l’iPod nano Chapitre 3 37 Écouter de la musique 37 Lecture de musique et d’autres fichiers audio 42 Utilisation de la fonction Genius sur l’iPod nano 43 Configuration de l’iPod nano pour la lecture de morceaux dans un ordre aléatoire 47 Visionnage et écoute de podcasts 48 Écoute de livres audio 48 Écoute de la radio FM Chapitre 4 49 Visionnage de vidéos 49 Regarder et écouter des vidéos sur l’iPod nano 50 Visionnage de vidéos sur un téléviseur connecté à l’iPod nano Chapitre 5 53 Fonctionnalités concernant les photos 53 Importation de photos 57 Visionnage de photosTable des matières 3 Chapitre 6 60 Réglages, fonctionnalités supplémentaires et accessoires 60 Utilisation de l’iPod nano comme disque dur externe 61 Utilisation des réglages supplémentaires 65 Synchronisation de contacts, de calendriers et de listes de tâches 67 Mémorisation et lecture de notes 68 Enregistrement de mémos vocaux 69 Utilisation des menus vocaux pour l’accessibilité 70 À propos des accessoires de l’iPod nano Chapitre 7 72 Astuces et dépannage 72 Quelques suggestions 78 Mise à jour et restauration du logiciel de l’iPod Chapitre 8 79 Sécurité et entretien 79 Informations importantes relatives à la sécurité 81 Informations importantes sur le maniement Chapitre 9 82 En savoir plus, service et assistancePréface 4 À propos de l’iPod nano Félicitations pour avoir choisi l’iPod nano. Avec l’iPod nano, vous pouvez emporter votre musique, vos films vidéo et vos photos partout où vous allez. Pour utiliser l’iPod nano, vous devez mettre de la musique, des vidéos, des photos et d’autres fichiers sur votre ordinateur, puis les ajouter à l’iPod nano. Lisez ce guide pour apprendre à :  Configurer l’iPod nano pour écouter de la musique et des livres audio, regarder des clips, des films, des émissions de télévision, écouter ou regarder des podcasts et bien plus encore.  Utiliser l’iPod nano comme album photo de poche, disque dur portable, réveille-matin, console de jeux et enregistreur.  Visionner des vidéos et des diaporamas sur un téléviseur.  Tirer pleinement parti des fonctionnalités de l’iPod nano.Préface À propos de l’iPod nano 5 Nouveautés de l’iPod nano  Fonction Genius, qui crée automatiquement des listes de lecture à partir de morceaux de votre bibliothèque qui s’associent harmonieusement les uns avec les autres.  Un capteur de mouvement permet de contrôler certaines fonctions par rotation ou secousse de l’iPod nano.  Visionnage de photo en plein écran en mode portrait ou paysage.  Exploration rapide des morceaux de l’album ou de l’artiste en cours d’écoute.  Accès direct à des options supplémentaires à partir de l’écran En lecture.  Nouvelles options d’enregistrement vocal.  Menus vocaux pour une accessibilité améliorée.1 6 1 Fonctions de base de l’iPod nano Lisez ce chapitre pour découvrir, entre autres, les fonctionnalités de l’iPod nano et la manière d’utiliser ses commandes. Vue d’ensemble de l’iPod nano Familiarisez-vous avec les commandes de l’iPod nano : Dock connector Menu Previous/Rewind Play/Pause Bouton Hold Headphones port Click Wheel Suivant/Avance rapide Center buttonChapitre 1 Fonctions de base de l’iPod nano 7 Utilisation des commandes de l’iPod nano Les commandes de l’iPod nano sont faciles à trouver et à utiliser. Appuyez sur n’importe quel bouton pour activer l’iPod nano. Le menu principal apparaît. Utilisez la molette cliquable et le bouton central pour naviguer dans les menus, écouter des morceaux, modifier des réglages et obtenir des informations. Déplacez légèrement votre pouce autour de la molette cliquable pour sélectionner un élément du menu. Pour sélectionner l’élément, appuyez sur le bouton central. Pour revenir au menu précédent, cliquez sur le bouton Menu de la molette cliquable. Le tableau ci-dessous présente d’autres commandes de l’iPod nano. Pour Procédez comme suit : Activer l’iPod nano. Appuyez sur un bouton quelconque. Désactiver l’iPod nano. Maintenez enfoncé le bouton Lecture/Pause (’). Activer le rétro-éclairage Appuyez sur un bouton quelconque ou utilisez la molette cliquable. Désactiver les commandes de l’iPod nano. (pour ne pas les activer par mégarde) Faites glisser le bouton Hold sur HOLD (une barre orange apparaît). Réinitialiser l’iPod nano (s’il ne répond pas) Faites glisser le bouton Hold sur HOLD, puis replacez-le en position normale. Appuyez simultanément sur les boutons Menu et central pendant environ 6 secondes jusqu’à l’apparition du logo Apple. Choisir un élément de menu Faites défiler jusqu’à l’élément, puis appuyez sur le bouton central. Revenir au menu précédent Appuyez sur Menu. Aller directement au menu principal Maintenez enfoncé le bouton Menu. Rechercher un morceau Dans le menu principal, sélectionnez Musique. Rechercher une vidéo Dans le menu principal, choisissez Musique. Lire un morceau ou une vidéo Sélectionnez la vidéo ou le morceau souhaité, puis appuyez sur le bouton central ou sur Lecture/Pause (’). L’iPod nano doit être éjecté de votre ordinateur pour lire des morceaux et des vidéos.8 Chapitre 1 Fonctions de base de l’iPod nano Interrompre temporairement la lecture d’un morceau ou d’une vidéo Appuyez sur Lecture/Pause (’) ou débranchez vos écouteurs. Régler le volume Dans l’écran En lecture, servez-vous de la molette cliquable. Lire tous les morceaux d’une liste de lecture ou d’un album Sélectionnez la liste de lecture ou l’album souhaité, puis appuyez sur le bouton Lecture/Pause (’). Lire tous les morceaux dans un ordre aléatoire Sélectionnez l’option Mix de morceaux dans le menu principal. Vous pouvez créer un mix de morceaux en secouant l’iPod nano. Activer ou désactiver la fonction de secousse pour la création de mix de morceaux Choisissez Réglages > Lecture, sélectionnez Secousse, puis Aléatoire ou Désactivé. Sauter directement à un endroit précis d’un morceau ou d’une vidéo Dans l’écran En lecture, appuyez sur le bouton central pour afficher le défileur (l’icône de losange sur la barre représente l’emplacement actuel), puis faites défiler le losange jusqu’à l’endroit souhaité dans le morceau ou la vidéo. Passer au morceau ou chapitre de livre audio ou de podcast suivant Appuyez sur Suivant/Avance rapide (‘). Recommencer la lecture d’un morceau ou d’une vidéo Appuyez sur Précédent/Retour rapide (]). Lire le morceau ou le chapitre de livre audio ou de podcast précédent Appuyez deux fois sur Précédent/Retour rapide (]). Avancer ou revenir rapidement dans un morceau Maintenez enfoncé Suivant/Avance rapide (‘) ou Précédent/ Retour rapide (]). Créer une liste de lecture Genius Lisez ou sélectionnez un morceau, puis maintenez enfoncé le bouton central jusqu’à ce qu’un menu apparaisse. Sélectionnez Démarrer Genius, puis appuyez sur le bouton central (Démarrer Genius n’apparaît que s’il existe des données Genius pour le morceau). Enregistrer une liste de lecture Genius Créez une liste de lecture Genius, sélectionnez Enregistrer la liste, puis appuyez sur le bouton central. Lire une liste de lecture Genius enregistrée Dans le menu Liste de lecture, sélectionnez une liste de lecture Genius, puis appuyez sur Lecture/Pause (’). Ajouter un morceau à la liste de lecture On-The-Go Lisez ou sélectionnez un morceau, puis maintenez enfoncé le bouton central jusqu’à ce qu’un menu apparaisse. Sélectionnez l’option d’ajout à la liste de lecture On-The-Go, puis appuyez sur le bouton central. Accéder à des options supplé- mentaires Maintenez enfoncé le bouton central jusqu’à ce qu’un menu apparaisse. Rechercher le numéro de série de l’iPod nano Dans le menu principal, choisissez Réglages > Informations, puis appuyez sur le bouton central jusqu’à obtenir le numéro de série ou bien, regardez au dos de l’iPod nano. Pour Procédez comme suit :Chapitre 1 Fonctions de base de l’iPod nano 9 Recherche de musique à l’aide de Cover Flow Vous pouvez explorer votre collection de musique à l’aide de Cover Flow, un moyen visuel de passer en revue le contenu de votre bibliothèque. Cover Flow classe vos albums alphabétiquement par nom d’artiste. Vous pouvez activer Cover Flow à partir du menu principal, de n’importe quel menu de musique ou de l’écran En lecture. Pour utiliser Cover Flow : 1 Tournez l’iPod nano de 90 degrés vers la gauche ou la droite. Cover Flow apparaît. 2 Utilisez la molette cliquable pour parcourir votre illustration d’album. 3 Sélectionnez un album, puis appuyez sur le bouton central. 4 Utilisez la molette cliquable pour sélectionner un morceau, puis appuyez sur le bouton central pour l’écouter. Vous pouvez également parcourir rapidement vos albums dans Cover Flow en déplaçant rapidement le doigt sur la molette cliquable. Remarque : toutes les langues ne sont pas prises en charge. Pour effectuer une exploration rapide dans Cover Flow : 1 Déplacez rapidement votre pouce sur la molette cliquable afin d’afficher à l’écran une lettre de l’alphabet.10 Chapitre 1 Fonctions de base de l’iPod nano 2 Utilisez la molette cliquable pour naviguer dans l’alphabet jusqu’à la première lettre de l’artiste recherché. Les albums reprenant différents artistes et ceux dont le nom de l’artiste commence par un symbole ou un numéro sont classés après la lettre « Z ». 3 Levez temporairement votre pouce pour revenir à une exploration normale. 4 Sélectionnez un album, puis appuyez sur le bouton central. 5 Utilisez la molette cliquable pour sélectionner un morceau, puis appuyez sur le bouton central pour l’écouter. Défilement rapide dans les listes de grande taille Vous pouvez faire défiler rapidement une liste de taille importante en déplaçant rapidement le doigt sur la molette cliquable. Remarque : toutes les langues ne sont pas prises en charge. Pour défiler rapidement parmi la liste : 1 Déplacez rapidement votre pouce sur la molette cliquable afin d’afficher à l’écran une lettre de l’alphabet. 2 Utilisez la molette cliquable pour naviguer dans l’alphabet jusqu’à la première lettre de l’élément recherché. Les éléments commençant par un symbole ou un numéro apparaissent après la lettre « Z ». 3 Levez temporairement votre pouce pour revenir à un défilement normal. 4 Utilisez la molette cliquable pour atteindre l’élément souhaité. Recherche de musique L’iPod nano permet de rechercher des morceaux, des listes de lecture, des titres d’album, des noms d’artiste, des podcasts audio et des livres audio. La recherche ne porte pas sur les vidéos, les notes, les éléments de calendrier, les contacts ni les paroles. Remarque : toutes les langues ne sont pas prises en charge. Pour rechercher de la musique : 1 Choisissez Rechercher dans le menu Musique. 2 Saisissez une chaîne de recherche. Pour cela, utilisez la molette cliquable pour parcourir l’alphabet et choisissez les caractères un par un en appuyant sur le bouton central. L’iPod nano lance la recherche dès que vous saisissez le premier caractère et affiche les résultats sur l’écran de recherche. Par exemple, si vous saisissez « b », l’iPod nano affiche tous les éléments de musique qui contiennent la lettre « b ». Si vous saisissez « ab », l’iPod nano affiche tous les éléments qui contiennent cette suite de lettres. Pour saisir un espace, appuyez sur le bouton Suivant/Avance rapide. Pour supprimer le caractère précédent, appuyez sur le bouton Précédent/Retour rapide.Chapitre 1 Fonctions de base de l’iPod nano 11 3 Appuyez sur Menu pour afficher la liste des résultats que vous pouvez à présent explorer. Dans la liste des résultats, les éléments sont accompagnés d’icônes qui identifient leur type : morceau, vidéo, artiste, album, livre audio ou podcast. Pour revenir à Recherche (si l’élément Recherche est sélectionné dans le menu), appuyez sur le bouton central. Utilisation des menus de l’iPod nano Lorsque vous allumez l’iPod nano, le menu principal est affiché. Sélectionnez des éléments du menu pour effectuer des actions ou accéder à d’autres menus. Les icônes en haut de l’écran indiquent l’état de l’iPod nano. Élément affiché Fonction Intitulé du menu Affiche l’intitulé du menu actuel. Icône de verrouillage L’icône de cadenas apparaît lorsque le bouton Hold (dans le haut de l’iPod nano) est réglé sur la position HOLD. Cela indique que les commandes de l’iPod nano sont désactivées. Icône Lecture L’icône Lecture («) apparaît lorsqu’un morceau, une vidéo ou tout autre élément est en cours de lecture. L’icône Pause (1) apparaît lorsque la lecture de l’élément est interrompue temporairement. Icône Batterie L’icône de la batterie indique la charge restante approximative. Éléments de menu Utilisez la molette cliquable pour faire défiler les éléments de menu. Appuyez sur le bouton central pour sélectionner un élément. Une flèche en regard d’un élément de menu indique qu’en le sélectionnant vous accédez à un autre menu ou écran. Panneau Aperçu Affiche les illustrations, les photos et d’autres éléments ou informations liés à l’option de menu sélectionnée. Intitulé du menu Icône de verrouillage Icône Batterie Éléments de menu Panneau Aperçu Icône Lecture12 Chapitre 1 Fonctions de base de l’iPod nano Ajout ou suppression d’éléments dans le menu principal Il peut s’avérer utile d’ajouter des éléments que vous utilisez fréquemment au menu principal de l’iPod nano. Par exemple, vous pouvez ajouter un élément Morceaux au menu principal pour ne pas devoir choisir Musique avant de choisir Morceaux. Pour ajouter ou supprimer des éléments dans le menu principal : 1 Choisissez Réglages > Général > Menu principal. 2 Sélectionnez les différents éléments à ajouter au menu principal. Une coche identifie les éléments qui ont été ajoutés. Désactivation du panneau d’aperçu Le panneau d’aperçu, situé en bas du menu principal, et qui affiche les illustrations d’album, les vignettes de photo, l’espace disponible et d’autres informations, peut être désactivé pour attribuer de l’espace supplémentaire aux options de menu. Pour désactiver le panneau d’aperçu : m Choisissez Réglages > Général > Menu principal > Panneau d’aperçu, puis choisissez Désactivé. Pour réactiver le panneau d’aperçu, choisissez Réglages > Général > Menu principal > Panneau d’aperçu, puis choisissez Activé. Le panneau d’aperçu n’affiche les illustrations d’une catégorie que si l’iPod nano contient au moins quatre éléments contenant des illustrations dans la catégorie. Réglage de la taille de police des menus L’iPod nano permet d’afficher le texte dans deux tailles différentes : standard et grande. Pour régler la taille de police : m Choisissez Réglages > Général > Taille de la police, puis appuyez sur le bouton central pour sélectionner Standard ou Grande. Réglage de la langue Il est possible de choisir la langue utilisée dans les menus de l’iPod nano. Pour choisir la langue : m Sélectionnez Réglages > Langue, puis choisissez une langue dans la liste. Réglage de la minuterie du rétro-éclairage Vous pouvez configurer l’activation du rétro-éclairage et illuminer l’écran pendant une durée déterminée lorsque vous cliquez sur un bouton ou utilisez la molette cliquable. Cette durée est configurée par défaut sur 10 secondes.Chapitre 1 Fonctions de base de l’iPod nano 13 Pour régler la minuterie du rétro-éclairage : m Sélectionnez Réglages > Général > Rétro-éclairage, puis choisissez la durée de rétro- éclairage souhaitée. Choisissez « Toujours » pour empêcher la désactivation du rétro- éclairage (cette option réduit les performances de la batterie). Réglage de la luminosité de l’écran Vous pouvez régler la luminosité de l’écran de l’iPod nano à l’aide d’un curseur. Pour régler la luminosité de l’écran : m Choisissez Réglages > Général > Luminosité, puis utilisez la molette cliquable pour déplacer le curseur. Le déplacer vers la gauche rend l’écran plus foncé, le déplacer vers la droite le rend plus clair. Vous pouvez également régler la luminosité au cours d’un diaporama ou d’une vidéo. Appuyez sur le bouton central pour afficher ou masquer le curseur de luminosité. Désactivation du son de la molette cliquable Lorsque vous faites défiler les éléments de menu, les écouteurs et le haut-parleur de l’iPod nano émettent de petits clics. Vous pouvez, si vous le souhaitez, désactiver le son de la molette cliquable dans les écouteurs ou dans le haut-parleur, voire dans les deux. Pour désactiver le son de la molette cliquable : m Choisissez Réglages > Général et réglez Cliqueur sur Non. Pour rétablir le son de la molette cliquable, réglez Cliqueur sur Haut-parleur, Écouteurs ou Les deux. Obtenir des informations sur l’iPod nano Vous pouvez obtenir des informations sur votre iPod nano, notamment l’espace disponible, le nombre de morceaux, de vidéos, de photos et d’autres éléments qu’il contient, ainsi que le numéro de série, le modèle et la version du logiciel. Pour obtenir des informations sur l’iPod nano : m Choisissez Réglages > Informations, puis appuyez sur le bouton central pour faire défiler tous les écrans d’information. Réinitialisation de tous les réglages Vous pouvez rétablir les réglages par défaut de tous les éléments du menu Réglages. Pour réinitialiser tous les réglages : m Choisissez Réglages > Réinitialiser réglages, puis Réinitialiser.14 Chapitre 1 Fonctions de base de l’iPod nano Désactivation des commandes de l’iPod nano Si vous ne voulez pas activer accidentellement l’iPod nano ou ses commandes, vous pouvez les désactiver à l’aide du bouton Hold. Le bouton Hold désactive toutes les commandes de la molette cliquable, ainsi que les fonctions activées par des mouvements, tels que les secousses qui permettent de créer un mix de morceaux ou la rotation qui permet d’ouvrir ou de fermer Cover Flow. Pour désactiver les commandes de l’iPod nano : m Faites glisser le bouton Hold sur HOLD (une barre orange s’affiche). Si vous désactivez les commandes lors de l’utilisation de l’iPod nano, la lecture du morceau, de la liste de lecture, du podcast ou de la vidéo en cours continue. Pour arrêter ou suspendre la lecture, faites glisser le bouton Hold afin de réactiver les commandes. Connexion et déconnexion de l’iPod nano Connectez l’iPod nano à votre ordinateur pour ajouter de la musique, des vidéos, des photos et des fichiers, ainsi que pour recharger la batterie. Déconnectez l’iPod nano une fois que vous avez fini. Important : la batterie ne se recharge pas si l’activité de votre ordinateur est suspendue. Connexion de l’iPod nano Pour connecter l’iPod nano à votre ordinateur : m Branchez le câble iPod Dock Connector vers USB 2.0 inclus sur un port USB 2.0 à haute intensité de votre ordinateur, puis connectez l’autre extrémité à votre iPod nano. Si vous disposez d’un socle iPod Dock, vous pouvez connecter le câble à un port USB 2.0 de votre ordinateur, connecter l’autre extrémité au socle iPod Dock, puis placer l’iPod nano sur le socle.Chapitre 1 Fonctions de base de l’iPod nano 15 Remarque : le port USB de la majorité des claviers ne fournit pas une alimentation suffisante. Connectez l’iPod nano à un port USB 2.0 de votre ordinateur. Par défaut, iTunes synchronise automatiquement les morceaux avec l’iPod nano lorsque vous connectez ce dernier à l’ordinateur. Quand iTunes a terminé la synchronisation, vous pouvez déconnecter l’iPod nano. Vous pouvez synchroniser des morceaux pendant que la batterie se recharge. Si vous connectez l’iPod nano à un autre ordinateur et qu’il est configuré de manière à synchroniser automatiquement la musique, iTunes vous demande si vous voulez effectuer une synchronisation. Si vous cliquez sur Oui, les morceaux et autres fichiers audio qui se trouvent déjà sur l’iPod nano sont effacés et remplacés par des morceaux et d’autres fichiers provenant de l’ordinateur auquel l’iPod nano est connecté. Pour en savoir plus sur l’ajout de musique à l’iPod nano et sur l’utilisation de l’iPod nano avec plusieurs ordinateurs, reportezvous au chapitre 2, « Configuration de l’iPod nano » à la page 21.16 Chapitre 1 Fonctions de base de l’iPod nano Déconnexion de l’iPod nano Il est important de ne pas déconnecter l’iPod nano au cours d’une synchronisation. Pour savoir si vous pouvez déconnecter l’iPod nano, consultez l’écran de l’iPod nano. Important : ne déconnectez pas l’iPod nano si le message « Connecté » ou « Synchronisation » est affiché. Vous pourriez endommager des fichiers sur l’iPod nano. Si vous voyez l’un de ces messages, vous devez éjecter l’iPod nano avant de le déconnecter. Si vous avez configuré l’iPod nano de manière à gérer manuellement les morceaux (voir la section « Gestion manuelle de l’iPod nano » à la page 31) ou si vous avez activé l’utilisation de l’iPod nano comme disque (voir la section « Utilisation de l’iPod nano comme disque dur externe » à la page 60), vous devez toujours éjecter l’iPod nano avant de le déconnecter. Si vous voyez l’un de ces messages, vous devez éjecter l’iPod nano avant de le déconnecter. Si vous voyez le menu principal ou une grande icône représentant une batterie, vous pouvez déconnecter l’iPod nano.Chapitre 1 Fonctions de base de l’iPod nano 17 Pour éjecter l’iPod nano : m Cliquez sur le bouton d’éjection (C) situé près de l’iPod nano dans la liste des appareils de la liste des sources d’iTunes. Si vous utilisez un Mac, vous pouvez également éjecter l’iPod nano en faisant glisser l’icône de l’iPod nano du bureau vers la Corbeille. Si vous utilisez un PC Windows, vous pouvez également éjecter l’iPod nano via le Poste de travail ou en cliquant sur l’icône « Retirer le périphérique en toute sécurité » située dans la zone de notification Windows, puis en sélectionnant votre iPod nano. Pour déconnecter l’iPod nano : 1 Débranchez les écouteurs s’ils sont branchés. 2 Déconnectez le câble de l’iPod nano. Si l’iPod nano se trouve sur le socle Dock, il suffit de le retirer. Vous pouvez déconnecter l’iPod nano en toute sécurité si l’un de ces messages est affiché.18 Chapitre 1 Fonctions de base de l’iPod nano À propos de la batterie de l’iPod nano L’iPod nano dispose d’une batterie interne que l’utilisateur ne peut remplacer lui-même. Pour un résultat optimal, la première fois que vous utilisez l’iPod nano, laissez-le se charger pendant environ trois heures ou jusqu’à ce que l’icône de batterie qui se trouve dans la zone d’état de l’écran indique que la batterie est entièrement chargée. Si l’iPod nano n’est pas utilisé pendant un certain temps, il se peut que la batterie doive être rechargée. Remarque : l’iPod nano consomme l’énergie de la batterie même lorsqu’il est désactivé. La batterie de l’iPod nano est chargée à 80 pour cent en une heure et demie environ et entièrement en trois heures environ. Si vous rechargez l’iPod nano pendant que vous ajoutez des fichiers, que vous écoutez de la musique, que vous visionnez des vidéos ou un diaporama, l’opération peut durer plus longtemps. Recharge de la batterie de l’iPod nano Vous pouvez recharger la batterie de l’iPod nano de deux façons distinctes :  Connectez l’iPod nano à votre ordinateur.  Utilisez l’adaptateur secteur USB Apple (vendu séparément). Pour recharger la batterie via votre ordinateur : m Connectez l’iPod nano à un port USB 2.0 de votre ordinateur. L’ordinateur doit être allumé et son activité ne peut être suspendue. Si l’icône de batterie affichée sur l’écran de l’iPod nano présente l’écran de charge, la batterie est en train d’être rechargée. Si l’écran Chargé s’affiche, cela signifie que la batterie est entièrement rechargée. Si vous ne voyez pas l’écran de charge, il se peut que l’iPod nano ne soit pas connecté à un port USB à haute intensité. Essayez de le connecter à un autre port USB de votre ordinateur. Chapitre 1 Fonctions de base de l’iPod nano 19 Important : si le message « Chargement, veuillez patienter » ou le message « Branchez la batterie » apparaît sur l’écran de l’iPod nano, la batterie doit être rechargée pour que l’iPod nano puisse communiquer avec votre ordinateur. Consultez la section « Si l’iPod nano affiche un message « Branchez la batterie » » à la page 74. Si vous voulez recharger l’iPod nano lorsque vous n’êtes pas à votre ordinateur, vous pouvez acheter l’adaptateur secteur Apple USB Power Adapter. Pour charger la batterie à l’aide de l’adaptateur secteur USB Apple : 1 Connectez l’adaptateur secteur à une prise électrique (si nécessaire). 2 Connectez le câble iPod Dock Connector vers USB 2.0 à l’adaptateur secteur et connectez l’autre extrémité du câble à l’iPod nano. 3 Connectez l’adaptateur secteur à une prise de courant en état de fonctionnement. AVERTISSEMENT : assurez-vous que l’adaptateur secteur est complètement assemblé avant de le brancher sur la prise. Adaptateur CA (La prise de votre adaptateur secteur peut se présenter différemment.) Adaptateur secteur USB Câble iPod Dock Connector vers USB 2.020 Chapitre 1 Fonctions de base de l’iPod nano États de la batterie Lorsque l’iPod nano n’est pas connecté à une source électrique, une icône de batterie située dans le coin supérieur droit de l’écran de l’iPod nano affiche la charge restante approximative. Si l’iPod nano est connecté à une source électrique, l’icône de batterie change pour indiquer que la batterie est en charge ou entièrement chargée. Vous pouvez déconnecter ou utiliser l’iPod nano même si la batterie n’est pas entièrement rechargée. Remarque : les batteries rechargeables ont un nombre de cycles de recharge limité et il peut s’avérer nécessaire de les remplacer. La durée de vie de la batterie et le nombre de cycles de recharge varient en fonction de l’utilisation et des réglages de l’iPod. Pour plus d’informations, rendez-vous sur le site web www.apple.com/fr/batteries. Amélioration des performances de la batterie à l’aide de l’économiseur d’énergie L’économiseur d’énergie permet d’allonger la durée entre les recharges de la batterie en désactivant l’écran de l’iPod nano lorsque vous n’utilisez pas les commandes. Pour activer ou désactiver l’économiseur d’énergie : m Choisissez Réglages > Lecture > Économiseur d’énergie, puis sélectionnez Activé ou Désactivé. Batterie rechargée à moins de 20 % Batterie environ à moitié rechargée Batterie entièrement rechargée Batterie en cours de recharge (éclair) Batterie entièrement rechargée (prise)2 21 2 Configuration de l’iPod nano Pour configurer l’iPod nano, vous devez d’abord utiliser iTunes sur votre ordinateur afin d’importer, d’acheter et d’organiser votre musique, vos vidéos, vos podcasts, vos livres audio, vos jeux et vos autres contenus multimédias. Connectez ensuite l’iPod nano à votre ordinateur et synchronisez-le avec votre bibliothèque iTunes. Utilisation d’iTunes iTunes est l’application logicielle que l’on utilise avec l’iPod nano. iTunes permet de synchroniser de la musique, des livres audio, des podcasts etc. avec l’iPod nano. Lorsque vous connectez l’iPod nano à votre ordinateur, iTunes s’ouvre automatiquement. Ce guide vous explique comment utiliser iTunes pour télécharger des morceaux et d’autres contenus audio et vidéo sur votre ordinateur, comment créer des compilations personnalisées de vos morceaux préférés (listes de lecture), comment les synchroniser avec l’iPod nano et comment régler l’iPod nano. iTunes possède également une fonction appelée Genius, qui crée des listes de lecture instantanées à partir de morceaux qui s’associent harmonieusement les uns avec les autres. Vous pouvez synchroniser avec l’iPod nano des listes de lecture Genius que vous avez créées dans iTunes et créer des listes de lecture Genius sur l’iPod nano. Pour pouvoir utiliser Genius, vous devez disposer d’iTunes 8.0 ou ultérieur et d’un compte iTunes Store. iTunes possède de nombreuses autres fonctionnalités. Vous pouvez graver vos propres CD lisibles sur des lecteurs CD standard (si votre ordinateur possède un graveur de CD), écouter de la radio diffusée sur Internet, regarder des vidéos et des émissions de télévision, classer vos morceaux selon vos préférences et bien plus encore. Pour en savoir plus sur l’utilisation de ces fonctions d’iTunes, ouvrez iTunes, puis choisissez Aide > Aide iTunes. Si iTunes 8.0 est installé sur votre ordinateur et que vous avez configuré votre bibliothè- que iTunes, passez à la section suivante « Synchronisation de l’iPod nano ». Pour apprendre à configurer la fonction Genius dans iTunes, reportez-vous à la section « Utilisation de Genius dans iTunes » à la page 27.22 Chapitre 2 Configuration de l’iPod nano Importation de musique dans votre bibliothèque iTunes Pour pouvoir écouter de la musique sur l’iPod nano, vous devez d’abord importer cette musique dans iTunes, sur votre ordinateur. Il y a trois façons d’importer de la musique et d’autres données audio dans iTunes :  Acheter de la musique, des livres audio et des vidéos ou télécharger des podcasts en ligne sur l’iTunes Store.  Importer de la musique et d’autres données audio à partir de CD audio.  Ajouter de la musique et d’autres données audio qui se trouvent déjà sur votre ordinateur à votre bibliothèque iTunes. Achat de musique et téléchargement de podcasts via l’iTunes Store Si vous disposez d’une connexion à Internet, vous pouvez facilement acheter et télécharger des morceaux, des albums, des livres audio et des vidéos en ligne sur l’iTunes Store. Vous pouvez aussi vous abonner à des podcasts et les télécharger. Pour acheter de la musique en ligne via l’iTunes Store, vous devez configurer un compte Apple dans iTunes, rechercher les morceaux voulus, puis les acheter. Si vous disposez déjà d’un compte Apple ou d’un compte America Online (AOL, disponible uniquement dans certains pays), vous pouvez vous en servir pour vous inscrire à l’iTunes Store et acheter des morceaux. Il n’est pas nécessaire de disposer d’un compte iTunes Store pour télécharger des podcasts ou s’y abonner. Pour vous connecter à l’iTunes Store : m Ouvrez iTunes, puis :  Si vous disposez déjà d’un compte iTunes, choisissez Store > Ouvrir une session.  Si vous n’avez pas encore de compte iTunes, choisissez Store > Créer un compte. Suivez alors les instructions à l’écran pour configurer un compte Apple ou bien saisissez les données de votre compte Apple ou AOL existant.Chapitre 2 Configuration de l’iPod nano 23 Vous pouvez parcourir l’iTunes Store ou y faire une recherche pour trouver un album, un morceau ou un artiste. Ouvrez iTunes et sélectionnez iTunes Store dans la liste des sources.  Pour explorer l’iTunes Store, choisissez une catégorie (par exemple, Musique) dans la partie gauche de la page principale de l’iTunes Store. Vous pouvez ensuite choisir un genre, consulter les nouveautés, cliquer sur l’un des morceaux mis en avant, consulter les classements et bien plus encore, ou cliquer sur Explorer sous Raccourcis dans la fenêtre principale de l’iTunes Store.  Pour explorer les podcasts, cliquez sur le lien Podcasts dans la partie gauche de la page principale de l’iTunes Store.  Pour faire une recherche dans l’iTunes Store, tapez le nom d’un album, d’un morceau, d’un artiste ou d’un compositeur dans le champ de recherche.  Pour restreindre votre recherche, tapez quelque chose dans le champ de recherche, appuyez sur Retour ou Entrée sur votre clavier, puis cliquez sur des liens dans la barre de recherche, dans le haut de la page des résultats. Par exemple, pour restreindre votre recherche aux morceaux et albums, cliquez sur le lien Musique.  Pour rechercher une combinaison d’éléments, cliquez sur Recherche avancée dans la fenêtre Résultats de la recherche.  Pour revenir à la page principale de l’iTunes Store, cliquez sur le bouton Départ dans la ligne d’état, dans le haut de la fenêtre. Pour acheter un morceau, un album, un clip vidéo ou un livre audio : 1 Sélectionnez iTunes Store dans la liste des sources, puis recherchez l’élément que vous souhaitez acheter. Vous pouvez double-cliquer sur un morceau ou un autre élément pour en écouter un extrait et vous assurer que c’est bien celui que vous voulez. (Si la vitesse de votre connexion réseau est inférieure à 128 Kbit/s, choisissez iTunes > Préférences, puis, dans la sous-fenêtre Store, cochez la case « Charger l’extrait complet avant la lecture ».) 2 Cliquez sur Acheter un morceau, Acheter un album, Acheter une vidéo ou Acheter un livre. Le morceau ou autre élément est téléchargé sur votre ordinateur et débité de la carte de crédit indiquée dans votre compte Apple ou AOL. Pour vous abonner à un podcast ou le télécharger : 1 Sélectionnez iTunes Store dans la liste des sources. 2 Cliquez sur le lien Podcasts dans la partie gauche de la page principale de l’iTunes Store. 3 Recherchez le podcast que vous souhaitez télécharger.  Pour télécharger un seul épisode de podcast, cliquez sur le bouton Obtenir l’épisode en regard de l’épisode.  Pour vous abonner à un podcast, cliquez sur le bouton S’abonner en regard de l’illustration du podcast. iTunes télécharge le dernier épisode. Les nouveaux épisodes disponibles seront automatiquement téléchargés sur iTunes lorsque vous vous connecterez à Internet.24 Chapitre 2 Configuration de l’iPod nano Pour en savoir plus, consultez les sections « Ajout de podcasts à l’iPod nano » à la page 33 et « Visionnage et écoute de podcasts » à la page 47. Ajout de morceaux stockés sur votre ordinateur à votre bibliothèque iTunes Si votre ordinateur contient des morceaux encodés dans des formats de fichier pris en charge par iTunes, vous pouvez facilement les ajouter à iTunes. Pour ajouter des morceaux stockés sur votre ordinateur à votre bibliothèque iTunes : m Faites glisser le dossier ou disque contenant les fichiers audio sur Bibliothèque dans la liste des sources d’iTunes (ou choisissez Fichier > Ajouter à la bibliothèque, puis sélectionnez le dossier ou disque). Si iTunes prend en charge le format de fichier des morceaux, ceux-ci sont automatiquement ajoutés à votre bibliothèque iTunes. Vous pouvez également faire glisser individuellement des fichiers audio dans iTunes. Remarque : si vous utilisez iTunes pour Windows, vous pouvez convertir les fichiers WMA non protégés au format AAC ou MP3. Cela peut être utile si vous disposez d’une bibliothèque de musique encodée au format WMA. Pour en savoir plus, ouvrez iTunes, puis choisissez Aide > Aide iTunes. Importation de musique dans iTunes à partir de CD audio Suivez ces instructions pour importer de la musique de vos CD dans iTunes. Pour importer de la musique dans iTunes à partir d’un CD audio : 1 Insérez un CD dans votre ordinateur, puis ouvrez iTunes. Si vous disposez d’une connexion à Internet, iTunes obtient le nom des morceaux sur Internet (s’ils sont disponibles) et les affiche dans la fenêtre. Si vous ne disposez pas de connexion à Internet, vous pouvez dans un premier temps importer vos CD puis, ultérieurement, lorsque l’ordinateur est connecté à Internet, choisir Avancé > Obtenir le nom des pistes du CD. iTunes introduira alors le nom des pistes des CD importés. Si le nom des pistes du CD n’est pas disponible en ligne, vous pouvez les saisir manuellement. Consultez la section « Saisie du nom des morceaux et d’autres informations » ci-dessous. Une fois les informations des morceaux saisies, vous pouvez parcourir les morceaux dans iTunes ou sur l’iPod par titre, artiste, album ou autre critère. 2 Cliquez pour supprimer la coche en regard du ou des morceaux que vous ne souhaitez pas importer. 3 Cliquez sur le bouton Importer. La zone d’affichage située en haut de la fenêtre iTunes indique le temps nécessaire à l’importation des différents morceaux. Par défaut, iTunes lit les morceaux à mesure qu’ils sont importés. Si vous importez un grand nombre de morceaux, il est possible que vous souhaitiez arrêter la lecture des morceaux afin d’améliorer les performances.Chapitre 2 Configuration de l’iPod nano 25 4 Pour éjecter le CD, cliquez sur le bouton d’éjection (C). Vous ne pouvez pas éjecter un CD avant la fin de l’importation. 5 Répétez ces opérations pour tout autre CD contenant des morceaux que vous souhaitez importer. Saisie du nom des morceaux et d’autres informations Pour saisir manuellement des noms de morceau provenant d’un CD et d’autres informations : 1 Sélectionnez le premier morceau du CD, puis sélectionnez Fichier > Lire les informations. 2 Cliquez sur Infos. 3 Saisissez les informations concernant le morceau. 4 Cliquez sur Suivant pour saisir les informations concernant le morceau suivant. 5 Cliquez sur OK une fois que vous avez fini. Ajout de paroles Vous pouvez taper des paroles de chansons au format texte dans iTunes pour pouvoir les afficher sur l’iPod nano en cours de lecture. Pour saisir des paroles dans iTunes : 1 Sélectionnez un morceau, puis choisissez Fichier > Lire les informations. 2 Cliquez sur Paroles. 3 Saisissez les paroles de la chanson dans la zone de texte. 4 Cliquez sur Suivant pour saisir les paroles du morceau suivant. 5 Une fois que vous avez fini, cliquez sur OK. Pour en savoir plus, consultez la section « Affichage de paroles sur l’iPod nano » à la page 39. Ajout d’illustrations d’album La musique que vous achetez sur l’iTunes Store est accompagnée de l’illustration de l’album que votre iPod nano peut afficher. Vous pouvez ajouter automatiquement les illustrations d’album de morceaux importés depuis des CD si ces CD sont disponibles sur l’iTunes Store. Vous pouvez ajouter manuellement des illustrations d’album si elles se trouvent sur votre ordinateur. Pour ajouter automatiquement une illustration d’album : m Choisissez Avancé > Obtenir les illustrations d’album. Il est nécessaire de disposer d’un compte iTunes Store pour ajouter des illustrations automatiquement.26 Chapitre 2 Configuration de l’iPod nano Pour ajouter manuellement une illustration d’album à iTunes : 1 Sélectionnez un morceau, puis choisissez Fichier > Lire les informations. 2 Cliquez sur Illustration. 3 Cliquez sur Ajouter, naviguez jusqu’au fichier de l’illustration, puis cliquez sur Choisir. 4 Utilisez le curseur pour ajuster la taille de l’illustration. 5 Cliquez sur Suivant pour ajouter une illustration au morceau ou à l’album suivant. 6 Cliquez sur OK une fois que vous avez fini. Pour en savoir plus, consultez la section « Affichage d’illustrations d’album sur l’iPod nano » à la page 39. Organisation de votre musique Grâce à iTunes, vous pouvez organiser à votre guise des morceaux et d’autres éléments dans des listes appelées listes de lecture. Vous pouvez par exemple créer des listes de lecture comprenant des morceaux à écouter pendant vos séances d’entraînement ou qui correspondent à une ambiance particulière. Vous pouvez aussi créer des listes de lecture intelligente qui sont automatiquement actualisées en fonction de règles que vous définissez. Lorsque vous ajoutez à iTunes des morceaux qui correspondent à ces règles, ils seront automatiquement ajoutés à la liste de lecture intelligente. Vous pouvez créer autant de listes de lecture que vous voulez à l’aide de n’importe quels morceaux de votre bibliothèque iTunes. Le fait d’ajouter un morceau à une liste de lecture ou de l’en supprimer ne le supprime pas de votre bibliothèque. Pour créer une liste de lecture dans iTunes : 1 Cliquez sur le bouton Ajouter (+) ou choisissez Fichier > Nouvelle liste de lecture. 2 Tapez le nom de la liste de lecture. 3 Cliquez sur Musique dans la liste Bibliothèque, puis faites glisser un morceau ou un autre élément vers la liste de lecture. Pour sélectionner plusieurs morceaux, maintenez enfoncée la touche Maj ou Commande (x) s’il s’agit d’un Mac, ou la touche Maj ou Contrôle s’il s’agit d’un PC Windows, tout en cliquant sur chacun des morceaux voulus. Pour créer une liste de lecture intelligente : m Sélectionnez Fichier > « Nouvelle liste de lecture intelligente », puis définissez les règles de votre liste de lecture. Remarque : pour créer des listes de lecture sur l’iPod nano lorsque l’iPod nano n’est pas connecté à votre ordinateur, consultez la section « Création de listes de lecture On-The-Go sur l’iPod nano » à la page 40.Chapitre 2 Configuration de l’iPod nano 27 Utilisation de Genius dans iTunes Genius crée automatiquement des listes de lecture à partir de morceaux de votre bibliothèque qui s’associent harmonieusement les uns avec les autres. Pour utiliser Genius sur l’iPod nano, vous devez tout d’abord configurer Genius dans iTunes. Même s’il s’agit d’un service gratuit, Genius requiert un compte iTunes Store (si vous n’en possédez pas, vous pouvez en établir un lorsque vous activez Genius). Pour configurer Genius : 1 Dans iTunes, choisissez Store > Activer Genius. 2 Suivez les instructions à l’écran. iTunes recueille ensuite des informations anonymes sur votre bibliothèque et les compare à tous les morceaux disponibles sur l’iTunes Store ainsi qu’aux bibliothèques d’autres clients de l’iTunes Store. La durée de cette opération dépend de la taille de votre bibliothèque, de la vitesse de connexion et d’autres facteurs. 3 Connectez l’iPod nano et synchronisez-le. Vous pouvez à présent utiliser Genius sur l’iPod nano (voir page 42). Pour créer une liste de lecture Genius dans iTunes : 1 Cliquez sur Musique dans la liste de la bibliothèque ou sélectionnez une liste de lecture. 2 Sélectionnez un morceau. 3 Cliquez sur le bouton Genius dans le bas de la fenêtre iTunes. 4 Pour modifier le nombre maximal de morceaux inclus dans la liste de lecture, choisissez un nombre dans le menu local. 5 Pour enregistrer la liste de lecture, cliquez sur Enregistrer la liste de lecture. Vous pouvez ajouter ou supprimer des éléments dans la liste de lecture Genius enregistrée. Vous pouvez également cliquer sur Actualiser pour créer une liste de lecture basée sur le même morceau original. Comme n’importe quelle liste de lecture iTunes, les listes de lecture Genius créées dans iTunes peuvent être synchronisées avec l’iPod nano. Consultez la section « Synchronisation d’une sélection de listes de lecture avec l’iPod nano » à la page 31.28 Chapitre 2 Configuration de l’iPod nano Achat ou location de vidéos et téléchargement de podcasts vidéo Pour acheter des vidéos, c’est-à-dire des films, des émissions de télévision et des clips vidéo, ou louer des vidéos en ligne sur l’iTunes Store (une partie d’iTunes qui n’est disponible que dans certains pays), vous devez vous connecter à votre compte iTunes Store, rechercher les morceaux et les vidéos souhaités et les acheter ou les louer. Un film loué ne peut plus être visionné 30 jours après la date de location ou au bout de 24 heures après sa première lecture. Les locations arrivées à expiration sont supprimées automatiquement. Remarque : ces conditions s’appliquent aux locations réalisées aux États-Unis. Les conditions de location dépendent des pays. Pour explorer les vidéos dans l’iTunes Store : 1 Dans iTunes, choisissez iTunes Store dans la liste des sources. 2 Cliquez sur un élément (Films, Émissions de télévision ou Clips vidéo) dans la liste de l’iTunes Store à gauche. Vous pouvez aussi rechercher des clips vidéo faisant partie d’un album ou d’une autre offre. Vous pouvez regarder des bandes-annonces ou extraits d’émissions de télévision. Une icône d’affichage ( ) apparaît en regard des vidéos dans iTunes et dans l’iTunes Store. Pour acheter ou louer une vidéo : 1 Sélectionnez iTunes Store dans la liste des sources, puis recherchez l’élément à acheter ou louer. 2 Cliquez sur Acheter la vidéo, Acheter l’épisode, Acheter la saison, Acheter le film ou Louer le film. Les vidéos achetées sont affichées lorsque vous choisissez Films ou Émissions de télévision (sous Bibliothèque) ou Achats (sous Store) dans la liste des sources. Les vidéos louées s’affichent lorsque vous sélectionnez Films loués (sous Bibliothèque). Certains éléments disposent d’autres options, comme, par exemple, les émissions de télévision, qui vous permettent d’acheter une carte pour la saison complète pour tous les épisodes. Pour télécharger un podcast vidéo : Les podcasts vidéo apparaissent parmi les autres podcasts dans l’iTunes Store. Vous pouvez vous y abonner et les télécharger comme n’importe quel autre podcast. Il n’est pas nécessaire de disposer d’un compte iTunes Store pour télécharger des podcasts. Consultez la section « Achat de musique et téléchargement de podcasts via l’iTunes Store » à la page 22.Chapitre 2 Configuration de l’iPod nano 29 Conversion de vos propres vidéos pour qu’elles fonctionnent sur l’iPod nano Vous pouvez regarder d’autres fichiers vidéo sur l’iPod nano, comme, par exemple, des vidéos que vous avez créées dans iMovie sur un Mac ou des vidéos que vous avez téléchargées d’Internet. Importez la vidéo dans iTunes, convertissez-la vers un format compatible avec l’iPod nano, si nécessaire, puis ajoutez-la à l’iPod nano. iTunes prend en charge tous les formats vidéo que QuickTime prend en charge. Pour en savoir plus, choisissez Aide > Aide QuickTime Player dans la barre des menus de QuickTime Player. Pour importer une vidéo dans iTunes : m Faites glisser le fichier de la vidéo dans votre bibliothèque iTunes. Il se peut que certaines vidéos soient déjà dans un format compatible avec l’iPod nano une fois que vous les avez importées dans iTunes. Si vous tentez d’ajouter une vidéo à l’iPod nano (voir la section « Synchronisation automatique de vidéos » à la page 34) et qu’un message indique que la vidéo ne peut pas être lue sur l’iPod nano, vous devez la convertir pour qu’elle puisse être utilisée sur l’iPod nano. Pour convertir une vidéo à l’utiliser avec l’iPod nano : 1 Sélectionnez la vidéo dans votre bibliothèque iTunes. 2 Choisissez Avancé > « Convertir la sélection au format iPod » Selon la longueur et le contenu de la vidéo, la conversion vers un format compatible avec l’iPod nano peut prendre de quelques minutes à plusieurs heures. Lorsque vous convertissez une vidéo vers un format compatible avec l’iPod nano, la vidéo originale reste dans votre bibliothèque iTunes. Pour en savoir plus sur la conversion de vidéo dans un format compatible avec l’iPod nano, lisez le document www.info.apple.com/kbnum/n302758-fr. Ajout de musique à l’iPod nano Une fois que vous avez importé votre musique dans iTunes et l’y avez organisée, vous pouvez facilement l’ajouter à l’iPod nano.30 Chapitre 2 Configuration de l’iPod nano Pour définir la façon dont la musique doit être transférée de votre ordinateur à l’iPod nano, connectez l’iPod nano à votre ordinateur, puis utilisez les préférences d’iTunes pour définir les réglages relatifs à l’iPod nano. Il y a trois façons de transférer de la musique d’iTunes vers l’iPod nano :  Synchroniser tous les morceaux et les listes de lecture : lorsque vous connectez l’iPod nano, il est automatiquement mis à jour avec les morceaux et autres éléments de votre bibliothèque iTunes. Tous les autres morceaux se trouvant sur l’iPod nano sont supprimés.  Synchroniser les listes de lecture sélectionnées : lorsque vous connectez l’iPod nano, il est mis à jour automatiquement de façon que les morceaux correspondent aux listes de lecture que vous avez sélectionnées dans iTunes.  Ajouter manuellement de la musique à l’iPod nano : lorsque vous connectez l’iPod nano, vous pouvez faire glisser des morceaux et des listes de lecture individuels vers l’iPod nano et supprimer des morceaux et des listes de lecture individuels de l’iPod nano. Avec cette option, vous pouvez ajouter des morceaux provenant de plusieurs ordinateurs sans effacer ceux qui se trouvent sur l’iPod nano. Lorsque vous générez la musique vous-même, vous devez toujours éjecter l’iPod nano d’iTunes avant de le déconnecter. Synchronisation automatique de la musique L’iPod nano est configuré par défaut pour être synchronisé avec tous les morceaux et toutes les listes de lecture des votre ordinateur dès que vous le connectez à ce dernier. C’est la façon la plus simple d’ajouter de la musique à l’iPod nano. Pour cela, connectez l’iPod nano à votre ordinateur, laissez-le ajouter automatiquement des morceaux, des livres audio, des vidéos et d’autres éléments, puis déconnectez-le. Si vous avez ajouté des morceaux à iTunes depuis la dernière connexion de l’iPod nano, ils seront ajoutés à l’iPod nano. Si vous avec supprimé des morceaux d’iTunes, ils seront aussi supprimés de l’iPod nano. Pour synchroniser de la musique avec l’iPod nano : m Connectez simplement l’iPod nano à votre ordinateur. Si l’iPod nano est configuré pour une synchronisation automatique, la mise à jour commence. Important : la première fois que vous connectez l’iPod nano à un ordinateur, un message vous demande si vous voulez synchroniser automatiquement les morceaux. Si vous acceptez, tous les morceaux, les livres audio, les vidéos et autres éléments sont supprimés de l’iPod nano et remplacés par ceux de l’ordinateur en question. Si vous refusez, vous pourrez toujours ajouter manuellement des morceaux à l’iPod nano sans supprimer les morceaux qui se trouvent déjà sur l’iPod nano. Pendant la synchronisation de la musique de votre ordinateur sur l’iPod nano, la fenêtre d’état d’iTunes indique la progression de l’opération et une icône de synchronisation s’affiche à côté de l’iPod nano dans la liste des sources. Une fois la mise à jour terminée, le message « L’iPod est à jour » apparaît dans iTunes.Chapitre 2 Configuration de l’iPod nano 31 Synchronisation d’une sélection de listes de lecture avec l’iPod nano Configurer iTunes de sorte qu’il synchronise les listes de lecture sélectionnées vers l’iPod nano est utile si la musique qui se trouve dans votre bibliothèque iTunes ne tient pas sur l’iPod nano. Dans ce cas seule la musique des listes de lecture que vous avez sélectionnées est synchronisé vers l’iPod nano. Pour configurer iTunes afin qu’il ne synchronise que la musique provenant des listes de lecture sélectionnées avec l’iPod nano : 1 Dans iTunes, sélectionnez l’iPod nano dans la liste des sources, puis cliquez sur l’onglet Musique. 2 Sélectionnez « synchroniser la musique », puis choisissez « Listes de lecture sélectionnées ». 3 Sélectionnez les listes de lecture voulues. 4 Pour inclure les clips vidéo et afficher les illustrations d’album, cochez les cases correspondantes. 5 Cliquez sur Appliquer. Si la case « Ne synchroniser que les morceaux et vidéos sélectionnés » est cochée dans la sous-fenêtre Résumé, iTunes ne synchronise que les éléments sélectionnés. Gestion manuelle de l’iPod nano Configurer iTunes de manière à pouvoir gérer manuellement l’iPod nano vous offre la plus grande flexibilité pour gérer la musique et la vidéo qui se trouve sur l’iPod nano. Vous pouvez ajouter et supprimer individuellement des morceaux (y compris des clips vidéo) et des vidéos (y compris des films et des émissions de télévision). Vous pouvez aussi ajouter de la musique et des vidéos de plusieurs ordinateurs à l’iPod nano sans supprimer les éléments qui se trouvent déjà sur l’iPod nano. Régler l’iPod nano de manière à pouvoir gérer manuellement la musique et la vidéo désactive les options de synchronisation automatique dans les fenêtres Musique, films et Émissions de télévision. Vous ne pouvez pas gérer manuellement les uns et synchroniser automatiquement les autres en même temps. Pour configurer iTunes de manière à pouvoir gérer manuellement la musique et la vidéo de l’iPod nano : 1 Dans iTunes, sélectionnez l’iPod nano dans la liste des sources, puis cliquez sur l’onglet Résumé. 2 Dans la section Options, sélectionnez « Gérer manuellement la musique et les clips vidéo ». 3 Cliquez sur Appliquer. Lorsque vous générez la musique et la vidéo vous-même, vous devez toujours éjecter l’iPod nano d’iTunes avant de le déconnecter.32 Chapitre 2 Configuration de l’iPod nano Pour ajouter un morceau, une vidéo ou tout autre élément à l’iPod nano : 1 Cliquez sur Musique ou tout autre élément de la bibliothèque dans la liste des sources d’iTunes, . 2 Faites glisser un morceau ou tout autre élément vers l’iPod nano dans la liste des sources. Pour supprimer un morceau, une vidéo ou tout autre élément de l’iPod nano : 1 Dans iTunes, sélectionnez l’iPod nano dans la liste des sources. 2 Sélectionnez un morceau ou tout autre élément sur l’iPod nano, puis appuyez sur la touche Supprimer ou Arrière de votre clavier. Si vous supprimez manuellement un morceau ou tout autre élément de l’iPod nano, il n’est pas supprimé de votre bibliothèque iTunes. Pour créer une nouvelle liste de lecture sur l’iPod nano : 1 Dans iTunes, sélectionnez l’iPod nano dans la liste des sources, puis cliquez sur le bouton Ajouter (+) ou choisissez Fichier > Nouvelle liste de lecture. 2 Tapez le nom de la liste de lecture. 3 Cliquez sur un élément, comme par exemple Musique, dans la liste Bibliothèque, puis faites glisser un morceau ou un autre élément vers la liste de lecture. Pour ajouter des morceaux à ou supprimer des morceaux d’une liste de lecture sur l’iPod nano : m Faites glisser un morceau vers une liste de lecture de l’iPod nano pour ajouter le morceau. Sélectionnez un morceau dans une liste de lecture et appuyez sur la touche Supprimer du clavier pour supprimer le morceau. Si vous avez réglé iTunes pour la gestion manuelle de la musique, vous pouvez réinitialiser l’application plus tard afin de mettre en place la synchronisation automatique. Pour réinitialiser iTunes de sorte qu’il synchronise à nouveau automatiquement toute la musique sur l’iPod nano : 1 Dans iTunes, sélectionnez l’iPod nano dans la liste des sources, puis cliquez sur l’onglet Musique. 2 Sélectionnez « Synchroniser la musique », puis choisissez « Tous les morceaux et listes de lecture ». 3 Cliquez sur Appliquer. La mise à jour commence automatiquement. Si la case « Ne synchroniser que les éléments sélectionnés » est cochée dans la sous-fenêtre Résumé, iTunes ne synchronise que les éléments qui sont sélectionnés dans votre bibliothè- que de musique et dans les autres bibliothèques.Chapitre 2 Configuration de l’iPod nano 33 Ajout de podcasts à l’iPod nano Les réglages relatifs à l’ajout de podcasts à l’iPod nano ne sont pas liés aux réglages relatifs à l’ajout de morceaux. Les réglages de mise à jour de podcasts n’influent pas sur ceux de mise à jour de morceaux, et inversement. Vous pouvez configurer iTunes de sorte qu’il synchronise automatiquement tous les podcasts ou uniquement les podcasts sélectionnés, ou ajouter manuellement des podcasts à l’iPod nano. Pour configurer iTunes de sorte qu’il mette automatiquement à jour les podcasts de l’iPod nano : 1 Dans iTunes, sélectionnez l’iPod nano dans la liste des sources, puis cliquez sur l’onglet Podcasts. 2 Dans la sous-fenêtre Podcasts, sélectionnez « Synchroniser … épisodes de podcast », puis choisissez le nombre d’épisodes souhaité dans le menu local. 3 Cliquez sur « Tous les podcasts » ou sur « Podcasts sélectionnés ». Si vous cliquez sur « Podcasts sélectionnés », sélectionnez aussi les podcasts dans la liste que vous voulez synchroniser. 4 Cliquez sur Appliquer. Lorsque vous configurez iTunes de sorte qu’il synchronise automatiquement les podcasts de l’iPod nano, l’iPod nano est mis à jour chaque fois que vous le connectez à votre ordinateur. Remarque : si la case « Ne synchroniser que les éléments sélectionnés » est cochée dans la sous-fenêtre Résumé, iTunes ne synchronise que les éléments qui sont sélectionnés dans votre bibliothèque de podcasts et dans les autres bibliothèques. Pour gérer manuellement les podcasts : 1 Dans iTunes, sélectionnez l’iPod nano dans la liste des sources, puis cliquez sur l’onglet Résumé. 2 Sélectionnez « Gérer manuellement la musique et les clips vidéo », puis cliquez sur Appliquer. 3 Sélectionnez la bibliothèque de podcasts dans la liste des sources, puis faites glisser les podcasts souhaités vers l’iPod nano. Ajout de vidéos à l’iPod nano Vous pouvez ajouter des films et des émissions de télévision à l’iPod nano de la même façon que vous ajoutez des morceaux. Vous pouvez configurer iTunes de sorte qu’il synchronise automatiquement tous les films et toutes les émissions de télévision vers l’iPod nano lorsque vous connectez l’iPod nano ou configurer iTunes de sorte qu’il ne synchronise que les listes de lecture sélectionnées. Si cela ne vous convient pas, vous pouvez gérer manuellement les films et les émissions de télévision. Avec cette option, vous pouvez ajouter des vidéos provenant de plusieurs ordinateurs sans effacer celles qui se trouvent sur l’iPod nano. 34 Chapitre 2 Configuration de l’iPod nano Remarque : les clips vidéo sont gérés avec les morceaux, dans l’onglet Musique d’iTunes. Consultez la section « Ajout de musique à l’iPod nano » à la page 29. Important : les films loués ne peuvent être visionnés que sur un seul appareil à la fois. Si vous louez par exemple un film sur l’iTunes Store, puis que vous l’ajoutez à l’iPod nano, vous ne pouvez le visionner que sur l’iPod nano. Si vous le transférez ensuite dans iTunes, vous ne pourrez le visionner que dans iTunes et non plus sur l’iPod nano. Tous les délais habituels de location s’appliquent aux films loués ajoutés à l’iPod nano. Synchronisation automatique de vidéos Par défaut, l’iPod nano est configuré pour synchroniser toutes les vidéos de votre ordinateur lorsque vous le connectez à ce dernier. C’est la façon la plus simple d’ajouter des vidéos à l’iPod nano. Pour cela, connectez l’iPod nano à votre ordinateur, laissez-le ajouter automatiquement des vidéos et d’autres éléments, puis déconnectez-le. Si vous avez ajouté des vidéos à iTunes depuis la dernière connexion de l’iPod nano, elles seront ajoutées à l’iPod nano. Si vous avec supprimé des vidéos d’iTunes, elles seront aussi supprimées de l’iPod nano. Vous pouvez configurer l’iPod nano de façon qu’il synchronise automatiquement les vidéos lorsque vous le connectez à votre ordinateur. Pour synchroniser des vidéos avec l’iPod nano : m Connectez simplement l’iPod nano à votre ordinateur. Si l’iPod nano est configuré pour une synchronisation automatique, la synchronisation commence. Important : la première fois que vous connectez l’iPod nano à un autre ordinateur lorsque la synchronisation automatique est activée, un message vous demande si vous souhaitez synchroniser automatiquement les morceaux et les vidéos. Si vous acceptez, tous les morceaux, vidéos et autres éléments sont supprimés de l’iPod nano et remplacés par ceux de la bibliothèque iTunes de l’ordinateur en question. Si vous refusez, vous pourrez toujours ajouter manuellement des morceaux à l’iPod nano sans supprimer les morceaux qui se trouvent déjà sur l’iPod nano. iTunes comprend une fonction permettant de synchroniser vos achats entre l’iPod nano et un autre ordinateur. Pour en savoir plus, consultez l’Aide iTunes.Chapitre 2 Configuration de l’iPod nano 35 Pendant la synchronisation des vidéos de votre ordinateur vers l’iPod nano, la fenêtre d’état d’iTunes affiche la progression et l’icône de l’iPod nano clignote en rouge dans la liste des sources. Une fois la mise à jour terminée, le message « L’iPod est à jour » apparaît dans iTunes. Synchronisation des vidéos sélectionnées avec l’iPod nano Configurer iTunes de façon qu’il synchronise les vidéos sélectionnées vers l’iPod nano est utile si toutes les vidéos de votre bibliothèque iTunes ne tiennent pas sur l’iPod nano. Seules les vidéos que vous indiquez sont alors synchronisées avec l’iPod nano. Vous pouvez synchroniser les vidéos sélectionnées ou les listes de lecture sélectionnées qui contiennent des vidéos. Pour qu’iTunes synchronise les films non visionnés ou sélectionnés avec l’iPod nano : 1 Dans iTunes, sélectionnez l’iPod nano dans la liste des sources, puis cliquez sur l’onglet Films. 2 Sélectionnez « Synchroniser les films ». 3 Sélectionnez les films ou listes de lecture souhaités. Films non visionnés : sélectionnez « … films non visionnés », puis le nombre de films non visionnées dans le menu local. Films sélectionnés ou Listes de lecture sélectionnées : cliquez sur « Sélectionnés … », sélectionnez « films » ou « listes de lecture » dans le menu local, puis sélectionnez les films ou listes de lecture souhaités. 4 Cliquez sur Appliquer. Si la case « Ne synchroniser que les éléments sélectionnés » est cochée dans la sous-fenêtre Résumé, iTunes ne synchronise que les films sélectionnés. Pour configurer iTunes afin qu’il synchronise les épisodes les plus récents ou les émissions de télévision sélectionnées avec l’iPod nano : 1 Dans iTunes, sélectionnez l’iPod nano dans la liste des sources, puis cliquez sur l’onglet Émissions de télévision. 2 Sélectionnez « Synchroniser … épisodes », puis choisissez le nombre d’épisodes souhaité dans le menu local. 3 Cliquez sur « Sélectionnés … », puis sélectionnez « émissions de télévision » ou « listes de lecture » dans le menu local. 4 Sélectionnez les films ou listes de lecture à synchroniser. 5 Cliquez sur Appliquer. Si la case « Ne synchroniser que les éléments sélectionnés » est cochée dans la sousfenêtre Résumé, iTunes ne synchronise que les émissions de télévision sélectionnées.36 Chapitre 2 Configuration de l’iPod nano Gestion manuelle des vidéos Configurer iTunes de manière à pouvoir gérer manuellement l’iPod nano vous offre la plus grande flexibilité pour gérer des vidéos sur l’iPod nano. Vous pouvez ajouter et supprimer des films, des émissions de télévision et d’autres éléments individuellement. Vous pouvez aussi ajouter des vidéos de plusieurs ordinateurs à l’iPod nano sans supprimer les vidéos qui se trouvent déjà sur l’iPod nano. Consultez la section « Gestion manuelle de l’iPod nano » à la page 31. Si vous configurez iTunes de manière à pouvoir gérer manuellement les films et les émissions de télévision, vous pouvez toujours réinitialiser iTunes plus tard de façon qu’il les synchronise automatiquement. Si vous configurez iTunes de façon qu’il synchronise automatiquement après avoir géré manuellement l’iPod nano, vous perdez tous les éléments qui se trouvent sur l’iPod nano mais pas dans votre bibliothèque iTunes. Pour régler iTunes de sorte qu’il synchronise automatiquement tous les films sur l’iPod nano : 1 Dans iTunes, sélectionnez l’iPod nano dans la liste des sources, puis cliquez sur l’onglet Films. 2 Sélectionnez « Synchroniser les films », puis « Tous les films ». 3 Cliquez sur Appliquer. Si la case « Ne synchroniser que les éléments sélectionnés » est cochée dans la sousfenêtre Résumé, iTunes ne synchronise que les films sélectionnés. Pour régler iTunes de sorte qu’il synchronise automatiquement toutes les émissions de télévision sur l’iPod nano : 1 Dans iTunes, sélectionnez l’iPod nano dans la liste des sources, puis cliquez sur l’onglet Émissions de télévision. 2 Sélectionnez « Synchroniser … épisodes », puis choisissez « Tous » dans le menu local. 3 Sélectionnez « Toutes les émissions de télévision ». 4 Cliquez sur Appliquer. Si la case « Ne synchroniser que les éléments sélectionnés » est cochée dans la sousfenêtre Résumé, iTunes ne synchronise que les émissions de télévision sélectionnées. Ajout de podcasts vidéo à l’iPod nano Vous pouvez ajouter des podcasts vidéo à l’iPod nano de la même façon que vous ajoutez d’autres podcasts (voir « Ajout de podcasts à l’iPod nano » à la page 33). Si un podcast possède un composant vidéo, la vidéo est lue lorsque vous le sélectionnez dans Podcasts.3 37 3 Écouter de la musique Après avoir configuré l’iPod nano, vous pouvez écouter des morceaux, des podcasts, des livres audio, des émissions de radio et bien plus encore. Ce chapitre vous expliquera comment écouter de la musique avec l’iPod nano. Lecture de musique et d’autres fichiers audio Utilisez la molette cliquable et le bouton central pour rechercher un morceau de musique ou un clip vidéo. Pour rechercher et lire un morceau : m Sélectionnez Musique, recherchez un morceau ou un clip vidéo, puis appuyez sur le bouton Lecture/Pause. Remarque : lorsque vous explorez des clips vidéo dans le menu Musique, vous n’entendez que la musique. Par contre, lorsque vous explorez des clips vidéo dans le menu Vidéos, vous voyez aussi la vidéo.38 Chapitre 3 Écouter de la musique Lorsqu’un morceau est en cours de lecture, l’écran En lecture apparaît. Le tableau suivant décrit les éléments qui apparaissent dans l’écran En lecture de l’iPod nano. Pour régler le volume de lecture : m Lorsque la barre de progression est visible, utilisez la molette cliquable pour régler le volume. Pour écouter une autre partie d’un morceau de musique : 1 Appuyez sur le bouton central jusqu’à ce que s’affiche le défileur. 2 Utilisez la molette cliquable pour déplacer le losange le long du défileur. Pour revenir au menu précédent : m À partir de n’importe quel écran, appuyez sur le bouton Menu pour revenir au menu précédent. Élément de l’écran En lecture Fonction Icône Aléatoire (¡) Apparaît lorsque l’iPod nano est configuré pour lire de façon aléatoire des morceaux ou des albums. Icône Répéter (/) Apparaît lorsque l’iPod nano est configuré pour répéter tous les morceaux. L’icône Répéter une fois (!) apparaît lorsque l’iPod nano est configuré pour ne répéter qu’un seul morceau. Pochette d’album Affiche l’illustration de l’album, si elle est disponible. Informations du morceau Affiche le titre du morceau, le nom de l’artiste et le titre de l’album. Barre de progression du temps du morceau Affiche le temps écoulé et le temps restant du morceau en cours de lecture. Défileur Permet d’atteindre rapidement un autre emplacement de la piste. Curseur Genius Crée une liste de lecture Genius basée sur le morceau actuel (ce curseur n’est pas affiché si aucune donnée Genius n’est disponible pour ce morceau). Curseur de lecture aléatoire Permet de réaliser un mix de morceaux ou d’albums directement à partir de l’écran En lecture. Classement du morceau Affiche les étoiles de votre classement pour le morceau. Paroles Affiche les paroles du morceau en cours de lecture (uniquement si vous les avez saisies). Informations du morceau (cliquez sur le bouton central pour afficher le défileur, le curseur Genius ou le curseur de lecture aléatoire, le classement du morceau et les paroles) Pochette d’album Icône Aléatoire Icône RépéterChapitre 3 Écouter de la musique 39 Affichage de paroles sur l’iPod nano Si vous ajoutez des paroles à un morceau dans iTunes (voir la section « Ajout de paroles » à la page 25), puis ajoutez ce morceau à l’iPod nano, vous pouvez afficher les paroles sur l’iPod nano. Les paroles ne sont pas affichées si vous ne les avez pas ajoutées. Pour afficher les paroles sur l’iPod nano lorsqu’un morceau est en cours de lecture : m Lorsque l’écran En lecture est affiché, cliquez sur le bouton central jusqu’à ce que les paroles apparaissent. Vous pouvez faire défiler les paroles pendant la lecture du morceau. Classement des morceaux Vous pouvez attribuer à un morceau une note d’évaluation (de 1 à 5 étoiles) pour indiquer à quel point il vous plaît. Vous pouvez créer automatiquement des listes de lecture dans iTunes selon ces notes d’évaluation. Pour attribuer une note à un morceau : 1 Lancez la lecture du morceau. 2 À partir de l’écran En lecture, appuyez sur le bouton central jusqu’à ce que les cinq pastilles de classement apparaissent. 3 Utilisez la molette cliquable pour choisir un classement (représenté par des étoiles). Remarque : il est impossible d’attribuer une note à un podcast vidéo. Affichage d’illustrations d’album sur l’iPod nano Par défaut, iTunes affiche les illustrations d’album sur l’iPod nano. Les illustrations disponibles sont affichées sur l’iPod nano dans Cover Flow, dans la liste des albums et lorsque vous lisez des morceaux de cet album. Pour configuré iTunes de manière à afficher les illustrations d’album sur l’iPod nano : 1 Connectez l’iPod nano à votre ordinateur. 2 Dans iTunes, sélectionnez l’iPod nano dans la liste des sources, puis cliquez sur l’onglet Musique. 3 Sélectionnez « Afficher les illustrations d’album sur votre iPod ». Pour afficher les illustrations d’album sur l’iPod nano : m Tenez l’iPod nano horizontalement pour afficher Cover Flow ou écoutez un morceau possédant une illustration d’album. Pour en savoir plus à ce sujet, ouvrez iTunes, puis choisissez Aide > Aide iTunes.40 Chapitre 3 Écouter de la musique Accès aux commandes supplémentaires Certaines commandes de l’iPod nano sont accessibles directement depuis l’écran En lecture et certains menus. Pour accéder aux commandes supplémentaires : m Maintenez enfoncé le bouton central jusqu’à ce qu’un menu s’affiche, sélectionnez une commande et appuyez une nouvelle fois sur le bouton central. Exploration des morceaux par album ou par artiste Lorsque vous écoutez un morceau, vous pouvez explorer d’autres morceaux du même artiste ou tous les morceaux de l’album en cours. Pour explorer des morceaux par album : 1 À partir de l’écran En lecture, maintenez enfoncé le bouton central jusqu’à ce qu’un menu apparaisse. 2 Choisissez Explorer par album, puis appuyez sur le bouton central. Vous pouvez visualiser tous les morceaux de cet album présents sur l’iPod nano. Vous pouvez sélectionner un autre morceau ou retourner à l’écran En lecture. Pour explorer des morceaux par artiste : 1 À partir de l’écran En lecture, maintenez enfoncé le bouton central jusqu’à ce qu’un menu apparaisse. 2 Choisissez Explorer par artiste, puis appuyez sur le bouton central. Vous pouvez visualiser tous les morceaux de cet artiste présents sur l’iPod nano. Vous pouvez sélectionner un autre morceau ou retourner à l’écran En lecture. Création de listes de lecture On-The-Go sur l’iPod nano Vous pouvez créer des listes de lecture On-The-Go sur l’iPod nano, même si l’iPod nano n’est pas connecté à votre ordinateur.Chapitre 3 Écouter de la musique 41 Pour créer une liste de lecture On-The-Go : 1 Sélectionnez un morceau, puis maintenez enfoncé le bouton central jusqu’à ce qu’un menu apparaisse. 2 Sélectionnez « Ajouter à la liste On-The-Go ». 3 Pour ajouter plusieurs morceaux, répétez les étapes 1 et 2. 4 Sélectionnez Musique > Listes de lecture > On-The-Go pour parcourir et lire votre liste de morceaux. Vous pouvez également ajouter un groupe de morceaux. Pour ajouter un album, par exemple, sélectionnez le titre de l’album, maintenez le bouton central enfoncé jusqu’à ce qu’un menu apparaisse, puis choisissez « Ajouter à la liste On-The-Go ». Pour lire les morceaux d’une liste de lecture On-The-Go : m Sélectionnez Musique > Listes de lecture > On-The-Go, puis choisissez un morceau. Pour supprimer un morceau d’une liste de lecture On-The-Go : 1 Sélectionnez un morceau dans la liste de lecture, puis maintenez le bouton central enfoncé jusqu’à ce qu’un menu apparaisse. 2 Choisissez « Supprimer de la liste On-The-Go », puis appuyez sur le bouton central. Pour effacer tout le contenu de la liste de lecture On-The-Go : m Choisissez Musique > Listes de lecture > On-The-Go > Effacer la liste de lecture, puis cliquez sur Effacer. Pour enregistrer la liste de lecture On-The-Go sur l’iPod nano : m Choisissez Musique > Listes de lecture > On-The-Go > Enregistrer liste. La première liste de lecture est enregistrée sous l’intitulé « Nouvelle liste 1 » dans le menu Listes de lecture. La liste de lecture On-The-Go est effacée. Vous pouvez enregistrer autant de listes de lecture que vous le souhaitez. Après avoir enregistré une liste de lecture, vous ne pouvez plus en supprimer des morceaux. Pour copier des listes de lecture On-The-Go de l’iPod nano vers votre ordinateur : m Si l’iPod nano est configuré pour mettre à jour automatiquement les morceaux (voir la section « Synchronisation automatique de la musique » à la page 30) et que vous créez une liste de lecture On-The-Go, celle-ci est copiée automatiquement dans iTunes lorsque vous connectez l’iPod nano. La nouvelle liste de lecture On-The-Go apparaît dans la liste des listes de lecture d’iTunes. Vous pouvez renommer, modifier ou supprimer la nouvelle liste de lecture comme n’importe quelle autre liste de lecture.42 Chapitre 3 Écouter de la musique Utilisation de la fonction Genius sur l’iPod nano La fonction Genius peut créer instantanément des listes de lecture comprenant des morceaux qui s’associent harmonieusement même si l’iPod nano n’est pas connecté à un ordinateur. Pour utiliser la fonction Genius, vous devez d’abord la configurer sur l’iTunes Store, puis synchroniser l’iPod nano avec iTunes. Vous pouvez également créer des listes de lecture Genius dans iTunes et les ajouter à l’iPod nano. Pour configurer Genius dans iTunes, reportez-vous à la section intitulée « Utilisation de Genius dans iTunes » à la page 27. Pour créer une liste de lecture Genius avec l’iPod nano : 1 Sélectionnez un morceau, puis maintenez enfoncé le bouton central jusqu’à ce qu’un menu apparaisse. Vous pouvez sélectionner un morceau dans un menu ou une liste de lecture, ou bien le lancer à partir de l’écran En lecture. 2 Choisissez Démarrer Genius, puis appuyez sur le bouton central. La nouvelle liste de lecture apparaît. La commande Démarrer Genius n’est pas visible dans les cas suivants :  Vous n’avez pas configuré la fonction Genius dans iTunes, puis synchronisé l’iPod nano avec iTunes.  Genius ne reconnaît pas le morceau que vous avez sélectionné.  Genius reconnaît le morceau, mais votre bibliothèque contient moins de dix morceaux similaires. 3 Pour conserver la liste de lecture, sélectionnez Enregistrer la liste. La liste de lecture est enregistrée sous un nom reprenant le titre et l’artiste du morceau utilisé comme base de liste de lecture. 4 Pour remplacer la liste de lecture par une autre basée sur le même morceau, choisissez Actualiser. Si vous actualisez une liste de lecture enregistrée, la nouvelle liste de lecture remplace la liste de lecture précédente. Il n’est pas possible de récupérer la liste de lecture précédente. Vous pouvez également démarrer Genius à partir de l’écran En lecture, en appuyant sur le bouton central jusqu’à ce que le curseur Genius apparaisse, puis en appuyant sur la molette cliquable pour déplacer le curseur vers la droite. Le curseur Genius n’est pas visible si Genius ne reconnaît pas le morceau en cours de lecture. Les listes de lecture Genius enregistrées sur l’iPod nano sont synchronisées avec iTunes lorsque vous connectez l’iPod nano à votre ordinateur. Pour écouter une liste de lecture Genius : m Sélectionnez Musique > Listes de lecture, puis choisissez la liste de lecture.Chapitre 3 Écouter de la musique 43 Configuration de l’iPod nano pour la lecture de morceaux dans un ordre aléatoire Vous pouvez configurer l’iPod nano de sorte qu’il lise des morceaux, des albums ou l’ensemble de votre bibliothèque dans un ordre aléatoire. Pour configurer l’iPod nano de manière qu’il lise tous vos morceaux dans un ordre aléatoire : m Choisissez Mix de morceaux dans le menu principal de l’iPod nano. L’iPod nano commence à lire des morceaux de l’ensemble de votre bibliothèque de musique dans un ordre aléatoire, en ignorant les livres audio et les podcasts. Pour configurer l’iPod nano de sorte qu’il lise toujours les morceaux ou les albums dans un ordre aléatoire : 1 Choisissez Réglages dans le menu principal de l’iPod nano. 2 Réglez l’élément du menu Aléatoire sur Morceaux ou Albums. Lorsque vous configurez l’iPod nano pour lire les morceaux dans un ordre aléatoire en choisissant Réglages > Ordre aléatoire, l’iPod nano lit dans un ordre aléatoire les morceaux de la liste (par exemple, l’album ou la liste de lecture) que vous avez choisi de lire. Lorsque vous configurez l’iPod nano pour lire les albums dans un ordre aléatoire, il lit tous les morceaux d’un album dans l’ordre, puis sélectionne de façon aléatoire un autre album dans la liste et lit les morceaux qu’il contient dans l’ordre. Vous pouvez aussi régler l’iPod nano pour lire aléatoirement des morceaux directement à partir de l’écran En lecture en appuyant sur le bouton central jusqu’à ce qu’apparaisse le curseur de lecture aléatoire, puis en utilisant la molette cliquable pour que l’iPod nano lise aléatoirement des morceaux ou des albums.44 Chapitre 3 Écouter de la musique Pour mélanger des morceaux pendant qu’un morceau est lu ou que sa lecture est suspendue : m Secouez l’iPod nano d’un côté à l’autre. La lecture d’un nouveau morceau commence. Le fait de secouer l’iPod nano pour créer un mix de morceaux ne modifie pas vos réglages de lecture aléatoire, qu’ils soient définis à l’aide de la commande Réglages > Aléatoire ou à l’aide du curseur de lecture aléatoire. Pour désactiver la fonction de secousse : m Sélectionnez Réglages > Lecture > Secousse, puis Désactivé. Pour réactiver la fonction de secousse, choisissez Réglages > Lecture > Secousse, puis Oui. La fonction de secousse est également désactivée lorsque le bouton Hold se trouve dans la position HOLD ou lorsque l’affichage est désactivé. Si l’iPod nano est éteint, vous ne pouvez pas l’activer en le secouant. Réglage de l’iPod nano pour la répétition de morceaux Vous pouvez configurer l’iPod nano de sorte qu’il répète un morceau indéfiniment ou bien qu’il répète les morceaux d’une liste particulière. Pour configurer l’iPod nano de sorte qu’il répète les morceaux : m Choisissez Réglages dans le menu principal de l’iPod nano.  Pour répéter tous les morceaux de la liste, réglez l’élément du menu Répéter sur Tous.  Pour lire un morceau en boucle, réglez l’élément du menu Répéter sur Un.Chapitre 3 Écouter de la musique 45 Personnalisation du menu Musique Vous pouvez ajouter ou supprimer des éléments du menu Musique comme dans le menu principal. Par exemple, vous pouvez ajouter un élément Compilations au menu Musique, afin de pouvoir choisir facilement des compilations composées à partir de diverses sources. Pour ajouter ou supprimer des éléments dans le menu Musique : 1 Choisissez Réglages > Général > Menu Musique. 2 Sélectionnez les différents éléments qui doivent apparaître dans le menu Musique. Une coche identifie les éléments qui ont été ajoutés. Pour revenir aux réglages du menu Musique, choisissez Réinitialiser le menu. Réglage de la limite de volume maximum Vous pouvez définir une limite pour le volume maximal de l’iPod nano et affecter un code à cette limite pour empêcher que quelqu’un d’autre ne modifie ce réglage. Pour définir le volume maximum de l’iPod nano : 1 Choisissez Réglages > Lecture > Volume maximum. La commande de volume affiche le volume actuel. 2 Utilisez la molette cliquable pour sélectionner la limite de volume maximum. 3 Appuyez sur le bouton central pour valider la limite de volume maximum. Dans la barre de volume, un triangle indique la limite de volume maximum. Pour exiger un code avant toute modification de la limite de volume maximum : 1 Après avoir réglé le volume maximum, utilisez la molette cliquable pour sélectionner Verrouiller, puis appuyez sur le bouton central. 2 Dans l’écran qui apparaît, saisissez un code. Pour saisir un code :  Utilisez la molette cliquable pour sélectionner un chiffre à entrer dans la case du premier chiffre. Appuyez sur le bouton central pour confirmer votre choix et passer à la case suivante.  Utilisez la même méthode pour définir les autres chiffres du code (ou combinaison). Vous pouvez utiliser le bouton Suivant/Avance rapide pour passer à la case suivante ou le bouton Précédent/Retour rapide pour revenir à la case précédente. Appuyez sur le bouton central lorsque vous vous trouvez sur la dernière position pour confirmer le code entier. Le volume des morceaux et des autres fichiers audio peut varier selon leur mode d’enregistrement ou d’encodage. Consultez la section « Réglage de morceaux pour qu’ils soient lus au même niveau de volume » à la page 46 pour obtenir des informations sur la manière de mettre en place un niveau sonore relatif dans iTunes et sur l’iPod nano. Le niveau sonore peut également varier selon le type d’écouteurs ou de casque utilisés. À l’exception de l’iPod Radio Remote, les accessoires qui se branchent via le connecteur iPod Dock Connector de l’iPod ne prennent pas en charge le volume maximum.46 Chapitre 3 Écouter de la musique Si vous avez défini une combinaison, vous devez alors la saisir avant de modifier ou de supprimer le volume maximum. Pour modifier le volume maximum : 1 Choisissez Réglages > Lecture > Volume maximum. 2 Si vous avez établi une combinaison, saisissez-la en utilisant la molette cliquable pour sélectionner les chiffres et en appuyant sur le bouton central pour les valider. 3 Utilisez la molette cliquable pour modifier le niveau sonore établi en tant que volume maximum. 4 Appuyez sur le bouton Lecture/Pause pour accepter la modification. Pour supprimer le volume maximum : 1 Si vous êtes en train d’écouter l’iPod nano, appuyez sur Pause. 2 Choisissez Réglages > Lecture > Volume maximum. 3 Si vous avez établi une combinaison, saisissez-la en utilisant la molette cliquable pour sélectionner les chiffres et en appuyant sur le bouton central pour les valider. 4 Utilisez la molette cliquable pour déplacer la limite établie jusqu’au niveau le plus élevé sur la barre de volume. Cela annule toute restriction quant au volume. 5 Appuyez sur le bouton Lecture/Pause pour accepter la modification. Si vous avez oublié le code, vous pouvez toujours restaurer l’iPod nano. Consultez la section « Mise à jour et restauration du logiciel de l’iPod » à la page 78. Réglage de morceaux pour qu’ils soient lus au même niveau de volume iTunes peut régler automatiquement le volume des morceaux, de manière qu’ils soient lus au même volume relatif. Vous pouvez configurer l’iPod nano de sorte qu’il utilise les réglages de volume d’iTunes. Pour régler iTunes de sorte qu’il lise les morceaux au même niveau sonore : 1 Dans iTunes, sélectionnez iTunes > Préférences, si vous utilisez un Mac, ou Édition > Préférences, si vous utilisez un PC Windows. 2 Cliquez sur Lecture, cochez la case Égaliseur de volume, puis cliquez sur OK. Pour configurer l’iPod nano de sorte qu’il utilise les réglages de volume d’iTunes : m Choisissez Réglages, puis réglez Égaliseur de volume sur Oui. Si vous n’avez pas activé l’égaliseur de volume dans iTunes, l’activer sur l’iPod nano n’a aucun effet. Utilisation de l’égaliseur Vous pouvez utiliser des préréglages d’égaliseur pour adapter le son de l’iPod nano à un genre ou style musical particulier. Par exemple, pour améliorer l’acoustique d’un morceau rock, réglez l’égaliseur sur Rock. Chapitre 3 Écouter de la musique 47 Pour utiliser l’égaliseur pour modifier le son de l’iPod nano : m Sélectionnez Réglages > Lecture > Égaliseur, puis choisissez un préréglage d’égaliseur. Si vous avez assigné un préréglage d’égaliseur à un morceau dans iTunes et que l’égaliseur de l’iPod nano est désactivé, le morceau est lu avec les réglages d’iTunes. Pour en savoir plus, consultez l’Aide iTunes. Fondu entre morceaux Vous pouvez régler l’iPod nano pour qu’il insère un effet de fondu sortant à la fin de chaque morceau et un effet de fondu entrant au début du morceau suivant. Pour activer le fondu : m Sélectionnez Réglages > Lecture > Fondu audio et sélectionnez Oui. Remarque : les morceaux regroupés pour s’enchaîner sans silence intermédiaire ne sont pas affectés par l’effet de fondu. Visionnage et écoute de podcasts Les podcasts sont des émissions audio ou vidéo téléchargeables que vous pouvez vous procurer sur l’iTunes Store. Vous pouvez écouter les podcasts audio et regarder les podcasts vidéo. Les podcasts s’organisent par émissions, épisodes (inclus dans les émissions) et chapitres (inclus dans les épisodes). Si vous interrompez le visionnage ou l’écoute d’un podcast sur l’iPod, vous pourrez le reprendre à l’endroit où vous l’avez interrompue. Pour regarder ou écouter un podcast : 1 Dans le menu principal, sélectionnez Podcasts, puis choisissez une émission. Les émissions s’affichent dans l’ordre chronologique inverse pour que vous puissiez commencer par regarder ou écouter la plus récente. Un point bleu apparaît à côté des émissions et des épisodes que vous n’avez pas encore regardés ou écoutés. 2 Choisissez un épisode à écouter. L’écran En lecture affiche l’émission, l’épisode, les informations sur la date mais aussi le temps écoulé et le temps restant. Appuyez sur le bouton central pour obtenir plus d’informations sur le podcast. Si le podcast inclut des illustrations, vous pourrez également les visualiser. Les illustrations d’un podcast peuvent changer au cours d’un épisode. Si le podcast que vous écoutez comporte des chapitres, vous pouvez appuyer sur le bouton Suivant/Avance rapide pour passer au chapitre suivant et sur le bouton Précédent/Retour rapide pour revenir au début du chapitre actuel. Pour en savoir plus sur les podcasts, ouvrez iTunes, puis choisissez Aide > Aide iTunes. Recherchez alors « podcasts ».48 Chapitre 3 Écouter de la musique Écoute de livres audio Vous pouvez acheter et télécharger des livres audio depuis l’iTunes Store ou à l’adresse audible.com et les écouter sur votre iPod nano. Vous pouvez utiliser iTunes pour ajouter des livres audio à l’iPod nano de la même façon que vous ajoutez des morceaux. Si vous arrêtez la lecture d’un livre audio sur l’iPod nano et la reprenez plus tard, la lecture du livre audio reprend à l’endroit où vous êtes arrivé.L’iPod nano évite les livres audio lorsqu’il est en mode aléatoire. Si le livre audio que vous écoutez comporte des chapitres, vous pouvez appuyer sur le bouton Suivant/Avance rapide pour passer au chapitre suivant et sur le bouton Précédent/Retour rapide pour revenir au début du chapitre actuel. Vous pouvez lire des livres audio à des vitesses inférieures ou supérieures à la normale. Pour régler la vitesse de lecture d’un livre audio : m Choisissez Réglages > Lecture > Livres audio et choisissez une vitesse ou maintenez enfoncé le bouton central dans la fenêtre En lecture. Le choix d’une vitesse de lecture ne concerne que les livres audio achetés sur l’iTunes Store ou audible.com. Écoute de la radio FM Vous pouvez écouter la radio à l’aide de l’accessoire en option iPod Radio Remote pour l’iPod nano. Cet accessoire se fixe sur votre iPod nano à l’aide du câble du connecteur Dock. Lorsque vous utilisez la télécommande iPod Radio Remote, une commande de menu Radio apparaît dans le menu principal de l’iPod nano. Pour en savoir plus, consultez la documentation de l’iPod Radio Remote.4 49 4 Visionnage de vidéos L’iPod nano permet de visionner des émissions de télévision, des films, des podcasts vidéo et bien plus encore. Ce chapitre vous expliquera comment faire pour visionner des vidéos sur l’iPod nano et sur votre téléviseur. Vous pouvez visionner et écouter les vidéos sur l’iPod nano. Si vous disposez d’un câble AV Apple (disponible séparément sur www.apple.com/fr/ipodstore), vous pouvez même visionner les vidéos de l’iPod nano sur votre téléviseur. Regarder et écouter des vidéos sur l’iPod nano Les vidéos que vous ajoutez à l’iPod nano apparaissent dans les menus Vidéos. Les clips vidéo apparaissent aussi dans les menus Musique. Pour regarder une vidéo sur l’iPod nano : m Choisissez Vidéos, puis sélectionnez la vidéo souhaitée. Sélectionnez une vidéo, puis appuyez sur Lecture/Pause. Pour visionner la vidéo, maintenez l’iPod nano en position horizontale. Si vous faites pivoter l’iPod nano vers la gauche ou la droite, la vidéo s’adapte à la position de l’écran. Lorsque vous lancez la lecture d’une vidéo sur l’iPod nano, vous pouvez voir les images et entendre le son. 50 Chapitre 4 Visionnage de vidéos Pour écouter simplement un clip vidéo : m Choisissez Musique, puis sélectionnez le clip vidéo. Vous pouvez alors entendre la vidéo, mais pas la voir. Lorsque vous lisez une liste de lecture contenant des podcasts vidéo, vous entendez le son de ces podcasts sans voir leurs images. Pour visionner un podcast vidéo : m Dans le menu principal, sélectionnez Podcasts, puis choisissez un podcast vidéo. Consultez la section « Visionnage et écoute de podcasts » à la page 47 pour en savoir plus. Visionnage de vidéos sur un téléviseur connecté à l’iPod nano Si vous disposez d’un câble AV Apple, vous pouvez visionner des vidéos sur un téléviseur connecté à votre iPod nano. Vous devez d’abord configurer l’iPod nano de sorte qu’il affiche les vidéos sur un téléviseur, puis connecter l’iPod nano à votre téléviseur et enfin lire la vidéo. Remarque : utilisez le câble AV composante Apple, le câble AV composite Apple ou le kit de connexion AV Apple. Il se peut que des câbles RCA similaires ne fonctionnent pas. Vous pouvez acheter ces câbles sur www.apple.com/fr/ipodstore. Pour configurer l’iPod nano de sorte qu’il affiche les vidéos sur un téléviseur : m Choisissez Vidéos > Réglages, puis réglez Sortie télévision sur Activé. Si vous avez réglé Sortie télévision sur Activé, l’iPod nano vous demande si vous souhaitez afficher les vidéos sur un téléviseur ou sur l’iPod nano chaque fois que vous lisez une vidéo. Vous pouvez également choisir entre la lecture des vidéos en mode écran large ou plein écran et entre la lecture sur des appareils PAL ou NTSC. Pour définir les réglages de téléviseur : m Choisissez Vidéos > Réglages, puis suivez les instructions ci-dessous. Pour activer : Procédez comme suit : La vidéo à afficher sur un téléviseur Réglez Sortie télévision sur Demander ou Oui. L’affichage vidéo sur des téléviseurs PAL ou NTSC Réglez Signal télévision sur PAL ou NTSC. PAL et NTSC font référence à des normes de diffusion TV. Votre téléviseur utilise probablement l’une de ces deux normes, selon la région du monde dans laquelle il a été acheté. Si vous ne savez pas laquelle de ces normes votre téléviseur utilise, consultez la documentation que accompagne votre téléviseur. Le format de votre téléviseur externe Réglez l’écran du téléviseur sur Écran large pour le format 16:9 ou sur Standard pour le format 4:3.Chapitre 4 Visionnage de vidéos 51 Pour utiliser le câble AV composante Apple afin de connecter l’iPod nano à votre téléviseur : 1 Branchez les connecteurs vidéo rouge, vert et bleu dans les ports d’entrée vidéo composante (Y, Pb et Pr) de votre téléviseur. Vous pouvez également utiliser le câble AV composite Apple. Dans ce cas, connectez le connecteur vidéo jaune dans le port d’entrée vidéo de votre téléviseur. Votre téléviseur doit être équipé de ports vidéo et audio RCA. 2 Branchez respectivement les connecteurs audio blanc et rouge dans les port d’entrée audio analogique gauche et droit de votre téléviseur. 3 Branchez le connecteur iPod Dock Connector dans votre iPod nano ou station d’accueil Universal Dock. 4 Branchez le connecteur USB à votre adaptateur secteur USB Power Adapter ou votre ordinateur, de manière à garder votre iPod nano chargé. 5 Mettez votre iPod nano et votre téléviseur ou récepteur sous tension pour lancer la lecture. Assurez-vous que l’option Sortie télévision de l’iPod nano est réglée sur Oui. Remarque : les ports de votre téléviseur ou récepteur peuvent différer de ceux qui sont illustrés. L’adaptation de la vidéo à la taille de l’écran Réglez l’option « Adapter à l’écran » sur Oui. Si vous réglez l’option « Adapter à l’écran » sur Non, les vidéos écran large s’affichent en format letterbox sur l’iPod nano ou sur les écrans standard de téléviseur (format 4:3). D’autres sons à écouter Réglez Autre son sur Oui. L’affichage des légendes Réglez Légendes sur Oui. L’affichage des sous-titres Réglez Sous-titres sur Oui. Pour activer : Procédez comme suit : Adaptateur secteur USB iPod Audio gauche (blanc) Connecteur Dock Téléviseur Entrée vidéo (Y, Pb et Pr) Audio droit (rouge) Connecteur USB52 Chapitre 4 Visionnage de vidéos Pour visionner une vidéo sur votre téléviseur : 1 Connectez l’iPod nano à votre téléviseur (voir ci-avant). 2 Allumez votre téléviseur et réglez-le de sorte qu’il affiche le signal provenant des ports d’entrée connectés à l’iPod nano. Consultez la documentation qui accompagne votre téléviseur pour plus d’informations. 3 Sur l’iPod nano, choisissez Vidéos, puis choisissez la vidéo souhaitée.5 53 5 Fonctionnalités concernant les photos Vous pouvez importer des photos numériques dans votre ordinateur, puis les ajouter à l’iPod nano. Vous pouvez visionner vos photos sur l’iPod nano ou sous la forme d’un diaporama sur votre téléviseur. Lisez ce chapitre pour apprendre comment importer et visionner des photos. Importation de photos Vous pouvez importer des photos numériques à partir d’un appareil photo numérique dans votre ordinateur, puis les ajouter à l’iPod nano pour les visionner sur ce dernier. Vous pouvez connecter l’iPod nano à votre téléviseur et visionner des photos sous forme d’un diaporama accompagné de musique. Importation des photos d’un appareil photo vers votre ordinateur Vous pouvez importer des photos depuis un appareil photo numérique ou un lecteur de cartes photo. Pour importer des photos sur un Mac via iPhoto : 1 Connectez l’appareil photo ou le lecteur de cartes photo à votre ordinateur. Ouvrez l’application iPhoto (dans le dossier Applications) si elle ne s’ouvre pas automatiquement. 2 Cliquez sur Importer. Les images de l’appareil photo sont importées dans iPhoto.54 Chapitre 5 Fonctionnalités concernant les photos Vous pouvez importer d’autres images numériques dans iPhoto, comme des images téléchargées depuis le web. Pour en savoir plus sur l’importation et l’utilisation de photos et d’autres images, ouvrez iPhoto et choisissez Aide > Aide iPhoto. iPhoto fait partie d’une suite d’applications appelée iLife, en vente sur www.apple.com/fr/ilife. Il est possible qu’iPhoto soit déjà installé sur votre Mac, dans le dossier Applications. Si vous ne disposez pas d’iPhoto, vous pouvez importer des photos via l’application Transfert d’images. Pour importer des photos sur un Mac via l’application Transfert d’images : 1 Connectez l’appareil photo ou le lecteur de cartes photo à votre ordinateur. 2 Ouvrez l’application Transfert d’images (dans le dossier Applications) si celle-ci ne s’ouvre pas automatiquement. 3 Pour importer certains éléments seulement, cliquez sur Télécharger certaines images. Ou, pour télécharger tous les éléments, cliquez sur Tout télécharger. Pour importer des photos sur un PC Windows : m Suivez les instructions fournies avec votre appareil photo numérique ou votre application de gestion de photos. Ajout de photos de votre ordinateur à l’iPod nano Vous pouvez ajouter des photos à l’iPod nano à partir d’un dossier de votre disque dur. Si vous disposez d’un Mac et d’iPhoto 6 ou ultérieur, vous pouvez synchroniser automatiquement des albums iPhoto. Si vous disposez d’un PC Windows et d’Adobe Photoshop Album 2.0 ou ultérieur ou d’Adobe Photoshop Elements 4.0 ou ultérieur, vous pouvez synchroniser automatiquement des collections de photos. La première opération d’ajout de photos à l’iPod nano peut prendre un certain temps si votre photothèque contient un grand nombre de photos. Pour synchroniser des photos d’un Mac ou PC Windows vers l’iPod nano à l’aide d’une application photo : 1 Dans iTunes, sélectionnez l’iPod nano dans la liste des sources, puis cliquez sur l’onglet Photos.Chapitre 5 Fonctionnalités concernant les photos 55 2 Sélectionnez « Synchroniser les photos à partir de : … ».  Sur un Mac, choisissez iPhoto dans le menu local.  Sur un PC Windows, choisissez Photoshop Album ou Photoshop Elements dans le menu local. Remarque : certaines versions de Photoshop Album et Photoshop Elements ne prennent pas en charge les collections. Vous pouvez toujours les utiliser pour ajouter toutes vos photos. 3 Pour ajouter toutes vos photos, choisissez « Tous les albums et photos ». Pour conserver vos photos organisées par événement, sélectionnez « …événements » et choisissez une option dans le menu local. Pour ajouter des photos à partir de certains albums, choisissez « Albums sélectionnés », puis les albums souhaités. 4 Cliquez sur Appliquer. Chaque fois que vous connectez l’iPod nano à votre ordinateur, les photos sont synchronisées automatiquement. Pour ajouter des photos à partir d’un dossier de votre disque dur à l’iPod nano : 1 Faites glisser les images de votre choix dans un dossier de votre ordinateur. Si vous souhaitez que les images apparaissent dans différents albums photo sur l’iPod nano, créez des dossiers à l’intérieur du dossier d’images principal et faites glisser les images dans les nouveaux dossiers. 2 Dans iTunes, sélectionnez l’iPod nano dans la liste des sources, puis cliquez sur l’onglet Photos. 3 Sélectionnez « Synchroniser les photos à partir de… ». 4 Sélectionnez « Choisir un dossier » dans le menu local, puis choisissez votre dossier d’images. 5 Cliquez sur Appliquer. Lorsque vous ajoutez des photos à l’iPod nano, iTunes optimise les photos pour l’affichage. Par défaut, les fichiers d’image en pleine résolution ne sont pas transférés. L’ajout de fichiers d’image en pleine résolution est utile si vous souhaitez, par exemple, les déplacer d’un ordinateur à un autre, mais il n’est pas nécessaire pour afficher les images en haute qualité sur l’iPod nano. Pour ajouter des fichiers d’image en pleine résolution à l’iPod nano : 1 Dans iTunes, sélectionnez l’iPod nano dans la liste des sources, puis cliquez sur l’onglet Photos. 2 Sélectionnez « Inclure les photos en pleine résolution ». 3 Cliquez sur Appliquer. iTunes copie les versions en pleine résolution des photos dans le dossier Photos de l’iPod nano.56 Chapitre 5 Fonctionnalités concernant les photos Pour supprimer des photos de l’iPod nano : 1 Dans iTunes, sélectionnez l’iPod nano dans la liste des sources, puis cliquez sur l’onglet Photos. 2 Sélectionnez « Synchroniser les photos à partir de : … ».  Sur un Mac, choisissez iPhoto dans le menu local.  Sur un PC Windows, choisissez Photoshop Album ou Photoshop Elements dans le menu local. 3 Choisissez « Albums sélectionnés », puis désélectionnez les albums que vous souhaitez supprimer de l’iPod nano. 4 Cliquez sur Appliquer. Ajout de photos de l’iPod nano à votre ordinateur Si vous ajoutez des photos en pleine résolution de votre ordinateur à l’iPod nano en suivant les étapes précédentes, elles sont stockées sur l’iPod nano dans un dossier intitulé Photos. Vous pouvez connecter l’iPod nano à un ordinateur et placer ces photos sur l’ordinateur. L’utilisation de l’iPod nano en tant que disque dur doit être activée (voir la section « Utilisation de l’iPod nano comme disque dur externe » à la page 60). Pour ajouter des photos de l’iPod nano à un ordinateur : 1 Connectez l’iPod nano à l’ordinateur. 2 Faites glisser des fichiers d’images du dossier Photos ou DCIM de l’iPod nano vers le bureau ou une application de retouche de photos sur l’ordinateur. Vous pouvez aussi utiliser une application de retouche de photos, comme, par exemple, iPhoto, pour ajouter des photos stockées dans le dossier Photos. Consultez la documentation qui accompagne l’application pour plus d’informations. Pour supprimer des photos du dossier Photos de l’iPod nano : 1 Connectez l’iPod nano à l’ordinateur. 2 Naviguez jusqu’au dossier Photos de l’iPod nano et supprimez les photos dont vous ne voulez plus.Chapitre 5 Fonctionnalités concernant les photos 57 Visionnage de photos Vous pouvez visionner des photos sur l’iPod nano manuellement, ou sous la forme d’un diaporama. Si vous disposez d’un câble AV optionnel Apple (le câble AV composante Apple par exemple), vous pouvez connecter l’iPod nano à votre téléviseur et afficher vos photos sous forme de diaporama accompagné de musique. Visionnage de photos sur l’iPod nano Pour visionner des photos sur l’iPod nano : 1 Sur l’iPod nano, choisissez Photos > Toutes les photos. Vous pouvez aussi sélectionner Photos, puis un album photo pour afficher uniquement les photos de cet album. L’affichage des vignettes des photos peut prendre un moment. 2 Sélectionnez la photo souhaitée, puis appuyez sur le bouton central. 3 Pour visualiser des photos, maintenez l’iPod nano verticalement pour le format portrait ou horizontalement pour le format paysage. À partir de n’importe quel écran d’affichage de photos, utilisez la molette cliquable pour parcourir les photos (si vous visionnez un diaporama, la molette cliquable commande le volume sonore uniquement). Pour passer à l’écran de photos suivant ou précédent, appuyez sur le bouton Suivant/Avance rapide ou Précédent/Retour rapide. Maintenez enfoncé le bouton Suivant/Avance rapide ou Précédent/Retour rapide pour sauter à la première ou à la dernière photo de la photothèque ou de l’album. Visionnage de diaporamas Vous pouvez visionner un diaporama, avec la musique et les transitions de votre choix, sur l’iPod nano. Si vous disposez d’un câble AV optionnel Apple, vous pouvez visionner le diaporama sur votre téléviseur.58 Chapitre 5 Fonctionnalités concernant les photos Pour configurer les réglages d’un diaporama : m Choisissez Photos > Réglages, puis suivez les instructions ci-dessous : Pour visionner un diaporama sur l’iPod nano : m Choisissez une photo, un album ou un rouleau, puis appuyez sur le bouton Lecture/Pause ou bien sélectionnez une photo en plein écran et appuyez sur le bouton central. Pour faire une pause, appuyez sur le bouton Lecture/Pause. Pour passer à la photo suivante ou précé- dente, appuyez sur le bouton Suivant/Avance rapide ou Précédent/Retour rapide. Lorsque vous visionnez un diaporama, la molette cliquable commande uniquement le volume de la musique. Elle ne permet pas de faire défiler les photos durant le diaporama. Pour connecter l’iPod nano à votre téléviseur : 1 Connectez le câble AV composante ou composite Apple à l’iPod nano. Utilisez le câble AV composante Apple, le câble AV composite Apple ou le kit de connexion AV Apple. Les câbles RCA similaires ne fonctionnent pas. Vous pouvez acheter ces câbles sur www.apple.com/fr/ipodstore. 2 Connectez les connecteurs audio aux ports de votre téléviseur (pour une illustration, reportez-vous à la page 51). Votre téléviseur doit être équipé de ports vidéo et audio RCA. Pour activer : Procédez comme suit : La durée d’affichage de chaque diapositive Sélectionnez Temps par diapo, puis choisissez une durée. La musique d’accompagnement des diaporamas Choisissez Musique, puis sélectionnez une liste de lecture ou l’option En lecture. Si vous utilisez iPhoto, vous pouvez choisir l’option D’iPhoto pour copier le réglage de musique d’iPhoto. Seuls les morceaux que vous avez ajoutés à l’iPod nano sont lus. Les diapositives à répéter Réglez Répéter sur Oui. Les diapositives à afficher dans un ordre aléatoire Réglez Mix de photos sur Oui. Les diapositives à afficher avec des transitions Sélectionnez Transitions, puis choisissez le type de transition. Les diaporamas à afficher sur l’iPod nano Réglez Sortie télévision sur Demander ou Non. Les diaporamas à afficher sur un téléviseur Réglez Sortie télévision sur Demander ou Oui. Si vous avez réglé Sortie télévision sur Oui, l’iPod nano vous demande si vous souhaitez afficher des diaporamas sur un téléviseur ou sur l’iPod nano chaque fois que vous lancez un diaporama. Les diapositives à afficher sur des téléviseurs PAL ou NTSC Réglez Signal télévision sur PAL ou NTSC. PAL et NTSC font référence à des normes de diffusion TV. Votre téléviseur utilise probablement l’une de ces deux normes, selon la région du monde dans laquelle il a été acheté. Si vous ne savez pas laquelle de ces normes votre téléviseur utilise, consultez la documentation que accompagne votre téléviseur.Chapitre 5 Fonctionnalités concernant les photos 59 Pour visionner un diaporama sur votre téléviseur : 1 Connectez l’iPod nano à votre téléviseur (voir ci-avant). 2 Allumez votre téléviseur et réglez-le de sorte qu’il affiche le signal provenant des ports d’entrée connectés à l’iPod nano. Consultez la documentation qui accompagne votre téléviseur pour plus d’informations. 3 Sur l’iPod nano, choisissez une photo ou un album, puis appuyez sur le bouton Lecture/ Pause ou bien sélectionnez une photo en plein écran et appuyez sur le bouton central. Pour faire une pause, appuyez sur le bouton Lecture/Pause. Pour passer à la photo suivante ou précédente, appuyez sur le bouton Suivant/Avance rapide ou Précédent/Retour rapide. Si vous avez sélectionné une liste de lecture dans Photos > Réglages > Musique, elle est lue automatiquement lorsque vous lancez le diaporama. Les photos s’affichent sur votre téléviseur et avancent automatiquement conformément aux réglages du menu Diaporama > Réglages.6 60 6 Réglages, fonctionnalités supplé- mentaires et accessoires Votre iPod nano peut faire bien plus que lire des morceaux... et avec lui, vous pouvez faire bien plus qu’écouter de la musique. Consultez ce chapitre pour en savoir plus sur les fonctions supplémentaires de l’iPod nano, notamment pour découvrir comment l’utiliser comme disque externe, alarme ou minuterie ; comment jouer à des jeux ; comment afficher l’heure qu’il est dans d’autres régions du monde ; comment afficher des notes ; et comment synchroniser des contacts, des calendriers et des listes de tâches. Apprenez comment utiliser l’iPod nano en tant que chronomè- tre et comment verrouiller l’écran, et découvrez quelques-uns des accessoires disponibles pour l’iPod nano. Utilisation de l’iPod nano comme disque dur externe Vous pouvez utiliser l’iPod nano comme disque externe pour y stocker des fichiers de données. Les morceaux que vous ajoutez à l’aide d’iTunes ne seront pas visibles dans le Finder Mac ni dans l’Explorateur Windows. De la même façon, si vous copiez des fichiers de musique sur l’iPod nano dans le Finder Mac ou dans l’Explorateur Windows, vous ne pourrez pas les lire sur l’iPod nano. Pour activer l’iPod nano en tant que disque externe : 1 Dans iTunes, sélectionnez l’iPod nano dans la liste des sources, puis cliquez sur l’onglet Résumé. 2 Dans la section Options, sélectionnez « Activer l’utilisation comme disque dur ». 3 Cliquez sur Appliquer. Lorsque vous utilisez l’iPod nano comme disque externe, l’icône de disque iPod nano apparaît sur le bureau du Mac ou sous la première lettre d’unité disponible dans l’Explorateur Windows sur un PC Windows.Chapitre 6 Réglages, fonctionnalités supplémentaires et accessoires 61 Remarque : vous pouvez également cliquer sur Résumé, puis cocher la case « Gérer manuellement la musique et les clips vidéo » dans la section Options pour activer l’utilisation de l’iPod nano comme disque externe. Faites glisser des fichiers sur et à partir de l’iPod nano pour les copier. Si vous utilisez principalement l’iPod nano en tant que disque, vous souhaiterez probablement qu’iTunes ne s’ouvre pas automatiquement lorsque vous connectez l’iPod nano à votre ordinateur. Pour empêcher iTunes de s’ouvrir automatiquement lorsque vous connectez l’iPod nano à votre ordinateur : 1 Dans iTunes, sélectionnez l’iPod nano dans la liste des sources, puis cliquez sur l’onglet Résumé. 2 Dans la section Options, désélectionnez « Ouvrir iTunes à la connexion de cet iPod ». 3 Cliquez sur Appliquer. Utilisation des réglages supplémentaires Vous pouvez régler la date et l’heure, définir des horloges dans différents fuseaux horaires et définir des fonctionnalités d’alarme et de suspension de l’activité sur l’iPod nano. Vous pouvez utiliser l’iPod nano en tant que chronomètre ou comme console de jeu et verrouiller l’écran de l’iPod nano. Réglage et affichage de la date et de l’heure La date et l’heure sont réglées automatiquement à partir de l’horloge de votre ordinateur lorsque vous connectez l’iPod nano, mais vous pouvez les modifier. Pour régler les options de date et d’heure : 1 Choisissez Réglages > Date et Heure. 2 Choisissez une ou plusieurs des options suivantes : Pour Procédez comme suit : Régler la date Choisissez Date. Utilisez la molette cliquable pour modifier la valeur sélectionnée. Appuyez sur le bouton central pour passer à la valeur suivante. Régler l’heure Choisissez Heure. Utilisez la molette cliquable pour modifier la valeur sélectionnée. Appuyez sur le bouton central pour passer à la valeur suivante. Indiquer le fuseau horaire Choisissez Fuseau horaire, puis utilisez la molette cliquable pour sélectionner une ville se trouvant dans un autre fuseau horaire. Afficher l’heure au format 24 heures Choisissez Horloge 24 heures, puis appuyez sur le bouton central pour activer ou désactiver le format 24 heures. Afficher l’heure dans la barre de titre Choisissez Heure dans titre, puis appuyez sur le bouton central pour activer ou désactiver cette option. 62 Chapitre 6 Réglages, fonctionnalités supplémentaires et accessoires Ajout d’horloges d’autres fuseaux horaires Pour ajouter des horloges d’autres fuseaux horaires : 1 Choisissez Extras > Horloge monde. 2 Dans l’écran Horloge monde, appuyez sur le bouton central, puis choisissez Ajouter. 3 Choisissez une région, puis une ville. Les horloges ajoutées s’affichent dans une liste. La dernière horloge ajoutée s’affiche à la fin. Pour supprimer une horloge : 1 Choisissez Extras > Horloge monde. 2 Choisir l’horloge. 3 Appuyez sur le bouton central. 4 Choisissez Supprimer. Réglage des alarmes Vous pouvez régler une alarme pour n’importe quelle horloge sur l’iPod nano. Pour utiliser l’iPod nano comme une horloge d’alarme : 1 Choisissez Extras > Alarmes. 2 Choisissez Créer nouvelle, puis configurez une ou plusieurs des options suivantes : Si vous synchronisez des événements de calendrier contenant des alarmes avec l’iPod nano, ces événements apparaissent dans le menu Alarmes. Pour supprimer une alarme : 1 Choisissez Extras > Alarmes. 2 Choisissez l’alarme, puis Supprimer. Pour Procédez comme suit : Activer l’alarme Choisissez Alarme, puis Active. Régler la date Choisissez Date. Utilisez la molette cliquable pour modifier la valeur sélectionnée. Appuyez sur le bouton central pour passer à la valeur suivante. Régler l’heure Choisissez Heure. Utilisez la molette cliquable pour modifier la valeur sélectionnée. Appuyez sur le bouton central pour passer à la valeur suivante. Définir une option de répétition Choisissez Répétition, puis choisissez une option (par exemple, « du lundi au vendredi »). Choisir un son Choisissez Alertes ou une liste de lecture. Si vous avez choisi Alertes, sélectionnez Bip pour que le haut-parleur interne diffuse l’alarme. Si vous avez choisi une liste de lecture, vous devez connecter l’iPod nano à des haut-parleurs ou à des écouteurs pour entendre l’alarme. Nommer l’alarme Choisissez Étiquette, puis choisissez une option (par exemple, « Réveil »).Chapitre 6 Réglages, fonctionnalités supplémentaires et accessoires 63 Réglage de la minuterie de mise en veille Vous pouvez configurer l’iPod nano de façon qu’il s’éteigne automatiquement après avoir lu un morceau ou tout autre contenu pendant un certain temps. Pour configurer la minuterie de mise en veille : 1 Choisissez Extras > Alarmes. 2 Choisissez Mise en veille, puis choisissez pendant combien de temps l’iPod nano doit être actif. Utilisation du chronomètre Vous pouvez utiliser le chronomètre pendant que vous faites de l’exercice pour connaître votre temps total et, si vous courrez sur une piste, vos temps de passage. Vous pouvez écouter de la musique tout en utilisant le chronomètre. Pour utiliser le chronomètre : 1 Sélectionnez Extras > Chronomètre. 2 Appuyez sur Lecture/Pause pour lancer le chronomètre. 3 Appuyez sur le bouton central pour enregistrer des temps au tour. Les deux temps au tour les plus récents s’affichent au-dessus du temps total. Tous les temps au tour sont enregistrés dans l’historique. 4 Appuyez sur Lecture/Pause pour lancer le chronomètre global. Pour redémarrer le chronomètre, appuyez sur Lecture/Pause. Pour commencer une nouvelle session de chronométrage, appuyez sur le bouton Menu, puis choisissez Nouveau chronomètre. Pour consulter ou supprimer une session de chronométrage enregistrée : 1 Sélectionnez Extras > Chronomètre. L’historique courant et la liste des sessions de chronométrage enregistrées apparaissent. 2 Choisissez une session de chronométrage pour la consulter. L’iPod nano enregistre chaque session de chronométrage avec la date, l’heure et les statistiques au tour. Vous pouvez voir la date et l’heure auxquelles la session a commencé, le temps total de la session, le plus petit temps au tour, le plus grand temps au tour et le temps au tour moyen ainsi que les derniers temps au tour. 3 Appuyez sur le bouton central, puis choisissez soit Supprimer l’historique pour supprimer l’historique sélectionné, soit Effacer les historiques pour supprimer tous les historiques. Jeux L’iPod nano comprend les trois jeux suivants : Klondike, Maze et Vortex. Pour jouer à un jeu : m Sélectionnez Extras > Jeux, puis choisissez un jeu.64 Chapitre 6 Réglages, fonctionnalités supplémentaires et accessoires Lorsque vous commencez un jeu créé pour des versions précédentes de l’iPod nano, le fonctionnement des commandes de l’iPod nano pour ce jeu vous est présenté préalablement. Vous pouvez acheter des jeux supplémentaires sur l’iTunes Store (dans certains pays) pour jouer sur l’iPod nano. Une fois que vous avez acheté des jeux sur iTunes, vous pouvez les ajouter à l’iPod nano en les synchronisant automatiquement ou en les gérant manuellement. La plupart des jeux peuvent fonctionner en mode portrait ou en mode paysage. Pour acheter un jeu : 1 Dans iTunes, choisissez iTunes Store dans la liste des sources. 2 Choisissez Jeux iPod dans la liste de l’iTunes Store. 3 Sélectionnez le jeu souhaité, puis cliquez sur Ajouter ce jeu. Pour synchroniser automatiquement les jeux sur l’iPod nano : 1 Dans iTunes, choisissez iPod nano dans la liste des sources, puis cliquez sur l’onglet Jeux. 2 Cochez « Synchroniser les jeux ». 3 Cliquez sur « Tous les jeux » ou « Jeux sélectionnés ». Si vous cliquez sur « Jeux sélectionnés », sélectionnez les jeux à synchroniser. 4 Cliquez sur Appliquer. Verrouillage de l’écran de l’iPod nano Vous pouvez définir un code d’accès pour empêcher que l’iPod nano ne soit utilisé sans votre autorisation. Si vous verrouillez l’iPod nano lorsqu’il n’est pas connecté à un ordinateur, vous devez taper un code d’accès pour le déverrouiller et l’utiliser. Cette combinaison n’a aucun rapport avec le bouton Hold qui empêche simplement l’utilisateur d’appuyer par erreur sur des boutons de l’iPod nano. Le code d’accès empê- che les autres personnes d’utiliser l’iPod nano. Pour définir un code d’accès pour l’iPod nano : 1 Choisissez Extras > Verr. écran. 2 Dans l’écran Nouveau code d’accès, tapez un code d’accès :  Utilisez la molette cliquable pour sélectionner un chiffre à entrer dans la case du premier chiffre. Appuyez sur le bouton central pour confirmer votre choix et passer à la case suivante.  Utilisez la même méthode pour définir les autres chiffres du code (ou combinaison). Vous pouvez utiliser le bouton Suivant/Avance rapide pour passer à la case suivante ou le bouton Précédent/Retour rapide pour revenir à la case précédente. Appuyez sur le bouton central sur la dernière position.Chapitre 6 Réglages, fonctionnalités supplémentaires et accessoires 65 3 Dans l’écran Confirmer le code d’accès, tapez le code d’accès pour le confirmer, ou appuyez sur Menu pour terminer sans verrouiller l’écran. Lorsque vous avez fini, vous revenez à l’écran Verr. écran, où vous pouvez verrouiller l’écran ou réinitialiser le code d’accès. Appuyez sur le bouton Menu pour terminer sans verrouiller l’écran. Pour verrouiller l’écran de l’iPod nano : m Choisissez Extras > Verr. écran > Verrouiller. Si vous venez de définir votre combinaison, l’élément Verrouiller sera déjà sélectionné à l’écran. Il suffit alors d’appuyer sur le bouton central pour verrouiller l’iPod. Lorsque l’écran est verrouillé, un cadenas apparaît. Vous pouvez ajouter la commande de menu Verr. écran au menu principal pour pouvoir verrouiller rapidement l’écran de l’iPod nano. Consultez la section « Ajout ou suppression d’éléments dans le menu principal » à la page 12. Lorsque le cadenas apparaît à l’écran, vous pouvez déverrouiller l’écran de l’iPod nano de deux manières :  Appuyez sur le bouton central pour taper le code d’accès sur l’iPod nano. Utilisez la molette cliquable pour sélectionner les chiffres, puis appuyez sur le bouton central pour les confirmer. Si vous tapez un code d’accès incorrect, le verrouillage n’est pas levé. Essayez à nouveau.  Connectez l’iPod nano à l’ordinateur avec lequel vous l’utilisez généralement. L’iPod nano se déverrouille automatiquement. Remarque : si, après avoir essayé ces méthodes, vous ne pouvez toujours pas déverrouiller l’iPod nano, vous pouvez restaurer l’iPod nano. Consultez la section « Mise à jour et restauration du logiciel de l’iPod » à la page 78. Pour modifier une combinaison déjà définie : 1 Choisissez Extras > Verr. écran > Réinitialiser. 2 Dans l’écran Saisir le code d’accès, tapez le code d’accès actuel. 3 Dans l’écran Nouveau code d’accès, tapez et confirmez un nouveau code d’accès. Si vous avez oublié la combinaison actuelle, la seule façon de l’effacer et d’en saisir une nouvelle est de restaurer le logiciel de l’iPod nano. Consultez la section « Mise à jour et restauration du logiciel de l’iPod » à la page 78. Synchronisation de contacts, de calendriers et de listes de tâches L’iPod nano peut mémoriser des contacts, des événements de votre calendrier et des listes de tâches qui vous accompagneront partout. iTunes vous permet de synchroniser les informations de contact et de calendrier de l’iPod nano avec le Carnet d’adresses et iCal.66 Chapitre 6 Réglages, fonctionnalités supplémentaires et accessoires Si vous utilisez Windows XP et le Carnet d’adresses Windows ou Microsoft Outlook 2003 ou ultérieur pour stocker les informations de vos contacts, iTunes vous permet de synchroniser les informations du carnet d’adresses sur l’iPod nano. Si vous utilisez Microsoft Outlook 2003 ou ultérieur pour tenir à jour un calendrier, vous pouvez également synchroniser ce dernier. Pour synchroniser les informations de contacts ou de calendrier à l’aide de Mac OS X 10.4.11 ou ultérieur : 1 Connectez l’iPod nano à votre ordinateur. 2 Dans iTunes, sélectionnez l’iPod nano dans la liste des sources, puis cliquez sur l’onglet Contacts. 3 Procédez de l’une des manières suivantes :  Pour synchroniser les contacts, sélectionnez « Synchroniser les contacts de Carnet d’adresses » dans la section Contacts, puis sélectionnez l’une des options suivantes :  Pour synchroniser automatiquement tous les contacts, sélectionnez « Tous les contacts ».  Pour synchroniser automatiquement les groupes de contacts sélectionnés, sélectionnez « Groupes sélectionnés », puis sélectionnez les groupes à synchroniser.  Pour copier les photos des contacts sur l’iPod nano lorsqu’elles sont disponibles, sélectionnez « Inclure les photos des contacts » Lorsque vous cliquez sur Appliquer, iTunes met à jour l’iPod nano avec les informations relatives aux contacts de Carnet d’adresses que vous avez indiquées.  Pour synchroniser des calendriers, dans la section Calendriers, sélectionnez « Synchroniser les calendriers iCal », puis choisissez l’une des options suivantes :  Pour synchroniser automatiquement tous les calendriers, sélectionnez « Tous les calendriers ».  Pour synchroniser automatiquement les calendriers sélectionnés, sélectionnez « Calendriers sélectionnés », puis sélectionnez les calendriers à synchroniser. Lorsque vous cliquez sur Appliquer, iTunes met à jour l’iPod nano avec les informations de calendrier que vous avez indiquées. Pour synchroniser des contacts ou des calendriers à l’aide du Carnet d’adresses de Windows ou de Microsoft Outlook pour Windows : 1 Connectez l’iPod nano à votre ordinateur. 2 Dans iTunes, sélectionnez l’iPod nano dans la liste des sources, puis cliquez sur l’onglet Contacts. 3 Procédez de l’une des manières suivantes :  Pour synchroniser des contacts, dans la section Contacts, sélectionnez « Synchroniser les contacts de », puis choisissez le Carnet d’adresses Windows ou Microsoft Outlook dans le menu local. Sélectionnez ensuite les informations à synchroniser.Chapitre 6 Réglages, fonctionnalités supplémentaires et accessoires 67  Pour synchroniser des calendriers de Microsoft Outlook, sélectionnez « Synchroniser les calendriers de Microsoft Outlook » dans la section Calendriers. 4 Cliquez sur Appliquer. Vous pouvez aussi ajouter manuellement des informations de contact et de calendrier à l’iPod nano. L’iPod nano doit être activé en tant que disque externe (consultez la section « Utilisation de l’iPod nano comme disque dur externe » à la page 60). Pour ajouter manuellement des informations de contact : 1 Connectez l’iPod nano et ouvrez votre application de courrier électronique ou de gestion de contacts préférée. Vous pouvez ajouter des contacts à l’aide de Palm Desktop, Microsoft Outlook, Microsoft Entourage et Eudora, entre autres. 2 Faites glisser des contacts du carnet d’adresses de l’application dans le dossier Contacts de l’iPod nano. Dans certains cas, il peut être nécessaire d’exporter des contacts, puis de faire glisser le ou les fichiers exportés dans le dossier Contacts. Consultez la documentation de votre application de courrier électronique ou de contacts. Pour ajouter manuellement des rendez-vous et autres événements de calendrier : 1 Exportez les événements de calendrier à partir d’une application de calendrier qui utilise le format iCal standard (extension de fichier .ics) ou le format vCal (extension de fichier .vcs). 2 Faites glisser les fichiers dans le dossier Calendriers de l’iPod nano. Pour ajouter manuellement des listes de tâches à l’iPod nano, enregistrez-les dans un fichier de calendrier portant l’extension .ics ou .vcs. Pour afficher des contacts sur l’iPod nano : m Sélectionnez Extras > Contacts. Pour trier les contacts selon le prénom ou le nom de famille : m Choisissez Réglages > Général > Trier les contacts, puis sélectionnez Prénom ou Nom. Pour afficher les événements du calendrier : m Choisissez Extras > Calendriers > Tous les calendriers, puis choisissez un calendrier. Pour afficher les listes de tâches : m Choisissez Extras > Calendriers > Tâches. Mémorisation et lecture de notes Vous pouvez stocker et lire des notes sur l’iPod nano si ce dernier est activé comme disque externe (voir « Utilisation de l’iPod nano comme disque dur externe » à la page 60). 1 Enregistrez un document en tant que fichier texte (.txt) à l’aide de n’importe quel programme de traitement de texte. 2 Placez le fichier dans le dossier Notes de l’iPod nano. Pour afficher les notes : m Sélectionnez Extras > Notes.68 Chapitre 6 Réglages, fonctionnalités supplémentaires et accessoires Enregistrement de mémos vocaux Vous pouvez enregistrer des mémos vocaux à l’aide d’un micro optionnel compatible avec l’iPod nano (en vente sur www.apple.com/fr/ipodstore). Vous pouvez définir des marques de chapitre pendant l’enregistrement, stocker les mémos sur l’iPod nano, les synchroniser avec votre ordinateur et leur ajouter des étiquettes. Les mémos vocaux ne peuvent pas durer plus de deux heures. Si vous enregistrez pendant plus de deux heures, l’iPod nano commence automatiquement un nouveau mémo vocal pour poursuivre l’enregistrement. Pour enregistrer un mémo vocal : 1 Connectez un micro au port de connecteur Dock de l’iPod nano. L’élément Mémos vocaux apparaît dans le menu principal. 2 Pour lancer l’enregistrement, choisissez Mémo vocal > Commencer l’enregistrement. 3 Parlez en tenant le micro à quelques centimètres de votre bouche. Pour suspendre l’enregistrement, appuyez sur le bouton Menu. Choisissez Reprendre pour poursuivre l’enregistrement. 4 Pour terminer, appuyez sur Menu, puis choisissez sur « Arrêter et enregistrer ». Votre enregistrement est affiché dans une liste d’enregistrements triée en fonction de la date et de l’heure. Pour définir des marques de chapitre : m Au cours de l’enregistrement, appuyez sur le bouton central chaque fois que vous souhaitez placer une marque de chapitre. Durant la lecture, vous pouvez accéder directement au prochain chapitre en appuyant sur le bouton Suivant/Précédent. Appuyez sur le bouton Précédent/Rembobiner : une fois pour accéder au début du chapitre actuel, ou deux fois pour accéder au début du chapitre précédent. Pour associer une étiquette à un enregistrement : 1 Sélectionnez Mémos vocaux > Enregistrements, puis choisissez un enregistrement sauvegardé. 2 Sélectionnez Étiquette, puis choisissez une étiquette pour l’enregistrement. Vous pouvez choisir Podcast, Interview, Conférence, Idée, Réunion ou Mémo. Pour supprimer une étiquette d’un enregistrement, choisissez Aucun. Pour écouter un enregistrement : m Dans le menu principal, sélectionnez Mémos vocaux et choisissez l’enregistrement. L’élément de menu Mémos vocaux n’est pas visible si vous n’avez jamais connecté de micro à l’iPod nano.Chapitre 6 Réglages, fonctionnalités supplémentaires et accessoires 69 Pour synchroniser les mémos vocaux avec votre ordinateur : Les mémos vocaux sont enregistrés dans le dossier Enregistrements de l’iPod au format de fichier WAV. Si vous avez activé l’iPod nano en tant que disque externe, vous pouvez faire glisser des mémos vocaux à partir du dossier pour les copier. Si l’iPod nano est configuré pour synchroniser automatiquement les morceaux (voir « Synchronisation automatique de la musique » à la page 30), les mémos vocaux de l’iPod nano sont synchronisés automatiquement sous forme d’album dans iTunes (et supprimés de l’iPod nano) lorsque vous connectez l’iPod nano. La nouvelle liste de lecture Mémos vocaux apparaît dans la liste des sources. Utilisation des menus vocaux pour l’accessibilité L’iPod nano comporte des menus vocaux qui permettent aux utilisateurs souffrant de déficience visuelle d’en explorer le contenu plus aisément. iTunes génère les menus vocaux en utilisant soit les voix incluses avec le système d’exploitation de votre ordinateur, soit des voix achetées séparément. Toutes les voix incluses avec le système d’exploitation ou de tierce partie ne sont pas compatibles avec les menus vocaux et toutes les langues ne sont pas prises en charge. Vous devez activer les menus vocaux dans iTunes avant de les activer sur l’iPod nano. Pour activer les menus vocaux dans iTunes : 1 Connectez l’iPod nano à votre ordinateur. 2 Dans iTunes, sélectionnez l’iPod nano dans la liste des sources, puis cliquez sur l’onglet Résumé. 3 Sélectionnez « Activer les menus vocaux pour l’accessibilité ». Dans Mac OS X, si VoiceOver est activé dans les préférences d’Accès universel, cette option est sélectionnée par défaut. 4 Cliquez sur Appliquer. Une fois que l’iPod nano est synchronisé avec iTunes, les menus vocaux sont activés sur l’iPod nano. La synchronisation de l’iPod nano prend plus de temps si les menus vocaux sont en cours d’activation. Pour désactiver les menus vocaux sur l’iPod nano : m Choisissez Réglages > Menus vocaux, puis Non. Pour réactiver les menus vocaux, choisissez Réglages > Général > Menus vocaux, puis choisissez Activé. Remarque : l’option Menus vocaux apparaît dans le menu Réglages de l’iPod nano uniquement si les menus vocaux ont été activés dans iTunes.70 Chapitre 6 Réglages, fonctionnalités supplémentaires et accessoires À propos des accessoires de l’iPod nano L’iPod nano vous est fourni avec un certain nombre d’accessoires, mais il en existe bien d’autres. Pour acheter des accessoires pour l’iPod nano, visitez www.apple.com/fr/ipodstore. Parmi les accessoires disponibles, citons :  les écouteurs avec télécommande et micro « Apple Headphones with Remote and Mic » ;  les écouteurs intra-auriculaires avec télécommande et micro « Apple In-Ear Headphones with Remote and Mic » ;  le kit Nike + iPod Sport Kit ;  la station d’accueil Apple Universal Dock ;  le câble AV composante Apple ;  le câble AV composite Apple ;  le kit de connexion AV Apple ;  l’adaptateur secteur USB Apple ;  l’adaptateur USB/FireWire Apple ;  les écouteurs iPod In-Ear ;  la télécommande iPod Radio Remote ;  le kit de voyage World Travel Adapter Kit (adaptateurs pour tous les pays) ;  les chaussettes iPod Socks ;  les écouteurs iPod Earphones ;  des accessoires de tierce partie tels que haut-parleurs, casques, housses, micros, adaptateurs stéréo pour voiture, adaptateurs secteur, etc.Chapitre 6 Réglages, fonctionnalités supplémentaires et accessoires 71 Pour utiliser les écouteurs inclus avec l’iPod nano : m Connectez les écouteurs au port de sortie casque. Placez ensuite les écouteurs dans vos oreilles comme illustré. AVERTISSEMENT : vous risquez une perte auditive irréversible si vous réglez votre casque ou vos écouteurs sur un volume sonore trop élevé. Vous pouvez vous habituer petit à petit à un volume de son plus élevé qui peut vous paraître normal mais entraîner une détérioration de votre audition. Si vos oreilles bourdonnent ou si les sons vous semblent sourds, arrêtez l’écoute et rendez-vous chez votre médecin pour vérifier votre audition. Plus le volume est élevé, plus vous risquez d’abîmer rapidement votre audition. Pour protéger votre audition, les experts donnent les conseils suivants :  Limitez la durée d’utilisation d’un casque à volume sonore élevé.  Évitez d’augmenter le volume pour bloquer le bruit ambiant.  Diminuez le volume si vous ne pouvez plus entendre les personnes parler autour de vous. Pour en savoir plus sur la mise en place d’un volume maximum sur l’iPod, consultez la section « Réglage de la limite de volume maximum » à la page 45. Le fil des écouteurs est réglable.7 72 7 Astuces et dépannage Vous pourrez résoudre rapidement la plupart des problèmes de l’iPod nano en suivant les conseils qui figurent dans le pré- sent chapitre. Quelques suggestions Vous pouvez résoudre la plupart des problèmes de l’iPod nano en le réinitialisant. Assurez-vous d’abord que l’iPod nano est chargé. Pour réinitialiser l’iPod nano : 1 Mettez le commutateur Hold sur HOLD, puis désactivez-le à nouveau. 2 Maintenez enfoncés les boutons Menu et central pendant au moins 6 secondes jusqu’à l’apparition du logo Apple. Si l’iPod nano ne s’allume pas ou ne répond pas  Assurez-vous que le commutateur Hold n’est pas sur HOLD. Les 5 R :réinitialiser, réessayer, redémarrer, réinstaller, restaurer Souvenez-vous de ces cinq conseils de base si vous rencontrez un problème avec votre iPod nano. Essayez une de ces solutions à la fois jusqu’à ce que votre problème soit résolu. Si les solutions suivantes ne suffisent pas, lisez plus loin pour apprendre à résoudre des problèmes spécifiques.  Réinitialisez l’iPod nano. Consultez la section « Quelques suggestions, » ci-dessous.  Réessayez sur un autre port USB si vous ne voyez pas l’iPod nano dans iTunes.  Redémarrez votre ordinateur et assurez-vous que les mises à jour de logiciels les plus récentes sont installées.  Réinstallez le logiciel d’iTunes à partir de la dernière version disponible sur le web.  Restaurez l’iPod nano. Consultez la section « Mise à jour et restauration du logiciel de l’iPod » à la page 78.Chapitre 7 Astuces et dépannage 73  Il se peut que la batterie de l’iPod nano doive être rechargée. Connectez l’iPod nano à votre ordinateur ou à un adaptateur secteur Apple USB Power Adapter et laissez la batterie se recharger. Assurez-vous à la présence de l’éclair sur l’écran de l’iPod nano que l’iPod nano reçoit bien du courant. Pour charger la batterie, connectez l’iPod nano à un port USB 2.0 de votre ordinateur.  Essayez la méthode des 5 R, un par un, jusqu’à ce que l’iPod nano réponde. Si vous voulez déconnecter l’iPod nano, mais qu’un message indique « Connecté » ou « Synchronisation en cours »  Si l’iPod nano synchronise de la musique, attendez que la synchronisation soit terminée.  Sélectionnez l’iPod nano dans la liste des sources d’iTunes, puis cliquez sur le bouton Éjecter (C).  Si l’iPod nano disparaît de la liste des appareils, dans la liste des sources d’iTunes mais que le message « Connecté » ou « Synchronisation en cours » est toujours affiché sur l’écran de l’iPod nano, déconnectez l’iPod nano.  Si l’iPod nano ne disparaît pas de la liste des appareils de la liste des sources d’iTunes, faites glisser l’icône de l’iPod nano du bureau vers la Corbeille (si vous utilisez un Mac) ou cliquez sur l’icône « Retirer le périphérique en toute sécurité » située dans zone de notification, puis sélectionnez votre iPod nano (si vous utilisez un PC Windows). Si le message « Connecté » ou « Synchronisation en cours » est toujours affiché, redémarrez votre ordinateur, puis éjectez à nouveau l’iPod nano. Si l’iPod nano ne parvient pas à lire la musique  Assurez-vous que le commutateur Hold n’est pas sur HOLD.  Assurez-vous que la fiche du casque est complètement enfoncée dans la prise casque.  Assurez-vous que le volume est correctement réglé. Il est possible qu’une limite de volume maximum ait été définie. Vous pouvez la modifier ou la supprimer en choisissant Réglages > Volume maximum. Consultez la section « Réglage de la limite de volume maximum » à la page 45.  Il se peut que l’iPod nano soit en pause. Essayez d’appuyer sur le bouton Lecture/Pause.  Assurez-vous que vous utilisez iTunes 8.0 ou ultérieur (visitez www.apple.com/fr/ipod/start). Les morceaux achetés sur l’iTunes Store à l’aide des versions antérieures d’iTunes ne peuvent pas être lus sur l’iPod nano tant que vous n’avez par mis à niveau iTunes.  Si vous utilisez la station d’accueil iPod Universal Dock, assurez-vous que l’iPod nano y repose correctement et que tous les câbles sont bien connectés. Si vous connectez l’iPod nano à votre ordinateur et qu’il ne se passe rien  Assurez-vous que vous avez installé la dernière version d’iTunes sur www.apple.com/fr/ipod/start.  Essayez la connexion à un autre port USB de votre ordinateur. 74 Chapitre 7 Astuces et dépannage Remarque : un port USB 2.0 est recommandé pour connecter l’iPod nano. USB 1.1 est beaucoup plus lent que USB 2.0. Si votre PC Windows n’est pas équipé d’un port USB 2.0, vous pouvez dans certains cas acheter et installer une carte USB 2.0. Pour plus d’informations, visitez www.apple.com/fr/ipod.  Une réinitialisation de votre iPod nano est peut-être nécessaire (voir page 72).  Si vous connectez l’iPod nano à un ordinateur portable à l’aide du câble iPod Dock Connector vers USB 2.0, branchez l’ordinateur sur une source d’alimentation avant de connecter l’iPod nano.  Assurez-vous que vous disposez de l’ordinateur et du logiciel requis. Consultez la section « Si vous souhaitez effectuer une double vérification de la configuration requise » à la page 77.  Vérifiez la connexion des câbles. Débranchez le câble aux deux extrémités et assurezvous que rien ne s’est glissé dans les ports USB. Rebranchez alors le câble avec pré- caution. Assurez-vous que les connecteurs des câbles sont correctement orientés. Ils ne peuvent être insérés que dans un sens.  Essayez de redémarrer votre ordinateur.  Si aucune des suggestions ci-avant ne résout votre problème, il se peut que vous deviez restaurer le logiciel de l’iPod nano. Consultez la section « Mise à jour et restauration du logiciel de l’iPod » à la page 78. Si l’iPod nano affiche un message « Branchez la batterie » Il se peut que ce message apparaisse si la charge de l’iPod nano est exceptionnellement basse et que la batterie doit être rechargée pour que l’iPod nano puisse communiquer avec votre ordinateur. Pour charger la batterie, connectez l’iPod nano à un port USB 2.0 de votre ordinateur. Laissez l’iPod nano connecté à votre ordinateur jusqu’à ce que le message disparaisse et que l’iPod nano apparaisse dans iTunes ou le Finder. Si le niveau de charge de la batterie est vraiment très bas, il se peut que vous deviez recharger l’iPod nano pendant une trentaine de minutes avant qu’il ne démarre. Pour recharger l’iPod nano plus rapidement, utilisez l’adaptateur secteur Apple USB Power Adapter (en option). Si l’iPod nano affiche le message « Utilisez iTunes pour restaurer ».  Assurez-vous que vous disposez de la dernière version d’iTunes sur votre ordinateur (à défaut, téléchargez-la depuis www.apple.com/fr/ipod/start).  Connectez l’iPod nano à votre ordinateur. Après l’ouverture d’iTunes, suivez les instructions à l’écran pour restaurer l’iPod nano.  Si la restauration de l’iPod nano ne résout pas le problème, il se peut que l’iPod nano doive être réparé. Pour bénéficier du service, rendez-vous sur le site web de service et d’assistance iPod, à l’adresse : www.apple.com/fr/support/ipodChapitre 7 Astuces et dépannage 75 Si les morceaux ou les données sont synchronisés plus lentement via USB 2.0  Si vous synchronisez un grand nombre de morceaux ou une grande quantité de données par USB 2.0 et que la charge de la batterie de l’iPod nano est basse, l’iPod nano synchronise les informations à vitesse réduite pour économiser la puissance de la batterie.  Pour synchroniser plus rapidement, vous pouvez arrêter la synchronisation et laisser l’iPod nano connecté pour qu’il puisse se recharger ou le connecter à l’adaptateur secteur USB 2.0 pour iPod facultatif. Laissez l’iPod nano se recharger pendant une heure environ, puis reprenez la synchronisation de la musique ou des données. Si vous ne parvenez pas à ajouter un morceau ou un autre élément à l’iPod nano Il se peut que le morceau ait été encodé dans un format que l’iPod nano ne prend pas en charge. Les formats de fichier audio suivants sont pris en charge par l’iPod nano. Ils comprennent les formats des livres audio et des podcasts :  AAC (M4A, M4B, M4P, jusqu’à 320 Kbit/s)  Apple Lossless (format de compression haute qualité)  MP3 (jusqu’à 320 Kbit/s)  MP3 Variable Bit Rate (VBR)  WAV  AA (texte lu audible.com, formats 2, 3 et 4)  AIFF Un morceau encodé au format Apple Lossless possède la même qualité sonore qu’un CD tout en occupant deux fois moins d’espace qu’un morceau encodé au format AIFF ou WAV. Le même morceau encodé au format AAC ou MP3 utilise encore moins de place. Lorsque vous importez de la musique depuis un CD à l’aide d’iTunes, elle est convertie par défaut au format AAC. Si vous utilisez iTunes pour Windows, vous pouvez convertir les fichiers WMA non protégé au format AAC ou MP3. Cela peut être utile si vous disposez d’une bibliothèque de musique encodée au format WMA. L’iPod nano ne prend pas en charge les fichiers audio WMA, MPEG Layer 1, MPEG Layer 2 ou le format 1 d’audible.com. Si un des morceaux dans iTunes n’est pas pris en charge par l’iPod nano, vous pouvez le convertir dans un format que l’iPod nano prend en charge. Pour en savoir plus, consultez l’Aide iTunes. Si l’iPod nano affiche un message indiquant qu’il faut le connecter à iTunes pour activer Genius : Vous n’avez pas activé Genius dans iTunes ou vous n’avez pas synchronisé l’iPod nano depuis que vous avez activé Genius dans iTunes. Consultez la section « Utilisation de Genius dans iTunes » à la page 27.76 Chapitre 7 Astuces et dépannage Si l’iPod nano indique que Genius n’est pas disponible pour le morceau sélectionné Genius est activé mais ne reconnaît pas le morceau que vous avez sélectionné pour créer une liste de lecture Genius. De nouveaux morceaux sont continuellement ajoutés à la base Genius de l’iTunes Store. Vous pouvez renouveler votre tentative un peu plus tard. Si vous avez configuré accidentellement l’iPod nano de sorte qu’il utilise une langue que vous ne comprenez pas Vous pouvez réinitialiser le choix de la langue. 1 Maintenez enfoncé le bouton Menu jusqu’à ce que le menu principal apparaisse. 2 Choisissez le sixième élément du menu (Réglages). 3 Choisissez le dernier élément du menu (Réinitialiser les réglages). 4 Choisissez le premier élément (Réinitialiser) et sélectionnez une langue. D’autres réglages de l’iPod nano, comme, par exemple, la répétition des morceaux, sont aussi réinitialisés. Remarque : si vous avez ajouté ou supprimé des éléments du menu principal de l’iPod nano (voir la section « Ajout ou suppression d’éléments dans le menu principal » à la page 12), il se peut que la commande de menu Réglages se trouve à un autre endroit. Si vous ne trouvez pas la commande de menu Réinitialiser les réglages, vous pouvez restaurer l’iPod nano dans son état d’origine et sélectionner une langue. Consultez la section « Mise à jour et restauration du logiciel de l’iPod » à la page 78. Si vous ne pouvez pas visionner des vidéos ou des photos sur votre téléviseur  Vous devez utiliser des câbles RCA fabriqués spécialement pour l’iPod nano tels que les câbles AV composant Apple et AV composite Apple pour connecter l’iPod nano à votre téléviseur. Les câbles RCA similaires ne fonctionnent pas.  Assurez-vous que votre téléviseur est réglé de sorte qu’il affiche les images provenant de la bonne source d’entrée (consultez la documentation qui accompagnait votre télé- viseur pour en savoir plus).  Assurez-vous que tous les câbles sont connecté correctement (voir la section « Visionnage de vidéos sur un téléviseur connecté à l’iPod nano » à la page 50).  Assurez-vous que la fiche jaune du câble AV composite Apple est connectée au port vidéo de votre téléviseur.  Si vous essayez de visionner une vidéo, choisissez Vidéos > Réglages, réglez Sortie télévision sur Oui, puis réessayez. Si vous essayez de visionner un diaporama, choisissez Photos > Réglages de diaporama, réglez Sortie télévision sur Oui, puis réessayez.  Si cela ne fonctionne pas, choisissez Vidéos > Réglages (pour la vidéo) ou Photos > Réglages (pour un diaporama) et réglez Signal TV sur PAL ou NTSC, selon le type de téléviseur dont vous disposez. Essayez les deux réglages.Chapitre 7 Astuces et dépannage 77 Si vous souhaitez effectuer une double vérification de la configuration requise Pour utiliser l’iPod nano, vous devez disposer des éléments suivants :  Une des configurations d’ordinateur suivantes :  Un Mac équipé d’un port USB 2.0  Un PC Windows équipé d’un port USB 2.0 ou d’une carte USB 2.0  Un des systèmes d’exploitation suivants :  Mac OS X v10.4.11 ou ultérieur  Windows Vista  Windows XP Édition familiale ou Professionnel avec Service Pack 3 ou ultérieur  iTunes 8.0 ou ultérieur (iTunes est disponible en téléchargement à l’adresse www.apple.com/fr/ipod/start) Si votre PC Windows n’est pas équipé d’un port USB 2.0 , vous pouvez acheter et installer une carte USB 2.0. Pour en savoir plus sur les câbles et les cartes USB compatibles, rendez-vous sur www.apple.com/fr/ipod. Sur le Mac, iPhoto 6 ou ultérieur est recommandé pour ajouter des photos et des albums à l’iPod nano. Ce logiciel est facultatif. iPhoto est peut-être déjà installé sur votre Mac. Vérifiez dans le dossier Applications. Sur un PC Windows, l’iPod nano peut synchroniser automatiquement des collections de photos à partir d’Adobe Photoshop Album 2.0 ou ultérieur et d’Adobe Photoshop Elements 4.0 ou ultérieur, tous deux disponibles sur www.adobe.com. Ce logiciel est facultatif. Sur les Mac et les PC Windows, l’iPod nano peut synchroniser des photos numériques à partir de dossiers du disque dur de votre ordinateur. Si vous voulez utiliser l’iPod nano avec un Mac et un PC Windows Si vous utilisez l’iPod nano avec un Mac et souhaitez l’utiliser avec un PC Windows, vous devez restaurer le logiciel de l’iPod pour pouvoir l’utiliser avec le PC (consultez la section « Mise à jour et restauration du logiciel de l’iPod » à la page 78 ci-dessous). La restauration du logiciel de l’iPod efface toutes les données de l’iPod nano, y compris tous les morceaux de musique. Vous ne pouvez pas passer de l’utilisation de l’iPod nano avec un Mac à l’utilisation de ce dernier avec un PC Windows sans effacer toutes les données qui se trouvent sur l’iPod nano. Si vous avez verrouillé l’écran de l’iPod nano et que vous ne pouvez plus le déverrouiller En règle générale, si vous pouvez connecter l’iPod nano à l’ordinateur avec lequel il est autorisé à travailler, l’iPod nano se déverrouille automatiquement. Si l’ordinateur autorisé à travailler avec l’iPod nano est indisponible, vous pouvez connecter l’iPod nano à un autre ordinateur et utiliser iTunes pour restaurer le logiciel de l’iPod. Consultez la section suivante pour en savoir plus.78 Chapitre 7 Astuces et dépannage Si vous souhaitez modifier la combinaison de verrouillage de l’écran mais que vous ne vous souvenez pas de la combinaison actuelle, une restauration du logiciel de l’iPod sera nécessaire avant de pouvoir définir une nouvelle combinaison. Mise à jour et restauration du logiciel de l’iPod Vous pouvez utiliser iTunes pour mettre à jour ou restaurer le logiciel de l’iPod. Il est recommandé de mettre à jour l’iPod nano pour utiliser la dernière version du logiciel. Vous pouvez aussi restaurer le logiciel, ce qui remet l’iPod nano dans son état d’origine.  Si vous choisissez de mettre à jour, le logiciel sera mis à jour, mais vos réglages et morceaux seront conservés.  Si vous optez pour la restauration, toutes les données sont effacées de l’iPod nano, y compris les morceaux, les vidéos, les fichiers, les contacts, les photos, les informations de calendrier et toutes les autres données. Tous les réglages de l’iPod nano sont restaurés à leur état d’origine. Pour mettre à jour et restaurer l’iPod nano : 1 Assurez-vous que vous disposez d’une connexion à Internet et que vous avez installé la dernière version d’iTunes disponible sur www.apple.com/fr/ipod/start. 2 Connectez l’iPod nano à votre ordinateur. 3 Dans iTunes, sélectionnez l’iPod nano dans la liste des sources, puis cliquez sur l’onglet Résumé. La section Version vous indique si votre iPod nano est à jour ou a besoin d’une version plus récente du logiciel. 4 Cliquez sur Mettre à jour pour installer la toute dernière version du logiciel. 5 Si nécessaire, cliquez sur Restaurer pour restaurer l’iPod nano à son état d’origine (cela efface toutes les données de l’iPod nano). Suivez les instructions à l’écran pour terminer la restauration.8 79 8 Sécurité et entretien Lisez attentivement les informations importantes ci-dessous concernant la sécurité et le maniement des iPod Apple. Gardez le Guide de sécurité de l’iPod et le Guide des fonctions de l’iPod à portée de la main pour référence ultérieure. Informations importantes relatives à la sécurité Maniement de l’iPod Ne tordez, n’écrasez, ne perforez, n’incinérez, n’ouvrez ni ne laissez pas tomber l’iPod. Utilisation près de l’eau et dans des endroits humides N’utilisez pas l’iPod sous la pluie ni à proximité d’un lavabo ou de tout autre endroit humide. Veillez à ne pas renverser d’aliments ou de liquides sur l’iPod. Si l’iPod est mouillé, débranchez tous les câbles, éteignez l’iPod et mettez le bouton Hold (s’il est disponible) sur HOLD avant de procéder au nettoyage. Laissez-le ensuite sécher entièrement avant de le rallumer. Réparation de l’iPod N’essayez jamais de réparer l’iPod vous-même. L’iPod ne contient aucune pièce manipulable par l’utilisateur. Pour des informations concernant le service, choisissez Aide iPod dans le menu Aide d’iTunes ou accédez à la page www.apple.com/fr/support/ipod. La batterie rechargeable de l’iPod ne doit être remplacée que par un Centre de maintenance agréé Apple. Pour plus d’informations sur les batteries, accédez à www.apple.com/fr/batteries. ± Pour éviter toute blessure, lisez toutes les informations relatives à la sécurité exposées ci-dessous, ainsi que le mode d’emploi, avant d’utiliser l’iPod. AVERTISSEMENT : ne pas suivre les présentes instructions relatives à la sécurité pourrait provoquer un incendie, un choc électrique ou un autre dommage.80 Chapitre 8 Sécurité et entretien Utilisation de l’adaptateur secteur USB Apple (disponible séparément) Si vous utilisez l’adaptateur secteur USB Apple (vendu séparément sur www.apple.com/fr/ipodstore) pour recharger l’iPod, assurez-vous qu’il est correctement assemblé avant de le brancher sur une prise électrique. Insérez ensuite fermement l’adaptateur secteur Apple USB Power Adapter dans la prise de courant. Ne branchez ni ne débranchez en aucun cas l’adaptateur secteur Apple USB Power Adapter lorsque vous avez les mains mouillées. N’utilisez pas d’adaptateur secteur autre qu’un adaptateur secteur iPod Power Adapter d’Apple pour recharger votre iPod. Il se peut que l’adaptateur secteur iPod USB Power Adapter chauffe pendant une utilisation normale. Veillez à toujours assurer une ventilation correcte autour de lui et à toujours le manipuler avec précaution. Débranchez l’adaptateur secteur iPod USB Power Adapter si l’une des conditions suivantes se présente :  Le câble d’alimentation ou la prise est effiloché ou endommagé.  L’adaptateur est exposé à la pluie, à des liquides ou à une humidité excessive.  Le boîtier de l’adaptateur est endommagé.  Vous pensez que l’adaptateur doit être réparé.  Vous voulez nettoyer l’adaptateur. Prévention de la diminution de l’acuité auditive Vous risquez une perte d’audition irréparable si vous utilisez un casque ou des écouteurs à volume sonore élevé. Réglez le volume à un niveau raisonnable. Vous pouvez vous habituer petit à petit à un volume de son plus élevé qui peut vous paraître normal mais entraîner une détérioration de votre audition. Si vos oreilles bourdonnent ou si les sons vous semblent sourds, arrêtez l’écoute et rendez-vous chez votre médecin pour vérifier votre audition. Plus le volume est élevé, plus vous risquez d’abîmer rapidement votre audition. Pour protéger votre audition, les experts donnent les conseils suivants :  Limitez la durée d’utilisation d’un casque à volume sonore élevé.  Évitez d’augmenter le volume pour bloquer le bruit ambiant.  Diminuez le volume si vous ne pouvez plus entendre les personnes parler autour de vous. Pour en savoir plus sur la manière de définir un volume maximum sur l’iPod, consultez la section « Réglage de la limite de volume maximum » à la page 45.Chapitre 8 Sécurité et entretien 81 Déclaration de Conformité Utiliser cet iPod avec les écouteurs inclus ou les écouteurs actuellement commercialisés sous la marque Apple, sous la marque iPod ou revêtus du logo Apple permet d’assurer le respect de la puissance sonore maximale fixée par l’article L 5232-1 du Code de la Santé Publique français. Pour en savoir plus sur l’écoute sans risque, consultez les directives de sécurité dans la documentation de l’iPod. Utilisation d’un casque d’écoute en toute sécurité L’utilisation des écouteurs n’est pas recommandée lorsque vous conduisez et constitue par ailleurs une infraction au code de la route dans certains endroits. Soyez prudent et attentif au volant. Cessez d’utiliser l’iPod si vous vous rendez compte que cela vous distrait ou vous dérange lorsque vous conduisez un véhicule ou lorsque vous réalisez tout autre activité nécessitant toute votre attention. Crises d’épilepsie, évanouissements et fatigue visuelle Si vous avez eu des crises d’épilepsie ou des évanouissements ou si vous avez des antécédents familiaux dans ces domaines, veuillez consulter un médecin avant de jouer à des jeux vidéo sur l’iPod (si cette fonction est disponible). Arrêter de l’utiliser et consultez un médecin si vous souffrez des symptômes suivants : convulsions, contractions des muscles ou des yeux, perte de conscience, mouvements involontaires ou désorientation. Lorsque vous regardez des vidéos ou jouez à des jeux sur l’iPod (si ces fonctions sont disponibles), évitez une utilisation prolongée et faites des pauses pour éviter de souffrir de fatigue visuelle. Informations importantes sur le maniement Port de l’iPod iPod est doté de composants fragiles, notamment, dans certains cas, un disque dur. Ne tordez, n’écrasez ni ne laissez pas tomber l’iPod. Si vous avez peur de griffer l’iPod, vous pouvez utiliser une des nombreuses housses vendues séparément. Utilisation des connecteurs et des ports Ne forcez jamais un connecteur à entrer dans un port. Vérifiez que rien ne bloque l’entrée au port. Si le connecteur et le port ne s’assemblent pas facilement, c’est probablement parce qu’ils ne sont pas compatibles. Assurez-vous que le connecteur est compatible avec le port et que vous l’avez positionné correctement par rapport à ce dernier. A pleine puissance, l’écoute prolongée du baladeur peut endommager l’oreille de l’utilisateur. AVIS : ne pas suivre les présentes instructions sur le maniement peut provoquer des dommages à l’iPod ou à d’autres objets.9 82 9 En savoir plus, service et assistance Vous trouverez plus d’informations sur l’utilisation de l’iPod nano dans l’aide à l’écran et sur le web. Le tableau suivant décrit à quel endroit trouver de plus amples informations sur les services et les logiciels de l’iPod. Pour en savoir plus sur : Procédez comme suit : Le service et l’assistance, les discussions, les guides d’initiation et les téléchargements de logiciels Apple Allez sur www.apple.com/fr/support/ipodnano. L’utilisation d’iTunes Ouvrez iTunes et choisissez Aide > Aide iTunes. Pour consulter le guide d’initiation iTunes en ligne (uniquement disponible dans certains pays), rendez-vous sur www.apple.com/fr/support/itunes. L’utilisation d’iPhoto (sous Mac OS X) Ouvrez iPhoto et sélectionnez Aide > Aide iPhoto. L’utilisation d’iCal (sous Mac OS X) Ouvrez iCal et sélectionnez Aide > Aide iCal. Les dernières informations sur l’ iPod nano Allez sur www.apple.com/fr/ipodnano. L’enregistrement de l’iPod nano Pour enregistrer l’iPod nano, installez iTunes sur votre ordinateur et connectez l’iPod nano. La recherche du numéro de série de l’iPod nano Regardez au dos de l’iPod nano ou choisissez Réglages > Informations et appuyez sur le bouton central. Dans iTunes (lorsque l’iPod nano est connecté à votre ordinateur), sélectionnez iPod nano dans la liste des sources et cliquez sur l’onglet Réglages. L’obtention du service assuré par la garantie Suivez d’abord les conseils qui figurent dans le présent fascicule, l’aide à l’écran et les ressources en ligne. Allez ensuite sur www.apple.com/fr/support/ipodnano/service. 83 Regulatory Compliance Information FCC Compliance Statement This device complies with part 15 of the FCC rules. Operation is subject to the following two conditions: (1) This device may not cause harmful interference, and (2) this device must accept any interference received, including interference that may cause undesired operation. Consultez les instructions si vous suspectez des interférences avec la réception radio ou TV. Interférences radio et TV This computer equipment generates, uses, and can radiate radio-frequency energy. If it is not installed and used properly—that is, in strict accordance with Apple’s instructions—it may cause interference with radio and TV reception. This equipment has been tested and found to comply with the limits for a Class B digital device in accordance with the specifications in Part 15 of FCC rules. These specifications are designed to provide reasonable protection against such interference in a residential installation. However, there is no guarantee that interference will not occur in a particular installation. You can determine whether your computer system is causing interference by turning it off. If the interference stops, it was probably caused by the computer or one of the peripheral devices. If your computer system does cause interference to radio or TV reception, try to correct the interference by using one or more of the following measures:  Turn the TV or radio antenna until the interference stops.  Move the computer to one side or the other of the TV or radio.  Move the computer farther away from the TV or radio.  Plug the computer in to an outlet that is on a different circuit from the TV or radio. (That is, make certain the computer and the TV or radio are on circuits controlled by different circuit breakers or fuses.) If necessary, consult an Apple Authorized Service Provider or Apple. See the service and support information that came with your Apple product. Or, consult an experienced radio/TV technician for additional suggestions. Important: Changes or modifications to this product not authorized by Apple Inc. could void the EMC compliance and negate your authority to operate the product. This product was tested for EMC compliance under conditions that included the use of Apple peripheral devices and Apple shielded cables and connectors between system components. It is important that you use Apple peripheral devices and shielded cables and connectors between system components to reduce the possibility of causing interference to radios, TV sets, and other electronic devices. You can obtain Apple peripheral devices and the proper shielded cables and connectors through an Apple Authorized Reseller. For non-Apple peripheral devices, contact the manufacturer or dealer for assistance. Responsible party (contact for FCC matters only): Apple Inc. Corporate Compliance 1Infinite Loop, M/S 26-A Cupertino, CA 95014-2084 Industry Canada Statement This Class B device meets all requirements of the Canadian interference-causing equipment regulations. Cet appareil numérique de la classe B respecte toutes les exigences du Règlement sur le matériel brouilleur du Canada. VCCI Class B Statement Korea Class B Statement (? ??? ???84 Russia European Community Remplacement de la batterie Seuls les centres de maintenance agréés sont habilités à remplacer les batteries rechargeables d’iPod nano. Pour en savoir plus sur les services de remplacement de la batterie, rendez-vous à l’adresse : www.apple.com/fr/support/ipod/service/battery. Informations concernant l’élimination et le recyclage Vous devez respecter les lois et réglementations locales lors de l’élimination de votre iPod. Étant donné que ce produit contient une batterie, il doit être éliminé séparément des déchets ménagers. Lorsque votre iPod atteint la fin de sa vie, contactez Apple ou les autorités locales pour en savoir plus à propos des options de recyclage. Pour plus d’informations sur le programme de recyclage d’Apple, consultez la page : www.apple.com/fr/environment/recycling. Deutschland: Dieses Gerät enthält Batterien. Bitte nicht in den Hausmüll werfen. Entsorgen Sie dieses Gerätes am Ende seines Lebenszyklus entsprechend der maßgeblichen gesetzlichen Regelungen. Nederlands: Gebruikte batterijen kunnen worden ingeleverd bij de chemokar of in een speciale batterijcontainer voor klein chemisch afval (kca) worden gedeponeerd. China: Taiwan: Union Européenne - Informations sur l’élimination : Ce symbole signifie que vous devez vous débarrasser de votre produit sans le mélanger avec les ordures ménagères, selon les normes et la législation de votre pays. Lorsque ce produit n’est plus utilisable, portez-le dans un centre de traitement des déchets agréé par les autorités locales. Certains centres acceptent les produits gratuitement. Le traitement et le recyclage séparé de votre produit lors de son élimination aideront à préserver les ressources naturelles et à protéger l’environnement et la santé des êtres humains. Apple et l’environnement À Apple, nous sommes conscients de la responsabilité qui nous incombe de réduire les impacts écologiques de nos activités et de nos produits. Pour en savoir plus, rendez-vous à l’adresse : www.apple.com/fr/environment. © 2008 Apple Inc. Tous droits réservés. Apple, le logo Apple, FireWire, iCal, iLife, iPhoto, iPod, iPod Socks, iTunes, Mac, Macintosh et Mac OS sont des marques d’Apple Inc. déposées aux États-Unis et dans d’autres pays. Finder, le logo FireWire et Shuffle sont des marques d’Apple Inc. iTunes Store est une marque de service d’Apple Inc., déposée aux États-Unis et dans d’autres pays. NIKE est une marque de NIKE, Inc. et de ses filiales, utilisée sous licence. Les autres noms de société ou de produit mentionnés dans ce document peuvent être des marques de leurs sociétés respectives. Les produits commercialisés par des entreprises tierces ne sont mentionnés que pour information, sans aucune intention de préconisation ni de recommandation. Apple décline toute responsabilité quant à l’utilisation et au fonctionnement de ces produits. Tout arrangement, accord ou garantie, le cas échéant, s’applique directement entre le revendeur et les utilisateurs potentiels. Tout a été mis en œuvre pour que les informations présentées dans ce manuel soient exactes. Apple n’est pas responsable des erreurs de reproduction ou d’impression. Le produit décrit dans le présent manuel contient une technologie de protection du copyright qui est protégée par des prétentions de méthode de certains brevets des États-Unis et autres droits sur la propriété intellectuelle qui sont la propriété de Macrovision Corporation et d’autres propriétaires de droits. L’utilisation de cette technologie de protection du copyright doit être autorisée par Macrovision Corporation et est destinée uniquement à une utilisation domestique et à d’autres utilisations de visionnage limitées sauf autorisation contraire de Macrovision Corporation. L’ingénierie inverse et le désassemblage sont interdits. Apparatus Claims des États-Unis Brevets nos 4,631,603, 4,577,216, 4,819,098 et 4,907,093 sous licence pour des utilisation de visionnage limitées uniquement. F019-1343/07-2009 Boot Camp Guide d’installation et de configuration2 1 Table des matières 3 Boot Camp 3 Introduction 4 Configuration requise 4 Si vous avez déjà utilisé une version Bêta de Boot Camp 5 Mise à niveau de Windows XP à Windows Vista 5 Vue d’ensemble de l’installation 6 Étape 1 : Exécutez l’Assistant Boot Camp 6 Création d’une partition pour Windows 8 Étape 2 : Installation de Windows 9 Sélection de la partition Windows 10 Formatage de la partition Windows 12 Configuration de Windows 13 Étape 3 : Installation des pilotes Boot Camp pour Windows 14 Démarrage sous Mac OS X ou Windows 14 Réglage du système d’exploitation par défaut 16 Sélection d’un système d’exploitation au démarrage 16 Utilisation de Windows sur votre Macintosh 16 Utilisation d’un clavier Apple sous Windows 18 Utilisation des touches de fonction sur un clavier Apple Keyboard 18 Clic droit 18 Fonction de défilement avec un trackpad 19 Utilisation d’une télécommande Apple Remote 20 Utilisation de périphériques Bluetooth avec Windows 21 Éjection de disques 21 Configurez votre ordinateur pour qu’il redémarre automatiquement après une coupure d’alimentation 21 Utilisation d’utilitaires de tierce partie 22 Suppression de Windows de votre ordinateur 23 Dépannage 27 En savoir plus, assistance et commentaires 3 1 Boot Camp Utilisation de Microsoft Windows sur un Macintosh à processeur Intel. Introduction Boot Camp vous permet d’installer Windows sur votre ordinateur Macintosh à processeur Intel en utilisant un disque d’installation de Microsoft Windows personnel. Windows s’installe sur sa propre partition. Une fois terminé, vous pouvez exécuter Windows ou Mac OS X sur votre ordinateur Macintosh. L’application Assistant Boot Camp vous aide à créer la partition Windows puis à redé- marrer votre Mac à partir de votre disque d’installation de Windows. Vous pouvez alors suivre ces instructions afin d’installer Windows et les pilotes permettant à Windows de fonctionner avec votre matériel Mac. Important : imprimez ce document avant d’utiliser l’Assistant Boot Camp. Vous aurez besoin des informations qu’il contient pendant l’installation de Windows. AVERTISSEMENT : assurez-vous que toutes vos données sont sauvegardées avant d’installer Boot Camp et sauvegardez-les régulièrement tout au long de l’utilisation de ce logiciel.4 Configuration requise Voici la configuration requise pour installer et configurer Windows sur votre Macintosh :  Un ordinateur Macintosh à processeur Intel, avec :  un clavier et une souris USB ou un clavier et un trackpad intégrés ;  Mac OS X 10.5 ou ultérieur (la dernière version de Mac OS X est fortement recommandée) ;  un lecteur de disque optique intégré ou un lecteur de disque optique externe compatible. Pour plus d’information au sujet de l’utilisation de votre ordinateur avec un disque optique externe, consultez la documentation fournie avec votre ordinateur.  Toutes les mises à jour de programme interne de votre ordinateur. Pour plus d’information au sujet de la mise à jour du logiciel système et du programme interne de votre ordinateur, consultez la page 23.  Un disque d’installation de Mac OS X 10.5, se présentant sous l’une des formes suivantes :  un disque de Mac OS X 10.5 (inclus avec toute copie achetée de la version 10.5) ;  le CD « Mac OS X Install Disc 1 » (inclus avec tout Mac où la version 10.5 est préinstallée).  Au moins 10 Go d’espace libre sur le disque d’installation.  Assistant Boot Camp (à l’emplacement /Applications/Utilitaires/).  Windows XP Édition Familiale ou Professionnel avec le Service Pack 2 ou ultérieur, ou Windows Vista Édition Familiale Basique, Édition Familiale Premium, Professionnel ou Édition Intégrale. Important : vous devez utiliser un disque d’installation de Windows XP unique et complet (qui inclut le Service Pack 2). vous ne pouvez pas utiliser une version de mise à niveau de Windows ou utiliser une version plus ancienne de Windows XP et la mettre à niveau avec SP2. N’utilisez qu’une version 32 bits de Windows. Si vous possédez un Mac Pro ou un MacBook Pro (modèle de début 2008 ou plus récent), vous pouvez utiliser une version 64 bits de Windows Vista. Si vous avez déjà utilisé une version Bêta de Boot Camp Si vous utilisez Boot Camp pour la première fois, passez directement à la section « Vue d’ensemble de l’installation » à la page 5. Si vous avez déjà installé la version Bêta de Boot Camp sur votre ordinateur et que vous l’avez utilisée pour créer une partition Windows et installer Windows, vous n’avez alors besoin ni de repartitionner votre disque dur, ni de réinstaller Windows. Suivez les instructions ci-dessous pour installer de nouveaux pilotes Macintosh pour Windows ou ceux mis à jour. Important : si vous avez personnalisé votre environnement Windows, notez les paramètres personnalisés avant de mettre à jour les pilotes.5 Pour installer de nouveaux pilotes Macintosh pour Windows ou ceux mis à jour : 1 Redémarrez votre Macintosh sous Windows. 2 Insérez votre disque d’installation de Mac OS X 10.5. Si le programme d’installation ne démarre pas automatiquement, parcourez le disque à l’aide de l’Explorateur Windows et double-cliquez sur le fichier setup.exe dans le dossier Boot Camp. 3 Cliquez sur Réparer. Remarque : si vous utilisez l’application MacDrive de MediaFour, il se peut que le dossier Boot Camp soit invisible. Pour le voir, cliquez avec le bouton droit de la souris sur le lecteur de CD dans l’Explorateur Windows et choisissez MacDrive > Show Windows Files. Mise à niveau de Windows XP à Windows Vista Vous pouvez mettre à niveau Windows XP à Windows Vista à l’aide d’un exemplaire sous licence de Windows Vista Édition Familiale Basique, Édition Familiale Premium, Professionnel ou Édition Intégrale. Après la mise à niveau à Windows Vista, vous devez réinstaller les pilotes Boot Camp. Pour mettre à niveau Windows XP à Windows Vista : 1 Redémarrez votre Macintosh sous Windows. 2 Insérez votre disque d’installation ou de mise à niveau à Windows Vista. 3 Suivez les instructions fournies avec Windows Vista. 4 Après avoir terminé la mise à niveau à Windows Vista, insérez votre disque d’installation de Mac OS X 10.5. Si le programme d’installation ne démarre pas automatiquement, parcourez le disque à l’aide de l’Explorateur Windows et double-cliquez sur le fichier setup.exe dans le dossier Boot Camp. Vue d’ensemble de l’installation L’installation de Windows sur votre ordinateur Macintosh comprend les opérations suivantes : Étape 1 : Lancer l’Assistant Boot Camp. L’Assistant Boot Camp vous aide à effectuer ces tâches :  Créer une partition pour Windows. L’Assistant Boot Camp crée une partition pour Windows sur le disque de démarrage ou tout autre disque interne de votre ordinateur.  Lancer l’installation de Windows. L’Assistant Boot Camp vous aide à lancer l’installation de Windows.6 Étape 2 : Installer Windows. Étape 3 : Installer les pilotes Boot Camp sur votre volume Windows. Important : avant de commencer, vérifiez que vous disposez d’une copie de sauvegarde des données importantes de votre ordinateur. Étape 1 : Lancer l’Assistant Boot Camp Assistant Boot Camp vous aide à créer une partition pour Windows et à lancer l’installation de Windows. Important : si vous utilisez un ordinateur portable, branchez l’adaptateur secteur avant de poursuivre. Pour utiliser l’Assistant Boot Camp : 1 Ouvrez une session sur votre ordinateur sous un compte administrateur, fermez toutes les applications ouvertes, puis fermez la session ouverte de tout autre utilisateur sur votre ordinateur. 2 Ouvrez l’Assistant Boot Camp (dans /Applications/Utilitaires/) et suivez les instructions à l’écran. Consultez les sections suivantes pour obtenir des informations supplémentaires. Création d’une partition pour Windows L’Assistant Boot Camp vous aide à créer une partition pour Windows sur un disque interne. L’Assistant partitionne votre disque de démarrage de manière dynamique et crée une nouvelle partition pour Windows sans effacer votre système Mac OS X existant. Si votre ordinateur comprend plusieurs disques internes, vous pouvez créer une seconde partition sur n’importe lequel de ces disques ou choisir d’affecter l’intégralité d’un disque à Windows. Voir « Création d’une partition sur un ordinateur à plusieurs disques internes » à la page 7.7 Lors de la création de la partition Windows, vous pouvez opter pour une taille par défaut de 32 Go, utiliser la moitié du disque pour Windows ou définir vous-même la taille souhaitée. La partition de Windows doit toutefois comprendre un minimum de 5 Go tout en laissant 5 Go d’espace libre sur la partition Mac OS X. Pour créer une partition pour Windows : 1 Définissez la taille de votre partition Windows. Consultez la documentation de votre programme d’installation Windows pour connaî- tre la taille de partition convenant le mieux à votre configuration. Windows Vista requiert plus d’espace disque que Windows XP. Remarque : une partition de taille supérieure à 32 Go ne peut pas être formatée en FAT. Voir « Formatage de la partition Windows » à la page 10. 2 Cliquez sur Partitionner. L’Assistant Boot Camp crée la nouvelle partition Windows. Votre partition Mac OS X d’origine, avec tous vos logiciels et vos données, demeure intacte. Vous pouvez utiliser l’Assistant Boot Camp par la suite pour supprimer la partition si vous souhaitez restaurer le disque en tant que volume à partition simple pour Mac OS X (reportez-vous à la page 22). Création d’une partition sur un ordinateur à plusieurs disques internes Si vous installez Windows sur un ordinateur comprenant plusieurs disques internes, sélectionnez le disque à partitionner pour Windows. Vous pouvez :  créer une seconde partition pour Windows sur n’importe quel disque interne ;  effacer un disque autre qu’un disque de démarrage et créer une partition unique pour Windows.8 Si vous avez déjà partitionné un disque, vous pouvez le restaurer pour revenir à une partition Mac OS X unique. Dans la fenêtre « Créer ou supprimer une partition Windows », sélectionnez un disque pour voir les options disponibles. Étape 2 : Installer Windows Lisez et suivez ces instructions pour installer Windows sur votre ordinateur Macintosh. Pour obtenir des informations générales sur l’installation et la configuration de Windows, consultez votre documentation Windows. Important : un clavier et une souris USB sont nécessaires pendant l’installation, à moins que vous n’utilisiez un ordinateur portable. Important : si votre ordinateur ne dispose pas de lecteur de disque optique intégré, vous devez installer Windows et les pilotes Windows à l’aide d’un lecteur de disque optique externe compatible. Vous pouvez installer l’une des versions suivantes de Windows :  Windows XP Édition Familiale ou Professionnel.  Windows Vista Édition Familiale Basique, Édition Familiale Premium, Professionnel ou Édition Intégrale.9 Important : vous devez utiliser un disque d’installation unique et complète de Windows (Service Pack 2 ou ultérieur nécessaire pour les installations de Windows XP). Ne tentez pas d’installer une version antérieure de Windows XP pour ensuite la mettre à niveau à SP2. Pour installer Windows sur votre ordinateur Macintosh : 1 Si vous avez déjà fermé l’Assistant Boot Camp sans installer Windows : a Ouvrez l’Assistant Boot Camp. b Sélectionnez « Démarrer l’installateur de Windows ». c Cliquez sur Continuer. 2 Si vous utilisez un ordinateur comprenant plusieurs disques internes, sélectionnez le disque sur lequel vous comptez installer Windows et cliquez sur Continuer. 3 Insérez votre disque d’installation de Windows. 4 Dans l’Assistant Boot Camp, cliquez sur Commencer l’installation. 5 Votre ordinateur démarre alors à partir du disque d’installation de Windows. Suivez les instructions à l’écran. Consultez les sections suivantes pour obtenir des informations supplémentaires. Sélection de la partition Windows Il est primordial de sélectionner la bonne partition lors de l’installation de Windows afin de ne pas écraser Mac OS X. AVERTISSEMENT : respectez ce qui suit avant de créer une partition, d’en supprimer une ou encore de sélectionner toute autre partition. Ce type d’opération pourrait supprimer l’intégralité du contenu de votre partition Mac OS X.10 Pour sélectionner la partition adéquate pour Windows : m Sélectionnez « C: Partition3 [FAT32] ». Pour sélectionner la partition adéquate pour Windows Vista : m Sélectionnez « Disk 0 Partition 3 BOOTCAMP ». Formatage de la partition Windows Bien que Boot Camp préformate la partition Windows, cette dernière ne peut pas servir au démarrage de l’ordinateur. Vous devez dans ce cas reformater la nouvelle partition Windows à l’aide du programme d’installation de Windows. Pour formater la partition pour Windows XP : m Sélectionnez le format NTFS ou FAT :  NTFS : plus grande fiabilité et sécurité, mais ne permet pas d’enregistrer des fichiers sur le volume Windows à partir de Mac OS X.11  FAT : meilleure compatibilité, permet la lecture et l’écriture de fichiers sur le volume Windows à partir de Mac OS X. Cette option n’est disponible que si la partition Windows créée à l’étape 2 présente un espace libre de 32 Go maximum. Important : ne sélectionnez pas l’option « Conserver le système de fichier tel quel ». Pour installer correctement Windows XP, vous devez choisir une des autres options proposées.12 Pour formater la partition pour Windows Vista : 1 Cliquez sur « Options de lecteurs (avancées) ». 2 Cliquez sur Formater, puis sur OK. 3 Cliquez sur Suivant. La partition Windows Vista est alors formatée en utilisant le système de fichiers NTFS. Configuration de Windows Après l’installation du logiciel Windows, l’ordinateur redémarre automatiquement sous Windows. Suivez les écrans de configuration de Windows.13 Étape 3 : Installer les pilotes Boot Camp pour Windows Après l’installation de Windows, procédez à celle des pilotes et autres logiciels Mac pour Windows à l’aide de votre disque d’installation de Mac OS X 10.5. Le disque de Mac OS X installe les pilotes permettant la prise en charge des composants Mac tels que :  le graphisme ;  la mise en réseau ;  l’audio ;  la connectivité sans fil AirPort ;  Bluetooth® ;  la caméra iSight intégrée (les caméras iSight externes ne sont pas gérées) ;  les claviers Apple ;  la télécommande Apple Remote ;  la commande de luminosité pour les écrans intégrés. Le disque de Mac OS X installe également le panneau de configuration Boot Camp pour Windows et l’élément de zone de notification Apple Boot Camp. Pour installer les pilotes Boot Camp : 1 Éjectez le disque d’installation de Windows. a Accédez à Poste de travail. b Sélectionnez le lecteur optique (D:). c Cliquez sur « Éjecter ce disque » dans la liste Gestion du système. 2 Insérez le disque de Mac OS X. Si le programme d’installation ne démarre pas automatiquement, explorez le disque à l’aide de l’Explorateur Windows et double-cliquez sur le fichier setup.exe dans le dossier Boot Camp. 3 Suivez les instructions à l’écran. Si un message indiquant que le logiciel en cours d’installation n’a pas passé les tests Windows Logo apparaît à l’écran, cliquez quand même sur Continuer. Des fenêtres qui ne nécessitent aucune intervention apparaissent brièvement à l’écran au cours de l’installation. S’il vous semble que rien ne se passe, il se peut qu’une fenêtre cachée requière votre intervention. Examinez la barre des tâches ou regardez derrière les fenêtres ouvertes. Important : ne cliquez sur le bouton Annuler dans aucune des zones de dialogue du programme d’installation. 4 Après le redémarrage de l’ordinateur, suivez les instructions de l’Assistant « Ajout de nouveau matériel détecté » pour mettre à jour les pilotes (pour Windows XP uniquement).14 5 Suivez les instructions de tout autre assistant qui s’affiche. Remarque : de temps à autre, Apple peut mettre à disposition des pilotes Boot Camp que vous pouvez télécharger et installer à l’aide de Mises à jour de logiciels Apple. Pour rechercher manuellement des mises à jour de pilote, consultez la page www.apple.com/fr/support/bootcamp. Démarrage sous Mac OS X ou Windows Après avoir installé Windows et les pilotes Boot Camp, vous pouvez démarrer votre Macintosh sous Windows. Boot Camp facilite le démarrage de votre ordinateur sous Mac OS X ou Windows. Vous pouvez définir le système d’exploitation par défaut de votre ordinateur par le biais des préférences Disque de démarrage (Mac OS X) ou du panneau de configuration de Boot Camp (Windows). Vous pouvez également sélectionner un système d’exploitation lors du démarrage de votre ordinateur. Réglage du système d’exploitation par défaut Vous pouvez utiliser la sous-fenêtre Démarrage des Préférences Système de Mac OS X pour définir le système d’exploitation de démarrage par défaut. Boot Camp Bêta installe également le panneau de configuration de Boot Camp qui vous permet de définir le système d’exploitation par défaut lorsque vous utilisez Windows. Pour définir le système d’exploitation par défaut sous Mac OS X : 1 Dans Mac OS X, choisissez le menu Pomme (?) > Préférences Système. 2 Cliquez sur Démarrage. 3 Sélectionnez le disque de démarrage sur lequel est installé le système d’exploitation à utiliser par défaut. 4 Si vous voulez redémarrer maintenant sous ce système d’exploitation, cliquez sur Redémarrer.15 Pour définir le système d’exploitation par défaut sous Windows : 1 Sous Windows, cliquez sur l’élément de zone de notification de Boot Camp et choisissez le panneau de configuration Boot Camp. Remarque : votre écran peut avoir un aspect différent selon l’ordinateur que vous utilisez. 2 Sélectionnez le disque de démarrage sur lequel est installé le système d’exploitation à utiliser par défaut. 3 Si vous voulez redémarrer maintenant sous ce système d’exploitation, cliquez sur Redémarrer. Pour redémarrer sous Mac OS X par le biais de l’élément de Boot Camp présent dans la zone de notification : m Sous Windows, choisissez « Redémarrer sous Mac OS X » à partir de l’élément de Boot Camp présent dans la zone de notification. Le redémarrage sous Mac OS X par le biais de l’élément de Boot Camp présent dans la zone de notification définit également le système d’exploitation par défaut sur Mac OS X.16 Sélection d’un système d’exploitation au démarrage Vous pouvez sélectionner le système d’exploitation à utiliser lors du démarrage en maintenant enfoncée la touche Option. Cela a pour effet d’afficher les icônes de tous les disques de démarrage disponibles pour vous permettre d’ignorer le réglage par défaut défini dans les préférences Disque de démarrage (Mac OS X) ou dans le panneau de configuration Boot Camp (Windows) sans modifier ce réglage. Pour sélectionner un système d’exploitation au démarrage : 1 Redémarrez l’ordinateur et maintenez enfoncée la touche Option jusqu’à ce que les icônes de disques apparaissent à l’écran. 2 Sélectionnez le disque de démarrage sur lequel est installé le système d’exploitation à utiliser, puis cliquez sur la flèche située sous l’icône. Utilisation de Windows sur votre Macintosh Les rubriques suivantes fournissent des informations concernant l’exécution de Windows sur un ordinateur Macintosh. Si vous ne savez pas encore utiliser Windows, reportez-vous à la documentation accompagnant votre logiciel Windows. Utilisation d’un clavier Apple sous Windows Boot Camp redéfinit les touches de votre clavier Apple de façon à émuler celles d’un clavier standard pour Windows. Cela permet d’utiliser Ctrl + Alt + Suppr, Impression écran et d’autres commandes courantes sous Windows. Le tableau suivant vous indique comment taper les commandes PC sur un clavier Apple Keyboard externe, un clavier sans fil Apple Wireless Keyboard et un clavier intégré d’ordinateur Mac portable. Pour en savoir plus, reportez-vous à la page suivante : docs.info.apple.com/article.html?artnum=304270-fr17 Raccourci clavier sur PC Clavier Apple Keyboard Clavier intégré d’ordinateur Mac portable/Clavier Apple Wireless Keyboard Ctrl + Alt + Suppr Ctrl + Option + Suppr ;1 Ctrl + Option + Suppr (en arrière) Alt Option Option AltGr Ctrl + Option Ctrl + Option Effacement arrière Suppr Suppr Suppr Suppr ;1 Fn + Suppr (en arrière) Entrée Retour Retour Entrée (pavé numérique) Entrée Entrée (seulement sur certains claviers intégrés)2 Insertion Fn-Entrée ou Aide Fn + Entrée Verr num Effacer Fn-F6 (seulement sur certains claviers intégrés) Pause Attn F16 Fn + Échap Impr écran F14 Fn-Maj-F11 Imprimer la fenêtre active Option + F14 Fn-Maj-Option-F11 Arrêt Défil F15 Fn + F12 Windows Commande (x) Commande (x) 1 Utilisez la touche Suppr située au-dessus des touches de navigation. 2 Certains ordinateurs Mac portables disposent d’un groupe de touches dotées de petits nombres, qui peuvent être utilisées comme un pavé numérique. Pour ce faire, appuyez sur la touche F6 pour activer le verrouillage numérique ou maintenez la touche Fn enfoncée lorsque vous appuyez sur les touches en question.18 Utilisation des touches de fonction sur un clavier Apple Keyboard Les touches de fonction (F1 à F12) d’un clavier intégré de Mac portable ou sur un clavier Apple externe récent vous permettent de contrôler des fonctionnalités du matériel, notamment volume, luminosité de l’écran et lecture multimédia (sur certains claviers). En maintenant enfoncée la touche Fonction (Fn) en appuyant sur les touches de fonction, vous pouvez également lancer des fonctionnalités propres à l’application. Par exemple, si vous ouvrez iTunes et appuyez sur Fn-F1, l’Aide iTunes s’ouvre. Vous pouvez configurer le clavier afin que les touches de fonction contrôlent les fonctionnalités spécifiques à une application sans devoir appuyer sur la touche Fonction. Vous pouvez ainsi utiliser la touche Fonction pour contrôler des fonctions matérielles. Pour définir si les touches de fonction contrôle les fonctionnalités du matériel ou du logiciel : 1 Sous Windows, cliquez sur l’élément de zone de notification de Boot Camp et choisissez le panneau de configuration Boot Camp. 2 Cliquez sur l’onglet Clavier. 3 Sélectionnez ou désélectionnez « Utiliser les touches F1-F12 pour contrôler les fonctions logicielles ». Clic droit Il est possible d’effectuer un clic droit lorsque vous exécutez Windows sous un ordinateur Macintosh à l’aide d’une souris Apple Mighty Mouse. Cela est également possible avec le trackpad d’un ordinateur portable Macintosh. Pour faire un clic droit avec une souris Mighty Mouse : m Cliquez en utilisant le bouton supérieur droit de la souris. Pour faire un clic droit avec un trackpad : m Placez deux doigts sur le trackpad et cliquez sur son bouton. Fonction de défilement avec un trackpad Si vous utilisez un ordinateur Mac portable, vous pouvez utiliser deux doigts pour faire défiler des éléments à l’aide du trackpad. Pour faire défiler des éléments avec un trackpad : m Déplacez simultanément deux doigts sur le trackpad, horizontalement ou verticalement. 19 Utilisation d’une télécommande Apple Remote Si votre ordinateur est équipé d’un récepteur infrarouge intégré, vous pouvez utiliser une télécommande Apple Remote pour contrôler iTunes et Windows Media Player (non compris dans Boot Camp). La télécommande vous permet de modifier le volume du son, de lancer ou de mettre en pause la lecture et de revenir à l’élément précédent ou de passer au suivant. Vous pouvez également utiliser la télécommande pour ouvrir iTunes sous Windows. Pour ouvrir iTunes à l’aide de la télécommande Apple Remote : m Appuyez sur le bouton Menu. Si iTunes est déjà ouvert, vous pouvez appuyer sur le bouton Menu pour faire passer iTunes au premier plan. La télécommande Apple Remote utilise un émetteur infrarouge et fonctionne avec les ordinateurs Macintosh équipés d’un récepteur infrarouge. Si aucun obstacle ne se trouve entre la télécommande et le récepteur, celle-ci peut fonctionner jusqu’à 9 mètres. Jumelage de votre ordinateur avec une télécommande Apple Remote Si vous disposez de plusieurs ordinateurs équipés d’un récepteur infrarouge dans un même lieu, vous pouvez « jumeler » chacun d’eux avec une télécommande Apple Remote diffé- rente. Si vous ne le faites pas, l’ordinateur capte les commandes de n’importe quelle télé- commande à portée. Le jumelage configure l’ordinateur pour qu’il n’accepte les commandes que d’une seule télécommande. Vous ne pouvez jumeler votre ordinateur qu’avec une seule télécommande à la fois. Pour jumeler votre ordinateur avec une télécommande : 1 Tenez la télécommande à proximité de l’ordinateur (7 à 10 centimètres) et dirigez-la face à celui-ci. 2 Maintenez enfoncés les boutons » et ‘ sur la télécommande pendant 5 secondes environ jusqu’à ce que le symbole représentant une chaîne ( ) apparaisse à l’écran. Désactivation du jumelage de votre ordinateur avec une télécommande Apple Remote Le jumelage de votre ordinateur avec une télécommande Apple Remote indique à l’ordinateur de n’accepter que les commandes de cette dernière. Vous ne pouvez jumeler votre ordinateur qu’avec une seule télécommande à la fois. Si vous avez jumelé votre ordinateur avec une télécommande Apple Remote, vous devez désactiver ce jumelage avant de pouvoir utiliser l’ordinateur avec une autre télécommande.20 Pour désactiver le jumelage de votre ordinateur avec une télécommande Apple Remote : 1 Sous Windows, ouvrez le panneau de configuration de Boot Camp et cliquez sur l’onglet de la télécommande. 2 Cliquez sur Désactiver le jumelage. Désactivation de la télécommande Vous pouvez utiliser le panneau de configuration Boot Camp pour désactiver le récepteur infrarouge et empêcher la commande à distance de votre ordinateur. Pour désactiver le récepteur infrarouge : 1 Sous Windows, ouvrez le panneau de configuration de Boot Camp et cliquez sur l’onglet de la télécommande. 2 Cochez la case « Désactiver le récepteur à infrarouge de la télécommande ». Pour réactiver le récepteur infrarouge, désactivez cette case à cocher. Utilisation de périphériques Bluetooth avec Windows Avant de pouvoir utiliser un périphérique sans fil Bluetooth avec Windows sur votre Macintosh, vous devez jumeler ce périphérique avec votre ordinateur sous Windows. Pour jumeler une souris Mighty Mouse ou un clavier Apple avec votre Macintosh : 1 Sous Windows, ouvrez le panneau de configuration Appareils Bluetooth. 2 Dans le volet Appareils, cliquez sur Ajouter. 3 Suivez les instructions de l’Assistant Appareils Bluetooth pour configurer votre périphérique. a Pour que votre périphérique sans fil Apple soit détecté, mettez-le hors tension puis de nouveau sous tension. b Dans le volet du code d’accès, sélectionnez « Me laisser choisir mon propre code d’accès » puis saisissez un code numérique. Souris sans fil Mighty Mouse : tapez quatre zéros (« 0000 »). Clavier sans fil Apple : tapez de six à seize chiffres. Les codes d’accès des périphériques sans fil sont utilisés pour chiffrer les informations transmises entre ces derniers et votre ordinateur. Il n’est pas nécessaire de vous rappeler du code d’accès.21 Éjection de disques Vous pouvez éjecter un disque en utilisant la touche Éjecter (C) de votre clavier Apple. Si votre ordinateur dispose d’un lecteur optique équipé d’un plateau, utilisez la touche Éjecter pour ouvrir ou fermer le plateau. Vous pouvez également éjecter un disque en utilisant l’Explorateur Windows. Pour éjecter un disque, procédez de l’une des manières suivantes : m Maintenez enfoncée la touche Éjecter sur votre clavier Apple Keyboard jusqu’à ce que le symbole d’éjection (C) apparaisse à l’écran. m Cliquez sur l’icône avec le bouton droit dans l’Explorateur Windows et choisissez Éjecter dans le menu qui apparaît. m Sélectionnez l’icône du disque dans l’Explorateur Windows et cliquez sur Éjecter. m Maintenez enfoncé le bouton principal de la souris lors du démarrage de votre ordinateur jusqu’à l’éjection du disque. Si vous possédez un ordinateur Mac Pro, vous pouvez appuyer sur Option + Éjecter pour ouvrir ou fermer le plateau d’un autre lecteur optique en option. Configurez votre ordinateur pour qu’il redémarre automatiquement après une coupure d’alimentation Configurer votre ordinateur pour qu’il redémarre automatiquement après une coupure d’alimentation peut s’avérer utile si vous avez besoin d’y accéder à distance. Pour configurer votre ordinateur afin qu’il redémarre automatiquement après une coupure d’alimentation : 1 Cliquez sur l’élément de zone de notification de Boot Camp et choisissez le panneau de configuration Boot Camp. 2 Cliquez sur l’onglet Alimentation. 3 Sélectionnez « Redémarrer automatiquement après une coupure d’alimentation ». Utilisation d’utilitaires de tierce partie Avant d’installer et d’utiliser un utilitaire de disque de tierce partie pour Windows, assurezvous auprès du fournisseur que l’utilitaire en question est compatible avec Boot Camp. AVERTISSEMENT : une perte de données peut se produire en cas d’utilisation d’un utilitaire de disque non compatible avec Boot Camp.22 Suppression de Windows de votre ordinateur La méthode de suppression de Windows est différente selon que vous avez installé Windows sur un disque à volume simple ou sur la deuxième partition d’un disque. Si vous avez installé Windows sur la deuxième partition d’un disque : utilisez l’Assistant Boot Camp comme indiqué ci-dessous pour supprimer Windows en effaçant la partition Windows et en restaurant le disque en tant que volume simple Mac OS X. Si votre ordinateur est équipé de plusieurs disques et que vous avez installé Windows sur un disque doté d’une seule partition : démarrez sous Mac OS X et utilisez Utilitaire de disque, dans le dossier /Applications/Utilities, afin d’effacer le disque et de le reformater sous forme de volume Mac OS X. Pour supprimer Windows et la partition Windows : 1 Démarrez sous Mac OS X. 2 Quittez toutes les applications ouvertes et fermez la session de tout autre utilisateur de votre ordinateur. 3 Ouvrez l’Assistant Boot Camp. 4 Sélectionnez « Créer ou supprimer une partition Windows » et cliquez sur Continuer. 5 Procédez de l’une des manières suivantes :  Si votre ordinateur ne présente qu’un seul disque interne, cliquez sur Restaurer. AVERTISSEMENT : avant de supprimer Windows, créez une copie de sauvegarde des données importantes de votre ordinateur. Les logiciels Windows ainsi que toutes les autres données stockées sur la partition Windows seront effacés.23  Si votre ordinateur est doté de plusieurs disques internes, sélectionnez le disque où Windows est installé, puis sélectionnez « Rétablir en tant que partition Mac OS simple », puis cliquez sur Continuer. Dépannage Si vous avez des problèmes pour partitionner un disque, pour utiliser l’Assistant Boot Camp ou pour installer ou exécuter Windows sur votre Macintosh, consultez les solutions proposées dans cette rubrique. Pour plus d’informations relatives au dépannage Accédez à la page www.apple.com/fr/support/bootcamp. Si l’Assistant Boot Camp ne s’ouvre pas parce que vous n’avez pas mis à jour votre programme interne Boot Camp nécessite que Mac OS X v10.5 ou ultérieur et les plus récents logiciels internes soient installés sur votre ordinateur. Plusieurs mises à jour de programme interne peuvent s’avérer nécessaires sur certains ordinateurs. Pour mettre à jour le logiciel système de l’ordinateur : 1 Choisissez Mise à jour de logiciels dans le menu Pomme. 2 Si une mise à jour de Mac OS X est affichée dans la liste, sélectionnez–la. 3 Cliquez sur Installer. Pour mettre à jour le programme interne de l’ordinateur : 1 Accédez à la page www.apple.com/fr/support/downloads/. 2 Cherchez les mises à jour de programme interne pour votre ordinateur. Par exemple, effectuez une recherche de l’expression « mise à jour du programme interne du Mac mini ». Important : plusieurs mises à jour de programme interne peuvent s’avérer nécessaires sur certains ordinateurs. Consultez la page docs.info.apple.com/article.html?artnum=303880-fr pour connaître les différentes mises à jour disponibles pour votre ordinateur. 3 Téléchargez les paquets de mise à jour de programme interne applicables à votre ordinateur. 4 Ouvrez chaque paquet puis suivez les instructions à l’écran. Si vous ne parvenez pas à partitionner votre disque Pour partitionner votre disque et installer Windows à l’aide de l’Assistant Boot Camp, le disque doit être formaté comme volume Mac OS X étendu (journalisé) à partition simple. Si vous avez déjà partitionné le disque à l’aide de l’Utilitaire de disque ou d’un autre utilitaire, vous ne pouvez pas utiliser l’Assistant Boot Camp tant que vous n’avez pas restauré le disque comme Mac OS X à partition simple.24 L’Assistant Boot Camp ne fonctionne qu’avec les disques internes. Il est impossible d’utiliser l’Assistant Boot Camp pour partitionner un disque externe et y installer Windows. Si une zone de dialogue comportant le message « Ce disque ne peut pas être partitionné car la vérification a échoué » s’affiche, tentez de réparer le disque à l’aide de l’Utilitaire de disque et d’exécuter à nouveau l’Assistant Boot Camp. Si le problème persiste, sauvegardez toutes les données présentes sur votre ordinateur, démarrez ce dernier depuis le disque d’installation de Mac OS X 10.5, puis effacez le disque à l’aide de l’Utilitaire de disque. Restaurez les données sur votre ordinateur à partir de la copie de sauvegarde et tentez d’exécuter à nouveau l’Assistant Boot Camp. Si la partition Windows que vous avez créée est trop petite Créez d’abord une copie de sauvegarde de toutes les données présentes sur votre partition Windows. Exécutez ensuite l’Assistant Boot Camp pour restaurer votre disque comme volume simple. Redémarrez votre ordinateur et utilisez l’Assistant Boot Camp pour partitionner à nouveau le disque et réinstaller Windows. Pensez à installer les pilotes Boot Camp après l’installation de Windows. Si un message vous indique que le disque du programme d’installation est introuvable lorsque vous essayez d’installer Windows Assurez-vous que vous avez ouvert une session Mac OS X en tant qu’administrateur. Si le programme d’installation de Windows ne répond pas Si vous utilisez une souris Mighty Mouse directement branchée à votre ordinateur, le programme d’installation de Windows risque de ne pas répondre. Branchez dans ce cas la souris Mighty Mouse sur le port USB de votre clavier. Si Windows n’a pas été correctement installé Vérifiez que vous utilisez une version originale et complète de Windows XP Édition Familiale ou Professionnel avec le Service Pack 2 ou ultérieur, ou Windows Vista Édition Familiale Basique, Édition Familiale Premium, Professionnel ou Édition Intégrale. Les éditions Media Center, OEM et de mise à niveau de Windows XP ne sont pas recommandées. Redémarrez l’ordinateur et maintenez enfoncée la touche Option jusqu’à ce qu’une ou plusieurs icônes de disque apparaissent à l’écran. Insérez le disque d’installation de Windows. Sélectionnez l’icône de ce dernier, puis cliquez sur la flèche située en dessous. Appuyez rapidement sur l’une des touches de votre clavier pour lancer le programme d’installation. Suivez les instructions à l’écran pour réparer ou réinstaller Windows. Si vous avez installé MacDrive de MediaFour et que vous ne trouvez pas les pilotes Boot Camp sur le disque d’installation de Mac OS X Leopard Dans l’Explorateur Windows, cliquez avec le bouton droit de la souris sur le lecteur de CD et choisissez MacDrive > Show Windows Files.25 Si les pilotes Boot Camp n’ont pas été correctement installés Si les pilotes Boot Camp semblent ne pas avoir été correctement installés, tentez de leur appliquer le processus de réparation. Pour réparer les pilotes Boot Camp : 1 Démarrez votre ordinateur sous Windows. 2 Insérez votre disque d’installation de Mac OS X 10.5. 3 Si le programme d’installation ne démarre pas automatiquement, parcourez le disque à l’aide de l’Explorateur Windows et double-cliquez sur le fichier setup.exe dans le dossier Boot Camp. 4 Cliquez sur Réparer puis suivez les instructions à l’écran. Si un message indiquant que le logiciel en cours d’installation n’a pas passé les tests Windows Logo apparaît à l’écran, cliquez quand même sur Continuer. Si vous devez réinstaller des pilotes spécifiques, vous pouvez les installer l’un après l’autre. Par exemple, si votre caméra iSight intégrée ne fonctionne pas, vous pouvez réinstaller uniquement le pilote iSight. Les pilotes individuels se trouvent dans le dossier Drivers de votre disque d’installation de Mac OS X Leopard. Pour réinstaller un pilote donné : 1 Insérez votre disque d’installation de Mac OS X 10.5. 2 Quittez le programme d’exécution automatique s’il s’ouvre. 3 À l’aide de l’Explorateur Windows, recherchez le pilote que vous souhaitez réinstaller. 4 Ouvrez le pilote pour lancer l’installation. Si vous ne parvenez pas à éjecter un disque La plupart des claviers Apple comportent une touche d’éjection (C) pour éjecter les disques optiques. Pour éjecter un CD ou un DVD : m Maintenez enfoncée la touche Éjecter jusqu’à ce que le symbole d’éjection (C) apparaisse à l’écran. Elle ne fonctionne sous Windows que si vous avez installé les pilotes Boot Camp. Voir « Étape 3 : Installer les pilotes Boot Camp pour Windows » à la page 13. La session d’un compte utilisateur doit être ouverte pour pouvoir utiliser la touche Éjecter. La touche Éjecter ne fonctionne pas dans l’écran de bienvenue. Si votre clavier ne dispose pas de cette touche, vous pouvez éjecter un disque en utilisant l’Explorateur Windows. Sélectionner le disque et cliquez sur Éjecter.26 Si vous ne parvenez toujours pas à éjecter le disque, redémarrez votre ordinateur en maintenant enfoncé le bouton principal de la souris jusqu’à ce que le disque soit éjecté. Si votre ordinateur n’affiche pas toujours la date et l’heure exactes. Vous devez disposer d’une connexion à Internet pour que la date et l’heure soient correctes lorsque vous changez de système d’exploitation. Si vous n’êtes pas connecté à Internet, vous pouvez également régler la date et l’heure manuellement lorsque vous passez d’un système d’exploitation à l’autre. Si vous ne parvenez pas à régler la luminosité de votre écran Vous pouvez régler la luminosité des écrans d’ordinateur Mac portable à l’aide des touches de fonction du clavier. Appuyez sur la touche F1 pour diminuer ou F2 pour augmenter la luminosité de l’écran. Alternativement, si vous disposez d’un clavier Apple doté de symboles de luminosité sur les touches F1 et F2, vous pouvez utilisez ces dernières. Si les touches de luminosité ne fonctionnent pas, essayez de maintenir enfoncée la touche Fonction tout en appuyant sur la touche F1 ou F2. Si cela ne fonctionne pas, assurez-vous d’avoir installé les pilotes de Boot Camp. Voir « Étape 3 : Installer les pilotes Boot Camp pour Windows » à la page 13. Si vous ne parvenez pas à régler le volume Vous pouvez régler le volume sous Windows à l’aide des touches de volume de votre clavier Apple. Appuyez sur Diminuer le volume (–) pour réduire le volume sonore ou sur Augmenter le volume (-) pour l’accroître. Pour désactiver le volume, appuyez sur la touche Silence (—). Si les touches de volume semblent ne pas fonctionner, vérifiez que vous avez bien installé les pilotes Boot Camp. Voir « Étape 3 : Installer les pilotes Boot Camp pour Windows » à la page 13. Si le bureau de Windows ne couvre pas la totalité de l’écran Si le bureau de Windows ne couvre pas la totalité de l’écran, vérifiez que vous avez bien installé les pilotes Boot Camp. Voir « Étape 3 : Installer les pilotes Boot Camp pour Windows » à la page 13. Si vous avez installé les pilotes et que le bureau n’occupe toujours pas l’intégralité de l’écran, augmentez la valeur du réglage de résolution du bureau, accessible à partir du tableau de bord Moniteur.Si l’écran est vide ou déformé Certaines cartes graphiques peuvent ne pas fonctionner avec les deux systèmes d’exploitation Mac OS X et Windows sur un même ordinateur Mac. Si vous rencontrez des problè- mes d’affichage sous Windows, essayez les solutions suivantes :  Utilisez la carte graphique fournie avec votre ordinateur Macintosh.  Vérifiez que vous avez bien installé les pilotes Boot Camp. Voir « Étape 3 : Installer les pilotes Boot Camp pour Windows » à la page 13.  Réglez la résolution de l’écran dans l’option Affichage accessible à partir du panneau de configuration. Si vous ne parvenez pas à renommer la partition Windows Si vous avez installé Windows XP sur une partition NTFS ou que vous avez installé Windows Vista, vous pouvez seulement renommer la partition Windows sous Windows. Démarrez sous Windows et cliquez avec le bouton droit de la souris sur lecteur C: dans l’Explorateur Windows. Tapez ensuite un nom. Si vous possédez une configuration RAID Les configurations RAID utilisant Boot Camp sont des cas non pris en charge. Pour en savoir plus, accédez à la page www.apple.com/fr/support/bootcamp et lancez une recherche sur le terme « RAID ». En savoir plus, assistance et commentaires Pour en savoir plus sur Boot Camp, accédez à la page www.apple.com/fr/bootcamp. Pour bénéficier d’une assistance sur Boot Camp, accédez à la page www.apple.com/fr/support/bootcamp. Nous souhaitons connaître vos remarques sur Boot Camp. Pour nous faire part de vos commentaires, accédez à la page www.apple.com/fr/macosx/feedback. Apple ne fournit aucune assistance pour l’installation ou l’utilisation de logiciels Microsoft Windows. Pour retrouver de l’aide à propos de problèmes relatifs à Windows, accé- dez à la page www.microsoft.fr/windows. © 2008 Apple Inc. Tous droits réservés. Apple, le logo Apple, AirPort, FireWire, iSight, Mac, MacBook et Mac OS sont des marques d’Apple Inc. déposées aux ÉtatsUnis et dans d’autres pays. Leopard est une marque d’Apple Inc. La marque et les logos Bluetooth® sont des marques déposées appartenant à Bluetooth SIG, Inc. et toute utilisation d’une telle marque par Apple Inc. est effectuée sous licence. Intel, Intel Core et Xeon sont des marques d’Intel Corp. aux États-Unis et dans d’autres pays. Mighty Mouse™ et © 2007 CBS Operations Inc. Tous droits réservés. Les autres noms de produits et d’entreprises mentionnés dans le présent document peuvent être des marques de leurs propriétaires respectifs. F019-1178 01-2008 iPad User Guide For iOS 5.1 SoftwareContents 9 Chapter 1: At a Glance 9 Overview 10 Buttons 12 Micro-SIM card tray 12 Home screen 16 Using the Multi-Touch screen 18 Chapter 2: Getting Started 18 What you need 18 Setting up iPad 18 Setting up mail and other accounts 19 Managing content on iPad 19 Using iCloud 20 Syncing with iTunes 21 Connecting iPad to your computer 21 Viewing the user guide on iPad 22 Battery 23 Using and cleaning iPad 24 Chapter 3: Basics 24 Using apps 26 Customizing the Home screen 28 Typing 32 Searching 33 Printing 34 File Sharing 35 Notifications 36 Twitter 37 Using AirPlay 37 Using Bluetooth devices 38 Security features 40 Chapter 4: Safari 40 Viewing webpages 41 Links 41 Reading List 41 Reader 41 Entering text and filling out forms 42 Searching 42 Bookmarks and history 42 Printing webpages, PDFs, and other documents 42 Web clips 243 Chapter 5: Mail 43 Checking and reading email 44 Working with multiple accounts 44 Sending mail 45 Using links and detected data 45 Viewing attachments 45 Printing messages and attachments 46 Organizing mail 46 Searching mail 46 Mail accounts and settings 48 Chapter 6: Messages 48 Sending and receiving messages 49 Sending messages to a group 49 Sending photos, videos, and more 50 Editing conversations 50 Searching messages 51 Chapter 7: Camera 51 About Camera 52 Taking photos and videos 52 Viewing, sharing, and printing 53 Editing photos 53 Trimming videos 53 Uploading photos and videos to your computer 54 Photo Stream 55 Chapter 8: FaceTime 55 About FaceTime 56 Making a FaceTime call 56 While on a FaceTime call 57 Chapter 9: Photo Booth 57 About Photo Booth 57 Selecting an effect 58 Taking a photo 58 Viewing and sharing photos 58 Uploading photos to your computer 59 Chapter 10: Photos 59 Viewing photos and videos 60 Viewing slideshows 60 Organizing photos and videos 61 Sharing photos and videos 61 Printing photos 61 Using Picture Frame 62 Importing photos and videos 63 Chapter 11: Videos 63 About Videos 63 Playing videos 64 Watching rented movies Contents 364 Watching videos on a TV 65 Deleting videos from iPad 65 Using Home Sharing 66 Chapter 12: YouTube 66 About YouTube 66 Browsing and searching for videos 67 Playing videos 68 Keeping track of videos you like 68 Sharing videos, comments, and ratings 68 Watching YouTube on a TV 69 Chapter 13: Calendar 69 About Calendar 69 Viewing your calendars 70 Adding events 70 Responding to invitations 71 Searching calendars 71 Subscribing to calendars 71 Importing calendar events from Mail 71 Syncing calendars 72 Calendar accounts and settings 73 Chapter 14: Contacts 73 About Contacts 73 Syncing contacts 74 Searching contacts 74 Adding and editing contacts 75 Contacts accounts and settings 76 Chapter 15: Notes 76 About Notes 76 Writing and reading notes 77 Searching notes 77 Printing or emailing notes 78 Chapter 16: Reminders 78 About Reminders 79 Setting a reminder 79 Managing reminders in list view 79 Managing reminders in date view 80 Managing completed reminders 80 Searching reminders 81 Chapter 17: Maps 81 Finding locations 82 Getting directions 83 Getting and sharing info about a location 83 Showing traffic conditions 84 Map views 4 Contents85 Chapter 18: Music 85 Adding music and audio 85 Playing songs and other audio 87 Viewing tracks on an album 87 Searching audio content 87 iTunes Match 88 Genius 88 Playlists 89 Home Sharing 90 Chapter 19: iTunes Store 90 About the iTunes Store 90 Finding music, videos, and more 91 Purchasing music, audiobooks, and tones 91 Purchasing or renting videos 91 Following artists and friends 92 Streaming or downloading podcasts 92 Checking download status 92 Viewing account information 93 Verifying downloads 94 Chapter 20: App Store 94 About the App Store 95 Finding and downloading apps 95 Deleting apps 96 Store settings 97 Chapter 21: Newsstand 97 About Newsstand 98 Reading the latest issues 99 Chapter 22: iBooks 99 About iBooks 99 Using the iBookstore 100 Syncing books and PDFs 100 Reading books 102 Changing a book’s appearance 102 Studying notes and vocabulary lists 102 Interacting with multimedia 103 Printing or emailing a PDF 103 Organizing the bookshelf 104 Chapter 23: Game Center 104 About Game Center 105 Signing in to Game Center 105 Purchasing and downloading games 105 Playing games 105 Playing with friends 106 Game Center settings Contents 5107 Chapter 24: Accessibility 107 Universal Access features 107 About VoiceOver 116 Triple-click Home 117 Zoom 117 Large Text 117 White on Black 117 Speak Selection 118 Speak Auto-Text 118 Mono Audio 118 AssistiveTouch 119 Universal Access in OS X 119 Minimum font size for mail messages 119 Widescreen keyboards 119 Closed captioning 120 Chapter 25: Settings 120 Airplane Mode 120 Wi-Fi 121 Notifications 122 Location Services 122 Cellular Data 123 VPN 123 Personal Hotspot 123 Brightness & Wallpaper 124 Picture Frame 124 General 129 Settings for apps 130 Appendix A: iPad in Business 130 iPad in the enterprise 130 Using configuration profiles 130 Setting up Microsoft Exchange accounts 131 VPN access 131 LDAP and CardDAV accounts 132 Appendix B: International Keyboards 132 Adding and removing keyboards 132 Switching keyboards 132 Chinese 134 Japanese 134 Typing emoji characters 134 Using the candidate list 134 Using shortcuts 135 Vietnamese 136 Appendix C: Support and Other Information 136 iPad Support site 136 Low-battery image or “Not Charging” message appears 136 iPad doesn’t respond 137 Restarting and resetting iPad 137 “This accessory is not supported by iPad” appears 6 Contents137 An app doesn’t fill the screen 137 Onscreen keyboard doesn’t appear 137 Backing up iPad 139 Updating and restoring iPad software 139 Can’t send or receive email 140 Sound, music, and video 141 iTunes Store and App Store 142 Safety, service, and support information 142 Disposal and recycling information 142 Apple and the environment 143 iPad operating temperature Contents 7At a Glance 1 Read this chapter to learn about iPad features, how to use the controls, and more. Overview Multi-Touch display Multi-Touch display Front camera Front camera Home Home App icons App icons Status bar Status bar Speaker Speaker Dock connector Dock connector Microphone Microphone Headphone jack Headphone jack Micro-SIM tray (on some models) Micro-SIM tray (on some models) Sleep/Wake Sleep/Wake Back camera Back camera Volume buttons Volume buttons Side Switch Side Switch Your iPad features and the Home screen may be different, depending on the model of iPad you have. 9 Accessories The following accessories are included with iPad: 10W USB Power Adapter Dock Connector to USB Cable Item What you can do with it 10W USB power adapter Use the 10W USB power adapter to provide power to iPad and charge the battery. Dock Connector to USB Cable Use this cable to connect iPad to the 10W USB power adapter to charge or to your computer to sync. Use the cable with the optional iPad Dock, or plug it directly into iPad. Buttons A few buttons make it easy to lock iPad and adjust the volume. Sleep/Wake button You can lock iPad by putting it to sleep when you’re not using it. When you lock iPad, nothing happens if you touch the screen, but music continues playing and you can use the volume buttons. Sleep/Wake button Sleep/Wake button Lock iPad Press the Sleep/Wake button. Unlock iPad Press the Home button or the Sleep/Wake button, then drag the slider. Turn iPad off Hold down the Sleep/Wake button for a few seconds until the red slider appears, then drag the onscreen slider. Turn iPad on Hold down the Sleep/Wake button until the Apple logo appears. If you don’t touch the screen for a minute or two, iPad locks automatically. You can change how long it takes the screen to lock, or set a passcode to unlock iPad. Set the Auto-Lock time: In Settings, go to General > Auto-Lock, then set a time for iPad to lock automatically. Set a passcode: In Settings, go to General > Passcode Lock, then tap On or Off. Use an iPad Smart Cover, sold separately, with iPad 2 or later to automatically unlock iPad when you open the cover and lock iPad when you close it. Use an iPad Smart Cover: In Settings, go to General > iPad Cover Lock/Unlock, then tap On. 10 Chapter 1 At a GlanceHome button The Home button lets you get back to the Home screen at any time. It also provides other convenient shortcuts. Go to the Home screen: Press the Home button . On the Home screen, tap an app to open it. See “Opening and switching apps” on page 24. Display the multitasking bar to see recently used apps When iPad is unlocked, double-click the Home button . Display audio playback controls When iPad is locked: Double-click the Home button . See “Playing songs and other audio” on page 85. When using another app: Double-click the Home button , then flick the multitasking bar from left to right. Volume buttons Use the volume buttons to adjust the volume of songs and other media, and of alerts and sound effects. Volume buttons Volume buttons Side Switch Side Switch Increase the volume Press the Volume Up button. Decrease the volume Press the Volume Down button. Set a volume limit In Settings, go to Music > Volume Limit. Mute the sound Hold down the Volume Down button. WARNING: For important information about avoiding hearing loss, see the iPad Important Product Information Guide at support.apple.com/manuals/ipad. Side Switch You can use the Side Switch to disable audio alerts and notifications. You can also use it to lock the screen rotation and prevent the iPad display from switching between portrait and landscape mode. Mute notifications, alerts, and sound effects Slide the Side Switch down to mute notifications, alerts, and sound effects. This switch doesn’t mute audio playback, such as music, podcasts, movies, and TV shows. See “Side Switch” on page 127. Lock the screen rotation In Settings, go to General > Use Side Switch to, then tap Lock Rotation. See “Side Switch” on page 127. Chapter 1 At a Glance 11Micro-SIM card tray The micro-SIM card in some 4G and 3G models is used for cellular data. If your micro-SIM card wasn’t preinstalled or if you change cellular data carriers, you may need to install or replace the micro-SIM card. Micro-SIM card Micro-SIM card SIM tray SIM tray SIM eject tool SIM eject tool Open the SIM tray: Insert the tip of the SIM eject tool into the hole on the SIM tray. Press firmly and push the tool straight in until the tray pops out. Pull out the SIM tray to install or replace the micro-SIM card. If you don’t have a SIM eject tool, you may be able to use the end of a small paper clip. For more information, see “Cellular Data” on page 122. Home screen Press the Home button at any time to go to the Home screen, which displays your iPad apps. Tap any icon to open the app. See “Using apps” on page 24. Status icons The icons in the status bar at the top of the screen give information about iPad: Status icon What it means Airplane mode Shows that airplane mode is on—you can’t access the Internet, or use Bluetooth® devices. Non-wireless features are available. See “Airplane Mode” on page 120. LTE Shows that your carrier’s 4G LTE network (iPad Wi-Fi + 4G) is available, and you can connect to the Internet over 4G LTE. 4G Shows that your carrier’s 4G network (some iPad Wi-Fi + 4G models) is available, and you can connect to the Internet over 4G. 3G Shows that your carrier’s 3G network (4G or 3G models) is available, and you can connect to the Internet over 3G. EDGE Shows that your carrier’s EDGE network (some 4G or 3G models) is available, and you can connect to the Internet over EDGE. GPRS Shows that your carrier’s GPRS network (some 4G or 3G models) is available, and you can connect to the Internet over GPRS. 12 Chapter 1 At a GlanceStatus icon What it means Wi-Fi Shows that iPad has a Wi-Fi Internet connection. The more bars, the stronger the connection. See “Joining a Wi-Fi network” on page 120. Personal Hotspot Shows that iPad is providing a Personal Hotspot to another iPad, iPhone, or iPod touch. See “Personal Hotspot” on page 123. Syncing Shows that iPad is syncing with iTunes. See “Syncing with iTunes” on page 20. Activity Shows network and other activity. Some third-party apps use this icon to show an active process. VPN Shows that you’re connected to a network using VPN. See “VPN” on page 123. Lock Shows that iPad is locked. See “Sleep/Wake button” on page 10. Screen orientation lock Shows that the screen orientation is locked. See “Viewing in portrait or landscape” on page 15. Location Services Shows that an item is using Location Services. See “Location Services” on page 122. Play Shows that a song, audiobook, or podcast is playing. See “Playing songs and other audio” on page 85. Bluetooth White icon: Bluetooth is on and paired with a device, such as a headset or keyboard. Gray icon: Bluetooth is on and paired with a device, but the device is out of range or turned off. No icon: Bluetooth is turned off or not paired. See “Using Bluetooth devices” on page 37. Battery Shows the battery level or charging status. See “Charging the battery” on page 22. iPad apps iPad comes with the following apps: Safari Browse websites on the Internet. Rotate iPad sideways for widescreen viewing. Double-tap to zoom in or out—Safari automatically fits the webpage column to the screen. Open multiple pages using tabs. Sync bookmarks with Safari or Microsoft Internet Explorer on your computer. Add Safari web clips to the Home screen for fast access to favorite websites. Save images from websites to your Photo Library. Print webpages using AirPrint. See Chapter 4,“Safari,” on page 40. Mail Send and receive mail using many of the most popular mail services, Microsoft Exchange, or most industry-standard POP3 and IMAP mail services. Send and save photos. View PDF files and other attachments, or open them in other apps. Print messages and attachments using AirPrint. See Chapter 5,“Mail,” on page 43. Photos Organize your favorite photos and videos into albums. Watch a slideshow. Zoom in for a closer look. Edit photos and print them using AirPrint. Use Photo Stream to push the photos you take on iPad to your devices. See Chapter 10,“Photos,” on page 59. Chapter 1 At a Glance 13Music Sync with your iTunes library and listen to your songs, audiobooks, and podcasts on iPad. Create and manage playlists, or use Genius to create playlists for you. Listen to Genius Mixes of songs from your library. Use Home Sharing to play music from your computer. Stream your music or videos wirelessly to an Apple TV or compatible audio system using AirPlay. See Chapter 18,“Music,” on page 85. Messages Send messages over Wi-Fi to other iOS 5 users, and include photos, videos, and other information. Your messages are encrypted. See Chapter 6,“Messages,” on page 48. Calendar Keep your calendar current on iPad, or sync it with your Mac OS X or Windows calendar. Subscribe to others’ calendars. Sync over the Internet with Microsoft Exchange or CalDAV servers. See Chapter 13,“Calendar,” on page 69. Notes Take notes on the go—grocery lists, brilliant ideas. Send them in mail. Sync notes to Mail or Microsoft Outlook or Outlook Express. See Chapter 15,“Notes,” on page 76. Reminders Organize your life with due dates and lists. Reminders work with iCal and Microsoft Outlook on your computer. You can keep your reminders up to date across all your devices using iCloud or a Microsoft Exchange account. See Chapter 16,“Reminders,” on page 78. Maps See a standard, satellite, hybrid, or terrain view of locations around the world. Zoom in for a closer look, or check out Google Street View. Find your current location. Get detailed driving, public transit, or walking directions and see current highway traffic conditions. Find businesses in the area. See Chapter 17,“Maps,” on page 81. YouTube Play videos from YouTube’s online collection. Search for any video, or browse featured, most viewed, most recently updated, and top-rated videos. Set up and log in to your YouTube account—then rate videos, sync your favorites, show subscriptions, and more. See Chapter 12,“YouTube,” on page 66. Videos Play movies, TV shows, podcasts, videos from your iTunes library or your movie collection. Buy or rent movies on iPad using the iTunes Store. Download video podcasts. See Chapter 11,“Videos,” on page 63. Contacts Organize your address book on iPad and keep it up to date on all of your iOS devices with iCloud. See Chapter 14,“Contacts,” on page 73. Game Center Discover new games and share your game experiences with friends. Invite a friend, or request a match with an opponent. Check player rankings on the leaderboards. Gain achievements for extra points. See Chapter 23,“Game Center,” on page 104. iTunes Store Search the iTunes Store for music, audiobooks, TV shows, music videos, and movies. Browse, preview, purchase, and download new releases, top items, and more. Buy or rent movies and buy TV shows to view on iPad. Download podcasts. Read reviews, or write your own reviews for your favorite store items. See Chapter 19,“iTunes Store,” on page 90. App Store Search the App Store for apps you can purchase or download. Read reviews, or write your own reviews for your favorite apps. Download and install the apps on your Home screen. See Chapter 20,“App Store,” on page 94. Newsstand Keep all your app subscriptions in one convenient place. Newsstand automatically downloads whatever’s new for each of your app subscriptions. It all happens in the background, so you never have to interrupt what you’re doing. See Chapter 21,“Newsstand,” on page 97. FaceTime Make video calls to other FaceTime users over Wi-Fi. Use the front camera to talk face to face, or the back camera to share what you see. See Chapter 8,“FaceTime,” on page 55. 14 Chapter 1 At a GlanceCamera Take photos and record HD videos. View them on iPad, mail them, or upload them to your computer or the Internet. Tap to set the exposure. Trim and save video clips. Upload videos directly to YouTube. See Chapter 7,“Camera,” on page 51. Photo Booth Use the front or back camera to take a snapshot. Add a special effect, such as twirl or stretch, before you take a snapshot. Snapshots are saved in an album in the Photo app. See Chapter 9,“Photo Booth,” on page 57. Settings Personalize your iPad settings in one convenient place—network, mail, web, music, video, photos, and more. Set up Picture Frame, mail accounts, contacts, and calendars. Manage your cellular data account. Set an auto-lock and a passcode for security. See Chapter 25,“Settings,” on page 120. Note: App functionality and availability may vary depending on where you purchase and use iPad. Viewing in portrait or landscape You can view iPad‘s built-in apps in either portrait or landscape orientation. Rotate iPad and the screen rotates too, adjusting automatically to fit the new orientation. You may prefer landscape orientation for viewing webpages in Safari, for example, or when entering text. Webpages automatically scale to the wider screen, making the text and images larger. The onscreen keyboard also becomes larger, which may help increase your typing speed and accuracy. Lock the screen orientation if you want to keep the screen from rotating. Lock the screen in portrait or landscape orientation: Double-click the Home button to view the multitasking bar, then flick from left to right. Tap to lock the screen orientation. You can also set the Side Switch to lock the screen orientation instead of silencing sound effects and notifications. In Settings, go to General > Use Side Switch to, then tap Lock Rotation. See “Side Switch” on page 127. Chapter 1 At a Glance 15Using the Multi-Touch screen The controls on the Multi-Touch screen change, depending on the task you’re performing. To control iPad, use your fingers to pinch, swipe, tap, and double-tap. Using multitasking gestures You can use multitasking gestures on iPad to return to the home screen, reveal the multitasking bar, or switch to another app. Return to the Home screen: Pinch four or five fingers together. Reveal the multitasking bar: Swipe up with four or five fingers. Switch apps: Swipe left or right with four or five fingers. Turn multitasking gestures on or off: In Settings, go to > General > Multitasking Gestures, then tap On or Off. Zooming in or out While viewing photos, webpages, mail, or maps, you can zoom in and out. Pinch two fingers together or apart. For photos and webpages, you can double-tap (tap twice quickly) to zoom in, then double-tap again to zoom out. For maps, double-tap to zoom in and tap once with two fingers to zoom out. Zoom is also an accessibility feature that lets you magnify the entire screen of any app you’re using and helps you see what’s on the display. See “Zoom” on page 117. Adjusting brightness To adjust the screen’s brightness, double-click the Home button to view the multitasking bar. Flick from left to right, then drag the brightness slider. Brightness Brightness Use Auto-Brightness to automatically adjust the screen’s brightness: In Settings, go to Brightness & Wallpaper. See “Brightness & Wallpaper” on page 123. 16 Chapter 1 At a GlanceUsing the onscreen keyboard The onscreen keyboard appears automatically anytime you need to type. Use the keyboard to enter text, such as contact information, mail, and web addresses. The keyboard corrects misspellings, predicts what you’re typing, and learns as you use it. See “Typing” on page 28. Using lists Some lists have an index along the side to help you navigate quickly. Find items in an indexed list: Tap a letter to jump to items starting with that letter. Drag your finger along the index to scroll quickly through the list. Choose an item: Tap an item in the list. Depending on the list, tapping an item can do different things—for example, it may open a new list, play a song, open an mail message, or show someone’s contact information. Return to a previous list: Tap the back button in the upper-left corner. Chapter 1 At a Glance 17Getting Started 2 Read this chapter to learn how to set up iPad, set up mail accounts, use iCloud, and more. What you need WARNING: To avoid injury, read all operating instructions in this guide and safety information in the · iPad Important Product Information Guide at support.apple.com/manuals/ipad before using iPad. To use iPad, you need:  An Apple ID for some features, including iCloud, the App Store and iTunes Store, and online purchases  An Internet connection (broadband is recommended) To use iPad with your computer, you need:  A Mac or a PC with a USB 2.0 port and one of the following operating systems:  Mac OS X version 10.5.8 or later  Windows 7, Windows Vista, or Windows XP Home or Professional with Service Pack 3 or later  iTunes 10.6 or later, available at www.itunes.com/download Setting up iPad To set up iPad, turn it on and follow the Setup Assistant. The onscreen directions in Setup Assistant step you through the setup process, including connecting to a Wi-Fi network, signing in with or creating a free Apple ID, setting up iCloud, and turning on recommended features, such as Location Services and Find My iPad. During setup, you can copy your apps, settings, and content from another iPad by restoring from an iCloud backup or from iTunes. See “Backing up iPad” on page 137. Setting up mail and other accounts iPad works with iCloud, Microsoft Exchange, and many of the most popular Internet-based mail, contacts, and calendar service providers. If you don’t already have a mail account, you can set up a free iCloud account when you set up iPad, or set one up later in Settings > iCloud. See “Using iCloud” on page 19. Set up an iCloud account: Go to Settings > iCloud. Set up another account: Go to Settings > Mail, Contacts, Calendars. You can add contacts using an LDAP or CardDAV account, if your company or organization supports it. See “Syncing contacts” on page 73. For information about setting up a Microsoft Exchange account in a corporate environment, see “Setting up Microsoft Exchange accounts” on page 130. 18Managing content on iPad You can transfer information and files between iPad and your other iOS devices and computers, using either iCloud or iTunes.  iCloud stores content such as music, photos, and more, and wirelessly pushes it to your other iOS devices and computers, keeping everything up to date. See “Using iCloud,” below.  iTunes syncs music, video, photos, and more between your computer and iPad. Changes you make on one device are copied to the other when you sync. You can also use iTunes to copy a file to iPad for use with an app, or to copy a document you’ve created on iPad to your computer. See “Syncing with iTunes” on page 20. You can use iCloud or iTunes, or both, depending on your needs. For example, you can use iCloud Photo Stream to automatically push photos you take on iPad to your other devices, and use iTunes to sync photo albums from your computer to iPad. Note: Don’t sync items in the Info pane of iTunes (such as contacts, calendars, and notes) and also use iCloud to keep that information up to date on your devices. Otherwise, you may see duplicated data on iPad. Using iCloud iCloud stores your content, including music, photos, contacts, calendars, and supported documents. Content stored in iCloud is pushed wirelessly to your other iOS devices and computers set up with the same iCloud account. iCloud is available on iOS 5 devices, on Macs running OS X Lion v10.7.2 or later, and on PCs with the iCloud Control Panel for Windows (Windows Vista Service Pack 2 or Windows 7 required). iCloud features include:  iTunes in the Cloud—Download previous iTunes music and TV show purchases to iPad for free, anytime you like.  Apps and Books—Download previous App Store and iBookstore purchases for free, anytime you like.  Photo Stream—Photos you take on one device appear automatically on all your devices. See “Photo Stream” on page 54.  Documents in the Cloud—For iCloud-enabled apps, keep documents and app data up to date across all your devices.  Mail, Contacts, Calendars—Keep your mail contacts, calendars, notes, and reminders up to date across all your devices.  Backup—Back up iPad to iCloud automatically when connected to power and Wi-Fi. See “Backing up with iCloud” on page 137.  Find My iPad—Locate your iPad on a map, display a message, play a sound, lock the screen, or remotely wipe the data. See “Find My iPad” on page 38.  Find My Friends—Keep track of your family and friends (when connected to a Wi-Fi or cellular network) using the Find My Friends app. Download the free app from the App Store.  iTunes Match—With an iTunes Match subscription, all your music, including music you’ve imported from CDs or purchased somewhere other than iTunes, appears on all of your devices and can be downloaded and played on demand. See “iTunes Match” on page 87. With iCloud, you get a free mail account and 5 GB of storage for your mail, documents, and backups. Your purchased music, apps, TV shows, and books, as well as your Photo Stream, don’t count against your free space. Chapter 2 Getting Started 19Note: iCloud is not available in all areas, and iCloud features may vary by area. For information about iCloud, go to www.apple.com/icloud. Sign in or create an iCloud account: Go to Settings > iCloud. If you have a MobileMe subscription, you can move it to iCloud from a Mac or PC at www.me.com/move until June 30, 2012. Enable or disable iCloud services Go to Settings > iCloud. Enable iCloud backups Go to Settings > iCloud > Storage & Backup. Find your iPad Visit www.icloud.com, sign in with your Apple ID, then choose Find My iPad. Important: On your iPad, Find My iPad must be turned on in Settings > iCloud in order for iPad to be located. But more iCloud storage Go to Settings > iCloud > Storage & Backup, then tap Buy More Storage. For information about buying iCloud storage, go to help.apple.com/icloud. View and download previous iTunes Store purchases Go to the iTunes Store, then tap Purchased . View and download previous App Store purchases Go to the App Store, then tap Purchased . View and download previous iBookstore purchases Go to iBooks, tap Store, then tap Purchased . Turn Photo Stream on or off Go to Settings > iCloud > Photo Stream. Turn on Automatic Downloads for music, apps, or books Go to Settings > Store. For more information about iCloud, go to www.apple.com/icloud. For support information, go to www.apple.com/support/icloud. Syncing with iTunes Syncing with iTunes copies information from a computer to iPad, and vice versa. You can sync by connecting iPad to your computer using the Dock Connector to USB Cable, or you can set up iTunes to sync wirelessly using Wi-Fi. You can set iTunes to sync music, photos, video, podcasts, apps, and more. For detailed information about syncing iPad with a computer, open iTunes then select iTunes Help from the Help menu. Set up wireless iTunes syncing: Connect iPad to your computer using the Dock Connector to USB Cable. In iTunes, turn on “Sync over Wi-Fi connection” in the device’s Summary pane. When Wi-Fi syncing is turned on, iPad automatically syncs every day. iPad must be connected to a power source, both iPad and your computer must be on the same wireless network, and iTunes must be open on the computer. For more information, see “iTunes Wi-Fi Sync.” Tips for syncing with iTunes  If you’re using iCloud to store your contacts, calendars, bookmarks, and notes, don’t also sync them to iPad using iTunes.  Purchases you make from the iTunes Store or the App Store on iPad are synced back to your iTunes library. You can also purchase or download content and apps from the iTunes Store on your computer, and then sync them to iPad.  In the device’s Summary pane, you can set iTunes to automatically sync iPad when it’s attached to your computer. To temporarily override this, hold down Command and Option (Mac) or Shift and Control (PC) until you see your iPad appear in the sidebar. 20 Chapter 2 Getting Started In the device’s Summary pane, select “Encrypt backup” if you want to encrypt the information stored on your computer when iTunes makes a backup. Encrypted backups are indicated by a lock icon , and you need a password to restore the backup. If you don’t select this option, passwords (such as those for mail accounts) aren’t included in the backup and have to be reentered if you use the backup to restore iPad.  In the device’s Info pane, when you sync mail accounts, only the settings are transferred from your computer to iPad. Changes you make to a mail account on iPad don’t affect the account on your computer.  In the device’s Info pane, click Advanced to select options that let you replace the information on iPad with the information from your computer during the next sync.  If you listen to part of a podcast or audiobook, your stopping point is included if you sync the content with iTunes. If you started listening on iPad, you can pick up where you left off in iTunes on your computer—or vice versa.  In the device’s Photo pane, you can sync photos and videos from a folder on your computer. Connecting iPad to your computer Use the included Dock Connector to USB Cable to connect iPad to your computer. Connecting iPad to your computer allows you to sync information, music, and other content with iTunes. You can also sync with iTunes wirelessly. See “Syncing with iTunes.” Unless iPad is syncing with your computer, you can disconnect it at any time. If you disconnect while a sync is in progress, some data may not get synced until the next time you connect iPad to your computer. Cancel a sync: Drag the slider on iPad. Viewing the user guide on iPad You can view the iPad User Guide on iPad in Safari, or you can install the free iBooks app and download the guide from the iBookstore. View the user guide in Safari: In Safari, tap , then tap the iPad User Guide bookmark. Or go to help.apple.com/ipad. Add an icon for the user guide to the Home screen: Tap , then tap “Add to Home Screen.” View the user guide in iBooks: If you haven’t installed iBooks, open the App Store, then search for and install “iBooks.” Open iBooks and tap Store. Search for “iPad User Guide,” then select and download the user guide. Chapter 2 Getting Started 21Battery iPad has an internal rechargeable battery. For more information about iPad batteries, go to www.apple.com/batteries/ipad.html. Charging the battery WARNING: For important safety information about charging iPad, see the iPad Important Product Information Guide at support.apple.com/manuals/ipad. The battery icon in the upper-right corner of the status bar shows the battery level or charging status. Not Charging Not Charging Charging Charging Charged Charged Charge the battery: The best way to charge the iPad battery is to connect iPad to a power outlet using the included Dock Connector to USB Cable and 10W USB power adapter. When you connect iPad to a USB 2.0 port on a Mac with the Dock Connector to USB Cable, iPad may charge slowly while syncing. Important: The iPad battery may drain instead of charge if iPad is connected to a PC, to a computer that’s turned off or is in sleep or standby mode, to a USB hub, or to the USB port on a keyboard. If your Mac or PC doesn’t provide enough power to charge iPad, a “Not Charging” message appears in the status bar. To charge iPad, disconnect it from your computer and connect it to a power outlet using the included Dock Connector to USB Cable and 10W USB power adapter. Important: If iPad is very low on power, it may display one of the following images, indicating that iPad needs to charge for up to twenty minutes before you can use it. If iPad is extremely low on power, the display may be blank for up to two minutes before one of the low-battery images appears. or or Maximizing battery life iPad uses a lithium-ion battery. For information about maximizing the battery life of iPad, go to www.apple.com/batteries/ipad.html. Replacing the battery The iPad battery isn’t user replaceable; it can be replaced only by an Apple Authorized Service Provider (AASP). Rechargeable batteries have a limited number of charge cycles and may eventually need to be replaced. AASPs also recycle iPad batteries according to local laws and regulations. For information, go to www.apple.com/batteries/replacements.html. 22 Chapter 2 Getting StartedUsing and cleaning iPad It’s important to find a comfortable posture when using iPad, and to take frequent breaks. Use your lap, or a table, case, or dock accessory, to support iPad during use. Handle iPad with care, to maintain its appearance. If you’re concerned about scratching or abrasion of the screen, you can use a case or a cover, sold separately. To clean iPad, unplug all cables and turn off iPad (press and hold the Sleep/Wake button until the red slider appears, then slide the onscreen slider). Use a soft, slightly damp, lint-free cloth. Avoid getting moisture in openings. Don’t use window cleaners, household cleaners, aerosol sprays, solvents, alcohol, ammonia, or abrasives to clean iPad. The iPad screen has an oleophobic coating; simply wipe the screen with a soft, lint-free cloth to remove oil left by your hands. The ability of this coating to repel oil will diminish over time with normal usage, and rubbing the screen with an abrasive material will further diminish its effect and may scratch your screen. For more information about handling iPad, see the iPad Important Product Information Guide at support.apple.com/manuals/ipad. Chapter 2 Getting Started 23Basics 3 Read this chapter to learn how to use apps on iPad. You’ll also learn how to search, print, share files, and more. Using apps The high-resolution Multi-Touch screen and simple finger gestures make it easy to use iPad apps. Open an app by tapping its icon. You can switch between apps, rearrange apps, and organize them in folders. Opening and switching apps Open an app: Tap its icon on the Home screen. Return to the Home screen: Press the Home button , or pinch four or five fingers together on the screen. Multitasking allows certain apps to run in the background, so you can quickly switch between the apps you’re using. View the most recently used apps: Double-click the Home button . The most recently used apps appear in the multitasking bar at the bottom of the screen. Flick left to see more apps. Force an app to close: Touch and hold the app icon until it begins to jiggle, then tap . The app is added to the recents list again, the next time you open it. Lock the screen orientation or use the music controls: Double-click the Home button , then flick along the bottom of the screen from left to right. 24The screen orientation lock, brightness slider, and music controls appear. Brightness Brightness Screen orientation lock Screen orientation lock Music controls Music controls Delete an app from the Home screen: Touch and hold the app icon until it jiggles and an appears. Tap to delete the app, then press the Home button . Important: Deleting an app from iPad also deletes the documents and data created by the app. Scrolling Drag up or down to scroll. You can also scroll sideways in apps such as Safari, Photos, and Maps. Dragging your finger to scroll doesn’t choose or activate anything on the screen. Swipe to scroll quickly. You can wait for the scrolling to come to a stop, or touch anywhere on the screen to stop it immediately. Touching the screen to stop scrolling doesn’t choose or activate anything on the screen. To quickly scroll to the top of a list, webpage, or mail message, tap the status bar at the top of the screen. Chapter 3 Basics 25Customizing the Home screen You can customize the layout of app icons on the Home screen—including the icons in the Dock along the bottom of the screen. Rearranging icons You can create additional Home screens and arrange your apps over multiple Home screens. Rearrange icons: 1 Touch and hold any app on the Home screen until it jiggles. 2 Arrange the apps by dragging them. 3 Press the Home button to save your arrangement. Move an icon to another screen While arranging icons, drag an icon to the right edge of the screen until a new screen appears. You can return to a previous screen and drag more icons to the new screen. Create additional Home screens While arranging icons, swipe to the rightmost Home screen, then drag an icon to the right edge of the screen. You can create up to 11 Home screens. The dots above the Dock show the number of screens you have, and which screen you’re viewing. Go to a different Home screen Flick left or right, or tap to the left or right of the row of dots. Go to the first Home screen Press the Home button . Reset the Home screen to its original layout In Settings, go to General > Reset, then tap Reset Home Screen Layout. Resetting the Home screen removes any folders you’ve created and applies the default wallpaper to your Home screen. When you connect iPad to your computer using the Dock Connector to USB Cable, you can rearrange the icons on the Home screen, as well as the order of the screens, in iTunes. Select iPad in the iTunes sidebar, then click the Apps tab. 26 Chapter 3 BasicsOrganizing with folders You can use folders to organize icons on the Home screen. You can put up to 20 icons in a folder. iPad automatically names a folder when you create it, based on the icons you use to create the folder, but you can change the name. Rearrange folders by dragging them on the Home screen or by moving them to a new Home screen or to the Dock. Create a folder: Touch and hold an icon until the Home screen icons begin to jiggle, then drag the icon onto another icon. iPad creates a new folder that includes the two icons, and shows the folder’s name. You can tap the name field to enter a different name. Add an icon to a folder When the icons are jiggling, drag the icon onto the folder. Remove an icon from a folder While arranging icons, tap to open the folder, then drag the icon out of the folder. Open a folder Tap the folder. You can then tap an app icon to open that app. Close a folder Tap outside the folder, or press the Home button. Delete a folder Remove all icons from the folder. The folder is deleted automatically when empty. Rename a folder While arranging icons, tap to open the folder, then tap the name at the top and use the keyboard to enter a new name. When you finish organizing your Home screen, press the Home button to save your changes. Many apps, such as Mail and the App Store, display an alert badge on their Home screen icon with a number (to indicate incoming items) or an exclamation mark (to indicate a problem). If the app is in a folder, the badge appears on the folder as well. A numbered badge shows the total number of items you haven’t attended to, such as incoming mail messages and updated apps to download. An alert badge indicates a problem with the app. Changing the wallpaper You can choose the images or photos you want to use as wallpaper for your Lock screen and your Home screen. Choose an image that came with iPad, or a photo from your Camera Roll album or another album on iPad. Set wallpaper: 1 In Settings, go to Brightness & Wallpaper, tap the image of the Lock and Home screens, then tap Wallpaper or Saved Photos. 2 Tap to choose an image or photo. If you choose a photo, drag or pinch it to position or resize it, until it looks the way you want. 3 Tap Set Lock Screen, Set Home Screen, or Set Both. Chapter 3 Basics 27Typing The onscreen keyboard appears automatically anytime you need to type. Use the keyboard to enter text, such as contact information, mail, and web addresses. The keyboard corrects misspellings, predicts what you’re typing, and learns as you use it. You can also use an Apple Wireless Keyboard to type. When you use an external keyboard, the onscreen keyboard doesn’t appear. See “Using an Apple Wireless Keyboard” on page 31. Entering text Depending on the app you’re using, the intelligent keyboard may automatically suggest corrections as you type, to help prevent mistyped words. Enter text: Tap a text field, such as in a note or new contact, to bring up the keyboard, then tap keys on the keyboard. If you touch the wrong key, you can slide your finger to the correct key. The letter isn’t entered until you release your finger from the key. Delete the previous character Tap . Quickly type a period and space Double-tap the space bar. To turn this feature off, go to Settings > General > Keyboard. Type uppercase Tap the Shift key before tapping a letter. Or touch and hold the Shift key, then slide to a letter. Turn caps lock on Double-tap the Shift key . The Shift key turns blue, and all letters you type are uppercase. Tap the Shift key to turn caps lock off. To turn this feature off, go to Settings > General > Keyboard. Enter numbers, punctuation, or symbols Tap the Number key . Tap the Symbol key to see additional punctuation and symbols. Enter accented letters or other alternate characters Touch and hold the related key, then slide to choose a variant. Use autocorrection to enter “’ll” Type “lll.” For example, type “youlll” to get “you’ll.” Set options for typing Go to Settings > General > Keyboard. Hide the onscreen keyboard Tap the Keyboard key . 28 Chapter 3 BasicsDictation On an iPad that supports dictation, you can dictate text instead of typing it on the onscreen keyboard. For example, you can dictate a message in Mail or a note in Notes. To use Dictation, iPad must be connected to the Internet. Turn on Dictation: Go to, Settings > General > Keyboard > Dictation. Tap to begin dictation. Tap to begin dictation. Dictate text: From the onscreen keyboard, tap , then dictate. When you finish, tap again. Add to a message: Tap again and continue dictating. Enter punctuation: Say the punctuation mark. Note: Dictation may not be available in all languages or in all areas, and features may vary by area. Cellular data charges may apply. Editing text The Multi-Touch screen makes it easy to change the text you’ve entered. An onscreen magnifying glass helps you position the insertion point right where you need it. Grab points let you select more or less text. You can also cut, copy, and paste text and photos within apps, or across apps. Position the insertion point: Touch and hold to bring up the magnifying glass, then drag to position the insertion point. Select text: Tap the insertion point to display the selection buttons. Tap Select to select the adjacent word, or tap Select All to select all text. You can also double-tap a word to select it. Drag the grab points to select more or less text. In read-only documents, such as webpages, or messages you receive, touch and hold to select a word. Grab points Grab points Cut or copy text Select text, then tap Cut or Copy. Paste text Tap the insertion point, then tap Paste to insert the last text that you cut or copied. Or, select text, then tap Paste to replace the text. Undo the last edit Shake iPad. Chapter 3 Basics 29Make text bold, italic, or underlined When available, tap , then tap B/I/U. Find a definition for a word Tap a word to select it, then tap Define. Find alternative words Tap a word, tap Select, then tap Suggest, and tap a suggested word. Justify text When available, select the text you want to justify, then tap the left arrow or the right arrow. Keyboard layouts On iPad, you can type with a split keyboard that’s at the bottom of the screen, or undocked and in the middle of the screen. Use a split keyboard Touch and hold the Keyboard key , slide your finger to Split, then release. Move the keyboard Touch and hold , slide your finger to Undock to move the keyboard to the middle of the screen, then release. Return to a full keyboard Touch and hold the Keyboard key , slide your finger to Dock and Merge, then release. Return a full keyboard to the bottom of the screen Touch and hold the Keyboard key , slide your finger to Dock, then release. Turn Split Keyboard on or off Go to Settings > General > Keyboard > Split Keyboard, then tap On or Off. You can use Settings to set the layouts for the onscreen software keyboard and for any hardware keyboards. The available layouts depend on the keyboard language. See Appendix B,“International Keyboards,” on page 132. For each language, you can choose different layouts for the onscreen software keyboard and for any external hardware keyboards. The software keyboard layout determines the layout of the keyboard on the iPad screen. The hardware keyboard layout determines the layout of an Apple Wireless Keyboard connected to iPad. See “Using an Apple Wireless Keyboard” on page 31. Select a hardware or software keyboard layout Go to Settings > General > International > Keyboards, tap a language, then choose a software or hardware keyboard layout. Add or remove an international keyboard Go to Settings > General > International > Keyboards. Use an international keyboard Touch and hold the Globe key on the onscreen keyboard to display a list of enabled languages, then slide your finger to choose a language. See Appendix B,“International Keyboards,” on page 132. 30 Chapter 3 BasicsAuto-correction and spell checking For many languages, iPad automatically corrects misspellings or makes suggestions as you type. When iPad suggests a word, you can accept the suggestion without interrupting your typing. Accept the suggestion: Type a space, punctuation mark, or return character. Reject a suggestion: Finish typing the word as you want it, then tap the “x” next to the suggestion. Each time you reject a suggestion for the same word, iPad becomes more likely to accept the word. iPad may also underline words you’ve already typed that might be misspelled. Replace a misspelled word Tap the word, then tap one of the alternate spellings. If the word you want doesn’t appear, just retype it. Turn auto-correction or spell checking on or off Go to Settings > General > Keyboard. Add a word to the keyboard dictionary Go to Settings > General > Keyboard. Tap Add New Shortcut. Enter the word in the Phrase field, but leave the Shortcut field blank. This adds the word to the keyboard dictionary and it won’t be identified as being misspelled when you type it. Shortcuts Shortcuts lets you type just a few characters instead of a longer word or phrase. The expanded text appears whenever you type the shortcut. For example, the shortcut “omw” expands to “On my way!” Create a shortcut: Go to Settings > General > Keyboard, then tap Add New Shortcut. To add a word or phrase to the keyboard dictionary so that iPad doesn’t try to correct or replace it, leave the Shortcut field blank. Edit a shortcut: Go to Settings > General > Keyboard, then tap the shortcut. Using an Apple Wireless Keyboard In addition to the onscreen keyboard, you can also use an Apple Wireless Keyboard with iPad. The Apple Wireless Keyboard connects using Bluetooth, so you must pair the keyboard with iPad. See “Pairing Bluetooth devices” on page 37. Once the keyboard is paired with iPad, it connects whenever the keyboard is within range (up to 33 feet or 10 meters). You can tell that the keyboard is connected if the onscreen keyboard doesn’t appear when you tap in a text field. Switch the language when using a hardware keyboard: Hold down the Command key and tap the space bar to display a list of available languages. Tap the space bar again to choose a language. Chapter 3 Basics 31Disconnect a wireless keyboard from iPad: Hold down the power button on the keyboard until the green light goes off. iPad disconnects the keyboard when it’s out of range. Unpair a wireless keyboard from iPad: In Settings, go to General > Bluetooth, tap next to the keyboard name, then tap “Forget this Device.” You can apply different layouts to a wireless keyboard. See Appendix B,“International Keyboards,” on page 132 and “Keyboard layouts” on page 30. Searching You can search iPad‘s built-in apps, including Mail, Calendar, Music, Video, Notes, and Contacts. Search an individual app, or search all the apps at once using Spotlight. Go to Search: On the main page of the Home screen, flick right or press the Home button . On the Search page, you can press the Home button to return to the main Home screen. Search iPad: On the Search page, enter text in the Search field. Search results appear automatically as you type. Tap Search to dismiss the keyboard and see more of the results. Tap an item in the results list to open it. Icons to the left of the search results let you know which app the results are from. At the top of the list, iPad shows your top hits based on previous searches. At the bottom of the list, the search results also include options to search the web or search Wikipedia. Here’s a list of the apps searched and what information is searched within each app: App What’s searched Contacts First, last, and company names Mail To, From, and Subject fields of all accounts (the text of messages isn’t searched) Calendar Event titles, invitees, locations, and notes Music Music (names of songs, artists, and albums) and the titles of podcasts, videos, and audiobooks Notes Text of notes Messages Names and text of messages Reminders Titles 32 Chapter 3 BasicsSearch also searches the names of built-in and installed apps on iPad. If you have a lot of apps, you can use Spotlight to locate and open them. Open an app from Search: Enter all or part of the app name, then tap to open the app. You can choose which apps are searched and the order they’re searched in. In Settings, go to General > Spotlight Search. Printing iPad can print wirelessly to AirPrint-enabled printers. You can print from the following iPad built-in apps:  Mail—email messages and viewable attachments  Photos and Camera—photos  Safari—webpages, PDF files, and viewable attachments  iBooks—PDF files  Notes—currently displayed note  Maps—view of map showing on the screen Other apps available from the App Store may also support AirPrint. An AirPrint-enabled printer doesn’t require printer software; it just needs to be connected to the same Wi-Fi network as iPad. If you’re not sure whether your printer is AirPrint-enabled, refer to its documentation. For more information about AirPrint, go to support.apple.com/kb/HT4356. Printing a document AirPrint uses your Wi-Fi network to send print jobs wirelessly to your printer. iPad and the printer must be on the same Wi-Fi network. Print a document: 1 Tap or (depending on the app you’re using), then tap Print. 2 Tap Select Printer to select a printer. 3 Set printer options, such as number of copies and double-sided output (if the printer supports it). Some apps also let you set a range of pages to print. 4 Tap Print. Chapter 3 Basics 33If you double-click the Home button while a document is printing, the Print Center app appears as the most recent app. A badge on the icon shows how many documents are ready to print, including the currently printing document. See the status of a print job Double-click the Home button , tap the Print Center icon, then select a print job. Cancel a print job Double-click the Home button , tap the Print Center icon, select the print job, then tap Cancel Printing. File Sharing File Sharing lets you transfer files with the Dock Connector to USB Cable between iPad and your computer, using iTunes. You can share files created with a compatible app and saved in a supported format. Apps that support file sharing appear in the File Sharing Apps list in iTunes. For each app, the Files list shows the documents that are on iPad. See the app’s documentation for how it shares files; not all apps support this feature. Transfer a file from iPad to your computer: In iTunes, go to your device’s Apps pane. In the File Sharing section, select an app from the list. On the right, select the file you want to transfer, then click “Save to.” Transfer a file from your computer to iPad: In iTunes, go to your device’s Apps pane. In the File Sharing section, select an app, then click Add. The file is immediately transferred to your device for use with the app you selected. Delete a file from iPad: In iTunes, go to your device’s Apps pane. Select the file in the Files list in the File Sharing section of the Apps pane, then press the Delete key. 34 Chapter 3 BasicsNotifications Notification Center displays all your alerts in one place, including alerts about:  Reminders  Calendar events  New mail  New messages  Friend requests (Game Center) Alerts also appear on the lock screen, or briefly at the top of the screen when you’re using iPad. You can see all current alerts in Notification Center. Show Notification Center Swipe down from the top of the screen. Respond to an alert in Notification Center Tap the alert. Respond to an alert on the lock screen Swipe the alert from left to right. Remove an alert from Notification Center Tap , then tap Clear. Set options for notifications Go to Settings > Notifications. Chapter 3 Basics 35Twitter Sign in to your Twitter account (or create a new account) in Settings to enable Tweets with attachments from the following apps:  Camera or Photos—with a photo from your Camera Roll album  Safari—with a webpage  Maps—with a location  YouTube—with a video Sign in to (or create) a Twitter account: 1 Go to Settings > Twitter. 2 Enter the user name and password for an existing account, or tap Create New Account. To add another account, tap Add Account. Tweet a photo, video, or webpage View the item, tap , then tap Tweet. If isn’t showing, tap the screen. To include your location, tap Add Location. Location Services must be on. Go to Settings > Location Services. Tweet a location in Maps Tap the location pin, tap , tap Share Location, then tap Tweet. Location Services must be on. Go to Settings > Location Services. Add Twitter user names and photos to your contacts Go to Settings > Twitter, then tap Update Contacts. Turn Twitter on or off for Photos or Safari Go to Settings > Twitter. Add your current location Add your current location Attachment Attachment Available characters remaining Available characters remaining When you’re writing a Tweet, the number in the lower-right corner of the Tweet screen shows the number of characters remaining that you can enter. Attachments use some of a Tweet’s 140 characters. You can install and use the Twitter app to post a Tweet, view your timeline, search for trending topics, and more. In Settings, go to Twitter, then tap Install. To learn how to use the Twitter app, open the app, tap the More button (…), tap Accounts & Settings, tap Settings, then tap Manual. 36 Chapter 3 BasicsUsing AirPlay You can stream music, photos, and video wirelessly to your HDTV or speakers using AirPlay and Apple TV. You can also use AirPlay to stream audio to an Airport Express or AirPort Extreme base station. Other AirPlay-enabled receivers are available from third-parties. Visit the online Apple Store for details. iPad and the AirPlay-enabled device must be on the same Wi-Fi network. Stream content to an AirPlay-enabled device: Start the video, slideshow, or music, then tap and choose the AirPlay device. Once streaming starts, you can exit the app that’s playing the content. Get quick access to the AirPlay controls When the screen is on, double-click the Home button and scroll to the left end of the multitasking bar. Switch playback back to iPad Tap and choose iPad. You can mirror the iPad screen (iPad 2 or later) on a TV with Apple TV. Everything on the iPad screen appears on the TV. Mirror the iPad screen on a TV: Tap at the left end of the multitasking bar, choose an Apple TV, and tap the Mirroring button that appears. A blue bar appears at the top of the iPad screen when AirPlay mirroring is turned on. You can also mirror the iPad screen on a TV using a cable. See “Watching videos on a TV” on page 64. Using Bluetooth devices You can use iPad with the Apple Wireless Keyboard and other Bluetooth devices, such as Bluetooth headphones. For supported Bluetooth profiles, go to support.apple.com/kb/HT3647. Pairing Bluetooth devices You must first pair a Bluetooth device (such as a keyboard or headphones) with iPad before you can use it. Pair a Bluetooth device with iPad: 1 Follow the instructions that came with the device to make it discoverable. 2 In Settings, choose General > Bluetooth, and turn Bluetooth on. 3 Select the device and, if prompted, enter the passkey or PIN number. See the instructions about the passkey or PIN that came with the device. Note: Before you pair an Apple Wireless Keyboard, press the power button to turn the keyboard on. You can pair only one Apple Wireless Keyboard with iPad at a time. To pair a different keyboard, you must first unpair the current one. After you pair the keyboard with iPad, the product name and a Bluetooth icon appear on the screen. After you pair headphones with iPad, the product name and a Bluetooth audio icon appear on the screen along with the audio or video playback controls. Tap to switch to a different audio output, such as the internal speaker. To use the onscreen keyboard again, turn off Bluetooth in Settings > General > Bluetooth, or press the Eject key on the Bluetooth keyboard. Chapter 3 Basics 37Bluetooth status The Bluetooth icon appears in the iPad status bar at the top of the screen:  (white): Bluetooth is on and paired with a device.  (gray): Bluetooth is on and paired with a device, but the device is out of range or turned off.  No Bluetooth icon: Bluetooth is turned off or not paired with a device. Unpairing a Bluetooth device from iPad If you pair iPad with one Bluetooth device and then want to use a different device of the same type instead, you must unpair the first device. Unpair a Bluetooth device: Go to Settings > General > Bluetooth, then turn Bluetooth on. Choose the device, then tap “Forget this Device.” Security features Security features help protect the information on iPad from being accessed by others. Passcodes and data protection For security, you can set up a passcode that you must enter each time you turn on or wake up iPad. Set a passcode: Go to Settings > General > Passcode Lock > Turn Passcode On. Enter a 4-digit passcode, then enter it again to verify it. iPad will require you to enter the passcode to unlock it, or to display the passcode lock settings. Setting a passcode turns on data protection, which uses your passcode as the key for encrypting mail messages and attachments stored on iPad. (Data protection may also be used by some apps available from the App Store.) A notice at the bottom of the Passcode Lock screen in Settings shows that data protection is enabled. To increase security, turn off Simple Passcode (a four-digit number) and use a more robust passcode that has a combination of numbers, letters, punctuation, and special characters. See “Auto-Lock” on page 126. Find My iPad Find My iPad can help you locate a lost or misplaced iPad using an iPhone, iPod touch, or another iPad. You can also use Find My iPad using a Mac or PC with a web browser signed in to www.icloud.com or www.me.com. Find My iPad includes:  Find on a map: View the approximate location of your iPad on a full-screen map.  Display a Message or Play a Sound: Compose a message that appears on your iPad, or play sound for two minutes.  Remote Passcode Lock: Remotely lock your iPad and create a 4-digit passcode, if you haven’t set one previously.  Remote Wipe: Protects your privacy by erasing all the information and media on your iPad and restoring iPad to its original factory settings. Important: Before you can use these features, you must turn on Find My iPad either in iCloud or in MobileMe settings on your iPad. Find My iPad can be turned on in only one account. 38 Chapter 3 BasicsTurn on Find My iPad using iCloud Go to Settings > iCloud and turn on Find My iPad. Turn on Find My iPad using MobileMe Go to Settings > Mail, Contacts, Calendars, tap your MobileMe account, then turn on Find My iPad. Find My iPad uses Wi-Fi to locate your iPad. If Wi-Fi is turned off or if your iPad isn’t connected to a Wi-Fi network, Find My iPad can’t find it. See “Using iCloud” on page 19. Chapter 3 Basics 39Safari 4 Viewing webpages View your bookmarks or Reading List. View your bookmarks or Reading List. Open a new page. Open a new page. Search the web and the current page. Search the web and the current page. Enter a web address (URL). Enter a web address (URL). Double-tap an item or pinch to zoom in or out. Double-tap an item or pinch to zoom in or out. View a webpage: Tap the address field (in the title bar), type the web address, then tap Go. You can view webpages in portrait or landscape orientation. Erase the text in the address field Tap . Scroll around a webpage Drag up, down, or sideways. Scroll within a frame on a webpage Scroll with two fingers inside the frame. Open a new page Tap . You can have up to nine pages open at a time. Go to another page Tap a tab at the top of the page. Stop a webpage from loading Tap in the address field. Reload a webpage Tap in the address field. Close a page Tap on the page’s tab. 40Protect private information and block some websites from tracking your behavior Go to Settings > Safari and turn on Private Browsing. Set options for Safari Go to Settings > Safari. Links Follow a link on a webpage: Tap the link. Open a link in a new tab Touch and hold the link, then tap “Open in New Tab.” See a link’s destination address Touch and hold the link. Detected data—such as phone numbers and email addresses—may also appear as links in webpages. Touch and hold a link to see the available options. See “Using links and detected data” on page 45. Reading List Reading List lets you collect links to webpages to read later. Add a link to the current page to your reading list: Tap , then tap “Add to Reading List.” Add a link to your reading list: Touch and hold the link, then choose “Add to Reading List.” View your reading list Tap , then tap Reading List. Use iCloud to keep your reading list up to date on your iOS devices and computers Go to Settings > iCloud, then turn on Bookmarks. See “Using iCloud” on page 19. Reader Reader displays web articles without ads or clutter, so you can read without distractions. On a webpage with an article, you can use Reader to view just the article. View an article in Reader: Tap the Reader button, if it appears in the address field. Adjust the font size Tap . Bookmark, add to Reading List or Home Screen, share, or print the article Tap . Return to normal view Tap Reader. Entering text and filling out forms Enter text: Tap a text field to bring up the keyboard. Move to another text field Tap the text field, or tap Next or Previous. Submit a form Tap Go or Search, or the link on the page to submit the form, if available. To enable AutoFill to help fill out forms, go to Settings > Safari > AutoFill. Chapter 4 Safari 41Searching The search field in the upper-right corner lets you search the web, and the current page or PDF. Search the web, and the current page or searchable PDF: Enter text in the search field.  To search the web: Tap one of the suggestions that appear, or tap Search.  To find the search text on the current page or PDF: Scroll to the bottom of the screen, then tap the entry below On This Page. The first instance is highlighted. To find later occurrences, tap . Change the search engine Go to Settings > Safari > Search Engine. Bookmarks and history When you save a bookmark, you can edit its title. Bookmarks are normally saved at the top level of Bookmarks. Tap Bookmarks to choose another folder. Bookmark a webpage: Open the page, tap , then tap Add Bookmark. View previous webpages (history): Tap , then tap History. To clear the history, tap Clear. Open a bookmarked webpage Tap . Display the bookmarks bar Tap the address field. To always show the bookmarks bar, go to Settings > Safari, under General. Edit a bookmark or bookmark folder Tap , choose the folder that has the bookmark or folder you want to edit, then tap Edit. Use iCloud to keep bookmarks up to date on your iOS devices and computers Go to Settings > iCloud, then turn on Bookmarks. See “Using iCloud” on page 19. Sync bookmarks with the web browser on your computer See “Syncing with iTunes” on page 20. Printing webpages, PDFs, and other documents Print a webpage, PDF, or Quick Look document: Tap , then tap Print. For more information, see “Printing a document” on page 33. Web clips You can create web clips, which appear as icons on the Home screen. When you open a web clip, Safari automatically zooms to the part of the webpage that was showing at the time you saved the web clip. Add a web clip: Open the webpage and tap . Then tap “Add to Home Screen.” Unless the webpage has a custom icon, that image is also used for the web clip icon on the Home screen. Web clips are backed up by iCloud and by iTunes, but they aren’t synced by iTunes or MobileMe. They also aren’t pushed to other devices by iCloud. 42 Chapter 4 SafariMail 5 Checking and reading email In Mail, the Mailboxes screen provides quick access to all your inboxes and other mailboxes. When you open a mailbox, Mail retrieves and displays the most recent messages. You can set the number of messages retrieved, in Mail settings. See “Mail accounts and settings” on page 46. Swipe to reveal the message list. Swipe to reveal the message list. Fetch new mail. Fetch new mail. Reveal the message list In portrait mode, swipe from left to right to show the message list for the current mailbox. Then tap Mailboxes to go to the mailboxes list. Organize messages by thread Go to Settings > Mail, Contacts, Calendars. If you organize messages by thread, related messages appear as a single entry in the mailbox. See “Mail accounts and settings” on page 46. Check for new messages Choose a mailbox, or tap at any time. Load more messages Scroll to the bottom of the message list and tap Load More Messages. 43Zoom in on part of a message Double-tap an area of the message. Double-tap again to zoom out. Or pinch apart or together to zoom in or out. Resize a column of text to fit the screen Double-tap the text. See all the recipients of a message Tap Details. Tap a name or email address to see the recipient’s contact information. Then tap a phone number or email address to contact the person. Add an email recipient to your contacts list Tap the message and, if necessary, tap Details to see the recipients. Then tap a name or email address and tap Create New Contact or “Add to Existing Contact.” Flag or mark a message as unread Open the message and, if necessary, tap Details. Then tap Mark. To mark multiple messages as unread, see “Organizing mail” on page 46. Open a meeting invitation Tap the invitation. See “Responding to invitations” on page 70. Working with multiple accounts If you set up more than one account, the Accounts section of the Mailboxes screen lets you access those accounts. You can also tap All Inboxes to see all of your incoming messages in a single list. For information about adding accounts, see “Mail accounts and settings” on page 46. When you compose a new message, tap the From field and select the account to send the message from. Sending mail You can send an email message to anyone who has an email address. Compose a message: Tap . Add a recipient from Contacts Type a name or email address in the To field, or tap . Rearrange recipients To move a recipient from one field to another, such as from To to Cc, drag the recipient’s name to the new location. Make text bold, italic, or underlined Tap the insertion point to display the selection buttons, then tap Select. Drag the points to select the text that you want to style. Tap , then tap B/I/U. Tap Bold, Italic, or Underline to apply the style. Send a photo or video in an email message In Photos, choose a photo or video, tap , then tap Email Photo or Email Video. You can also copy and paste photos and videos. To send multiple photos or videos, tap while viewing thumbnails in an album. Tap to select the photos and videos, tap Share, then tap Email. Save a draft of a message to finish later Tap Cancel, then tap Save. The message is saved in the Drafts mailbox. Touch and hold to quickly access it. Reply to a message Tap , then tap Reply. Files or images attached to the initial message aren’t sent back. To include the attachments, forward it instead of replying. Quote a portion of the message you’re replying to or forwarding Touch and hold to select text. Drag the grab points to select the text you want to include in your reply, then tap . To change the indentation of quoted text, touch and hold to select text, then tap . Tap Quote Level, then tap Increase or Decrease. Forward a message Open a message and tap , then tap Forward. Share contact information In Contacts, choose a contact, tap Share Contact at the bottom of the Info screen. 44 Chapter 5 MailUsing links and detected data iPad detects web links, phone numbers, email addresses, dates, and other types of information that you can use to open a webpage, create a pre-addressed email message, create or add information to a contact, or perform some other useful action. Detected data appears as blue underlined text. Tap the data to use its default action, or touch and hold to see other actions. For example, for an address, you can display the location in Maps, or add it to Contacts. Viewing attachments iPad displays image attachments in many commonly used formats (JPEG, GIF, and TIFF) inline with the text in email messages. iPad can play many types of audio attachments, such as MP3, AAC, WAV, and AIFF. You can download and view files (such as PDF, webpage, text, Pages, Keynote, Numbers, Microsoft Word, Excel, and PowerPoint documents) that are attached to messages you receive. View an attached file: Tap the attachment to open it in Quick Look. You may need to wait while it downloads before viewing. Open an attached file Touch and hold the attachment, then choose an app to open it. If none of your apps support the file, and it isn’t one that Quick Look supports, you can see the name of the file but you can’t open it. Save an attached photo or video Touch and hold the photo or video, then tap Save Image or Video. The item is saved to your Camera Roll album in the Photos app. Quick Look supports the following document types: .doc, .docx Microsoft Word .htm, .html webpage .key Keynote .numbers Numbers .pages Pages .pdf Preview, Adobe Acrobat .ppt, .pptx Microsoft PowerPoint .rtf Rich Text Format .txt text .vcf contact information .xls, .xlsx Microsoft Excel Printing messages and attachments You can print email messages, and attachments that can be viewed in Quick Look. Print an email message: Tap , then tap Print. Print an inline image Touch and hold the image, then tap Save Image. Then open Photos and print the image from your Camera Roll album. Print an attachment Tap the attachment to view it in Quick Look, then tap and tap Print. For more information, see “Printing” on page 33. Chapter 5 Mail 45Organizing mail You can organize messages in any mailbox, folder, or search results window. You can delete or mark messages as read. You can also move messages from one mailbox or folder to another in the same account or between different accounts. You can add, delete, or rename mailboxes and folders. Delete a message: Open the message and tap . You can also delete a message directly from the mailbox message list by swiping left or right over the message title, then tapping Delete. Some mail accounts support archiving messages instead of deleting them. When you archive a message, it’s moved from your Inbox to All Mail. Turn archiving on or off in Settings > Mail, Contacts, Calendars. Recover a message Deleted messages are moved to the Trash mailbox. To change how long a message stays in the Trash before being deleted permanently, go to Settings > Mail, Contacts, Calendars. Then tap Advanced. Delete or move multiple messages While viewing a list of messages, tap Edit, select the messages you want to delete, then tap Move or Delete. Move a message to another mailbox or folder While viewing a message, tap , then choose a mailbox or folder. Add a mailbox Go to the mailboxes list, tap Edit, then tap New Mailbox. Delete or rename a mailbox Go to the mailboxes list, tap Edit, then tap a mailbox. Enter a new name or location for the mailbox. Tap Delete Mailbox to delete it and all its contents. Flag and mark multiple messages as read While viewing a list of messages, tap Edit, select the messages you want, then tap Mark. Choose either Flag or Mark as Read. Searching mail You can search the To, From, Subject and body text of email messages. Mail searches the downloaded messages in the current mailbox. For iCloud, Exchange, and some IMAP mail accounts, you can also search messages on the server. Search email messages: Open a mailbox, scroll to the top, and enter text in the Search field. Tap From, To, Subject, or All to choose which fields you want to search. If your mail account supports it, messages on the server are also searched. Mail messages can also be included in searches from the Home screen. See “Searching”on page 32. Mail accounts and settings Accounts For Mail and for your mail account settings, go to Settings > Mail, Contacts, Calendars. You can set up:  iCloud  Microsoft Exchange  Gmail  Yahoo!  AOL  Microsoft Hotmail  MobileMe  Other POP and IMAP mail systems 46 Chapter 5 MailSome settings depend on the type of account you’re setting up. Your service provider or system administrator can provide the information you need to enter. Change an account’s settings: Go to Settings > Mail, Contacts, Calendars, choose an account, then make the changes you want. Stop using an account Go to Settings > Mail, Contacts, Calendars, choose an account, then turn off an account service (such as Mail, Calendars, or Notes). If an account service is off, iPad doesn’t display or sync information with the account service until you turn it back on. This is a good way to stop receiving work email while on vacation, for example. Store drafts, sent messages, and deleted messages on iPad For IMAP accounts, you can change where these messages are stored. Go to Settings > Mail, Contacts, Calendars, choose an IMAP account, then tap Advanced. Choose a location for Draft Mailbox, Sent Mailbox, or Deleted Mailbox. Set how long before messages are removed permanently from Mail Go to Settings > Mail, Contacts, Calendars, choose an account, then tap Advanced. Tap Remove, then choose a time: Never, or after one day, one week, or one month. Adjust email server settings Go to Settings > Mail, Contacts, Calendars, then choose an account. Ask your network administrator or Internet service provider for the correct settings. Adjust SSL and password settings Go to Settings > Mail, Contacts, Calendars, choose an account, then tap Advanced. Ask your network administrator or Internet service provider for the correct settings. Turn Archive Messages on or off Go to Settings > Mail, Contacts, Calendars, then choose an account. See “Organizing mail” on page 46. Delete an account Go to Settings > Mail, Contacts, Calendars, choose an account, then scroll down and tap Delete Account. All email and the contacts, calendar, and bookmark information synced with the account are removed from iPad. Send signed and encrypted messages Go to Settings > Mail, Contacts, Calendars, choose an account, then tap Advanced. Turn on S/MIME, then select certificates for signing and encrypting outgoing messages. To install certificates, obtain a configuration profile from your system administrator, download the certificates from the issuer’s website using Safari, or receive them in Mail attachments. Set Push settings Go to Settings > Mail, Contacts, Calendars > Fetch New Data. Push delivers new information when iPad is connected to the Internet (some delays may occur). You might want to turn Push off to suspend delivery of email and other information, or to conserve battery life. When Push is off, use the Fetch New Data setting to determine how often data is requested. For optimal battery life, don’t fetch too often. Mail settings To change settings that apply to all of your accounts, go to Settings > Mail, Contacts, Calendars. Change the tones played when mail is sent or received: Go to Settings > Sounds. Chapter 5 Mail 47Messages 6 Sending and receiving messages Using the Messages app and the built-in iMessage service, you can send text messages over Wi-Fi or cellular data connections to other iOS 5 users. Messages can include photos, videos, and other info, let you see when the other person is typing, and let others be notified when you’ve read their messages. Because iMessages are displayed on all of your iOS 5 devices logged in to the same account, you can start a conversation on one of your devices, then continue it on another device. iMessages are also encrypted. Note: Cellular data charges or additional fees may apply. Send a text message: Tap , then tap and choose a contact, search your contacts by entering a name, or enter a phone number or email address manually. Enter the message, then tap Send. Note: An alert badge appears if a message can’t be sent. If the alert appears in the address field, make sure you enter the name, phone number, or email address of another iOS 5 user. In a conversation, tap the alert to try sending the message again. Conversations are saved in the Messages list. A blue dot indicates unread messages. Tap a conversation to view or continue it. In an iMessage conversation, your outgoing messages are highlighted in blue. Tap the edit button to edit or forward a conversation. Tap the edit button to edit or forward a conversation. Tap the compose button to start a new conversation. Tap the compose button to start a new conversation. Tap the Attach Media button to include a photo or video. Tap the Attach Media button to include a photo or video. 48Use emoji characters Go to Settings > General > Keyboard > International Keyboards > Add New Keyboard, then tap Emoji to make that keyboard available. To enter emoji characters when typing a message, tap to bring up the Emoji keyboard. See “Switching keyboards” on page 132. Hide keyboard Tap in the lower-right corner. Resume a previous conversation Tap the conversation in the Messages list, then enter a message and tap Send. Display earlier messages in the conversation Tap the status bar to scroll to the top, then tap Load Earlier Messages. Receive iMessages using another email address Go to Settings > Messages > Receive At > Add Another Email. Follow a link in a message Tap the link. A link may open a webpage in Safari, or let you add a phone number to your contacts, for example. Forward a conversation Select a conversation, then tap . Select parts to include, then tap Forward. Add someone to your contacts list, or share a contact Tap a phone number or email address in the Messages list, then tap . Notify others when you’ve read their messages Go to Settings > Messages and turn on Send Read Receipts. Set other options for Messages Go to Settings > Messages. Manage notifications for messages See “Notifications” on page 121. Set the alert sound for incoming text messages See “Sounds” on page 125. Sending messages to a group Group messaging lets you send a message to multiple recipients. Send messages to a group: Tap , then enter multiple recipients. Sending photos, videos, and more You can send photos, videos, locations, contact info, and voice memos. Send a photo or video: Tap . The size limit of attachments is determined by your service provider. iPad may compress photo and video attachments, if necessary. Send a location In Maps, tap for a location, tap Share Location, then tap Message. Send contact info In Contacts, choose a contact, tap Share Contact (below Notes), then tap Send Message. Save a photo or video you receive to your Camera Roll album Tap the photo or video, tap , then tap Save Image. Copy a photo or video Touch and hold the attachment, then tap Copy. Save contact info you receive Tap the contact bubble, then tap Create New Contact or “Add to Existing Contact.” Chapter 6 Messages 49Editing conversations If you want to keep just part of a conversation, you can delete the parts you don’t want. You can also delete entire conversations from the Messages list. Edit a conversation: Tap Edit, select the parts to delete, then tap Delete. Clear all text and attachments, without deleting the conversation Tap Edit, then tap Clear All. Delete a conversation Swipe the conversation, then tap Delete. Searching messages You can search the content of conversations in the Messages list. Search a conversation: Tap the search field, then enter the text you’re looking for. You can also search conversations from the Home screen. See “Searching” on page 32. 50 Chapter 6 MessagesCamera 7 About Camera If you have an iPad 2 or later, you can take both still photos and videos. There’s a camera on the back, and a front camera for FaceTime and self-portraits. View the photos and videos you’ve taken. View the photos and videos you’ve taken. Start and stop video recording. Start and stop video recording. Camera/ Video switch Camera/ Video switch If Location Services is turned on, photos and videos are tagged with location data that can be used by some apps and photo-sharing websites. See “Location Services” on page 122. Note: If Location Services is turned off when you open Camera, you may be asked to turn it on. You can use Camera without Location Services. 51Taking photos and videos Take a photo: Make sure the Camera/Video switch is set to , then aim iPad and tap . You can also take a photo by pressing the Volume Up button. Record a video: Slide the Camera/Video switch to , then tap to start or stop recording, or press the Volume Up button. When you take a photo or start a video recording, iPad makes a shutter sound. You can control the volume with the Volume buttons or the Side Switch. Note: In some areas, the shutter sound isn’t silenced by the Side Switch. A rectangle briefly appears where the camera is focused and setting the exposure. When you photograph people, iPad (3rd generation) uses face detection to automatically focus on and balance the exposure across up to 10 faces. A rectangle appears over each detected face. Zoom in or out Pinch the screen (back camera, in camera mode only). Turn on the grid Tap Options. Set the exposure Tap the person or object on the screen. Lock the exposure Touch and hold the screen until the rectangle pulses. AE Lock appears on the screen, and the exposure remains locked until you tap the screen again. Take a screenshot Press and release the Sleep/Wake button and the Home button at the same time. The screenshot is added to your Camera Roll album. Note: On an iPad without a camera, screenshots are added to the Saved Photos album. Viewing, sharing, and printing The photos and videos you take with Camera are saved in your Camera Roll album. View your Camera Roll album: Flick from left to right, or tap the thumbnail image in the lower-left corner of the screen. You can also view your Camera Roll album in the Photos app. To take more photos or videos, tap Done. If you have iCloud Photo Stream turned on in Settings > iCloud, new photos also appear in your Photo Stream album, and are streamed to your other iOS devices and computers. See “Using iCloud” on page 19. For more information about viewing and sharing photos and videos, see “Sharing photos and videos” on page 61 and “Uploading photos and videos to your computer” on page 53. Show or hide the controls while viewing a full-screen photo or video Tap the screen. Email or text a photo or video Tap . Tweet a photo View the photo full-screen, tap , then tap Tweet. To post a Tweet, you must be logged in to your Twitter account. Go to Settings > Twitter. To include your location, tap Add Location. Print a photo Tap . See “Printing a document” on page 33. Delete a photo or video Tap . 52 Chapter 7 CameraEditing photos You can rotate, enhance, remove red-eye, and crop photos. Enhancing improves a photo’s overall darkness or lightness, color saturation, and other qualities. Auto enhance Auto enhance Crop Crop Rotate Rotate Remove red-eye Remove red-eye Edit a photo: While viewing a photo full-screen, tap Edit, then choose a tool. With the red-eye tool, tap each eye to correct it. To crop, drag the corners of the grid, drag the photo to reposition it, then tap Crop. You can also tap Constrain when cropping, to set a specific ratio. Trimming videos You can trim the frames from the beginning and end of a video that you just recorded, or from any other video in your Camera Roll album. You can replace the original video, or save the trimmed version as a new video clip. Trim a video: While viewing a video, tap the screen to display the controls. Drag either end of the frame viewer at the top of the video, then tap Trim. Important: If you choose Trim Original, the trimmed frames are permanently deleted from the original video. If you choose “Save as New Clip,” a new trimmed video clip is saved in your Camera Roll album, leaving the original video unaffected. Uploading photos and videos to your computer You can upload the photos and videos you take with Camera to photo applications on your computer, such as iPhoto on a Mac. Upload photos and videos to your computer: Connect iPad to your computer using the Dock Connector to USB Cable.  Mac: Select the photos and videos you want, then click the Import or Download button in iPhoto or other supported photo application on your computer.  PC: Follow the instructions that came with your photo application. If you delete the photos and videos from iPad when you upload them to your computer, they’re removed from your Camera Roll album. You can use the Photos settings pane in iTunes to sync photos and videos to the Photos app on iPad (videos can be synced only with a Mac). See “Syncing with iTunes” on page 20. Chapter 7 Camera 53Photo Stream With Photo Stream—a feature of iCloud—photos you take on iPad are automatically uploaded to iCloud and pushed to all your other devices that have Photo Stream enabled. Photos uploaded to iCloud from your other devices and computers are pushed to your Photo Stream album on iPad. See “Using iCloud” on page 19. Turn on Photo Stream: Go to Settings > iCloud > Photo Stream. New photos you’ve taken are uploaded to your Photo Stream when you leave the Camera app and iPad is connected to the Internet via Wi-Fi. Any other photos added to your Camera Roll— including photos downloaded from email and text messages, and images saved from web pages, Photo Booth, and screenshots—are also uploaded to your Photo Stream and pushed to your other devices. Photo Stream can share up to 1000 of your most recent photos across your iOS devices. Your computers can keep all your Photo Stream photos permanently. Save photos to iPad from Photo Stream In your Photo Stream album, tap , select the photos you want to save, then tap Save. Delete a photo from iCloud In your Photo Stream album, select the photo, then tap . Delete multiple photos from iCloud In your Photo Stream album, tap , select the photos you want to delete, then tap Delete. Note: To delete photos from Photo Stream, you need iOS 5.1 or later on iPad and all of your other iOS devices. For more information, see support.apple.com/kb/HT4486. Although deleted photos are removed from the Photo Stream on your devices, the original remains in the Camera Roll (or Saved Photos) album on the device the photo originated from. 54 Chapter 7 CameraFaceTime 8 About FaceTime FaceTime lets you make video calls over Wi-Fi. Use the front camera to talk face-to-face, or the back camera to share what you see around you. To use FaceTime, you need iPad 2 or later and a Wi-Fi connection to the Internet. See “Network”on page 125. The person you call must also have an iOS device or computer that works with FaceTime. Note: FaceTime may not be available in all areas. Drag your image to any corner. Drag your image to any corner. Switch cameras. Switch cameras. Mute (you can hear and see; the caller can see but not hear). Mute (you can hear and see; the caller can see but not hear). 55Making a FaceTime call To make a FaceTime call, choose someone from your contacts or favorites, or list of recent calls. When you open FaceTime, you may be prompted to sign in using your Apple ID, or to create a new account. Call a contact: Tap Contacts, choose a name, then tap the phone number or email address the person uses for FaceTime. FaceTime must be turned on in Settings > FaceTime. Restart a recent call Tap Recents, then choose the call from the list. Add a favorite Tap Favorites, then tap , choose a contact and select the phone number or email address that the person uses for FaceTime. Call a favorite Tap Favorites, then tap a name in the list. Add a contact Tap Contacts, then tap . For a contact outside your region, be sure to enter the complete number, including country code and area code. Set options for FaceTime Go to Settings > FaceTime. While on a FaceTime call While talking to someone using FaceTime, you can switch cameras, change the orientation of iPad, mute your microphone, move your picture-in-picture display, open another app, and finally, end your call. Switch between the front and back cameras Tap . Change the orientation of iPad Rotate iPad. The image your friend sees changes to match. To avoid unwanted orientation changes as you move, lock the iPad orientation. See “Viewing in portrait or landscape” on page 15. Mute the call Tap . Your friend can still see you, and you can still see and hear your friend. Move your picture-in-picture display Drag the inset window to any corner. Use another app during a call Press the Home button , then tap an app icon. You can still talk with your friend, but you can’t see each other. To return to the call, tap the green bar at the top of the screen. End the call Tap . 56 Chapter 8 FaceTimePhoto Booth 9 About Photo Booth If you have an iPad 2 or later, it’s easy to take a photo using Photo Booth. Make your photo more interesting by applying an effect when you take it. Photo Booth works with both the front and back cameras. Selecting an effect Before you take a picture, you can select an effect to apply. Select an effect: Tap , then tap the effect you want. Distort an image: If you select a distortion effect, drag your finger across the screen to change the distortion. You can also pinch, swipe, or rotate the image to change the distortion. 57Taking a photo To take a Photo Booth photo, just aim iPad and tap. Take a photo: Aim iPad and tap . When you take a photo, iPad makes a shutter sound. You can use the volume buttons on the side of the iPad to control the volume of the shutter sound. You won’t hear a sound if you set the Side Switch to silent. See “Buttons” on page 10. Note: In some regions, sound effects are played even if the Side Switch is set to silent. Switch between the front and back cameras: Tap at the bottom of the screen. Review the photo you’ve just taken: Tap the thumbnail of your last shot. Swipe left or right to view more thumbnails. If you don’t see the controls, tap the screen to display them. Delete a photo: Select a thumbnail, then tap . Manage photos: Tap one or more thumbnails. Tap , then tap Email, Copy, or Delete. Viewing and sharing photos The photos you take with Photo Booth are saved in your Camera Roll album in the Photos app on iPad. View photos in your Camera Roll album: In Photos, tap your Camera Roll album. To flip through the photos, tap the left or right button, or swipe left or right. See “Viewing photos and videos” on page 59. You can use Mail to send a Photo Booth photo in an email message. Email a photo: Tap a thumbnail to select the photo, or tap again to select more than one photo. Tap , then tap the Email button at the bottom of the screen. Mail opens and creates a new message with the photo attached. Uploading photos to your computer Upload the photos you take with Photo Booth to photo applications on your computer, such as iPhoto on a Mac. Upload photos to your computer: Connect iPad to your computer using the Dock Connector to USB cable.  Mac: Select the photos to upload, then click the Import or Download button in iPhoto or other supported photo application on your computer.  PC: Follow the instructions that came with your photo application. If you delete the photos from iPad when you upload them to your computer, they’re removed from your Camera Roll album. You can use the Photos settings pane in iTunes to sync photos to the Photos app on iPad. 58 Chapter 9 Photo BoothPhotos 10 Viewing photos and videos Photos lets you view photos, and videos that you capture on or sync to iPad, in your:  Camera Roll album—photos and videos you take with the built-in camera, or save from an email, text message, webpage, or screenshot  Photo Stream album—photos streamed from iCloud (see “Photo Stream” on page 54)  Last Import album—photos and videos imported from a digital camera, iOS device, or SD memory card (see “Importing photos and videos” on page 62)  Photo Library and other albums synced from your computer (see “Syncing with iTunes” on page 20) Note: On an iPad without a camera, the Camera Roll album is named Saved Photos. Select a photo to view. Select a photo to view. Edit the photo. Edit the photo. Play a slideshow. Play a slideshow. Delete the photo. Delete the photo. Stream slideshow to an HDTV using AirPlay. Stream slideshow to an HDTV using AirPlay. Share the photo, assign it to a contact, use it as wallpaper, or print it. Share the photo, assign it to a contact, use it as wallpaper, or print it. Tap the screen to display the controls. Tap the screen to display the controls. 59View photos and videos: Tap one of the buttons at the top of the screen. For example, tap Album, then tap an album to see its thumbnails. Tap a thumbnail to see the photo or video full-screen. You can also pinch to open or close an album, view a photo or video full-screen, or return to thumbnail view. Albums you sync with iPhoto 8.0 (iLife ’09) or later, or Aperture v3.0.2 or later, can be viewed by events or by faces. You can also view photos by location, if they were taken with a camera that supports geotagging. Show or hide the controls Tap the full-screen photo or video. See the next or previous photo or video Flick left or right. Zoom in or out Double-tap or pinch. Pan a photo Drag the photo. Play a video Tap in the center of the screen. Stream a video to an HDTV See “Using AirPlay” on page 37. Edit photos or trim videos See “Editing photos” or “Trimming videos” on page 53. Viewing slideshows View a slideshow: Tap Slideshow. Select slideshow options, then tap Start Slideshow. Stream a slideshow to an HDTV See “Using AirPlay” on page 37. Stop a slideshow Tap the screen. Set additional options Go to Settings > Photos. Organizing photos and videos You can create, rename, and delete albums on iPad to help you organize your photos and videos. Create an album: When viewing albums, tap Edit, then tap Add. Select photos to add to the new album, then tap Done. Note: Albums created on iPad aren’t synced back to your computer. Rename an album Tap Edit, then select an album. Rearrange albums Tap Edit, then drag up or down. Delete an album Tap Edit, then tap . 60 Chapter 10 PhotosSharing photos and videos Send a photo or video in an email, text message, or Tweet: Choose a photo or video, then tap . If you don’t see , tap the screen to show the controls. To post a Tweet, you must be logged in to your Twitter account. Go to Settings > Twitter. The size limit of attachments is determined by your service provider. iPad may compress photo and video attachments, if necessary. Send multiple photos or videos While viewing thumbnails, tap , select the photos or videos, then tap Share. Copy a photo or video Tap , then tap Copy. Copy multiple photos or videos Tap , select the photos and videos, then tap Copy. Paste a photo or video in an email or text message Touch and hold where you want to place the photo or video, then tap Paste. Save a photo or video from an email message Tap to download the item if necessary, tap the photo or touch and hold the video, then tap Save. Save a photo or video from a text message Tap the image in the conversation, tap , than tap Save. Save a photo from a webpage Touch and hold the photo, then tap Save Image. Photos and videos that you receive, or that you save from a webpage, are saved to your Camera Roll album (or to Saved Photos, on an iPad with no camera). Printing photos Print a photo: Tap , then tap Print. Print multiple photos: While viewing a photo album, tap . Select the photos you want to print, then tap Print. For more information, see “Printing” on page 33. Using Picture Frame When iPad is locked, you can display a slideshow of all, or selected albums, of your photos. Start Picture Frame: Press the Sleep/Wake button to lock iPad, press the button again to turn the screen on, then tap . Pause the slideshow Tap the screen. Stop the slideshow Pause the slideshow, then tap . Set options for Picture Frame Go to Settings > Picture Frame. Turn off Picture Frame Go to Settings > General > Passcode Lock. Chapter 10 Photos 61Importing photos and videos With the iPad Camera Connection Kit (sold separately), you can import photos and videos directly from a digital camera, another iOS device with a camera, or from an SD memory card. Import photos: 1 Insert the SD Card Reader or Camera Connector, included in the iPad Camera Connection Kit, into the iPad dock connector.  To connect a camera or iOS device: Use the USB cable that came with the camera or iOS device, and connect it to the USB port on the Camera Connector. If you’re using an iOS device, make sure it’s turned on and unlocked. To connect a camera, make sure the camera is turned on and in transfer mode. For more information, see the documentation that came with the camera.  To use an SD memory card: Insert the card in the slot on the SD Card Reader. Don’t force the card into the slot; it fits only one way. For more information, see the iPad Camera Connection Kit documentation. 2 Unlock iPad. 3 The Photos app opens and displays the photos and videos that are available for importing. 4 Select the photos and videos you want to import.  To import all the items: Tap Import All.  To import just some of the items: Tap the ones you want to include (a checkmark appears on each), tap Import, then select Import Selected. 5 After the photos are imported, keep or delete the photos and videos on the card, camera, or iOS device. 6 Disconnect the SD Card Reader or Camera Connector. To view the photos, look in the Last Import album. A new Event contains all the photos that were selected for import. To transfer the photos to your computer, connect iPad to your computer and import the images with a photo application such as iPhoto or Adobe Elements. 62 Chapter 10 PhotosVideos 11 About Videos You can use iPad to view movies, music videos, video podcasts, and, if they’re available in your area, TV shows. iPad also supports special features such as chapters, subtitles, alternate audio, and closed captioning. You can rent or purchase videos from the iTunes Store, and you can use a video adapter cable to watch videos on a TV or projector. If you have an Apple TV, you can use AirPlay to watch the videos wirelessly on a TV. Playing videos Play a video: Tap Videos, then tap a category of videos, such as Movies. Tap the video you want to watch. If the video has chapters, tap Chapters, and then tap a chapter title, or just tap . Cars 2 Cars 2 © Disney/Pixar. © Disney/Pixar. Drag to skip forward or back. Drag to skip forward or back. Tap the video to show or hide the controls. Tap the video to show or hide the controls. Watch the video on a TV with Apple TV. Watch the video on a TV with Apple TV. Drag to adjust the volume. Drag to adjust the volume. Show or hide the playback controls While a video is playing, tap the screen. Adjust the volume Drag the volume slider, or use the volume buttons on the side of iPad or the buttons on a compatible headset. Watch widescreen Rotate iPad. Scale a video to fill the screen or fit to the screen Double-tap the screen. Or, tap to make the video fill the screen, or tap to make it fit the screen. 63Pause or resume playback Tap or , or press the center button (or equivalent button) on a compatible headset. Start over from the beginning If the video contains chapters, drag the playhead along the scrubber bar all the way to the left. If there are no chapters, tap . If you’re less than 5 seconds into the video, the previous video in your library opens. Skip to a specific chapter Tap Done, tap Chapters, then choose a chapter. (Not always available.) Skip to the next chapter Tap or press the center button (or equivalent button) on a compatible headset twice quickly. (Not always available.) Skip to the previous chapter Tap or press the center button (or equivalent button) on a compatible headset three times quickly. If you’re less than 5 seconds into the video, the previous video in your library opens. (Not always available.) Rewind or fast-forward Touch and hold or . Skip to any point in a video Drag the playhead along the scrubber bar. Slide your finger down to adjust the scrub rate from fast to slow. Stop watching a video Tap Done. Play a video on Apple TV using AirPlay Tap and choose an Apple TV. See “Watching videos on a TV” on page 64. Select a different audio language Tap , then choose a language from the Audio list. (Not always available.) Show or hide subtitles Tap , then choose a language, or Off, from the Subtitles list. (Not always available.) Show or hide closed captioning Go to Settings > Video. (Not always available.) Watching rented movies You can rent movies in standard-definition or high-definition format from the iTunes Store and watch them on iPad. You can download rented movies to iPad, or transfer them to iPad from iTunes on your computer. (Rented movies aren’t available in all areas.) A movie must be completely downloaded before you can watch it. You can pause a download and continue it later. Rented movies expire after a certain number of days, and once you start a movie, you have a limited amount of time to finish watching it. Movies are automatically deleted when they expire. Before renting a movie, check the iTunes Store for the expiration time. View a rented movie: Tap Movies, tap the video you want to watch, then select a chapter or just tap . If you don’t see the video in your list, it might still be downloading. Transfer rented movies to iPad: Connect iPad to your computer. Then select iPad in the iTunes sidebar, click Movies, and select the rented movies you want to transfer. Your computer must be connected to the Internet. Movies rented on iPad cannot be transferred to a computer. Watching videos on a TV You can stream videos wirelessly to your TV using AirPlay and Apple TV, or connect iPad to your TV using one of the following cables:  Apple Digital AV Adapter and an HDMI cable  Apple Component AV Cable  Apple Composite AV Cable  Apple VGA Adapter and a VGA cable Apple cables are available for purchase in many countries. Go to www.apple.com/store or check with your local Apple retailer. 64 Chapter 11 VideosStream videos using AirPlay: Start video playback, then tap and choose your Apple TV from the list of AirPlay devices. If doesn’t appear or if you don’t see Apple TV in the list of AirPlay devices, make sure it’s on the same wireless network as iPad. For more information, see “Using AirPlay” on page 37. While video is playing, you can exit Videos and use other apps. To return playback to iPad, tap and choose iPad. Stream videos using a cable: Use the cable to connect iPad to your TV or AV receiver and select the corresponding input. Connect using an Apple Digital AV Adapter Attach the Apple Digital AV Adapter to the iPad Dock connector. Use an HDMI cable to connect the HDMI port of the adapter to your TV or receiver. To keep iPad charged while watching videos, use an Apple Dock Connector to USB Cable to connect the 30-pin port of the adapter to your iPad 10W USB Power Adapter. Connect using an AV cable Use the Apple Component AV Cable, Apple Composite AV Cable, or other authorized iPad-compatible cable. You can also use these cables with the Apple Universal Dock to connect iPad to your TV. You can use the dock’s remote to control playback. Connect using a VGA Adapter Attach the VGA Adapter to the iPad Dock connector. Connect the VGA Adapter with a VGA cable to a compatible TV, projector, or VGA display. With iPad 2 or later, when the cable is connected to a TV or projector, the iPad screen is automatically mirrored on the external display at a resolution of up to 1080p, and videos play at a resolution of up to 1080p. Some apps such as Keynote may use the external display as a second video monitor. With previous iPad models, only certain apps (including YouTube, Videos, and Photos) can use the external display. With iPad 2 or later, you can also mirror the screen on a TV wirelessly, using AirPlay Mirroring and Apple TV. See “Using AirPlay” on page 37. If you use the Apple Digital AV Adapter or the Apple Component AV Cable, high-resolution videos are shown in HD quality. Deleting videos from iPad To save space, you can delete videos from iPad. Delete a video: In the videos list, tap and hold a movie until the delete button appears, then tap . Tap Cancel or Home when you finish deleting videos. When you delete a video (other than rented movies) from iPad, it isn’t deleted from your iTunes library on your computer, and you can sync the video back to iPad later. If you don’t want to sync the video back to iPad, set iTunes to not sync the video. See “Syncing with iTunes” on page 20. Important: If you delete a rented movie from iPad, it’s deleted permanently and can’t be transferred back to your computer. Using Home Sharing Home Sharing lets you play music, movies, and TV shows on iPad from the iTunes library on your Mac or PC. See “Home Sharing” on page 89. Chapter 11 Videos 65YouTube 12 About YouTube YouTube lets you watch short videos submitted by people from around the world. Some YouTube features require a YouTube account. To set up an account, go to www.youtube.com. To use YouTube, iPad must have an Internet connection. See “Network” on page 125. Note: YouTube isn’t available in all languages and locations. Browsing and searching for videos Browse videos: Tap any browse button at the bottom of the screen. Search for a video Tap the search field, type a word or phrase, and tap Search. See more videos from this YouTube user While watching full-screen, tap the screen to see the controls, and then tap . In the sidebar, tap “More From.” You must be signed in to a YouTube account. See videos similar to this one In the sidebar, tap “Related.” 66Playing videos Watch a video: Tap any video as you browse. Playback starts when enough of the video is downloaded to iPad. Tap to start the video sooner. Drag to skip forward or back. Drag to skip forward or back. Tap the video to show or hide the controls. Tap the video to show or hide the controls. Drag to adjust the volume. Drag to adjust the volume. See video information, related videos, and comments. See video information, related videos, and comments. Add this video to your YouTube Favorites. Add this video to your YouTube Favorites. Show or hide the video controls Tap the screen. Adjust the volume Drag the volume slider, or use the iPad volume buttons or the volume buttons on a compatible headset. Watch full-screen Rotate iPad to landscape orientation. If you still see video information, tap . Switch between filling the screen and fitting the screen width While watching full-screen, double-tap the video. You can also tap to make the video fill the screen, or to make it fit the screen. If you don’t see these controls, the video already fits the screen perfectly. Pause or resume playback Tap or . You can also press the center button (or equivalent button) on a compatible headset. Start over from the beginning Tap while the video is playing. If you’ve watched less than five seconds of the video, you’ll skip instead to the previous video in the list. Scan forward or back Touch and hold or . Skip to any point Drag the playhead along the scrubber bar. Slide your finger down to adjust the scrub rate from fast to slow. Skip to the next or previous video in a list Tap to skip to the next video. Tap twice to skip to the previous video. If you’ve watched less than five seconds of the video, tap only once. Stop watching a video Tap Done. Play a video on Apple TV using AirPlay Tap and choose Apple TV. For information, see “Using AirPlay” on page 37. Chapter 12 YouTube 67Keeping track of videos you like Show the controls for managing videos: While watching a full-screen video, tap to display the playback controls, then tap . Add a video to Favorites Tap Add, then select Favorites. If you’re watching the video, tap . Add a video to a playlist Tap Add, then select the playlist. If you don’t see your playlists, sign in. Subscribe to videos by this YouTube user Tap More From, then tap Subscribe. You must be signed in to a YouTube account. Delete a favorite Tap Favorites, then tap Edit. Delete a video from a playlist or an entire playlist Tap Playlists, then tap Edit. Flag a video Tap . Sharing videos, comments, and ratings Show the controls for sharing, rating, and commenting: While watching a full-screen video, tap to display the controller, then tap . Rate a video Tap Like or Dislike. You must be signed in to a YouTube account. Add a comment Tap Comments, then tap the comment field. You must be signed in to a YouTube account. Add a video to Favorites or a playlist Tap Add, then select Favorites or a playlist. Email a link to a video Tap Share. Flag a video Tap the movie to display the toolbar, then tap . Send your own video to YouTube Open the Photos app, select the video, then tap . Watching YouTube on a TV If you have an Apple TV, you can use AirPlay to watch YouTube videos on a TV. See “Playing videos” on page 67. You can also use a cable to connect iPad to your TV or a projector. See “Watching videos on a TV” on page 64. 68 Chapter 12 YouTubeCalendar 13 About Calendar Calendar makes it easy to stay on schedule. You can view individual calendars, or several calendars at once. You can view your events by day, by month, or in a list. You can search the titles, invitees, locations, and notes of events. If you enter birthdays for your contacts, you can view those birthdays in Calendar. You can also make, edit, or cancel events on iPad, and sync them back to your computer. You can subscribe to iCloud, Google, Yahoo!, or iCal calendars. If you have a Microsoft Exchange or iCloud account, you can receive and respond to meeting invitations. Viewing your calendars You can view calendars individually or as a combined calendar, making it easy to manage work and family calendars at the same time. Choose a view. Choose a view. Add an event. Add an event. Touch and drag to adjust. Touch and drag to adjust. Change views: Tap List, Day, Year, or Month. 69View the Birthdays calendar Tap Calendars, then tap Birthdays to include birthdays from your Contacts with your events. See the details of an event Tap the event. You can tap information about the event to get more details. For example, if an address for the location is specified, tap it to open Maps. Edit or delete a calendar Tap Calendars, then tap Edit. Select calendars to view Tap Calendars, then tap to select the calendars you want to view. The events for all selected calendars appear in a single calendar on iPad. Adding events You can add and update calendar events directly on iPad. Add an event: Tap and enter event information, then tap Done. You can also touch and hold to add a new event to an empty spot on a calendar. Drag the grab points to adjust the event’s duration. Set an alert Tap Alert, then set an alert for 5 minutes to two days before the event. Set a default alert for events Go to Settings > Mail, Contacts, Calendar > Default Alert Times. Update an event Tap Edit, then change event information. To adjust an event’s time or duration, touch and hold the event to select it. Then drag it to a new time, or drag the grab points to change its duration. Delete an event Tap the event, tap Edit, then scroll down and tap Delete Event. Invite others to an event Tap Invitees to select people from Contacts. Requires an iCloud, Microsoft Exchange, or CalDAV account. Responding to invitations If you have an iCloud, Microsoft Exchange, or a supported CalDAV account you can receive and respond to meeting invitations from people in your organization. When you receive an invitation, the meeting appears in your calendar with a dotted line around it, and appears in the lowerright corner of the screen. Respond to an invitation: Tap a meeting invitation in the calendar, or tap to display the Event screen and tap the invitation. See the organizer’s contact information Tap “invitation from.” See other invitees Tap Invitees. Tap a name to see the person’s contact information. Add comments in reply Tap Add Comments. Your comments are visible to the organizer but not to other attendees. Comments may not be available, depending on the calendar service you’re using. Set your availability Tap Availability and select “busy” or “free.” Busy identifies the time as reserved when someone invites you to a meeting. 70 Chapter 13 CalendarSearching calendars In List view, you can search the titles, invitees, locations, and notes fields of the events in your calendars. Calendar searches the events for the calendars you’re currently viewing. Search for events: Tap List, then enter text in the search field. Calendar events can also be included in searches from the Home screen. See “Searching” on page 32. Subscribing to calendars You can subscribe to calendars that use the iCalendar (.ics) format. Many calendar-based services support calendar subscriptions, including iCloud, Yahoo!, Google, and the iCal application in OS X. Subscribed calendars are read-only. You can read events from subscribed calendars on iPad, but you can’t edit them or create new events. Subscribe to a calendar: Go to Settings > Mail, Contacts, Calendars, then tap Add Account. Tap Other, then tap Add Subscribed Calendar. You can also subscribe to an iCal (or other .ics) calendar published on the web by tapping a link to the calendar. Importing calendar events from Mail You can add events to a calendar by importing a calendar file from an email message. You can import any standard .ics calendar file. Import events from a calendar file: In Mail, open the message and tap the calendar file. Syncing calendars You can sync Calendar in these ways:  In iTunes: Use the device settings panes to sync with iCal or Microsoft Entourage on a Mac, or with Microsoft Outlook 2003, 2007, or 2010 on a PC, when you connect iPad to your computer.  In Settings: Turn on Calendars in your iCloud, Microsoft Exchange, Google, or Yahoo! accounts to sync your calendar information over the Internet, or to set up a CalDAV account if your company or organization supports it. See “Setting up mail and other accounts” on page 18. Chapter 13 Calendar 71Calendar accounts and settings There are several settings available for Calendar and your calendar accounts. Go to Settings > Mail, Contacts, Calendars. Calendar accounts are also used to sync to-do items for Reminders. Add a CalDAV account: Go to Settings > Mail, Contacts, Calendars, tap Add an Account, then tap Other. Under Calendars, tap Add CalDAV Account. These options apply to all of your calendars: Set calendar alert tones Go to Settings > Sounds > Calendar Alerts. Sync past events Go to Settings > Mail, Contacts, Calendars > Sync, then choose a time period. Future events are always synced. Set alerts to sound when you receive a meeting invitation Go to Settings > Mail, Contacts, Calendars, and tap “New Invitation Alerts.” Turn on Calendar time zone support Go to Settings > Mail, Contacts, Calendars > Time Zone Support, then turn on Time Zone Support. Set a default calendar Go to Settings > Mail, Contacts, Calendars > Default Calendar. Use iCloud to keep Calendar up to date on your iOS devices and computers Go to Settings > iCloud, then turn on Calendar. See “Using iCloud” on page 19. Important: When Time Zone Support is on, Calendar displays event dates and times in the time zone of the city you selected. When Time Zone Support is off, Calendar displays events in the time zone of your current location as determined by your Internet connection. When you travel, iPad may not display events or sound alerts at the correct local time. To manually set the correct time, see “Date & Time” on page 128. 72 Chapter 13 CalendarContacts 14 About Contacts Contacts lets you easily access and edit your contact lists from personal, business, and organizational accounts. You can search across all of your groups, and the information in Contacts is automatically accessed to make addressing emails quick and easy. View in Maps. View in Maps. Add or change info. Add or change info. Find contacts. Find contacts. Syncing contacts You can add contacts in the following ways:  Use your iCloud contacts. See “Using iCloud” on page 19.  In iTunes, sync contacts from Google or Yahoo!, or sync with applications on your computer. See “Syncing with iTunes” on page 20.  Set up a Microsoft Exchange account on iPad, with Contacts enabled. See “Contacts accounts and settings” on page 75.  Set up an LDAP or CardDAV account to access business or school directories. See “Contacts accounts and settings” on page 75.  Enter contacts directly on iPad. See “Adding and editing contacts” on page 74. 73Searching contacts You can search titles and first, last, and company names in your contacts on iPad. If you have a Microsoft Exchange account, an LDAP account, or a CardDAV account you can also search those contacts. Search contacts: In Contacts, tap the search field and enter your search. Search a GAL Tap Groups, tap Directories at the bottom of the list, then enter your search. Search an LDAP server Tap Groups, tap the LDAP server name, then enter your search. Search a CardDAV server Tap Groups, tap the searchable CardDAV group at the bottom of the list, then enter your search. Save contact information from a GAL, LDAP, or CardDAV server Search for the contact you want to add, then tap Add Contact. Contacts can also be found through searches from the Home screen. See “Searching” on page 32. Adding and editing contacts Add a contact on iPad: Tap Contacts and tap . If isn’t visible, make sure you’re not viewing an LDAP, CalDAV, or GAL contacts list; you can’t add contacts to those. Edit contact information: Choose a contact, then tap Edit. Add a new field Tap Add Field. Add a contact’s Twitter user name Tap Add Field, then tap Twitter. Change a field label Tap the label and choose a different one. To add a new label, scroll to the bottom of the list and tap Add Custom Label. Change the ringtone or text tone for the contact Tap the ringtone or text tone field, then choose a new sound in Settings > Sounds. Delete an item Tap , then tap Delete. Assign a photo to a contact In edit mode, tap Add Photo or tap the existing photo. You can choose to take a photo with the camera, or use an existing photo. To import photos from your contacts’ Twitter profiles, go to Settings > Twitter. Sign in to your Twitter account, then tap Update Contacts. Delete a contact In Contacts, choose a contact, than tap Edit. Scroll down and tap Delete Contact. 74 Chapter 14 ContactsContacts accounts and settings You can add additional Contacts accounts and adjust the way contact names are sorted and displayed. Add a Contacts account: Go to Settings > Mail, Contacts, Calendars, then tap Add Account. To change Contact settings, go to Settings > Mail, Contacts, Calendars for these options: Set how contacts are sorted Tap Sort Order and choose to sort by first or last name. Set how contacts are displayed Tap Display Order and choose to display by first or last name. Setting your My Info card Tap My Info, then select the contact card with your name and information from the list. The My Info card is used by Safari and other apps. Set a default Contacts account Tap Default Account, then select an account. New contacts you create without specifying another account are stored here. Use iCloud to keep Contacts up to date on your iOS devices and computers Go to Settings > iCloud, then turn on Contacts. See “Using iCloud” on page 19. Chapter 14 Contacts 75Notes 15 About Notes With its large display and onscreen keyboard, iPad makes jotting notes easy. iCloud makes notes you type on iPad available on all your other iOS devices and Mac computers. You can read and write notes in landscape or portrait orientation. In portrait orientation, tap Notes to view a list of your notes. In landscape orientation, the list of notes appears on the left, and the current note is circled in red. Writing and reading notes Notes are listed by last-modified date, with the most recent note at the top. The list shows the first few words of each note. Tap a note in the list to read or edit it. Add a note: Tap , type the note, then tap Done. Email or print the note. Email or print the note. Delete the note. Delete the note. Tap a note to view. Tap a note to view. Add a note. Add a note. View the previous or next note. View the previous or next note. Read a note: Tap the note in the list, or tap or to see the next or previous note. Edit a note Tap anywhere on the note to bring up the keyboard. Edit the note, then tap Done. Change the font Go to Settings > Notes. Delete a note Tap at the bottom of the note. Use iCloud to keep your notes up to date on your iOS devices and Mac computers Go to Settings > iCloud and turn on Notes (it’s on by default). See “Using iCloud” on page 19. 76Searching notes You can search the text of notes to find a particular note. Search for notes: Enter text in the search field that appears at the top of the notes list. In portrait orientation, tap Notes to display the notes list. Search results appear as you type. Tap the keyboard button to dismiss the keyboard and see more results. To view a note, tap it in the search results list. Printing or emailing notes Print or email a note: Tap the note, then tap . To email a note, iPad must be set up for email. See “Sending mail” on page 44. Chapter 15 Notes 77Reminders 16 About Reminders Reminders lets you organize your life—complete with due dates and lists. Reminders works with your calendar accounts, so changes you make update automatically on all your iOS devices and computers. Mark items as completed. Mark items as completed. Add a reminder. Add a reminder. Change views. Change views. Switch between list view and date view: At the top of the screen, tap List or Date. 78Setting a reminder Add a reminder: In Reminders, tap , then enter a description and tap Done. After you add a reminder, you can fine-tune its settings: Set a day or time for a reminder Tap the reminder, then tap Remind Me. Turn on “On a Day” then set the date and time you want to be reminded. Reminders that are due are displayed in Notification Center. Add notes to a reminder Tap the reminder, then tap Show More. Tap Notes. Move a reminder to another list Tap the reminder, then tap Show More. Tap List and choose a new list. To create or edit lists, see “Managing reminders in list view” on page 79. Delete a reminder Tap a reminder, tap Show More, then tap Delete. Edit a reminder Tap a reminder, then tap its name. Mark a reminder as completed Tap the box next to the reminder so that a checkmark appears. Completed reminders are shown in the Completed list. See “Managing completed reminders” on page 80. Set the tone played for reminders Go to Settings > Sound. Use iCloud to keep Reminders up to date on your iOS devices and computers Go to Settings > iCloud, then turn on Reminders. See “Using iCloud” on page 19. Managing reminders in list view Organizing reminders in to lists makes it easy to keep your work, personal, and other to-dos separate from each other. Reminders comes with one list for active reminders, plus a built-in list of completed items. You can add other lists of your own. Create a list: At the top of the screen, tap List, then tap Edit. Switch between lists In list view, tap the list you want to view. View completed items In list view, tap Completed. Change the order of lists In list view, tap Edit. Drag next to a list to change the order. You can’t move a list to a different account, and you can’t change the order of reminders in a list. Delete a list In list view, tap Edit. Tap for each list you want to delete. When you delete a list, all the items in the list are deleted. Change the name of a list In list view, tap Edit. Tap the name you want to change, then type a new name. Tap Done. Set a default list for new reminders Go to Settings > Mail, Contacts, Calendars, then under the Reminders heading, tap Default List. Managing reminders in date view Use date view to view and manage reminders that have a due date. View reminders for a date: At the top of the screen, tap Date to view today’s reminders and uncompleted items from previous days. Chapter 16 Reminders 79Managing completed reminders Reminders keeps track of the items you mark as completed. You can see them in list or date view, and also in the completed list. View completed items: Tap the List button at the top of the screen, then tap Completed. Mark a completed item as uncompleted Tap to remove the checkmark. The item automatically moves back to its original list. Sync previous reminders Go to Settings > Mail, Contacts, Calendars. Then under Reminders, tap Sync. This setting applies to all your reminder accounts. For best performance, don’t sync more previous items than you need to. Searching reminders Search reminders: Tap the search field, then enter a search phrase. Reminders are searched by name. You can also search Reminders from the Home screen. See “Spotlight Search” on page 126. 80 Chapter 16 RemindersMaps 17 Finding locations WARNING: For important information about driving and navigating safely, see the Important Product Information Guide at support.apple.com/manuals/ipad. More information More information Double-tab to zoom in; tap with two fingers to zoom out. Or, pinch to zoom in or out. Double-tab to zoom in; tap with two fingers to zoom out. Or, pinch to zoom in or out. Set options, such as showing traffic or satellite view. Set options, such as showing traffic or satellite view. © 2012 Google. Map data © 2012 Google. © 2012 Google. Map data © 2012 Google. Get directions by car, public transit, or walking. Get directions by car, public transit, or walking. Enter a search. Enter a search. Display the location of a business or person in your contacts list. Display the location of a business or person in your contacts list. Show your current location. Show your current location. Find a location: Tap Search, then tap the search field to bring up the keyboard. Type an address or other information, then tap Search. You can search for information such as:  Intersection (“8th and market”)  Area (“greenwich village”)  Landmark (“guggenheim”)  Zip code  Business (“movies,” “restaurants san francisco ca,” “apple inc new york”) You can also tap to find the location of a contact. 81See the name or description of a location Tap the pin. See a list of the businesses found in a search Tap . Tap a business to see its location. Find your current location Tap . Your current location is shown by a blue marker. If your location can’t be determined precisely, a circle appears around the marker. The smaller the circle, the greater the precision. Use the digital compass Tap again. The icon changes to and a small compass appears onscreen. Mark a location Touch and hold the map until the drop pin appears. Important: Maps, directions, and location-based apps depend on data services. These data services are subject to change and may not be available in all areas, resulting in maps, directions, or location-based information that may be unavailable, inaccurate, or incomplete. Compare the information provided on iPad to your surroundings, and defer to posted signs to resolve any discrepancies. If Location Services is turned off when you open Maps, you may be asked to turn it on. You can use Maps without Location Services. See “Location Services” on page 122. Getting directions Get directions: 1 Tap Directions. 2 Enter starting and ending locations. Tap to choose a location in Bookmarks (including your current location or the dropped pin), a recent location, or a contact. 3 Tap Route, then select directions for driving ( ), public transit ( ), or walking ( ). 4 Do one of the following:  To view directions one step at a time, tap Start, then tap to see the next leg of the trip.  To view all the directions in a list, tap Start, then tap . Tap any item in the list to see a map showing that leg of the trip. 5 If multiple routes appear, choose the one you want to use. If you’re taking public transit, tap to set your departure or arrival time, and to choose a schedule for the trip. Tap the icon at a stop to see the departure time for that bus or train, and to get a link to the transit provider’s website or contact info (when available). Get directions from a location on the map Tap the pin, tap , then tap Directions To Here or Directions From Here. Bookmark a location Tap "Add to Bookmarks.” 82 Chapter 17 MapsGetting and sharing info about a location Make a FaceTime call (when available). Make a FaceTime call (when available). Visit the website. Visit the website. © 2012 Google. Map data © 2012 Google. © 2012 Google. Map data © 2012 Google. Get or share info about a location: Tap the pin, then tap . Add a business to your contacts Tap “Add to Contacts.” Tweet, text, or email your location Tap Share Location. To post a Tweet, you must be logged in to your Twitter account. Go to Settings > Twitter. Showing traffic conditions You can show traffic conditions for major streets and highways on the map. Show traffic conditions: Tap or drag the bottom-right corner of the screen, then turn on Traffic. Streets and highways are color-coded to indicate the flow of traffic:  Gray—no data is available  Green—posted speed limit  Yellow—slower than the posted speed limit  Red—stop and go Traffic conditions aren’t available in all areas. Chapter 17 Maps 83Map views © 2012 Google. Map data © 2012 Google. © 2012 Google. Map data © 2012 Google. See a standard, satellite, hybrid, or terrain view: Tap or drag the bottom-right corner of the screen, then select the view you want. See the Google Street View of a location: Tap . Flick left or right to pan through the 360° panoramic view (the inset shows your current view). Tap an arrow to move down the street. To return to map view, tap the map inset. Tap to return to map view. Tap to return to map view. © 2012 Google. © 2012 Google. Street View may not be available in all areas. 84 Chapter 17 MapsMusic 18 Adding music and audio To get music and other audio content onto iPad:  Purchase and download content from the iTunes Store on iPad. In Music, tap Store when browsing. See Chapter 19,“iTunes Store,” on page 90.  Use Automatic Download to automatically download new music purchased on your other iOS devices and computers. See “Using iCloud” on page 19.  Sync with iTunes on your computer. You can sync all of your media, or selected songs and other items. See “Syncing with iTunes” on page 20.  Use iTunes Match to store your music library in iCloud and access it on all your iOS devices and computers. See “iTunes Match” on page 87. Playing songs and other audio WARNING: For important information about avoiding hearing loss, see the Important Product Information Guide at support.apple.com/manuals/ipad. You can listen to audio from the built-in speaker, headphones attached to the headphones port, or wireless Bluetooth stereo headphones paired with iPad. When headphones are attached or paired, no sound comes out of the speaker. Browse your collection: Tap one of the buttons along the bottom of the screen. You can browse by playlist, song, artist, or album. Tap More to browse by genre or composer, or to see your podcasts. Play a song or other item: Tap the item. Use the controls at the top of the screen to control playback. 85View the Now Playing screen: Tap the thumbnail of the album cover at the top of the screen. Drag to skip forward or back. Drag to skip forward or back. Adjust the volume. Adjust the volume. Back Back Browse music. Browse music. Track list Track list Toggle between now playing and browse. Toggle between now playing and browse. Make a Genius playlist. Make a Genius playlist. Play/Pause Play/Pause Repeat Repeat Shuffle Shuffle AirPlay AirPlay Repeat songs Tap . = Repeat all songs in the album or list. = Repeat the current song only. = No repeat. Shuffle songs Tap . = Songs are shuffled. = Songs are playing in order. Skip to any point in a song Drag the playhead along the scrubber bar. Slide your finger down to slow down the scrub rate. Set podcast playback speed Tap . Tap again to change the speed. = Play at double speed. = Play at half speed. = Play at normal speed. Repeat last 30 seconds of podcast Tap . Browse songs in a list using the cover art From the Now Playing screen, flick left to right. Songs start playing automatically. Use Ping See “Following artists and friends” on page 91. Play music on AirPlay speakers or Apple TV Tap . See “Using AirPlay” on page 37. Set options for Music Go to Settings > Music. When using another app, you can display audio playback controls by double-clicking the Home button , then flicking from left to right along the bottom of the screen. 86 Chapter 18 MusicThe controls operate the currently playing app, or—if the music is paused—the most recent app that played. The icon for the app appears on the right. Tap it to open the app. Double-clicking the Home button also displays audio playback controls when the screen is locked. Viewing tracks on an album See all the tracks on the album that contains the current song: From the Now Playing screen, tap . (Tap the screen first if the controls aren’t showing.) Tap a track to play it. Tap again to return to the Now Playing screen. In track list view, you can assign ratings to songs. You can use ratings when creating smart playlists in iTunes. Searching audio content You can search the titles, artists, albums, and composers of songs, podcasts, and other audio content on iPad. Search music: When browsing, enter text in the search field at the bottom-right corner of the screen. You can also search audio content from the Home screen. See “Searching” on page 32. iTunes Match iTunes Match stores your music library in iCloud—including songs imported from CDs—and lets you enjoy your collection anywhere, anytime on your iPad and other iOS devices and computers. iTunes Match is available as a paid subscription. Note: iTunes Match is not available in all areas. Cellular data charges may apply if Settings > Music > Use Cellular Data is turned on. Subscribe to iTunes Match: In iTunes on your computer, go to Store > Turn On iTunes Match, then click the Subscribe button. Once you subscribe, iTunes adds your music, playlists, and Genius Mixes to iCloud. Your songs that match music already in the iTunes Store are automatically available in iCloud. Any remaining songs are uploaded. You can download and play matched songs at iTunes Plus quality (256 kbps DRM-free AAC), even if your original was of lower quality. For more information, go to www.apple.com/icloud/features. Turn on iTunes Match Go to Settings > Music. Turning on iTunes Match removes synced music from iPad, and disables Genius Mixes and Genius Playlists. Chapter 18 Music 87Genius A Genius playlist is a collection of songs from your library that go great together. You can create Genius playlists in iTunes and sync them to iPad. You can also create and save Genius playlists directly on iPad. A Genius Mix is a selection of songs of the same kind of music, recreated from your library each time you listen to the mix. To use Genius on iPad, first turn on Genius in iTunes, then sync iPad with iTunes. Genius Mixes are synced automatically, unless you manually manage your music and choose which mixes you want to sync in iTunes. Genius is a free service, but it requires an Apple ID. When you sync a Genius Mix, iTunes may select and sync songs from your library that you haven’t specifically chosen to sync. Play a Genius Mix: Tap Playlists, then tap one of the Genius Mixes at the top of the playlists. Make a Genius playlist: Play a song, then tap at the top of the screen. The Genius Playlist is added to your playlists, following the Genius Mixes. Save a Genius playlist View your Playlists, tap Genius Playlist, than tap Save. The playlist is renamed with the title of the song you picked. Refresh a Genius playlist In the playlist, tap Refresh. Make a Genius playlist using a different song Play a song, then tap . Delete a saved Genius playlist Tap the playlist, then tap . Genius playlists created on iPad are copied to your computer when you sync with iTunes. Note: Once a Genius playlist is synced to iTunes, you can’t delete it directly from iPad. Use iTunes to edit the playlist name, stop syncing, or delete the playlist. Playlists You can create and edit your own playlists on iPad, or edit playlists synced from iTunes on your computer. Create a playlist: View Playlists, then tap New near the top of the screen. Enter and save a title, select songs and videos to include, then tap Done. When you make a playlist and then sync iPad to your computer, the playlist is synced to your iTunes library. Edit a playlist: View Playlists and select the playlist. Tap Edit, then: To add more songs: Tap Add Songs. To delete a song: Tap . Deleting a song from a playlist doesn’t delete it from iPad. To move a song higher or lower in the list: Drag . Your edits are copied to the playlist in your iTunes library, either the next time you sync iPad with your computer, or wirelessly via iCloud if you’ve subscribed to iTunes Match. Delete a playlist In Playlists, touch and hold the playlist, then tap . Delete a song from iPad In Songs, swipe the song, then tap Delete. The song is deleted from iPad, but not from your iTunes library on your Mac or PC. 88 Chapter 18 MusicHome Sharing Home Sharing lets you play music, movies, and TV shows on iPad from the iTunes library on your Mac or PC. iPad and your computer must be on the same Wi-Fi network. On your computer, iTunes must be open, with Home Sharing turned on and logged in using the same Apple ID as Home Sharing on iPad. Note: Home Sharing requires iTunes 10.2 or later, available at www.itunes.com/download. Bonus content, such as digital booklets and iTunes Extras, can’t be shared. Play music from your computer iTunes library on iPad: 1 In iTunes on your computer, go to Advanced > Turn On Home Sharing. 2 Log in, then click Create Home Share. 3 On iPad, go to Settings > Music, then log in to Home Sharing using the same Apple ID and password. 4 In Music, tap More, then tap Shared and choose your computer’s library. Return to content on iPad Tap Shared and choose My iPad. Chapter 18 Music 89iTunes Store 19 About the iTunes Store Use the iTunes Store to add content to iPad. You can browse and purchase music, TV shows, audiobooks, and alert tones. You can also buy and rent movies, or download and play podcasts or iTunes U collections. You need an Apple ID in order to purchase content. See “Store settings” on page 96. Note: The iTunes Store may not be available in all regions, and iTunes Store content may vary across regions. Features are subject to change. To access the iTunes Store, iPad must have an Internet connection. See “Network” on page 125. Finding music, videos, and more Choose a category. Choose a category. Browse content: Tap one of the content categories, such as Music or Videos. Search for content Tap the search field and enter one or more words, then tap Search. Buy, review, or tell a friend about an item Tap an item in a list to see more details on its Info screen. Explore artist and friend recommendations Tap Ping. See “Following artists and friends” on page 91. 90Purchasing music, audiobooks, and tones When you find a song, album, tone, or audiobook you like in the iTunes Store, you can purchase and download it. You can preview an item before you purchase it, to make sure it’s what you want. Preview a song, tone, or audiobook: Tap the item and follow the onscreen instructions. Redeem a gift card or code Tap Music, then tap Redeem at the bottom of the screen and follow the onscreen instructions. While you’re signed in, your remaining store credit appears with your Apple ID information at the bottom of most iTunes Store screens. Complete an album While viewing any album, tap the discounted price for the remaining songs, below Complete My Album (not available in all areas). To see offers for completing other albums, tap Music, then tap Complete My Album Offers. Download a previously purchased item Tap Purchased. You can also download an item while browsing; just tap Download where you usually see the price. Automatically download purchases made on other iOS devices and computers Go to Settings > Store, then turn on the kinds of purchases you want to automatically download. Purchasing or renting videos The iTunes Store lets you purchase and download movies, TV shows, and music videos. Some movies can also be rented for a limited time. Video content may be available in standarddefinition (SD) format, high-definition (HD) format, or both. Purchase or rent a video: Tap Buy or Rent. Once you purchase an item, it begins downloading and appears on the Downloads screen. See “Checking download status” on page 92. Preview a video Tap Preview. View the preview on a TV with AirPlay and Apple TV When the preview starts, tap and choose Apple TV. See “Using AirPlay” on page 37. Following artists and friends Use Ping to connect with the world’s most passionate music fans. Follow favorite artists to learn about new releases and upcoming concerts and tours, get an insider’s perspective through their photos and videos, and learn about their musical influences. Read friends’ comments about the music they’re listening to, and see what they’re buying and which concerts they plan to attend. Also, express your musical likes and post comments for your own followers. To create and explore musical connections, you need to create a Ping profile. Create your Ping profile: Open the iTunes application on your Mac or PC, click Ping, and follow the onscreen instructions. Chapter 19 iTunes Store 91Follow an artist Tap Follow on the artist’s profile page. Follow a friend Tap People, enter your friend’s name in the search field, then tap Follow. When you follow someone, they don’t automatically follow you. In your profile, you can choose to approve or decline requests to be followed as they arrive, or simply accept all new followers without review (the default). Share your thoughts As you browse albums and songs, tap Post to comment on a piece of music, or tap Like just to say you like it. Your friends will see your thoughts in their Ping Activity feed. Share concert plans Tap Concerts on your profile page to see upcoming concerts by the artists you follow, and see which of your friends are going to a concert. Tap Tickets to buy your own ticket, or tap I’m Going to let others know you’ll be there too. (Not available in all areas.) Streaming or downloading podcasts You can listen to audio podcasts or watch video podcasts streamed over the Internet from the iTunes Store. You can also download audio and video podcasts. Stream a podcast: Tap Podcasts to browse podcasts in the iTunes Store. Video podcasts are marked with a video icon . Download a podcast Tap the Free button, then tap Download. Downloaded podcasts appear in the Podcasts playlist. Listen to or watch a podcast you’ve downloaded In Music, tap Podcasts, then tap the podcast. Video podcasts also appear in your list of videos. Checking download status You can check the Downloads screen to see the status of in-progress and scheduled downloads, including purchases you pre-order. See the status of items being downloaded: Tap Downloads. Pre-ordered items don’t download automatically when they’re released. Return to the Downloads screen to begin the download. Download a pre-ordered item Tap the item, then tap . If a download is interrupted, the download resumes when there’s an Internet connection. Or, if you open iTunes on your computer, iTunes completes the download to your iTunes library (if your computer is connected to the Internet and signed in using the same Apple ID). Viewing account information To view iTunes Store information for your Apple ID on iPad, tap your Apple ID (at the bottom of most iTunes Store screens). Or go to Settings > Store and tap View Apple ID. You must be signed in to view your account information. See “Store settings” on page 96. 92 Chapter 19 iTunes StoreVerifying downloads You can use iTunes on your computer to verify that all the music, videos, apps, and other items you bought from the iTunes Store or App Store are in your iTunes library. You might want to do this if a download was interrupted. Verify your downloads: In iTunes on your computer, go to Store > Check for Available Downloads. To see all of your purchases, sign in using your Apple ID, go to Store > View My Account, and click Purchase History. Chapter 19 iTunes Store 93App Store 20 About the App Store You can search for, browse, review, purchase, and download apps from the App Store directly to iPad. Note: The App Store may not be available in all countries or regions, and App Store content may vary by country or region. Features are subject to change. To browse the App Store, iPad must be connected to the Internet. See “Network” on page 125. To purchase apps, you need an Apple ID. See “Store settings” on page 96. Check for app updates. Check for app updates. 94Finding and downloading apps Browse the featured selections to see new, notable, or recommended apps, or browse Top 25 to see the most popular apps. If you’re looking for a specific app, use Search. Browse the App Store: Tap Featured, Categories, or Top Charts. Browse using Genius Tap Genius to see a list of recommended apps based on what’s already in your app collection. To turn Genius on, follow the onscreen instructions. Genius is a free service, but you need an Apple ID. Search for apps Tap Search, tap the search field and enter one or more words, then tap Search. Email a link to an app’s Info page in iTunes Tap “Tell a Friend.” Send an app to someone as a gift Tap “Gift This App,” then follow the onscreen instructions. Report a problem Tap “Report a Problem.” Select a problem from the list or type optional comments, then tap Report. Purchase and download an app Tap the price (or tap Free), then tap Buy Now. If you already purchased the app, “Install” appears instead of the price on the Info screen. You won’t be charged if you download it again. Redeem a gift card or code Tap Redeem near the bottom of the Featured screen, then follow the onscreen instructions. See the status of downloads After you begin downloading an app, its icon appears on the Home screen and shows a progress indicator. Download a previously purchased app Tap Purchased, find the app in the list, then tap Download. You can also download an item while browsing; just tap Download where you usually see the price. Automatically download purchases made on other iOS devices and computers Go to Settings > Store, then turn on the kinds of purchases you want to automatically download. Deleting apps You can delete apps you install from the App Store. If you delete an app, data associated with the app is also deleted. Delete an App Store app: Touch and hold the app icon on the Home screen, until the icons start to jiggle, then tap . Press the Home button when you finish deleting apps. For information about resetting iPad to erase every app and all of your data and settings, see “Reset” on page 129. Chapter 20 App Store 95Store settings Use Store settings to sign in using an Apple ID, create a new Apple ID, or edit an existing one. If you have more than one Apple ID, you can use Store settings to sign out and sign in using another Apple ID. For iTunes Store terms and conditions, go to www.apple.com/legal/itunes/ww/. Sign in using an Apple ID: Go to Settings > Store, tap Sign In, then tap Use Existing Apple ID and enter your Apple ID and password. View and edit your account information Go to Settings > Store, tap your Apple ID, then tap View Apple ID. Tap an item to edit it. To change your password, tap the Apple ID field. Sign in using a different Apple ID Go to Settings > Store, tap your account name, then tap Sign Out. Create a new Apple ID Go to Settings > Store, tap Sign In, then tap Create New Apple ID and follow the onscreen instructions. Automatically download purchases Go to Settings > Store, then turn on the types of purchases, such as Music or Books, that you want to automatically download to iPad. You can also turn off automatic updating of Newsstand apps. Download purchases using the cellular network Go to Settings > Store, then turn Use Cellular Data on or off. Downloading purchases over the cellular network may incur charges from your carrier. Newsstand apps update only when iPad is connected to a Wi-Fi network. See Chapter 21,“Newsstand,” on page 97. 96 Chapter 20 App StoreNewsstand 21 About Newsstand Newsstand organizes your magazine and newspaper app subscriptions with a shelf that lets you access your publications quickly and easily. Newsstand apps appear on the shelf, and as new issues become available, a badge lets you know they’re ready for reading. They’re delivered to iPad automatically. Touch and hold a publication to rearrange. Touch and hold a publication to rearrange. Find Newsstand apps: Tap Newsstand to reveal the shelf, then tap Store. When you purchase a newsstand app, it’s added to your shelf for easy access. After the app is downloaded, open it to view its issues and subscription options. Subscriptions are In-App purchases, billed to your Apple ID account. See “Store settings”on page 96. Pricing varies, and Newsstand apps may not be available in all regions or countries. 97Reading the latest issues When a newspaper or magazine has a new issue, Newsstand automatically downloads it when connected to Wi-Fi and notifies you by displaying a badge on the app icon. To start reading, open Newsstand and look for apps with a “New” banner. Each app has its own method of managing issues. For information about how to delete, find, or work with individual issues, see the app’s help information or App Store listing. You can’t remove a Newsstand app from the shelf, or put other types of apps on the shelf. Turn off automatic downloads: Go to Settings > Store and turn automatic downloads off for the publication. 98 Chapter 21 NewsstandiBooks 22 About iBooks iBooks is a great way to read and buy books. Download the free iBooks app from the App Store, and then get everything from classics to bestsellers from the built-in iBookstore. Once you download a book, it’s displayed on your bookshelf. To download the iBooks app and use the iBookstore, you need an Internet connection and an Apple ID. If you don’t have an Apple ID, or if you want to make purchases using a different Apple ID, go to Settings > Store. See “Store settings” on page 96. Note: The iBooks app and the iBookstore may not be available in all languages or areas. Using the iBookstore In the iBooks app, tap Store to open the iBookstore. From there, you can browse featured books or bestsellers, and find books by author or topic. When you find a book you like, you can purchase and download it. Note: Some features of the iBookstore may not be available in all locations. Purchase a book: Find a book you want, tap the price, then tap Buy Book, or Get Book, if it’s free. Get information about a book You can read a summary of the book, read reviews, and download a sample of the book before buying it. After buying the book, you can write a review of your own. Download a previous purchase Tap Purchased, or tap Download where you usually see the price. Automatically download purchases made on other iOS devices or computers Go to Settings > Store, then turn on the kinds of purchases you want to automatically download. 99Syncing books and PDFs Use iTunes to sync your books and PDFs between iPad and your computer, and to buy books from the iTunes Store. When iPad is connected to your computer, the Books pane lets you select which items to sync. You can also add DRM-free ePub books and PDFs to your iTunes library. Books in PDF and ePub format are available on the web. Sync a book or PDF to iPad: In iTunes on your computer, choose File > Add to Library and select a .pdf, .epub, or .ibooks file. Connect iPad to your computer and sync. To add a book or PDF to iBooks without syncing, email the file to yourself from your computer. Open the email message on iPad, then touch and hold the attachment and choose “Open in iBooks” from the menu that appears. Reading books Reading a book is easy. From the bookshelf, tap the book you want to read. If you don’t see the book you’re looking for, tap Collections to go to other collections. Add a bookmark. Add a bookmark. Double-tap to zoom. Double-tap to zoom. Go to a different page. Go to a different page. Read a book while lying down: Use the orientation lock to prevent iPad from rotating the screen when you turn iPad. See “Viewing in portrait or landscape” on page 15. Each book has a particular set of features, based on its contents and format. Some of the capabilities described below might not be available in the book you’re reading. For example, printing is available only for PDFs, and if a book doesn’t include a recorded narration, you won’t see the read aloud icon. Show the controls Tap near the center of the page. Turn the page Tap near the right or left margin of the page, or flick left or right. To change the direction the page turns when you tap the left margin, go to Settings > iBooks > Tap Left Margin. View the table of contents Tap . With some books, you can also pinch to see the the table of contents. Add or remove a bookmark Tap . You can have multiple bookmarks. To remove a bookmark, tap it. You don’t need to add a bookmark when you close a book, because iBooks remembers where you left off. 100 Chapter 22 iBooksAdd or remove a highlight Double-tap a word, use the grab points to adjust the selection, then tap Highlight and choose a color. To remove a highlight, tap the highlighted text, then tap . To underline words, tap . To change the color, tap the highlighted text, then select a color from the menu. Add, remove, or edit a note Double-tap a word, then tap Note. When you finish writing the note, tap elsewhere on the page to close it. To view a note, tap the indicator in the margin near the highlighted text. To remove a note, delete its text. To remove a note and its highlight, tap the highlighted text, then tap . To change the color, tap the highlighted text, then select a color from the menu. To add a note to a highlight, tap the highlighted text, then tap . See all your bookmarks Tap and then choose a bookmark from the list. See all your notes Depending on the book, either tap and then tap Notes, or tap . See “Studying notes and vocabulary lists” on page 102. Enlarge an image Double-tap the image to zoom in, or in some books, pinch to enlarge the image. Go to a specific page Use the page navigation controls at the bottom of the screen. Or, tap and enter a page number, then tap the page number in the search results. Search in a book Tap . To search the web, tap Search Web or Search Wikipedia. Safari opens and displays the results. Search for other occurrences of a word or phrase Double-tap a word, use the grab points to adjust the selection, then tap Search in the menu that appears. Look up a word Double-tap a word, use the grab points to adjust the selection, then tap Define in the menu that appears. Definitions are not available for all languages. Listen to a book Tap . This feature is not available for all books. If you have a visual impairment, you can also use VoiceOver to speak the text of almost any book. See “About VoiceOver” on page 107. iBooks stores your collections, bookmarks, notes, and current page information using your Apple ID, so you can read books seamlessly across all your iOS devices. iBooks saves information for all of your books when you open or quit the app. Information for individual books is also saved when you open or close the book. Turn syncing on or off: Go to Settings > iBooks. Some books might access audio or video that’s stored on the web. Turn online audio and video access on or off: Go to Settings > iBooks > Online Audio & Video. Note: If iPad has a cellular data connection, playing these files may incur carrier charges. Chapter 22 iBooks 101Changing a book’s appearance Some books let you change the type size, font, and page color. Change the brightness: Tap near the center of a page to display the controls, then tap . If you don’t see , tap first. Change the font or type size Tap near the center of a page to display the controls, then tap . Tap Fonts to select a typeface. Not all books support changing the font. Some books allow you to change the type size only when iPad is in portrait orientation. Change the color of the page and text Tap near the center of a page to display the controls, tap , then tap Theme. This setting applies to all books that support it. Use the full screen to display a book Tap near the center of a page to display the controls, tap , tap Theme, then turn on Full Screen. Some books automatically fill the screen. Turn justification and hyphenation on or off Go to Settings > iBooks. Some books and PDFs can’t be justified or hyphenated. Studying notes and vocabulary lists In books that support it, you can use notes view to review all of your highlights and notes as cards. To quickly locate your notes, view them by chapter or search their contents. View your notes: Tap . View notes by chapter Badges in the chapter list indicate the number of notes and highlights you’ve added to each chapter. If you don’t see the chapter list, tap the Chapter button. Tap a chapter to see its notes. Tap an item in the list to see the note or highlight in context. Search all notes In notes view, enter a word or phrase in the search field. If you don’t see the search field, tap the Chapters button. Chapters with matching notes and highlights are shown. Tap a chapter to see its notes. Review notes and vocabulary as study cards Tap Study Cards. The front of each card displays the text you highlighted. Swipe to move between cards. If a card has notes, indicated by , tap the card to turn it over. Tap to select which highlights are displayed, or to shuffle the cards. If the chapter includes a vocabulary list, you can also include it in your cards. Email your notes When viewing notes, tap . Select the notes that you want to share, then tap Email. Delete notes When viewing notes, tap . Select the notes that you want to delete, then tap Delete. Interacting with multimedia Some books have interactive elements, such as movies, diagrams, presentations, galleries, 3D objects, and chapter reviews. To interact with a multimedia object, tap, swipe, or pinch it. For example, with a presentation, you can tap to start it, then tap to see each screen. To view an element full-screen, pinch two fingers apart. When you finish, pinch to close it. 102 Chapter 22 iBooksPrinting or emailing a PDF You can use iBooks to send a copy of a PDF via email, or to print all or part of the PDF to a supported printer. You can email or print PDFs, but not books. Email a PDF: Open the PDF, then tap and choose Email Document. A new message appears with the PDF attached. When you finish the message, tap Send. Print a PDF Open the PDF, then tap and choose Print. Select a printer, the page range, and the number of copies, then tap Print. See “Printing” on page 33. Organizing the bookshelf Use the bookshelf to browse your books and PDFs. You can also organize items in collections. Touch and hold a book to rearrange. Touch and hold a book to rearrange. Available on the iBookstore. Title availability is subject to change. Available on the iBookstore. Title availability is subject to change. Move a book or PDF to a collection: Go to the bookshelf and tap Edit. Select the items you want to move, then tap Move and select a collection. When you add a book or PDF to your bookshelf, it appears in your Books or PDF collection. From there, you can move it to a different collection. You might want to create collections for work and school, for example, or for reference and leisure reading. View a collection Tap Collections, then pick a new collection from the list that appears. Manage collections Tap Collections to display the collections list. To edit the name of a collection, tap Edit. You can’t edit or remove the built-in Books and PDF collections. Sort the bookshelf Tap , then select a sort method from the choices at the bottom of the screen. Delete an item from the bookshelf Tap Edit, then tap each book or PDF that you want to delete so that a checkmark appears. Tap Delete. When you finish deleting, tap Done. If you delete a book you purchased, you can download it again from Purchases in the iBookstore. Search for a book Go to the bookshelf. Tap the status bar to scroll to the top of the screen, then tap . Searching looks for the title and the author’s name. Chapter 22 iBooks 103Game Center 23 About Game Center Discover new games and share your game experiences with friends around the world in Game Center. Invite your friends to play, or use auto-match to find other equally-matched opponents. Earn bonus points by achieving specific accomplishments in a game, see what your friends have achieved, and check leaderboards to see who the best players are. Note: Game Center may not be available in all areas, and game availability may vary. To use Game Center, you need an Internet connection and an Apple ID. If you have an iCloud account, you can use that Apple ID with Game Center. If you don’t have an Apple ID, or if you want a separate ID for gaming, you can create one in Game Center, as described below. Declare your status, change your photo, or sign out. Declare your status, change your photo, or sign out. Invite friends to play. Invite friends to play. Choose a game to play. Choose a game to play. Respond to friend requests. Respond to friend requests. 104Signing in to Game Center Sign in: Open Game Center. If you see your nickname and photo at the top of the Me screen, you’re already signed in. If not, enter your Apple ID and password, then tap Sign In. Or, tap Create New Account to create a new Apple ID. Add your photo Tap the photo next to your name. Declare your status Tap Me, tap the status bar, then enter your status. View your account settings Tap Me, tap the account banner, then choose View Account. Sign out Tap Me, tap the Account banner, then tap Sign Out. You don’t need to sign out each time you quit Game Center. Purchasing and downloading games Games for the Game Center are available from the App Store. Purchase and download a game: Tap Games, then tap a recommended game or tap Find Game Center Games. The Game Center section of App Store displays games that work with Game Center. You can browse this section, and purchase and download games from it. See Chapter 20,“App Store,” on page 94. Purchase a game your friend has Tap Friends, then tap the name of your friend. Tap a game in your friend’s list of games, then tap the price of the game. Playing games Play a game: Tap Games, choose a game, then tap Play Game. See a list of top scorers Tap Games, then choose the game and tap Leaderboard. See the achievements you can try for Tap Games, choose a game, then tap Achievements. Return to Game Center after playing Press the Home button, then tap Game Center on the Home screen. Playing with friends Game Center puts you in contact with players around the world. You add friends to Game Center by making a request, or by accepting a request from another player. Invite friends to a multiplayer game: Tap Friends, choose a friend, choose a game, and tap Play. If the game allows or requires additional players, choose additional players to invite, then tap Next. Send your invitation, then wait for the others to accept. When everyone is ready, start the game. If a friend isn’t available or doesn’t respond to your invitation, you can tap Auto-Match to have Game Center find another player for you, or tap Invite Friend to try inviting some other friend. Chapter 23 Game Center 105Send a friend request Tap Friends or Requests, tap Add Friends, then enter your friend’s email address or Game Center nickname. To browse your contacts, tap . To add several friends in one request, type Return after each address. Respond to a friend request Tap Requests, tap the request, then tap Accept or Ignore. To report a problem with the request, flick up and tap “Report a Problem.” See the games a friend plays and check your friend’s scores Tap Friends, tap your friend’s name, then tap Games or Points. Search for someone in your list of friends Tap the status bar to scroll to the top of the screen, then tap the search field and start typing. Prevent game invitations from others Turn off Game Invites in your Game Center account settings. See “Game Center settings” on page 106. Keep your email address private Turn off Find Me By Email in your Game Center account settings. See “Game Center settings” on page 106. Disable all multiplayer activity Go to Settings > General > Restrictions > Game Center and turn off Multiplayer Games. Disallow friend requests Go to Settings > General > Restrictions > Game Center and turn off Adding Friends. See a list of a friend’s friends Tap Friends, tap the friend’s name, then tap Friends just below their picture. Remove a friend Tap Friends, tap a name, then tap Unfriend. Report offensive or inappropriate behavior Tap Friends, tap the person’s name, then tap “Report a Problem.” Game Center settings Some Game Center settings are associated with the Apple ID you use to sign in. Others are in the Settings app on iPad. Change Game Center settings for your Apple ID: Sign in using your Apple ID, tap Me, tap the Account banner, then choose View Account. Specify which notifications you want for Game Center: Go to Settings > Notifications > Game Center. If Game Center doesn’t appear, turn on Notifications. Change restrictions affecting Game Center: Go to Settings > General > Restrictions > Game Center. 106 Chapter 23 Game CenterAccessibility 24 Universal Access features iPad incorporates numerous accessibility features, including:  VoiceOver screen reader  Zoom magnification  Large Text  White on Black  Speak Selection  Speak Auto-text  Mono Audio and balance  AssistiveTouch  Support for braille displays  Playback of closed-captioned content Zoom, White on Black, and Mono Audio work with all apps. Large Text works with Mail and Notes. VoiceOver works with the built-in iPad apps, and with some third-party apps you can download from the App Store. Closed-captioning works with videos and podcasts that support it. For more information about the iPad accessibility features, go to www.apple.com/accessibility. You can turn individual accessibility features on or off in Accessibility settings on iPad. You can also turn some features on or off in iTunes when you connect iPad to your computer. Turn on accessibility features using iPad: Go to Settings > General > Accessibility. Turn on accessibility features using iTunes: Connect iPad to your computer and select iPad in the iTunes device list. Click Summary, then click Configure Universal Access at the bottom of the Summary screen. About VoiceOver VoiceOver describes aloud what appears onscreen, so you can use iPad without seeing it. VoiceOver tells you about each element on the screen as you select it. When you select an element, a black rectangle (the VoiceOver cursor) encloses it and VoiceOver speaks the name or describes the item. Touch the screen or drag your fingers to hear different items on the screen. When you select text, VoiceOver reads the text. If you turn on Speak Hints, VoiceOver may tell you the name of the item and provide instructions for you—for example, “double-tap to open.” To interact with items on the screen, such as buttons and links, use the gestures described in “Learning VoiceOver gestures” on page 110. 107When you go to a new screen, VoiceOver plays a sound and automatically selects and speaks the first element of the screen (typically, the item in the upper-left corner). VoiceOver also lets you know when the display changes to landscape or portrait orientation, and when the screen is locked or unlocked. Note: VoiceOver speaks in the language specified in International settings, which may be influenced by the Region Format setting (Settings > General > International > Region Format). VoiceOver is available in many languages, but not all. Setting up VoiceOver Important: VoiceOver changes the gestures you use to control iPad. Once VoiceOver is turned on, you must use VoiceOver gestures to operate iPad—even to turn VoiceOver off again to resume standard operation. Note: You can’t use VoiceOver and Zoom at the same time. Turn VoiceOver on or off: Go to Settings > General > Accessibility > VoiceOver. You can also set Triple-click Home to turn VoiceOver on or off. See “Triple-click Home” on page 116. Turn spoken hints on or off Go to Settings > General > Accessibility > VoiceOver. When Speak Hints is turned on, VoiceOver may tell you the action of the item or provide instructions for you—for example, “double-tap to open.” You can also add Hints to the rotor, then swipe up or down to adjust. See “Using the VoiceOver rotor control” on page 111. Set the VoiceOver speaking rate Go to Settings > General > Accessibility > VoiceOver and drag the Speaking Rate slider. You can also add Speech Rate to the rotor, then swipe up or down to adjust. See “Using the VoiceOver rotor control” on page 111. Change typing feedback Go to Settings > General > Accessibility > VoiceOver > Typing Feedback. Use phonetics in typing feedback Go to Settings > General > Accessibility > VoiceOver > Use Phonetics. Text is read character-by-character. Voiceover first speaks the character, then its phonetic equivalent—for example, “f” and then “foxtrot.” Use pitch change Go to Settings > General > Accessibility > VoiceOver > Use Pitch Change. VoiceOver uses a higher pitch when entering a letter, and a lower pitch when deleting a letter. VoiceOver also uses a higher pitch when speaking the first item of a group (such as a list or table) and a lower pitch when speaking the last item of a group. Set the rotor options for web browsing Go to Settings > General > Accessibility > VoiceOver > Rotor. Tap to select or deselect options, or drag up to reposition an item. Change VoiceOver pronunciation Set the rotor to Language and then swipe up or down. The Language rotor position is available when you select more than one pronunciation. Select the pronunciations available in the language rotor Go to Settings > General > Accessibility > VoiceOver > Language Rotor. To change the position of a language in the list, drag up or down. Change the language for iPad Go to Settings > General > International > Language. Some languages may be affected by the Region Format setting in Settings > General > International > Region Format. Skip images while navigating Go to Settings > General > Accessibility > VoiceOver > Navigate Images. You can choose to skip all images or only those without descriptions. Speak notifications when you unlock iPad Go to Settings > General > Accessibility > VoiceOver > Speak Notifications. If this is off, iPad speaks only the time when you unlock it. 108 Chapter 24 AccessibilityUsing VoiceOver Select items on the screen: Drag your finger over the screen. VoiceOver identifies each element as you touch it. You can move systematically from one element to the next by flicking left or right with a single finger. Elements are selected from left to right, top to bottom. Flick right to go to the next element, or flick left to go to the previous element. Enable vertical navigation Add Vertical Navigation to the rotor, use the rotor to select it, then swipe up or down to move to the item above or below. See “Using the VoiceOver rotor control” on page 111. Select the first or last element on the screen Flick up or down with four fingers. Unlock iPad Select the Unlock button, then double-tap the screen. Select an item by name Triple-tap with two fingers anywhere on the screen to open the Item Chooser. Then type a name in the search field, or flick right or left to move through the list alphabetically, or tap the table index to the right of the list and flick up or down to move quickly through the list of items. Change the name of a screen item so it’s easier to find Tap and hold with two fingers anywhere on the screen. Speak the text of the selected element: Flick down or up with one finger to read the next or previous word or character (twist the rotor control to choose characters or words). You can include the phonetic spelling. See “Setting up VoiceOver” on page 108. Stop speaking an item Tap once with two fingers. Tap again with two fingers to resume speaking. Speaking automatically resumes when you select another item. Change the speaking volume Use the volume buttons on iPad, or add volume to the rotor and swipe up and down to adjust. See “Using the VoiceOver rotor control” on page 111. Mute VoiceOver Double-tap with three fingers. Double-tap again with three fingers to turn speaking back on. To turn off only VoiceOver sounds, set the Side Switch to Mute. If an external keyboard is connected, you can also press the Control key on the keyboard to mute or unmute VoiceOver. Change the reading voice Go to Settings > General > Accessibility > VoiceOver > Use Compact Voice. Speak the entire screen from the top Flick up with two fingers. Speak from the current item to the bottom of the screen Flick down with two fingers. Speak the iPad status information Tap the top of the screen to hear such information as the time, battery life, Wi-Fi signal strength, and more. “Tap” the selected item when VoiceOver is on: Double-tap anywhere on the screen. “Double-tap” the selected item when VoiceOver is on Triple-tap anywhere on the screen. Adjust a slider With a single finger, flick up to increase the setting or down to decrease the setting. Scroll a list or area of the screen Flick up or down with three fingers. Flick down to page down through the list or screen, or flick up to page up. When paging through a list, VoiceOver speaks the range of items displayed (for example, “showing rows 5 through 10”). You can also scroll continuously through a list, instead of paging through it. Double-tap and hold. When you hear a series of tones, you can move your finger up or down to scroll the list. Continuous scrolling stops when you lift your finger. Chapter 24 Accessibility 109Use a list index Some lists have an alphabetical index along the right side. The index can’t be selected by flicking between elements; you must touch the index directly to select it. With the index selected, flick up or down to move along the index. You can also double-tap, then slide your finger up or down. Reorder a list Some lists, such as Rotor and Language Rotor in Accessibility settings can be reordered. Select on the right side of an item, double-tap and hold until you hear a sound, then drag up or down. VoiceOver speaks the item you’ve moved above or below, depending on the direction you’re dragging. Rearrange the Home screen On the Home screen, select the icon you want to move. Double-tap and hold the icon, then drag it. VoiceOver speaks the row and column position as you drag the icon. Release the icon when it’s in the location you want. You can drag additional icons. Drag an item to the left or right edge of the screen to move it to a different page of the Home screen. When you finish, press the Home button . Turn the screen curtain on or off Triple-tap with three fingers. When the screen curtain is on, the screen contents are active even though the display is turned off. Unlock iPad Select the Unlock switch, then double-tap the screen. Learning VoiceOver gestures When VoiceOver is turned on, the standard touchscreen gestures have different effects. These and some additional gestures let you move around the screen and control individual elements when they’re selected. VoiceOver gestures include two- and three-finger gestures to tap or flick. For best results when using two- and three-finger gestures, relax and let your fingers touch the screen with some space between them. You can use standard gestures when VoiceOver is turned on, by double-tapping and holding your finger on the screen. A series of tones indicates that normal gestures are in force. They remain in effect until you lift your finger. Then VoiceOver gestures resume. You can use different techniques to enter VoiceOver gestures. For example, you can enter a two-finger tap using two fingers from one hand, or one finger from each hand. You can also use your thumbs. Many find the “split-tap” gesture especially effective: instead of selecting an item and double-tapping, you can touch and hold an item with one finger, then tap the screen with another finger. Try different techniques to discover which works best for you. If your gestures don’t work, try quicker movements, especially for double-tapping and flicking gestures. To flick, try quickly brushing the screen with your finger or fingers. When VoiceOver is turned on, the VoiceOver Practice button appears, which gives you a chance to practice VoiceOver gestures before proceeding. Practice gestures: Go to Settings > General > Accessibility > VoiceOver, then tap VoiceOver Practice. When you finish practicing, tap Done. If you don’t see the VoiceOver Practice button, make sure VoiceOver is turned on. Here’s a summary of key VoiceOver gestures: Navigate and read  Tap: Speak item.  Flick right or left: Select the next or previous item.  Flick up or down: Depends on the Rotor Control setting. See “Using the VoiceOver rotor control” on page 111.  Two-finger tap: Stop speaking the current item.  Two-finger flick up: Read all from the top of the screen. 110 Chapter 24 Accessibility Two-finger flick down: Read all from the current position.  Two-finger “scrub”: Move two fingers back and forth three times quickly (making a “z”) to dismiss an alert or go back to the previous screen.  Two-finger triple tap: Open the Item Chooser.  Three-finger flick up or down: Scroll one page at a time.  Three-finger flick right or left: Go to the next or previous page (such as the Home screen, Stocks, or Safari).  Three-finger tap: Speak additional information, such as position within a list or whether text is selected.  Four-finger tap at top of screen: Select the first item on the page.  Four-finger tap at bottom of screen: Select the last item on the page. Activate  Double-tap: Activate the selected item.  Triple-tap: Double-tap an item.  Split-tap: An alternative to selecting an item and double-tapping is to touch an item with one finger, then tap the screen with another to activate an item.  Touch an item with one finger, tap the screen with another finger (“split-tapping”): Activate the item.  Double-tap and hold (1 second) + standard gesture: Use a standard gesture. The double-tap and hold gesture tells iPad to interpret the subsequent gesture as standard. For example, you can double-tap and hold, then without lifting your finger, drag your finger to slide a switch.  Two-finger double-tap: Play or pause in Music, Videos, YouTube, Voice Memos, or Photos. Take a photo (Camera). Start or pause recording in Camera or Voice Memos. Start or stop the stopwatch.  Two-finger double-tap and hold: Open the element labeler.  Two-finger triple-tap: Open the Item Chooser.  Three-finger double-tap: Mute or unmute VoiceOver.  Three-finger triple-tap: Turn the screen curtain on or off. Using the VoiceOver rotor control The rotor control is a virtual dial that you can use to change the results of up and down flick gestures when VoiceOver is turned on. Operate the rotor: Rotate two fingers on the iPad screen around a point between them. Change the options included in the rotor: Go to Settings > General > Accessibility > VoiceOver > Rotor and select the options you want to be available using the rotor. The effect of the rotor depends on what you’re doing. When you read text in an email, you can use the rotor to switch between hearing text spoken word-by-word, character-by-character, or lineby-line when you flick up or down. When you browse a webpage, you can use the rotor setting to hear all the text (either word-by-word or character-by-character), or to jump from one element to another of a certain type, such as headers or links. Chapter 24 Accessibility 111Reading text Select and hear text by:  Character, word, or line Speaking Adjust VoiceOver speaking by:  Volume or rate  Use of typing echo, pitch change, or phonetics (using Apple Wireless Keyboard) See “Controlling VoiceOver using an Apple Wireless Keyboard” on page 114. Navigating Select and hear text by:  Character, word, or line  Heading  Link, visited link, non-visited link, or in-page link  Form control  Table or row (when navigating a table)  List  Landmark  Image  Static text  Items of the same type  Buttons  Text fields  Search fields  Containers (screen regions such as the dock) Zoom in or out Entering text Move insertion point and hear text by:  Character, word, or line Select edit function Select language Using a control Select and hear values by:  Character, word, or line Adjust the value of the control object 112 Chapter 24 AccessibilityEntering and editing text with VoiceOver When you select a text field with VoiceOver, you can use the onscreen keyboard or an external keyboard connected to iPad to enter text. You can use the editing features of iPad to cut, copy, or paste in the text field. There are two ways to enter text in VoiceOver—standard typing and touch typing. With standard typing, you select a key, then double-tap the screen to enter the character. With touch typing, you touch to select a key and the character is entered automatically when you lift your finger. Touch typing can be quicker, but may require more practice than standard typing. VoiceOver also lets you use the editing features of iPad to cut, copy, or paste in a text field. Enter text: Select an editable text field, double-tap to display the insertion point and the onscreen keyboard, and type characters.  Standard typing: Select a key on the keyboard by flicking left or right, then double-tap to enter the character. Or move you finger around the keyboard to select a key and, while continuing to touch the key with one finger, tap the screen with another finger. VoiceOver speaks the key when it’s selected, and again when the character is entered.  Touch typing: Touch a key on the keyboard to select it, then lift your finger to enter the character. If you touch the wrong key, move your finger on the keyboard until you select the key you want. VoiceOver speaks the character for each key as you touch it, but doesn’t enter a character until you lift your finger. Note: Touch typing works only for the keys that enter text. Use standard typing for other keys such as Shift, Delete, and Return. Move the insertion point: Flick up or down to move the insertion point forward or backward in the text. Use the rotor to choose whether you want to move the insertion point by character, by word, or by line. VoiceOver makes a sound when the insertion point moves, and speaks the character, word, or line that the insertion point moves across. When moving forward by words, the insertion point is placed at the end of each word, before the space or punctuation that follows. When moving backward, the insertion point is placed at the end of the preceding word, before the space or punctuation that follows it. To move the insertion point past the punctuation at the end of a word or sentence, use the rotor to switch back to character mode. When moving the insertion point by line, VoiceOver speaks each line as you move across it. When moving forward, the insertion point is placed at the beginning of the next line (except when you reach the last line of a paragraph, when the insertion point is moved to the end of the line just spoken). When moving backward, the insertion point is placed at the beginning of the line that’s spoken. Choose standard or touch typing With VoiceOver turned on and a key selected on the keyboard, use the rotor to select Typing Mode, then flick up or down. Delete a character Select , then double-tap or split-tap. You must do this even when touch typing. To delete multiple characters, touch and hold the Delete key, then tap the screen with another finger once for each character you want to delete. VoiceOver speaks the character as it’s deleted. If Use Pitch Change is turned on, VoiceOver speaks deleted characters in a lower pitch. Select text Set the rotor to Edit, flick up or down to choose Select or Select All, then double-tap. If you chose Select, the word closest to the insertion point is selected when you double-tap. If you chose Select All, the entire text is selected. Pinch apart or together to increase or decrease the selection. Cut, copy, or paste Make sure the rotor is set to edit. With text selected, flick up or down to choose Cut, Copy, or Paste, then double-tap. Chapter 24 Accessibility 113Undo Shake iPad, flick left or right to choose the action to undo, then double-tap. Enter an accented character In standard typing mode, select the plain character, then double-tap and hold until you hear a sound indicating alternate characters have appeared. Drag left or right to select and hear the choices. Release your finger to enter the current selection. Change the language you’re typing in Set the rotor to Language, then flick up or down. Choose “default language” to use the language specified in International settings. The Language rotor appears only if you select more than one language in the VoiceOver Language Rotor setting. See “Setting up VoiceOver” on page 108. Using VoiceOver with Safari When you search the web in Safari with VoiceOver on, the Search Results rotor items lets you hear the list of suggested search phrases. Search the web: Select the search field, enter your search, then select Search Results using the rotor. Flick right or left to move down or up the list, then double-tap the screen to search the web using the current search phrase. Using VoiceOver with Maps You can use VoiceOver to zoom in or out, select pins, and get information about locations. Zoom in or out: Select the map, use the rotor to choose zoom mode, then flick up or down to zoom in or out. Select a pin: Touch a pin, or flick left or right to move from one item to another. Get information about a location: With a pin selected, double-tap to display the information flag. Flick left or right to select the More Info button, then double-tap to display the information page. Controlling VoiceOver using an Apple Wireless Keyboard You can control VoiceOver on iPad using an Apple Wireless Keyboard. See “Using Bluetooth devices” on page 37. You can use VoiceOver keyboard commands to navigate the screen, select items, read screen contents, adjust the rotor, and perform other VoiceOver actions. All the keyboard commands (except one) include Control-Option, abbreviated in the table below as “VO.” VoiceOver Help speaks keys or keyboard commands as you type them. You can use VoiceOver Help to learn the keyboard layout and the actions associated with key combinations. VoiceOver keyboard commands VO = Control-Option Read all, starting from the current position VO–A Read from the top VO–B Move to the status bar VO–M Press the Home button VO–H Select the next or previous item VO–Right Arrow or VO–Left Arrow Tap an item VO–Space bar Double-tap with two fingers VO–”-” Choose the next or previous rotor item VO–Up Arrow or VO–Down Arrow 114 Chapter 24 AccessibilityChoose the next or previous speech rotor item VO–Command–Left Arrow or VO–Command–Right Arrow Adjust speech rotor item VO–Command–Up Arrow or VO–Command–Down Arrow Mute or unmute VoiceOver VO–S Turn the screen curtain on or off VO–Shift-S Turn on VoiceOver help VO–K Return to the previous screen, or turn off VoiceOver help Escape Quick Nav Turn on Quick Nav to control VoiceOver using the arrow keys. Quick Nav is off by default. Turn Quick Nav on or off Left Arrow–Right Arrow Select the next or previous item Right Arrow or Left Arrow Select the next or previous item specified by the rotor setting Up Arrow or Down Arrow Select the first or last item Control–Up Arrow or Control–Down Arrow “Tap” an item Up Arrow–Down Arrow Scroll up, down, left, or right Option–Up Arrow, Option–Down Arrow, Option–Left Arrow, or Option–Right Arrow Change the rotor Up Arrow–Left Arrow or Up Arrow–Right Arrow Single-letter Quick Nav for the web When you view a web page with Quick Nav enabled, you can use the following keys on the keyboard to navigate the page quickly. Typing the key moves to the next item of the indicated type. Hold the Shift key as you type the letter to move to the previous item. H Heading L Link R Text field B Button C Form control I Image T Table S Static text W ARIA landmark X List M Element of the same type 1 Level 1 heading 2 Level 2 heading 3 Level 3 heading 4 Level 4 heading 5 Level 5 heading 6 Level 6 heading Chapter 24 Accessibility 115Using a braille display with VoiceOver You can use a refreshable Bluetooth braille display to read VoiceOver output in braille, and you can use a braille display with input keys and other controls to control iPad when VoiceOver is turned on. iPad works with many of the most popular wireless braille displays. For a list of supported braille displays, go to www.apple.com/accessibility/iphone/braille-display.html. Set up a braille display: Turn on the display, then go to Settings > General > Bluetooth and turn on Bluetooth. Then go to Settings > General > Accessibility > VoiceOver > Braille and choose the display. Turn contracted braille on or off Go to Settings > General > Accessibility > VoiceOver > Braille. Turn eight-dot braille on or off Go to Settings > General > Accessibility > VoiceOver > Braille. For information about common braille commands for VoiceOver navigation, and for information specific to certain displays, go to support.apple.com/kb/HT4400. The braille display uses the language that’s set for Voice Control. This is normally the language that’s set for iPad in Settings > International > Language. You can use the VoiceOver language setting to set a different language for VoiceOver and braille displays. Set the language for VoiceOver: Go to Settings > General > International > Voice Control, then choose the language. If you change the language for iPad, you may need to reset the language for VoiceOver and your braille display. You can set the leftmost or rightmost cell of your braille display to provide system status and other information:  Announcement History contains an unread message  The current Announcement History message hasn’t been read  VoiceOver speech is muted  The iPad battery is low (less than 20% charge)  iPad is in landscape orientation  The screen display is turned off  The current line contains additional text to the left  The current line contains additional text to the right Set the leftmost or rightmost cell to display status information: Go to Settings > General > Accessibility > VoiceOver > Braille > Status Cell, then tap Left or Right. See an expanded description of the status cell: On your braille display, press the status cell’s router button. Triple-click Home Triple-click Home is an easy way to turn some accessibility features on or off by quickly pressing the Home button three times. You can set Triple-click Home to turn VoiceOver on or off, turn White on Black on or off, turn touch on or off, or ask if you would like to triple-click the Home button to:  Turn VoiceOver on or off  Turn White on Black on or off  Turn Zoom on or off  Turn AssistiveTouch on or off 116 Chapter 24 AccessibilityTriple-click Home is normally turned off. Set the Triple-click Home function: Go to Settings > General > Accessibility > Triple-click Home, then choose the feature you want. Zoom The Zoom accessibility feature lets you magnify the entire screen to help you see what’s on the display. Turn Zoom on or off: Go to Settings > General > Accessibility > Zoom. Or, use Triple-click Home. See “Triple-click Home” on page 116. Zoom in or out Double-tap the screen with three fingers. By default, the screen is magnified 200 percent. If you manually change the magnification (by using the tapand-drag gesture, described below), iPad automatically returns to that magnification when you zoom in by double-tapping with three fingers. Increase magnification With three fingers, tap and drag toward the top of the screen (to increase magnification) or toward the bottom of the screen (to decrease magnification). The tap-and-drag gesture is similar to a double-tap, except you don’t lift your fingers on the second tap—instead, drag your fingers on the screen. Once you start dragging, you can drag with a single finger. Move around the screen When zoomed in, drag or flick the screen with three fingers. Once you start dragging, you can drag with a single finger so that you can see more of the screen. Hold a single finger near the edge of the display to pan to that side of the screen image. Move your finger closer to the edge to pan more quickly. When you open a new screen, Zoom always goes to the top-middle of the screen. While using Zoom with an Apple Wireless Keyboard, the screen image follows the insertion point, keeping it in the center of the display. See “Using an Apple Wireless Keyboard” on page 31. Large Text Large Text lets you make the text larger in Mail and Notes. You can choose 20-point, 24-point, 32-point, 40-point, 48-point, or 56-point text. Set the text size: Go to Settings > General > Accessibility > Large Text. White on Black Use White on Black to invert the colors on the iPad display, which may make it easier to read the screen. When White on Black is turned on, the screen looks like a photographic negative. Invert the screen’s colors: Go to Settings > General > Accessibility > White on Black. Speak Selection Even with VoiceOver turned off, you can have iPad read aloud any text you can select. Turn on Speak Selection and adjust speaking rate: Go to Settings > General > Accessibility > Speak Selection. Have text read to you Select the text, then tap Speak. Chapter 24 Accessibility 117Speak Auto-Text Speak Auto-text speaks the text corrections and suggestions iPad makes when you type. Turn Speak Auto-text on or off: Go to Settings > General > Accessibility > Speak Auto-text. Speak Auto-text also works with VoiceOver or Zoom. Mono Audio Mono Audio combines the sound of the left and right channels into a mono signal played on both sides. This lets users with hearing impairment in one ear hear the entire sound signal with the other ear. Turn Mono Audio on or off: Go to Settings > General > Accessibility > Mono Audio. AssistiveTouch AssistiveTouch helps you use iPad if you have difficulty touching the screen or pressing the buttons. You can use a compatible adaptive accessory (such as a joystick) together with AssistiveTouch to control iPad. You can also use AssistiveTouch without an accessory to perform gestures that are difficult for you. Turn on AssistiveTouch: Go to Settings > General > Accessibility > AssistiveTouch. You can also set Triple-click Home to turn AssistiveTouch on or off; go to Settings > General > Accessibility > Triple-click Home. Adjust the tracking speed Go to Settings > General > Accessibility > AssistiveTouch > Touch speed. Show or hide the AssistiveTouch menu Click the secondary button on your accessory. Hide the menu button Go to Settings > General > Accessibility > AssistiveTouch > Always Show Menu. Perform a flick or drag that uses 2, 3, 4, or 5 fingers Tap the menu button, tap Gestures, and then tap the number of digits needed for the gesture. When the corresponding circles appear on the screen, flick or drag in the direction required by the gesture. When you’re finished, tap the menu button. Perform a pinch gesture Tap the menu button, tap Favorites, and then tap Pinch. When the pinch circles appear, touch anywhere on the screen to move the pinch circles, then drag the pinch circles in or out to perform a pinch gesture. When you finish, tap the menu button. Create your own gesture Tap the menu button, tap Favorites, and then tap an empty gesture placeholder. You can also go to Settings > General > Accessibility > AssistiveTouch > “Create custom gesture.” Lock or rotate the screen, adjust iPad volume, toggle the Side Switch, or simulate shaking iPad Tap the menu button, then tap Device. Simulate pressing the Home button Tap the menu button, then tap Home. Move the menu button Drag it to any location on the screen. Exit a menu without performing a gesture Tap anywhere outside the menu. 118 Chapter 24 AccessibilityUniversal Access in OS X Take advantage of the Universal Access features in OS X when you use iTunes to sync information and content from your iTunes library to iPad. In the Finder, choose Help > Help Center, then search for “universal access.” For more information about iPad and OS X accessibility features, go to www.apple.com/accessibility. Minimum font size for mail messages To increase readability, set the minimum font size for Mail message text to Large, Extra Large, or Giant. Set the minimum mail message font size: Go to Settings > Mail, Contacts, Calendars > Minimum Font Size. The Large Text setting overrides this minimum font size. Widescreen keyboards All built-in iPad apps show a larger onscreen keyboard when you rotate iPad to landscape view. You can also type using an Apple Wireless Keyboard. Closed captioning Turn on closed captioning for videos: Go to Settings > Video > Closed Captioning. Not all video content includes closed captions. Chapter 24 Accessibility 119Settings 25 Airplane Mode Airplane mode disables the wireless features of iPad in order to reduce potential interference with aircraft operation and other electrical equipment. Turn on airplane mode: Tap Settings and turn airplane mode on. When airplane mode is on, appears in the status bar at the top of the screen, and iPad emits no Wi-Fi, cellular (4G or 3G models), or Bluetooth signals. You won’t be able to use apps or features that depend on these connections. If allowed by the aircraft operator and applicable laws and regulations, you can continue to listen to music, watch videos, browse email, calendar, and other data you’ve previously received, and use apps that don’t require an Internet connection. If Wi-Fi is available and allowed by the aircraft operator and applicable laws and regulations, go to Settings > Wi-Fi to turn it on. Similarly, you can turn on BlueTooth in Settings > General > BlueTooth. Wi-Fi Joining a Wi-Fi network Wi-Fi settings determine whether iPad uses local Wi-Fi networks to connect to the Internet. When iPad is joined to a Wi-Fi network, the Wi-Fi icon in the status bar at the top of the screen shows signal strength. The more bars you see, the stronger the signal. Once you join a Wi-Fi network, iPad automatically connects to it whenever the network is in range. If more than one previously used network is in range, iPad joins the one last used. If no Wi-Fi networks are available, iPad (4G or 3G models) connect over your cellular network, if possible. You can also use iPad to set up a new AirPort base station that provides Wi-Fi services to your home or office. See “Setting up an AirPort base station” on page 121. Turn Wi-Fi on or off: Go to Settings > Wi-Fi. 120Set iPad to ask if you want to join a new network Go to Settings > Wi-Fi then turn “Ask to Join Networks” on or off. If “Ask to Join Networks” is turned off, you must manually join a network to connect to the Internet when a previously used network isn’t available. Forget a network, so iPad doesn’t join it Go to Settings > Wi-Fi then tap next to a network you’ve joined before. Then tap “Forget this Network.” Join a closed Wi-Fi network To join a Wi-Fi network that isn’t shown in the list of scanned networks, go to Settings > Wi-Fi > Other, then enter the network name. You must already know the network name, password, and security type to connect to a closed network. Adjust settings for connecting to a Wi-Fi network Go to Settings > Wi-Fi, then tap next to a network. You can set an HTTP proxy, define static network settings, turn on BootP, or renew the settings from a DHCP server. Setting up an AirPort base station An AirPort base station provides a Wi-Fi connection to your home, school, or small business network. You can use iPad to set up a new AirPort Express base station, AirPort Extreme base station, or Time Capsule. Use the AirPort Setup Assistant: Go to Settings > Wi-Fi. Under the “Set up an AirPort base station” heading, tap the name of the base station you want to set up. Then follow the onscreen instructions. Some older AirPort base stations cannot be set up using an iOS device. For setup instructions, see the documentation that came with the base station. If the base station you want to set up isn’t listed, make sure it has power, that you’re within range, and that it hasn’t already been configured. You can only set up base stations that are new or have been reset. If your AirPort base station is already configured, the AirPort Utility app from the App Store lets you change the base station’s settings and monitor its status. Notifications Push notifications appear in Notification Center and alert you to new information, even when an app isn’t running. Notifications vary by app, but may include text or sound alerts, and a numbered badge on the app icon on the Home screen. You can turn notifications off if you don’t want to be notified, and you can change the order notifications appear in. Turn notifications on or off: Go to Settings > Notifications. Tap an item in the list, then turn notifications on or off for that item. Apps that have notifications turned off are shown in the Not In Notification Center list. Change the number of recent notifications shown Go to Settings > Notifications, then choose an item from the In Notification Center list. Tap Show to select how many notifications of this type appear in Notification Center. Change the alert styles Go to Settings > Notifications, then choose an item from the In Notification Center list. Choose an alert style, or select None to turn off alerts and banners. Notifications will still appear in Notification Center. Change the order of notifications Go to Settings > Notifications, then tap Edit. Drag the notifications to reorder them. To turn off a notification, drag it to the Not In Notification Center list. Chapter 25 Settings 121Display numbered badges on apps with notifications Go to Settings > Notifications, then choose an item from the In Notification Center list. Turn on Badge App Icon. Prevent alerts from showing when iPad is locked Go to Settings > Notifications, then choose an app from the In Notification Center list. Turn off “View in Lock Screen” to hide alerts from the app when iPad is locked. Some apps have additional options. For example, Messages lets you specify how many times the alert sound is repeated and whether message previews are included in the notification. Location Services Location Services lets apps such as Reminders, Maps, Camera, and third-party location-based apps gather and use data showing your location. Your approximate location is determined using available information from cellular network data (4G or 3G models), and from local Wi-Fi networks (if you have Wi-Fi turned on). To conserve battery life, turn Location Services off when you’re not using it. When an app is using Location Services, appears in the status bar. Every app and system service that uses Location Services appears in the Location Services settings screen, showing whether Location Services is turned on or off for that app or service. You can turn Location Services off for some or for all apps and services, if you don’t want to use this feature. If you turn Location Services off, you’re prompted to turn it on again the next time an app or service tries to use it. The location data collected by Apple doesn’t personally identify you. If you have third-party apps on iPad that use Location Services, review the third party’s terms and privacy policy for each app to understand how it uses your location data. Turn Location Services on or off: Go to Settings > Location Services. Cellular Data Use Cellular Data settings (on models that support cellular connections) to activate cellular data service, turn cellular use on or off, or add a Personal Identification Number (PIN) to lock the microSIM card. With some carriers, you can also change your data plan. Activate, view, or change your cellular data account: Go to Settings > Cellular Data, then tap View Account. Follow the onscreen instructions. Turn Cellular Data on or off Go to Settings > Cellular Data. If Cellular Data is turned off, all data services will use only Wi-Fi, including email, web browsing, push notifications, and other services. If Cellular Data is turned on, carrier charges may be incurred. For example, using certain features and services such as Messages transfer data could result in charges to your data plan. Turn Data Roaming on or off Go to Settings > Cellular Data. Turning off Data Roaming avoids carrier charges that may arise when using a network provided by a different carrier. 122 Chapter 25 SettingsVPN VPNs used within organizations let you communicate private information securely over a nonprivate network. You may need to configure VPN, for example, in order to access your work email. This setting appears when you have VPN configured on iPad, and lets you turn VPN on or off. See “Network” on page 125. Personal Hotspot With iPad Wi-Fi + 4G models, you can use Personal Hotspot to share an Internet connection with a computer or other device—such as an iPod touch, iPhone, or other iPad—connected to your iPad via Wi-Fi. You can also use Personal Hotspot to share an Internet connection with a computer connected to iPad via Bluetooth or USB. Personal Hotspot works only if iPad is connected to the Internet over the cellular data network. Note: This feature may not be available in all areas. Additional fees may apply. Contact your carrier for more information. Share an Internet connection: Go to Settings > General > Network and tap Set Up Personal Hotspot—if it appears—to set up the service with your carrier. After you turn on Personal Hotspot, other devices can connect in the following ways:  W-Fi: On the device, choose your iPad from the list of available Wi-Fi networks.  USB: Connect your computer to iPad using the Dock Connector to USB Cable. In your computer’s Network preferences, choose iPad and configure the network settings.  Bluetooth: On iPad, go to Settings > General > Bluetooth and turn on Bluetooth. To pair and connect iPad with your device, refer to the documentation that came with your computer. When a device is connected, a blue band appears at the top of the iPad screen. Personal Hotspot remains on when you connect with USB, even when you aren’t actively using the Internet connection. Note: The Personal Hotspot icon appears in the status bar of iOS devices using the Personal Hotspot. Change the Wi-Fi password for iPad Go to Settings > Personal Hotspot > Wi-Fi Password, then enter a password of at least 8 characters. Monitor your cellular data network usage Go to Settings > General > Usage > Cellular Usage. Brightness & Wallpaper Use Brightness settings to adjust the screen to a comfortable level. Adjust the screen brightness: Go to Settings > Brightness & Wallpaper and drag the slider. Set whether iPad adjusts screen brightness automatically Go to Settings > Brightness & Wallpaper and turn Auto-Brightness on or off. If Auto-Brightness is on, iPad adjusts the screen brightness for current light conditions using the built-in ambient light sensor. Wallpaper settings let you set an image or photo as wallpaper for the Lock screen or Home screen. See “Changing the wallpaper” on page 27. Chapter 25 Settings 123Picture Frame Picture Frame mode turns iPad into an animated picture frame. Choose which transition to use, the duration of each photo, and which album to display. Choose whether to zoom in on faces and whether to shuffle photos. Start Picture Frame: Tap on the Lock screen. Remove the Picture Frame button from the lock screen Go to Settings > General > Passcode Lock. General General settings include network, sharing, security, and other iOS settings. You can also find information about your iPad, and reset various iPad settings. About Go to Settings > General > About to get information about your iPad, including available storage space, serial numbers, network addresses, and legal and regulatory information. You can also view and turn off diagnostic information that’s sent to Apple. Change the name of your iPad: Go to Settings > General > About, then tap Name. The name appears in the sidebar when iPad is connected to iTunes, and it’s used by iCloud. Software Update Software Update lets you download and install iOS updates from Apple. Update to the latest iOS version: Go to Settings > General > Software Update. If a newer version of iOS is available, follow the onscreen instructions to download and install the update. Note: Make sure iPad is connected to a power source so that the installation, which can take several minutes, completes successfully. Usage You can view available storage space, the percentage of battery power remaining, and, on 4G or 3G models, cellular usage. View available storage: Go to Settings > General > Usage. Manage iCloud storage Go to Settings > General > Usage > Manage Storage. You can view or delete backups, and turn off backing up your Camera Roll. You can also buy additional iCloud storage space. View app storage Go to Settings > General > Usage. Each installed app’s total storage space is shown. For more details, tap the app’s name. See your cellular usage Go to Settings > General > Usage > Cellular Usage. Available on 4G or 3G models. Reset your usage statistics Go to Settings > General > Usage > Cellular Usage, then tap Reset Statistics to clear the data and cumulative time statistics. Show battery percentage Go to Settings > General > Usage and turn Battery Percentage on. 124 Chapter 25 SettingsSounds You can set iPad to play a sound whenever you get a new message, email, or reminder. Sounds can also play for appointments, sending an email, keyboard clicks, and when you lock iPad. Adjust the alerts volume: Go to Settings > General > Sounds and drag the slider. Or, if “Change with Buttons” is turned on, use the volume buttons on the side of iPad. Note: In some countries or regions, the sound effects for Camera are played even if iPad is set to silent. Allow the volume buttons to change the alerts volume Go to Settings > General > Sounds and turn on “Change with Buttons.” Change the alert and other sounds Go to Settings > General > Sounds and select tones for the items in the list. Change the volume of other sounds Use the volume buttons on the side of iPad. Network Use Network settings to configure a VPN (virtual private network) connection and access Wi-Fi settings. Add a new VPN configuration Go to Settings > General > Network > VPN > Add VPN Configuration. Ask your network administrator which settings to use. In most cases, if you’ve set up VPN on your computer, you can use the same VPN settings for iPad. See “VPN” on page 123. For information about Wi-Fi settings, see “Wi-Fi” on page 120. Bluetooth iPad can connect wirelessly to Bluetooth devices such as headphones. You can also connect the Apple Wireless Keyboard using Bluetooth. See “Using an Apple Wireless Keyboard” on page 31. Turn Bluetooth on or off: Go to Settings > General > Bluetooth. Connect to a Bluetooth device Tap the device in the Devices list, then follow the onscreen instructions to connect to it. See the documentation that came with the device for instructions about Bluetooth pairing. iTunes Wi-Fi Sync You can sync iPad with iTunes on a computer that’s connected to the same Wi-Fi network. Enable iTunes Wi-Fi Sync: Connect iPad to your computer using the Dock Connector to USB Cable. In iTunes, turn on “Sync over Wi-Fi connection” in the device’s Summary pane. See “Syncing with iTunes” on page 20. After you configure Wi-Fi Sync, iPad syncs with iTunes automatically, once a day, when it is connected to a power source and:  iPad and your computer are both connected to the same Wi-Fi network.  iTunes on your computer is running. See Wi-Fi Sync status Go to Settings > General > iTunes Wi-Fi Sync. Immediately sync with iTunes Go to Settings > General > iTunes Wi-Fi Sync, then tap Sync Now. Chapter 25 Settings 125Spotlight Search The Spotlight Search setting lets you specify the content areas searched by Search, and rearrange the order of the results. Set which content areas are searched by Search: Go to Settings > General > Spotlight Search, then select the items to search. Set the order of search result categories Go to Settings > General > Spotlight Search. Touch next to an item and drag to move the item in the list. Auto-Lock Locking iPad turns off the display, preserves battery power, and prevents unintended operation of iPad. Set the amount of time before iPad locks: Go to Settings > General > Auto-Lock, then choose a time. If you’re listening to music while the screen is locked, use the volume buttons to adjust the volume. Passcode Lock By default, iPad doesn’t require a passcode to unlock it. Setting a passcode enables data protection. See “Security features” on page 38. Set a passcode: Go to Settings > General > Passcode Lock to set a 4-digit passcode. If you forget your passcode, you must restore the iPad software. See “Updating iPad” on page 139. Turn passcode lock off or change your passcode Go to Settings > General > Passcode Lock. Set how long before your passcode is required Go to Settings > General > Passcode Lock and enter your passcode. Tap Require Passcode, then select how long iPad will wait after being locked before it requires your passcode in order to be unlocked again. Turn Simple Passcode on or off Go to Settings > General > Passcode Lock. A simple passcode is a four-digit number. To increase security, turn off Simple Passcode and use a longer passcode with a combination of numbers, letters, punctuation, and special characters. Erase data after ten failed passcode attempts Go to Settings > General > Passcode Lock and tap Erase Data. After ten failed passcode attempts, all settings are reset, and all your information and media are erased by removing the encryption key to the data. Turn Picture Frame on or off Go to Settings > General > Passcode Lock. See “Picture Frame” on page 124. iPad Cover Lock / Unlock You can automatically lock or unlock iPad 2 or later when you use it with the iPad Smart Cover (available separately). When this feature is turned on, iPad automatically locks and goes to sleep when you close the cover, and then wakes when you open it. This setting appears when you attach the iPad Smart Cover. Restrictions You can set restrictions for the use of some apps and for purchased content. For example, parents can restrict explicit music from being seen on playlists, or turn off In-App purchases. Turn on restrictions: Go to Settings > General > Restrictions, then tap Enable Restrictions. Important: If you forget your restrictions passcode, you must restore the iPad software. See “Restoring iPad” on page 139. 126 Chapter 25 SettingsYou can set the following restrictions: Safari Safari is disabled and its icon is removed from the Home screen. You cannot use Safari to browse the web or access web clips. YouTube YouTube is disabled and its icon is removed from the Home screen. Camera Camera is disabled and its icon is removed from the Home screen. You cannot take photos. FaceTime You cannot make or receive FaceTime video calls. The FaceTime icon is removed from the Home screen. iTunes The iTunes Store is disabled and its icon is removed from the Home screen. You cannot preview, purchase, or download content. Ping You cannot access Ping or any of its features. Installing Apps The App Store is disabled and its icon is removed from the Home screen. You cannot install apps on iPad. Deleting Apps You cannot delete apps from iPad. doesn’t appear on app icons when you’re customizing the Home screen. Dictation You cannot use text dictation. Explicit Language iPad attempts to replace explicit dictated words with asterisks. Location Turn Location Services off for individual apps. You can also lock Location Services so that changes to the settings can’t be made, including authorizing additional apps to use the services. Accounts The current Mail, Contacts, Calendar settings are locked and you cannot add, modify, or delete accounts. Set content restrictions Tap Ratings For, then select a country from the list. You can then set restrictions using a country’s ratings system for music, podcasts, movies, TV shows, and apps. Content that doesn’t meet the rating you select won’t appear on iPad. In-app Purchases Turn off In-App Purchases. When enabled, this feature allows you to purchase additional content or functionality within apps downloaded from the App Store. Require Password Requires you to enter your Apple ID for in-app purchases after the time period you specify. Multiplayer Games When Multiplayer Games is turned off, you can’t request a match, send or receive invitations to play games, or add friends in Game Center. Adding Friends When Adding Friends is off, you can’t make or receive friend requests in Game Center. If Multiplayer Games is turned on, you can continue to play with existing friends. Side Switch You can use the Side Switch to lock screen orientation or to silence notifications and sound effects. Lock the screen in portrait or landscape orientation: Go to Settings > General > “Use the Side Switch to…,” then tap Lock Rotation. Mute notifications and other sound effects: Go to Settings > General > “Use the Side Switch to…,” then tap Mute. The Side Switch doesn’t mute audio or video playback. Use the volume buttons on the side to silence these sounds. Multitasking Gestures Multitasking gestures let you quickly switch between apps, reveal the multitasking bar, and go the Home screen. See “Using multitasking gestures” on page 16. Chapter 25 Settings 127Date & Time These settings apply to the time shown in the status bar at the top of the screen, and in world clocks and calendars. Set whether iPad shows 24-hour time or 12-hour time: Go to Settings > General > Date & Time. (24-Hour Time may not be available in all countries or regions.) Set whether iPad updates the date and time automatically Go to Settings > General > Date & Time. If iPad is set to update the time automatically, it determines your time zone based on your Internet connection and updates it for the time zone you’re in. If you’re traveling, iPad may not be able to automatically set the local time. Set the date and time manually Go to Settings > General > Date & Time, then turn Set Automatically off. Tap Time Zone to set your time zone. “Tap Date & Time,” then tap “Set Date & Time” and enter the date and time. Keyboard You can turn on keyboards for writing in different languages, and you can turn typing features, such as spell-checking, on or off. For information about keyboard options, see “Typing” on page 28. To reset the keyboard dictionary, see “Reset” on page 129 For information about using international keyboards, see Appendix B,“International Keyboards,” on page 132. International Use International settings to set the language for iPad, turn keyboards for different languages on or off, and set the date, time, and telephone number formats for your country or region. Set the language for iPad: Go to Settings > General > International > Language, choose the language you want to use, then tap Done. Set the calendar format Go to Settings > General > International > Calendar, and choose the format. Set the date, time, and telephone number formats Go to Settings > General > International > Region Format, then choose your region. The Region Format also determines the language used for the days and months that appear in apps. Accessibility To turn on accessibility features, choose Accessibility and choose the features you want. See Chapter 24,“Accessibility,” on page 107. Profiles This setting appears if you install one or more profiles on iPad. Tap Profiles to see information about the profiles you install. For more information about profiles, see Appendix A,“iPad in Business,” on page 130. 128 Chapter 25 SettingsReset You can reset the keyboard dictionary, network settings, home screen layout, and location warnings. You can also erase all of your content and settings. Erase all content and settings: Go to Settings > General > Reset, then tap Erase All Content and Settings. After confirming that you want to reset iPad, all content, your personal information, and settings are removed. It cannot be used until it’s set up again. Reset all settings Go to Settings > General > Reset and tap Reset All Settings. All your preferences and settings are reset. Reset network settings Go to Settings > General > Reset and tap Reset Network Settings. When you reset network settings, your list of previously used networks and VPN settings not installed by a configuration profile are removed. Wi-Fi is turned off and then back on, disconnecting you from any network you’re on. The Wi-Fi and “Ask to Join Networks” settings are left turned on. To remove VPN settings installed by a configuration profile, go to Settings > General > Profile, then select the profile and tap Remove. This also removes other settings and accounts provided by the profile. Reset the keyboard dictionary Go to Settings > General > Reset and tap Reset Keyboard Dictionary. You add words to the keyboard dictionary by rejecting words iPad suggests as you type. Tap a word to reject the correction and add the word to the keyboard dictionary. Resetting the keyboard dictionary erases all words you’ve added. Reset the Home screen layout Go to Settings > General > Reset and tap Reset Home Screen Layout. Reset location warnings Go to Settings > General > Reset and tap Reset Location Warnings. Location warnings are requests made by apps to use Location Services. iPad presents a location warning for an app the first time the app makes a request to use Location Services. If you tap Cancel in response, the request isn’t shown again. To reset the location warnings so that you get a request for each app, tap Reset Location Warnings. Settings for apps See other chapters for information about settings for apps. For example, for Safari settings, see Chapter 4,“Safari,” on page 40. Chapter 25 Settings 129iPad in Business A Appendix iPad in the enterprise With support for secure access to corporate networks, directories, and Microsoft Exchange, iPad is ready to go to work. For detailed information about using iPad in business, go to www.apple.com/ipad/business. Using configuration profiles If you’re in an enterprise environment, you may be able to set up accounts and other items on iPad by installing a configuration profile. Configuration profiles let your administrator set up your iPad to use the information systems at your company, school, or organization. For example, a configuration profile might set up your iPad to access the Microsoft Exchange servers at work, so iPad can access your Exchange email, calendars, and contacts. A configuration profile can configure many different settings on iPad. For example, a configuration profile can set up your Microsoft Exchange account, VPN account, and certificates for secure access to your company’s network and information. A configuration profile can also turn on Passcode Lock, which requires you to create and enter a passcode in order to use iPad. Your administrator may distribute configuration profiles by email, by putting them on a secure webpage, or by installing them directly on iPad for you. Your administrator may have you install a profile that ties your iPad to a mobile device management server, which allows your administrator to configure your settings remotely. Install configuration profiles: On iPad, open the email message or download the configuration profiles from the website your administrator provides. When you open the configuration profile, installation begins. Important: You may be asked whether a configuration profile is trusted. If in doubt, ask your administrator before installing the configuration profile. You can’t change the settings in a configuration profile. If you want to change settings, you must first remove the configuration profile, or install a new configuration profile with the new settings. Remove a configuration profile: Go to Settings > General > Profile, then select the configuration profile and tap Remove. Removing a configuration profile deletes the settings and all other information installed by the profile. Setting up Microsoft Exchange accounts Microsoft Exchange provides email, contact, tasks, and calendar information that you can automatically sync wirelessly to iPad. You can set up an Exchange account directly on iPad. Set up an Exchange account on iPad: Go to Settings > Mail, Contacts, Calendars. Tap Add Account, then tap Microsoft Exchange. Your service provider or administrator can provide the account settings you need. 130VPN access VPN (virtual private network) provides secure access over the Internet to private networks, such as the network at your company or school. Use Network settings on iPad to configure and turn on VPN. Ask your administrator what settings you should use. VPN can also be set up automatically by a configuration profile. When VPN is set up by a configuration profile, iPad may turn VPN on automatically whenever it’s needed. For more information, contact your administrator. LDAP and CardDAV accounts When you set up an LDAP account, you can view and search for contacts on your company or organization’s LDAP server. The server appears as a new group in Contacts. Because LDAP contacts aren’t downloaded to iPad, you must have an Internet connection to view them. Check with your administrator for account settings and other requirements (such as VPN). When you set up a CardDAV account, your account contacts are synced with iPad over the air. You may also be able to search for contacts on your company or organization’s CardDAV server. Set up an LDAP or CardDAV account: Go to Settings > Mail, Contacts, Calendars, then tap Add Account. Tap Other. Your service provider or administrator can provide the account settings you need. Appendix A iPad in Business 131International Keyboards B Appendix International keyboards let you type text in many different languages, including Asian languages and languages written from right to left. Adding and removing keyboards To type text in different languages on iPad, you use different keyboards. By default, only the keyboard for the language you’ve set is available. To make keyboards for other languages available, use Keyboard settings. For a list of keyboards supported by iPad, go to www.apple.com/ipad/specs. Add a keyboard: Go to Settings > General > International > Keyboards > Add New Keyboard, then choose a keyboard from the list. Repeat to add more keyboards. Remove a keyboard: Go to Settings > General > International > Keyboards, then tap Edit. Tap next to the keyboard you want to remove, then tap Delete. Edit your keyboard list: Go to Settings > General > International > Keyboards. Tap Edit, then drag next to a keyboard to a new place in the list. Switching keyboards To enter text in a different language, switch keyboards. Switch keyboards while typing: Touch and hold the Globe key to show all enabled keyboards. To choose a keyboard, slide your finger to the name of the keyboard, then release. The Globe key appears when you enable more than one keyboard. You can also tap . When you tap , the name of the newly activated keyboard appears briefly. Continue tapping to access other enabled keyboards. Many keyboards provide letters, numbers, and symbols that aren’t visible on the keyboard. Enter accented letters or other alternate characters: Touch and hold the related letter, number, or symbol, then slide to choose a variant. On a Thai keyboard, for example, you can choose native numbers by touching and holding the related Arabic number. Chinese You can use keyboards to enter Chinese in several different ways, including Pinyin, Cangjie, Wubihua, and Zhuyin. You can also use your finger to write Chinese characters on the screen. Typing using Pinyin Use the QWERTY keyboard to type Simplified or Traditional Pinyin. As you type, suggested characters appear. Tap a suggestion to choose it, continue typing Pinyin to see more options. If you keep entering Pinyin without spaces, sentence suggestions appear. 132Typing using Cangjie Build Chinese characters from the component Cangjie keys. As you type, suggested characters appear. Tap a character to choose it, or continue typing up to five components to see more options. Typing using Stroke (Wubihua) Use the keypad to build Chinese characters using up to five strokes, in the correct writing sequence: horizontal, vertical, left falling, right falling, and hook. For example, the Chinese character ? (circle) should begin with the vertical stroke ?. As you type, suggested Chinese characters appear (the most commonly used characters appear first). Tap a character to choose it. If you’re not sure of the correct stroke, enter an asterisk (*). To see more character options, type another stroke, or scroll through the character list. Tap the match key (??) to show only characters that match exactly what you typed. Typing using Zhuyin Use the keyboard to enter Zhuyin letters. As you type, suggested Chinese characters appear. Tap a suggestion to choose it, or continue entering Zhuyin letters to see more options. After you type an initial letter, the keyboard changes to show more letters. If you keep entering Zhuyin without spaces, sentence suggestions appear. Drawing Chinese characters When Simplified or Traditional Chinese handwriting formats are turned on, you can draw or write Chinese characters directly on the screen with your finger. As you write character strokes, iPad recognizes them and shows matching characters in a list, with the closest match at the top. When you choose a character, its likely follow-on characters appear in the list as additional choices. Touchpad Touchpad Some complex characters, such as ? (part of the name for the Hong Kong International Airport), ?? (elevator), and ? (particle used in Cantonese), can be typed by writing two or more component characters in sequence. Tap the character to replace the characters you typed. Roman characters are also recognized. Converting between Simplified and Traditional Chinese Select the character or characters you want to convert, then tap Replace. Appendix B International Keyboards 133Japanese You can type Japanese using the Kana or Romaji keyboards. You can also type facemarks. Typing Japanese kana Use the Kana keypad to select syllables. For more syllable options, tap the arrow key and select another syllable or word from the window. Typing Japanese romaji Use the Romaji keyboard to type syllables. Alternative choices appear along the top of the keyboard, tap one to type it. For more syllable options, tap the arrow key and select another syllable or word from the window. Typing facemarks or emoticons Using the Japanese Kana keyboard, tap the ^_^ key. Using the Japanese Romaji keyboard (QWERTY-Japanese layout), tap the Number key , then tap the ^_^ key. Using the Chinese (Simplified or Traditional) Pinyin or (Traditional) Zhuyin keyboard, tap the Symbols key , then tap the ^_^ key. Typing emoji characters Use the Emoji keyboard to add picture characters. You also can type emoji characters using a Japanese keyboard. For example, type ??? to get ?. Using the candidate list As you type on Chinese, Japanese, or Arabic keyboards, suggested characters or candidates appear at the top of the keyboard. Tap a candidate to enter it, or flick to the left to see more candidates. Use the extended candidate list: Tap the up arrow at the right to view the full candidate list. Flick up or down to scroll the list. Tap the down arrow to go back to the short list. Using shortcuts When using certain Chinese or Japanese keyboards, you can create a shortcut for word and input pairs. The shortcut is added to the personal dictionary. When you type a shortcut while using a supported keyboard, the associated word or input pair is substituted for the shortcut. Shortcuts are available for the following keyboards:  Chinese - Simplified (Pinyin)  Chinese - Traditional (Pinyin)  Chinese - Traditional (Zhuyin)  Japanese (Romaji)  Japanese (50 Key) Turn shortcuts on or off: Go to Settings > General > Keyboard > Shortcuts. 134 Appendix B International KeyboardsVietnamese Touch and hold a character to see the available diacritical marks, then slide to choose the one you want. You can also type the following key sequences to enter characters with diacritical marks:  aa—â (a circumflex)  aw—a (a caron)  ee—ê (e circumflex)  oo—ô (o circumflex)  ow—o (o hook)  w—u (u hook)  dd—d (d dash)  as—á (a acute)  af—à (a grave)  ar—? (a question mark)  ax—ã (a rising accent)  aj—? (a drop tone) Appendix B International Keyboards 135Support and Other Information C Appendix iPad Support site Comprehensive support information is available online at www.apple.com/support/ipad. You can also use Express Lane for personalized support (not available in all areas). See expresslane.apple.com. Low-battery image or “Not Charging” message appears iPad is low on power and needs to charge for up to twenty minutes before you can use it. For information about charging iPad, see “Charging the battery” on page 22. or or  When charging, make sure you’re using the 10W USB power adapter that came with iPad or the USB port on a recent Mac. The fastest way to charge is to use the power adapter. See “Charging the battery” on page 22.  For faster charging, turn iPad off.  iPad may not charge when connected to the USB port on an older Mac, a PC, a keyboard, or to a USB hub. If your Mac or PC doesn’t provide enough power to charge iPad, a Not Charging message appears in the status bar. To charge iPad, disconnect it from your computer and connect it to a power outlet using the included Dock Connector to USB Cable and 10W USB power adapter. iPad doesn’t respond  iPad may be low on power. Connect iPad to the 10W USB power adapter to charge. See “Charging the battery” on page 22.  Press and hold the Sleep/Wake button for a few seconds until a red slider appears, then press and hold the Home button to force the app you were using to close.  If that doesn’t work, turn iPad off, and then turn it on again. Press and hold the Sleep/Wake button until a red slider appears, then drag the slider. Then press and hold the Sleep/Wake button until the Apple logo appears.  If that doesn’t work, reset iPad. Press and hold both the Sleep/Wake button and the Home button for at least ten seconds, until the Apple logo appears.  If the screen doesn’t rotate when you turn iPad, hold iPad upright, and make sure that the screen rotation lock is not engaged. 136Restarting and resetting iPad If something isn’t working right, try restarting iPad, forcing an app to close, or resetting iPad. Restart iPad: Hold down the Sleep/Wake button until the red slider appears. Slide your finger across the slider to turn off iPad. To turn iPad back on, hold down the Sleep/Wake until the Apple logo appears. Force an app to close: Hold down the Sleep/Wake button on top of iPad for a few seconds until a red slider appears, then hold down the Home button until the app closes. If you can’t turn off iPad or if the problem continues, you may need to reset iPad. This should be done only if turning iPad off and on doesn’t resolve the problem. Reset iPad: Hold down the Sleep/Wake button and the Home button at the same time for at least ten seconds, until the Apple logo appears. “This accessory is not supported by iPad” appears The accessory you attached may not work with iPad. Make sure the Dock Connector to USB Cable is free of debris, and refer to the documentation that came with the accessory. An app doesn’t fill the screen Most apps for iPhone and iPod touch can be used with iPad, but they might not take advantage of the large screen. In this case, tap to zoom in on the app. Tap to return to the original size. Check the App Store to see if there’s a version of the app that’s optimized for iPad, or a universal version that’s optimized for iPhone, iPod touch, and iPad. Onscreen keyboard doesn’t appear If iPad is paired with a Bluetooth keyboard, the onscreen keyboard doesn’t appear. To make the onscreen keyboard appear, press the Eject key on a Bluetooth keyboard. You can also make the onscreen keyboard appear by moving the Bluetooth keyboard out of range or turning it off. Backing up iPad You can use iCloud or iTunes to automatically back up iPad. If you choose to automatically back up using iCloud, you can’t also use iTunes to automatically back up to your computer, but you can use iTunes to manually back up to your computer. Backing up with iCloud iCloud automatically backs up to iPad daily over Wi-Fi, when it’s connected to a power source and is locked. The date and time of the last backup is listed at the bottom of the Storage & Backup screen. iCloud backs up your:  Purchased music, TV shows, apps, and books  Photos and videos in your Camera Roll  iPad settings  App data  Home screen and app organization  Messages Note: Purchased music isn’t backed up in all areas and TV shows aren’t available in all areas. Appendix C Support and Other Information 137If you didn’t enable iCloud backups when you first set up your iPad, you can turn it on in iCloud settings. When you turn on iCloud backup, iPad no longer backs up to your computer automatically when you sync with iTunes. Turn on iCloud backups Go to Settings > iCloud, then log in using your Apple ID and password, if required. Go to Storage & Backup, then turn iCloud Backup on. Back up immediately Go to Settings > iCloud > Storage & Backup, then tap Back Up Now. Manage your backups Go to Settings > iCloud > Storage & Backup, then tap Manage Storage. Tap the name of your iPad. Turn Camera Roll backup on or off Go to Settings > iCloud > Storage & Backup, then tap Manage Storage. Tap the name of your iPad, then turn Camera Roll backup on or off. View the devices being backed up Go to Settings > iCloud > Storage & Backup > Manage Storage. Stop iCloud automatic backups Go to Settings > iCloud > Storage & Backup, then turn off iCloud Backup. Music that isn’t purchased in iTunes isn’t backed up in iCloud. You have to use iTunes to back up and restore that content. See “Syncing with iTunes” on page 20. Important: Backups for music or TV show purchases are not available in all areas. Previous purchases may be unavailable if they are no longer in the iTunes Store, App Store, or iBookstore. Purchased content, as well as Photo Stream content, doesn’t count against your 5 GB of free iCloud storage. Backing up with iTunes iTunes creates a backup of photos in Camera Roll or in Saved Photos, text messages, notes, contact favorites, sound settings, and more. Media files, such as songs, and some photos, aren’t backed up, but can be restored by syncing with iTunes. When you connect iPad to the computer you normally sync with, iTunes creates a backup each time you:  Sync with iTunes: iTunes syncs iPad each time you connect iPad to your computer. iTunes won’t automatically back up an iPad that isn’t configured to sync with that computer. See “Syncing with iTunes” on page 20.  Update or restore iPad: iTunes automatically backs up iPad before updating and restoring. iTunes can also encrypt iPad backups to secure your data. Encrypt iPad backups: Select “Encrypt iPad backup” in the iTunes Summary screen. Restore iPad files and settings: Connect iPad to the computer you normally sync with, select iPad in the iTunes window, and click Restore in the Summary pane. Removing an iTunes backup You can remove an iPad backup from the list of backups in iTunes. You may want to do this, for example, if a backup was created on someone else’s computer. Remove a backup: 1 In iTunes, open iTunes Preferences.  Mac: Choose iTunes > Preferences.  Windows: Choose Edit > Preferences. 2 Click Devices (iPad doesn’t need to be connected). 3 Select the backup you want to remove, then click Delete Backup. 4 Click Delete, to confirm you wish to remove the selected backup, then click OK. 138 Appendix C Support and Other InformationUpdating and restoring iPad software You can update iPad software in Settings, or by using iTunes. You can also erase iPad, and then use iCloud or iTunes to restore a backup. Deleted data is no longer accessible through the iPad user interface, but it isn’t erased from iPad. For information about erasing all content and settings, see “Reset” on page 129. Updating iPad You can update iPad software in Settings, or by using iTunes. Update wirelessly on iPad: Go to Settings > General > Software Update. iPad checks for available software updates. Update software in iTunes: iTunes checks for available software updates each time you sync iPad using iTunes. See “Syncing with iTunes” on page 20. For more information about updating iPad software, go to support.apple.com/kb/HT4623. Restoring iPad You can use iCloud or iTunes to restore iPad from a backup. Restore from an iCloud backup: Reset iPad to erase all settings and information. Sign in to iCloud and choose Restore from a Backup in the Setup Assistant. See “Reset” on page 129. Restore from an iTunes backup: Connect iPad to the computer you normally sync with, select iPad in the iTunes window, and click Restore in the Summary pane. When the iPad software is restored, you can either set it up as a new iPad, or restore your music, videos, app data, and other content from a backup. For more information about restoring iPad software, go to support.apple.com/kb/HT1414. Can’t send or receive email If iPad can’t send or receive email, try these steps. Can’t send email  Turn iPad off, and then on again. Press and hold the Sleep/Wake button for a few seconds until a red slider appears, then drag the slider. Then press and hold the Sleep/Wake button until the Apple logo appears.  In Settings, go to Mail, Contacts, Calendars, then select the account you’re trying to use. Tap Account Info, then tap SMTP under Outgoing Mail Server. You can set up additional SMTP servers, or select one from another mail account on iPad. Contact your Internet service provider for configuration information.  Set up your mail account directly on iPad, instead of syncing it from iTunes. Go to Settings > Mail, Contacts, Calendars, tap Add Account and enter your account information. If iPad is unable to locate your service provider’s settings when you enter your email address, go to support. apple.com/kb/HT4810 for help setting up your account. For additional troubleshooting information, go to www.apple.com/support/ipad. If you still can’t send email, you can use Express Lane (not available in all areas). Go to expresslane.apple.com. Appendix C Support and Other Information 139Can’t receive email  Turn iPad off, and then on again. Press and hold the Sleep/Wake button for a few seconds until a red slider appears, then drag the slider. Then press and hold the Sleep/Wake button until the Apple logo appears.  If you use one or more computers to check the same email account, it may create a lock-out. For more information, go to support.apple.com/kb/TS2621.  Set up your email account directly on iPad instead of syncing it from iTunes. Go to Settings > Mail, Contacts, Calendars, tap Add Account, then enter your account information. If iPad is unable to locate your service provider’s settings when you enter your email address, go to support.apple.com/kb/HT4810 for help setting up your account.  If you have an iPad 4G or 3G model that uses a cellular data network, turn off Wi-Fi so iPad connects to the Internet through the cellular data network. Go to Settings > Wi-Fi, then turn off Wi-Fi. For additional troubleshooting information, go to www.apple.com/support/ipad. If you still can’t send email, you can use Express Lane (not available in all countries). Go to expresslane.apple.com. Sound, music, and video If iPad does’t have sound or if video won’t play, try these steps. No sound  Make sure the iPad speaker isn’t covered.  Make sure the Side Switch isn’t set to silent. See “Volume buttons” on page 11.  If you’re using a headset, unplug it, then plug it in again. Make sure you push the plug all the way in.  Make sure the volume isn’t turned all the way down.  Music on iPad might be paused. If you’re using a headset with a play button, try pressing the play button to resume playback. Or from the Home screen, tap Music, then tap .  Check to see if a volume limit is set. In Settings, go to Music > Volume Limit.  If you’re using the line out port on the optional iPad Dock, make sure that you turn on the external speakers or stereo, and that they’re plugged in correctly and working properly. Use the volume controls on the the external speakers or stereo, not on iPad.  If you’re using an app that works with AirPlay, check to see if the AirPlay device you’re sending the sound to is turned on and the volume is turned up. If you want to hear sound through iPad’s speaker, tap and select it from the list. A song, video, or other item won’t play The song, video, audiobook, or podcast may be encoded in a format that iPad doesn’t support. For information about the audio and video file formats iPad supports, go to www.apple.com/ipad/specs. If a song or video in your iTunes library isn’t supported by iPad, you may be able to convert it to a format iPad supports. For example, you can use iTunes for Windows to convert nonprotected WMA files to a format iPad supports. For more information, open iTunes and choose Help > iTunes Help. 140 Appendix C Support and Other InformationNo video or sound when using AirPlay To send video or audio to an AirPlay device such as an Apple TV, iPad and the AirPlay device must be connected to the same wireless network. If you don’t see the button, iPad isn’t connected to the same Wi-Fi network as an AirPlay device, or the app you’re using doesn’t support AirPlay.  When sound or video is being sent to an AirPlay device, iPad doesn’t display video or play audio. To direct the content to iPad and disconnect iPad from the AirPlay device, tap and select iPad in the list.  Some apps play only audio over AirPlay. If video isn’t working, make sure that the app you’re using supports both audio and video.  If the Apple TV has been set up to require a passcode, you must enter it on iPad when asked, in order to use AirPlay.  Make sure the speakers on the AirPlay device are turned on and turned up. If you’re using an Apple TV, make sure the TV’s input source is set to Apple TV. Make sure the volume control on iPad is turned up.  When iPad is streaming with AirPlay, it must remain connected to the Wi-Fi network. If you take iPad out of range, playback stops.  Depending on the speed of your network, it may take 30 seconds or more for playback to begin when using AirPlay. For more information about AirPlay, go to support.apple.com/kb/HT4437. No image on TV or projector connected to iPad When you connect iPad to a TV or projector using a USB cable, the attached display automatically mirrors the iPad screen. Some apps may support using the attached display as a second monitor. Check the app’s settings and documentation.  To view HD videos in high resolution, use the Apple Digital AV Adapter or a component video cable.  Make sure the video cable is firmly connected at both ends, and that it’s a supported cable. If iPad is connected to an A/V switchbox or receiver, try connecting it directly to the TV or projector instead.  Make sure that your TV has the proper video input selected, such as HDMI or component video.  If no video appears, press the Home button, disconnect and reconnect the cable, and try again. iTunes Store and App Store To use the iTunes Store or the App Store, iPad must have an Internet connection. See “Network” on page 125. iTunes Store or App Store isn’t available To purchase content from the iTunes Store or the App Store, you need an Apple ID. You can set up an Apple ID on iPad. Go to Settings > Store > Create New Apple ID. You can also set up an Apple ID on your computer by opening iTunes and choosing Store > Create Account. Note: The iTunes Store and the App Store aren’t available in some countries. Appendix C Support and Other Information 141Safety, service, and support information The following table describes where to get more iPad-related safety, software, and service information. To learn about Do this Using iPad safely See the iPad Important Product Information Guide at support.apple.com/manuals/ipad for the latest safety and regulatory information. iPad service and support, tips, forums, and Apple software downloads Go to www.apple.com/support/ipad. The latest information about iPad Go to www.apple.com/ipad. Managing your Apple ID account Go to appleid.apple.com. Using iCloud Go to www.apple.com/support/icloud. Using iTunes Open iTunes and choose Help > iTunes Help. For an online iTunes tutorial (not available in all areas), go to www.apple.com/support/itunes. Using iPhoto in OS X Open iPhoto and choose Help > iPhoto Help. Using Address Book in OS X Open Address Book and choose Help > Address Book Help. Using iCal in OS X Open iCal and choose Help > iCal Help. Microsoft Outlook, Windows Address Book, Adobe Photoshop Album, and Adobe Photoshop Elements See the documentation that came with those apps. Obtaining warranty service First follow the advice in this guide. Then go to www.apple.com/support/ipad or see the iPad Important Product Information Guide at support.apple.com/manuals/ipad. Battery replacement service Go to www.apple.com/batteries/replacements.html. Using iPad in an enterprise environment Go to www.apple.com/ipad/business. Disposal and recycling information Your iPad must be disposed of properly according to local laws and regulations. Because it contains a battery, iPad must be disposed of separately from household waste. When your iPad reaches its end of life, contact Apple or your local authorities to learn about recycling options. For information about Apple’s recycling program, go to www.apple.com/recycling. Apple and the environment At Apple, we recognize our responsibility to minimize the environmental impacts of our operations and products. For more information, go to www.apple.com/environment. 142 Appendix C Support and Other InformationiPad operating temperature If the interior temperature of iPad exceeds normal operating temperatures, you may experience the following as it attempts to regulate its temperature:  iPad stops charging.  The screen dims.  A temperature warning screen appears. Important: You can’t use iPad while the temperature warning screen is displayed. If iPad can’t regulate its internal temperature, it goes into deep sleep mode until it cools. Move iPad to a cooler location and wait a few minutes before trying to use iPad again. Appendix C Support and Other Information 143K Apple Inc. © 2012 Apple Inc. All rights reserved. Apple, the Apple logo, AirPlay, AirPort, AirPort Express, AirPort Extreme, Aperture, Apple TV, FaceTime, Finder, iBooks, iCal, iLife, iPad, iPhone, iPhoto, iPod, iPod touch, iTunes, iTunes Extras, Keynote, Mac, Mac OS, Numbers, OS X, Pages, Photo Booth, Safari, Spotlight, and Time Capsule are trademarks of Apple Inc., registered in the U.S. and other countries. AirPrint, iMessage, and Multi-Touch are trademarks of Apple Inc. Apple Store, Genius, iCloud, iTunes Plus, iTunes Store, and MobileMe are service marks of Apple Inc., registered in the U.S. and other countries. App Store, iBookstore, and iTunes Match are service marks of Apple Inc. Adobe and Photoshop are trademarks or registered trademarks of Adobe Systems Incorporated in the U.S. and/or other countries. The Bluetooth® word mark and logos are registered trademarks owned by Bluetooth SIG, Inc. and any use of such marks by Apple Inc. is under license. IOS is a trademark or registered trademark of Cisco in the U.S. and other countries and is used under license. Ping is a registered trademark of Karsten Manufacturing Corporation and is used in the U.S. under license. Some apps are not available in all areas. App availability is subject to change. Content available on iTunes. Title availability is subject to change. Other company and product names mentioned herein may be trademarks of their respective companies. Mention of third-party products is for informational purposes only and constitutes neither an endorsement nor a recommendation. Apple assumes no responsibility with regard to the performance or use of these products. All understandings, agreements, or warranties, if any, take place directly between the vendors and the prospective users. Every effort has been made to ensure that the information in this manual is accurate. Apple is not responsible for printing or clerical errors. 019-2266/2012-03 iPhone Guide de l’utilisateur Pour le logiciel iOS 5.0Table des matières 9 Chapitre 1: Vue d’ensemble de l’iPhone 9 Présentation de l’iPhone 9 Accessoires 10 Boutons 12 Icônes d’état 14 Chapitre 2: Démarrage 14 Visualisation de ce guide de l’utilisateur sur l’iPhone 14 Éléments nécessaires 15 Installation de la carte SIM 15 Configuration et activation 16 Connexion à Internet 16 Connexion de l’iPhone à votre ordinateur 16 Configuration de Mail et d’autres comptes 17 Gestion du contenu sur vos appareils iOS 17 iCloud 18 Synchronisation avec iTunes 20 Chapitre 3: Notions élémentaires 20 Utilisation des apps 23 Personnalisation de l’écran d’accueil 25 Saisie de texte 28 Impression 29 Recherche 30 Contrôle vocal 31 Notifications 32 Twitter 34 Écouteurs avec télécommande et micro 34 AirPlay 35 Appareils Bluetooth 36 Batterie 38 Fonctionnalités de sécurité 39 Nettoyage de l’iPhone 39 Redémarrage ou réinitialisation de l’iPhone 40 Chapitre 4: Siri 40 Utilisation de Siri 42 Si Siri ne vous entend pas correctement 42 Dictée 43 Chapitre 5: Téléphone 43 Appels téléphoniques 47 FaceTime 248 Messagerie vocale visuelle 50 Contacts 50 Favoris 50 Renvoi d’appel, signal d’appel et identifiant de l’appelant 51 Sonneries, commutateur Sonnerie/Silence et vibration 52 Appels internationaux 53 Configuration d’options de Téléphone 54 Chapitre 6: Mail 54 Relève de la boîte aux lettres et lecture du courrier électronique 55 Fonctionner avec plusieurs comptes 55 Envoi de courrier électronique 56 Utilisation des liens et données détectées 56 Consultation de pièces jointes 57 Impression de messages et de pièces jointes 57 Organisation du courrier électronique 58 Recherche dans le courrier électronique 58 Comptes de messagerie et réglages 61 Chapitre 7: Safari 61 Affichage de pages web 62 Liens 62 Liste de lecture 63 Lecteur 63 Saisie de texte et remplissage de formulaires 63 Recherche 64 Signets et historique 64 Impression de pages web, de documents PDF et d’autres documents 64 Clips web 65 Chapitre 8: Musique 65 Ajout de musique et d’audio 65 Lecture de morceaux et d’autre contenu audio 67 Commandes audio supplémentaires 67 Commandes pour les podcasts et les livres audio 68 Utilisation de Siri ou Contrôle vocal avec Musique 68 Exploration des illustrations d’album en mode Cover Flow 69 Affichage des pistes d’un album 69 Recherche de contenu audio 69 iTunes Match 70 Genius 70 Listes de lecture 71 Partage à domicile 72 Chapitre 9: Messages 72 Envoi et réception de messages 74 Envoi de messages à un groupe 74 Envoi de photos, vidéos, etc. 74 Modification de conversations 74 Recherche de messages Table des matières 375 Chapitre 10: Calendrier 75 À propos de Calendrier 75 Affichage de vos calendriers 76 Ajout d’événements 76 Réponse à des invitations 77 Recherche dans les calendriers 77 Abonnement à des calendriers 77 Importation d’événements de calendrier depuis Mail 77 Comptes de calendrier et réglages 79 Chapitre 11: Photos 79 Visionnage de photos et de vidéos 80 Affichage de diaporamas 80 Organisation de photos et de vidéos 80 Partage de photos et de vidéos 81 Impression de photos 82 Chapitre 12: Appareil photo 82 À propos d’Appareil photo 82 Capture de photos et de vidéos 83 Photos HDR 83 Visionnage, partage et impression 84 Modification de photos 84 Ajustement des vidéos 85 Téléchargement de photos et de vidéos sur votre ordinateur 85 Flux de photos 86 Chapitre 13: YouTube 86 À propos de YouTube 86 Exploration et recherche de vidéos 87 Lecture de vidéos 87 Visionnage de vidéos YouTube sur un téléviseur 88 Suivi des vidéos que vous appréciez 88 Partage de vidéos, commentaires et classements 88 Obtention d’informations sur une vidéo 88 Envoi de vidéos sur YouTube 89 Chapitre 14: Bourse 89 Visualisation des cours de la bourse 90 Obtention d’informations supplémentaires 91 Chapitre 15: Plans 91 Recherche de lieux 92 Itinéraires 93 Obtenir et partager des informations sur un lieu 93 Affichage de l’état de la circulation 94 Vue satellite et vue Street View 95 Chapitre 16: Météo 95 Obtention d’informations météorologiques 4 Table des matières96 Chapitre 17: Notes 96 À propos de Notes 96 Rédaction de notes 97 Lecture et modification de notes 97 Recherche dans les notes 97 Impression ou envoi de notes par courrier électronique 98 Chapitre 18: Horloge 98 À propos d’Horloge 98 Réglage des horloges mondiales 99 Réglage des alarmes 99 Utilisation du chronomètre 99 Réglage d’un minuteur 100 Chapitre 19: Rappels 100 À propos de Rappels 100 Configuration d’un rappel 101 Gestion des rappels en présentation par liste 102 Gestion des rappels en présentation par date 102 À propos des rappels par lieu 102 Gestion des rappels accomplis 103 Recherche dans les rappels 104 Chapitre 20: Game Center 104 À propos de Game Center 105 Connexion à Game Center 105 Achat et téléchargement de jeux 105 Jeux 105 Jeu avec des amis 106 Réglages Game Center 107 Chapitre 21: iTunes Store 107 À propos de l’iTunes Store 107 Recherche de musique, vidéos, etc. 108 Achat de musique, livres audio et sons 108 Achat et location de vidéos 109 Suivi d’artistes et d’amis 109 Diffusion en continu ou téléchargement de podcasts 110 Vérification de l’état de téléchargement 110 Modification des boutons de navigation 110 Affichage des informations du compte 110 Vérification des téléchargements 111 Chapitre 22: Kiosque 111 À propos de Kiosque 112 Lecture des derniers numéros 113 Chapitre 23: App Store 113 À propos de l’App Store 113 Recherche et téléchargement d’apps 114 Suppression d’apps 115 Réglages du Store Table des matières 5116 Chapitre 24: Contacts 116 À propos de Contacts 116 Synchronisation des contacts 117 Recherche de contacts 117 Ajout et modification de contacts 118 Contacts unifiés 118 Comptes de Contacts et réglages 120 Chapitre 25: Vidéos 120 À propos de Vidéos 120 Lecture de vidéos 121 Recherche de vidéos 121 Visionnage de films en location 12 2 Visionnage de vidéos sur un téléviseur 12 3 Suppression de vidéos de l’iPhone 12 3 Utilisation de Partage à domicile 12 3 Réglage d’un minuteur de veille 12 3 Conversion de vidéos pour l’iPhone 124 Chapitre 26: Calculette 124 Utilisation de la calculette 124 Calculatrice scientifique 125 Chapitre 27: Boussole 125 À propos de Boussole 125 Étalonnage de la boussole 12 6 Recherche de la direction 12 6 Utilisation de Boussole avec Plans 12 7 Chapitre 28: Dictaphone 12 7 À propos de Dictaphone 128 Enregistrement 128 Écoute d’un enregistrement 129 Gestion et partage des enregistrements 129 Partage de mémos vocaux avec votre ordinateur 130 Chapitre 29: Nike + iPod 130 À propos de Nike + iPod 130 Activation de Nike + iPod 130 Association d’un capteur 131 Entraînement avec Nike + iPod 131 Étalonnage de Nike + iPod 131 Envoi de données d’entraînement à Nikeplus.com 132 Chapitre 30: iBooks 132 À propos d’iBooks 132 Utilisation de l’iBookstore 133 Synchronisation de livres et de documents PDF 133 Lecture de livres 134 Lecture de documents PDF 135 Modification de l’apparence d’un livre 135 Recherche de livres et de documents PDF 6 Table des matières135 Recherche de la définition d’un mot 135 Lecture d’un livre par l’appareil 13 6 Impression ou envoi par courrier d’un document PDF 13 6 Organisation de l’étagère 137 Synchronisation de signets et de notes 13 8 Chapitre 31: Accessibilité 13 8 Fonctionnalités d’accès universel 13 9 VoiceOver 150 Acheminement de l’audio des appels entrants 150 Siri 150 Triple clic sur le bouton principal 151 Zoom 151 Grande police 151 Blanc sur noir 152 Énoncer la sélection 152 Énonciation auto 152 Audio mono 152 Compatibilité avec les appareils auditifs 153 Vibreur personnalisé 153 Flash LED pour alertes 153 AssistiveTouch 154 Accès universel sous Mac OS X 154 Assistance TTY 154 Taille minimale de police pour les messages Mail 155 Sonneries assignables 155 Messagerie vocale visuelle 155 Larges claviers à l’écran 155 Grand clavier téléphonique 155 Contrôle vocal 155 Sous-titres codés 156 Chapitre 32: Réglages 156 Mode Avion 156 Wi-Fi 157 Notifications 158 Service de localisation 158 VPN 159 Partage de connexion 159 Opérateur 160 Sons et commutateur Sonnerie/Silence 160 Luminosité 160 Fond d’écran 160 Général 167 Réglages des apps 168 L’annexe A: Claviers internationaux 168 Ajout et suppression de claviers 168 Basculement entre les claviers 168 chinoise 170 Japonais 170 Saisie de caractères Emoji Table des matières 7170 Utilisation de la liste des candidats 171 Utilisation des raccourcis 171 Vietnamien 172 L’annexe B: Assistance et autres informations 172 Site d’assistance iPhone 172 Redémarrage ou réinitialisation de l’iPhone 172 Sauvegarde de l’iPhone 174 Mise à jour et restauration du logiciel de l’iPhone 175 Partage de fichiers 175 Informations relatives à la sécurité, au logiciel et au service après-vente 176 Utilisation de l’iPhone dans un environnement d’entreprise 176 Utilisation de l’iPhone avec d’autres opérateurs 176 Informations concernant l’élimination et le recyclage 178 Apple et l’environnement 178 Température de fonctionnement de l’iPhone 8 Table des matièresVue d’ensemble de l’iPhone 1 Présentation de l’iPhone Prise d’écouteurs Récepteur Commutateur Sonnerie/Silence Microphone du haut Boutons de volume Écran Retina d’Apple Haut-parleur %RXWRQ¬SULQFLSDO Appareil photo frontal Appareil photo principal Flash à diode Tiroir de carte SIM Connecteur Dock Bouton Marche/Arrêt Microphone du bas Icônes d’App Barre d’état iPhone Il se peut que votre iPhone et son écran d’accueil soient différents, selon le modèle d’iPhone dont vous disposez et la manière dont vous avez personnalisé l’écran d’accueil. Accessoires Les accessoires suivants sont fournis avec l’iPhone : Câble Connecteur Dock vers USB Écouteurs Apple avec télécommande et micro Adaptateur secteur USB Outil d’éjection de la carte SIM 9Élément Utilisation Écouteurs avec télécommande et micro Écoutez de la musique et des vidéos, et passer des appels téléphoniques. Consultez la section « Écouteurs avec télécommande et micro » à la page 34. Câble Connecteur Dock vers USB Utilisez ce câble pour connecter l’iPhone à votre ordinateur afin de le recharger et de le synchroniser. Vous pouvez utiliser le câble avec la station d’accueil vendue en option ou le brancher directement sur l’iPhone. Adaptateur secteur USB Connectez l’adaptateur secteur à l’iPhone à l’aide du câble fourni, puis branchez-le sur une prise électrique standard pour recharger l’iPhone. Outil d’éjection de carte SIM (non inclus dans toutes les régions) Éjectez le plateau de la carte SIM. Boutons Bouton Marche/Arrêt Lorsque vous n’utilisez pas l’iPhone, vous pouvez le verrouiller pour éteindre l’écran et économiser la batterie. Verrouiller l’iPhone : Appuyez sur le bouton Marche/Arrêt. Lorsque l’iPhone est verrouillé, il ne répond pas si vous touchez l’écran. iPhone peut tout de même recevoir des appels, des SMS et d’autres mises à jour. Vous pouvez également :  écouter de la musique ;  régler le volume à l’aide des boutons situés sur le côté de l’iPhone (ou sur les écouteurs de l’iPhone) pendant que vous parlez au téléphone ou écoutez de la musique ;  appuyer sur le bouton central des écouteurs de l’iPhone pour répondre ou mettre fin à des appels, ou pour commander la lecture audio (consultez la section « Lecture de morceaux et d’autre contenu audio » à la page 65). Bouton Marche/Arrêt Déverrouiller l’iPhone Appuyez sur le bouton principal ou sur le bouton Marche/Arrêt, puis faites glisser le curseur. Éteindre l’iPhone Maintenez le bouton Marche/Arrêt enfoncé pendant quelques secondes jusqu’à l’apparition du curseur rouge, puis faites glisser ce dernier. Allumer l’iPhone Maintenez le bouton Marche/Arrêt enfoncé jusqu’à l’apparition du logo Apple. Par défaut, l’iPhone se verrouille automatiquement si vous ne touchez pas l’écran pendant une minute. Pour désactiver le verrouillage automatique ou modifier le délai de verrouillage de l’iPhone, consultez la section « Verrouillage automatique » à la page 164. Pour demander un code pour déverrrouiller l’iPhone, consultez la section « Verrouillage par code » à la page 164. Bouton principal Le bouton principal vous permet de revenir à l’écran d’accueil à n’importe quel moment. Il fournit également d’autres raccourcis pratiques. 10 Chapitre 1 Vue d’ensemble de l’iPhoneAtteindre l’écran d’accueil : Appuyer sur le bouton principal . Sur l’écran principal, si vous touchez une app, celle-ci s’ouvre. Consultez la section « Ouverture d’apps et basculement entre apps » à la page 20. Afficher la barre multitâche pour voir les apps récemment utilisées Lorsque l’iPhone est verrouillé, touchez deux fois l’écran principal . Afficher les commandes de lecture audio Lorsque l’iPhone est verrouillé : Touchez deux fois le bouton principal . Consultez la section « Lecture de morceaux et d’autre contenu audio » à la page 65. Lors de l’utilisation d’une autre app : Touchez deux fois le bouton principal , puis balayez le sélecteur d’app de gauche à droite. Lancer Siri (iPhone 4S) ou Contrôle vocal Maintenez le bouton principal enfoncé . Consultez les sections Chapitre 4, « Siri, » à la page 40 et « Contrôle vocal » à la page 30. Boutons de volume Lorsque vous téléphonez ou écoutez des morceaux, des films ou tout autre contenu multimédia, les boutons situés sur le côté de l’iPhone permettent de régler le volume audio. À tout autre moment, ces boutons contrôlent le volume des sonneries, alarmes et autres effets sonores. AVERTISSEMENT : Pour obtenir des informations importantes sur la perte d’audition, consultez le Guide d’informations importantes sur le produit à l’adresse www.apple.com/fr/support/manuals/ iphone. Augmenter le volume Baisser le volume Pour limiter le volume de la musique et des vidéos, accédez à Réglages > Musique. Vous pouvez également utiliser le bouton d’augmentation du volume pour prendre une photo ou enregistrer une vidéo. Consultez la section « Capture de photos et de vidéos » à la page 82. Commutateur Sonnerie/Silence Utilisez le commutateur Sonnerie/Silence pour placer l’iPhone en mode Sonnerie ou Silence . Sonnerie Silence En mode Sonnerie, l’iPhone joue tous les sons. Lorsque le mode Silence est activé, l’iPhone ne sonne pas, et les alarmes et effets sonores sont désactivés. Chapitre 1 Vue d’ensemble de l’iPhone 11Important : Les alarmes, les apps audio telles que Musique, mais aussi de nombreux jeux reproduisent néanmoins les sons à travers le haut-parleur intégré même si l’iPhone est en mode Silence. Pour plus d’informations sur la modification des réglages de volume et de vibration, consultez la section « Sons et commutateur Sonnerie/Silence » à la page 160. Icônes d’état Les icônes de la barre d’état située en haut de l’écran proposent des informations concernant l’iPhone : Icône d’état Signification Signal de cellule* Indique si vous êtes à portée du réseau de téléphonie mobile et passer et recevoir des appels. Le nombre de barres est proportionnel à la qualité du signal. S’il n’y a pas de signal, les barres sont remplacées par « Réseau indisp. ». Mode Avion Indique que le mode Avion est activé : vous ne pouvez pas utiliser le téléphone, accéder à Internet ou utiliser les appareils Bluetooth®. Les fonctionnalités qui ne sont pas liées au réseau sans fil sont disponibles. Consultez la section « Mode Avion » à la page 156. UMTS/EV-DO Indique que le réseau 3G UMTS (GSM) ou EV-DO (CDMA) de votre opérateur est disponible et que l’iPhone peut se connecter à Internet par ce réseau. Consultez la section « Réseau » à la page 162. EDGE Indique que le réseau EDGE (GSM) de votre opérateur est disponible et que l’iPhone peut se connecter à Internet via ce réseau. Consultez la section « Réseau » à la page 162. GPRS/1xRTT Indique que le réseau GPRS (GSM) ou 1xRTT (CDMA) de votre opérateur est disponible et que l’iPhone peut se connecter à Internet par ce réseau. Consultez la section « Réseau » à la page 162. Wi-Fi* Indique que l’iPhone est connecté à Internet par un réseau Wi-Fi. Le nombre de barres est proportionnel à la qualité de la connexion. Consultez la section « Wi-Fi » à la page 156. Partage de connexion Indique que l’iPhone est connecté à un autre iPhone offrant un partage de connexion. Consultez la section « Partage de connexion » à la page 159. Synchronisation Indique que l’iPhone est en cours de synchronisation avec iTunes. Activité réseau Affiche l’activité réseau. Certaines apps tierces peuvent également utiliser cette icône pour indiquer un processus actif. Renvoi d’appel Indique que le renvoi d’appel est configuré sur l’iPhone. Consultez la section « Renvoi d’appel » à la page 50. VPN Indique que vous êtes connecté à un réseau en utilisant un VPN (réseau privé virtuel). Consultez la section « Réseau » à la page 162. 12 Chapitre 1 Vue d’ensemble de l’iPhoneIcône d’état Signification Cadenas Indique que l’iPhone est verrouillé. Consultez la section « Bouton Marche/Arrêt » à la page 10. TTY Indique que l’iPhone est configuré pour fonctionner avec une machine TTY. Consultez la section « Assistance TTY » à la page 154. Lecture Indique qu’un morceau, un livre audio ou un podcast est à l’écoute. Consultez la section « Lecture de morceaux et d’autre contenu audio » à la page 65. Verrouillage en orientation portrait Indique que l’écran de l’iPhone est verrouillé en orientation portrait. Consultez la section « Affichage en orientation portrait ou paysage » à la page 22. Alarme Indique qu’une alarme est réglée. Consultez la section « Réglage des alarmes » à la page 99. Service de localisation Indique qu’un élément utilise le Service de localisation. Consultez la section « Service de localisation » à la page 158. Bluetooth* Icône bleue ou blanche : le Bluetooth est activé et un appareil, tel qu’un casque ou un kit de voiture, est connecté. Icône grise : le Bluetooth est activé, mais aucun appareil n’est connecté. Consultez la section « Appareils Bluetooth » à la page 35. Batterie Bluetooth Indique le niveau de batterie d’un appareil Bluetooth jumelé pris en charge. Batterie Indique le niveau de la batterie ou l’état de la charge. Consultez la section « Batterie » à la page 36. * L’utilisation de certains accessoires avec l’iPhone peut altérer les performances sans fil. Chapitre 1 Vue d’ensemble de l’iPhone 13Démarrage 2 AVERTISSEMENT : Pour éviter tout risque de dommage corporel, lisez attentivement toutes les consignes d’utilisation de ce guide et les consignes de sécurité du Guide d’informations importantes sur le produit de l’iPhone à l’adresse www.apple.com/fr/support/manuals/iphone avant d’utiliser l’iPhone. · Visualisation de ce guide de l’utilisateur sur l’iPhone Le Guide de l’utilisateur de l’iPhone peut être affiché sur l’iPhone dans Safari et dans l’app iBooks gratuite. Consulter le guide de l’utilisateur dans Safari : Touchez , puis le signet Guide de l’utilisateur de l’iPhone. Pour ajouter une icône correspondant au guide sur l’écran d’accueil, touchez , puis touchez « Ajouter à l’écran d’accueil ». Pour le consulter dans une autre langue, touchez « Changer de langue » sur la page de contenu principale. Consulter le guide de l’utilisateur dans iBooks : Si vous n’avez pas installé iBooks, ouvrez l’App Store, recherchez « iBooks » puis installez-le. Ouvrez iBooks et touchez Store. Recherchez « Utilisateur de l’iPhone », puis sélectionnez et téléchargez le guide. Pour plus d’informations sur iBooks, consultez la section Chapitre 30, « iBooks, » à la page 132. Éléments nécessaires Pour utiliser l’iPhone, vous avez besoin des éléments suivants :  un plan de service sans fil auprès d’un opérateur offrant un service iPhone dans votre région ;  un identifiant Apple (pour certaines fonctionnalités), qui peut être créé durant la configuration ;  un Mac ou un PC équipé d’un port USB 2.0 et de l’un des systèmes d’exploitation suivants :  Mac OS X 10.5.8 ou ultérieur,  Windows 7, Windows Vista, Windows XP Édition Familiale ou Windows XP Professionnel avec Service Pack 3 ;  une connexion Internet pour votre ordinateur (haut débit recommandé) ;  iTunes 10.5 ou ultérieur (pour certaines fonctionnalités), disponible à la page www.itunes.com/ fr/download. 14Installation de la carte SIM Si une carte SIM à installer vous a été remise, installez-la avant de configurer l’iPhone. Important : Une carte SIM est requise pour utiliser les services cellulaires lors des connexions aux réseaux GSM et à certains réseaux CDMA. Un iPhone 4S qui a été activé sur un réseau sans fil CDMA peut également utiliser une carte SIM pour se connecter à un réseau GSM, principalement pour les services d’itinérance. Votre iPhone est soumis aux politiques de votre fournisseur de service sans fil, qui peuvent inclure des restrictions quant au basculement entre fournisseurs de service et à l’itinérance, même après la conclusion de tout contrat de service minimum requis. Contactez votre fournisseur de service sans fil pour en savoir plus. La disponibilité des capacités cellulaires dépend du réseau sans fil. Installation de la carte SIM dans l’iPhone 4S Carte micro SIM Tiroir de carte micro SIM Trombone ou outil d’éjection de la carte SIM Installer la carte SIM : Insérez l’extrémité d’un petit trombone ou l’outil d’éjection de carte SIM dans l’orifice du tiroir de carte SIM. Retirez le tiroir de carte SIM et placez-y la carte SIM comme illustré. Alignez le tiroir, la carte SIM sur le dessus, puis replacez-le soigneusement. Configuration et activation Pour configurer et activer l’iPhone, activez-le puis suivez l’Assistant réglages. Il vous guide lors de la configuration, notamment lors de la connexion à un réseau Wi-Fi, la connexion à un identifiant Apple ou la création d’un identifiant Apple gratuit, la configuration d’iCloud, l’activation de fonctionnalités recommandées telles que Service de localisation et Localiser mon iPhone, et l’activation de l’iPhone avec votre opérateur. Lors de la configuration, vous pouvez également restaurer à partir d’une sauvegarde iCloud ou iTunes. L’activation s’opère sur un réseau Wi-Fi ou le réseau de votre opérateur téléphonique (non disponible dans toutes les zones). Si aucun n’est disponible, vous devez connecter l’iPhone à votre ordinateur. Consultez la section suivante. Si aucune carte SIM (pour réseaux GSM) n’est installée, l’iPhone doit être connecté à un réseau Wi-Fi ou à votre ordinateur avec l’application iTunes ouverte afin de terminer l’activation. Dans les régions où vous avez le choix entre plusieurs opérateurs, la carte SIM doit être installée afin de terminer l’activation initiale. Chapitre 2 Démarrage 15Connexion à Internet L’iPhone se connecte à Internet lorsque c’est nécessaire, à l’aide d’une connexion Wi-Fi (le cas échéant) ou le réseau cellulaire de votre opérateur. Pour en savoir plus sur la connexion à un réseau Wi-Fi, consultez la section « Wi-Fi » à la page 156. Remarque : Si aucune connexion Wi-Fi à Internet n’est disponible, certaines fonctionnalités et certains services de l’iPhone peuvent transférer des données sur le réseau cellulaire de votre opé- rateur, ce qui peut entraîner des frais supplémentaires. Contactez votre opérateur pour obtenir des informations sur les tarifs de vos forfaits de données cellulaires. Pour gérer l’utilisation des données cellulaires, consultez la section « Réseau » à la page 162. Connexion de l’iPhone à votre ordinateur Si vous n’avez pas d’accès Wi-Fi ou cellulaire, l’iPhone doit être connecté à votre ordinateur afin de terminer l’activation. La connexion de l’iPhone à votre ordinateur vous permet de synchroniser des données, de la musique et d’autres contenus avec iTunes. Consultez la section « Synchronisation avec iTunes » à la page 18. Connecter l’iPhone à votre ordinateur : Utilisez le Câble Connecteur Dock vers USB fournit avec l’iPhone. Configuration de Mail et d’autres comptes L’iPhone fonctionne avec iCloud, Microsoft Exchange et de nombreux fournisseurs de services de messagerie, de contacts et de calendriers populaires. Si vous ne possédez pas encore de compte de messagerie, vous pouvez configurer un compte iCloud gratuit lors de la première configuration de votre iPhone, ou ultérieurement dans Réglages > iCloud. Configurer un compte : Accédez à Réglages > Mail, Contacts, Calendrier. Pour plus d’informations sur iCloud, consultez la section « iCloud » à la page 17. Vous pouvez ajouter des contacts à l’aide d’un compte LDAP ou CardDAV, si votre entreprise ou organisation le prend en charge. Consultez la section « Synchronisation des contacts » à la page 116. Vous pouvez ajouter un compte de calendrier CalDAV, et vous abonner à des calendriers iCal (.ics) ou les importer à partir de Mail. Consultez la section page 77. 16 Chapitre 2 DémarrageGestion du contenu sur vos appareils iOS Vous pouvez transférer des données et des fichiers entre vos appareils iOS et vos ordinateurs à l’aide d’iCloud ou d’iTunes.  iCloud stocke vos photos, apps, contacts, calendriers, etc. et les pousse sans fil vers vos appareils. Lorsque quelque chose change sur l’un de vos appareils, vos autres appareils sont automatiquement mis à jour. Consultez la section « iCloud » ci-dessous.  iTunes synchronise de la musique, des vidéos, des photos et bien plus entre votre ordinateur et votre iPhone. Les modifications apportées à un appareil s’appliquent à l’autre appareil lors de la synchronisation. Vous pouvez aussi utiliser iTunes pour copier un fichier sur l’iPhone et l’utiliser dans une app ou copier un document crée sur l’iPhone sur votre ordinateur. Consultez la section « Synchronisation avec iTunes » à la page 18. Vous pouvez utiliser iCloud, iTunes ou les deux selon vos besoins. Par exemple, vous pouvez utiliser Flux de photos iCloud pour automatiquement disposer des photos que vous prenez avec l’iPhone sur vos autres appareils, et utiliser iTunes pour synchroniser vos albums photo de votre ordinateur vers l’iPhone. Remarque : Vous ne devez pas synchroniser des éléments sur la sous-fenêtre Infos d’iTunes (tels que des contacts, des calendriers et des notes) et également utiliser iCloud pour maintenir ces données à jour sur vos appareils. Si vous utilisez les deux, vous risquez d’obtenir des données en double. iCloud iCloud stocke vos photos, apps, contacts, calendriers, etc. et les pousse sans fil vers vos appareils iOS et vos ordinateurs, maintenant ainsi toutes vos données à jour. Parmi les fonctionnalités d’iCloud figurent :  Téléchargements automatiques : la musique, les apps et les livres que vous achetez apparaissent automatiquement sur vos appareils.  Achats précédents : vous pouvez afficher vos achats dans l’iTunes Store, l’App Store et l’iBookstore, et les télécharger à nouveau si nécessaire.  Flux de photos : lorsque vous prenez une photo sur un appareil iOS, vous en disposez automatiquement sur vos autres appareils. Consultez la section « Flux de photos » à la page 85.  Documents et données : stocke des documents et les maintient à jour sur vos appareils pour les apps qui prennent en charge Documents dans iCloud.  Localiser mon iPhone : localise votre iPhone sur un plan, affiche un message, fait sonner l’appareil, verrouille l’écran ou efface les données à distance. Consultez la section « Localiser mon iPhone » à la page 38. Vous pouvez également effectuer une sauvegarde de l’iPhone dans iCloud. Consultez la section « Sauvegarde de l’iPhone » à la page 172. iCloud vous donne accès à un compte de courrier électronique gratuit et à 5 Go de stockage pour le courrier électronique, les documents et la sauvegarde. Vos achats de musique, d’apps, de séries TV et de livres, ainsi que votre Flux de photos, n’utilisent pas votre espace gratuit. Remarque : iCloud n’est pas disponible dans toutes les régions, et ses fonctionnalités varient en fonction de l’endroit. Se connecter ou créer un compte iCloud : Dans Réglages, touchez iCloud. Si vous disposez d’un abonnement à MobileMe, vous pouvez effectuer une migration vers iCloud à l’adresse me.com/move/fr. Chapitre 2 Démarrage 17Choisir les données à stocker dans iCloud Accédez à Réglages > iCloud. Activer ou désactiver Téléchargements automatiques Accédez à Réglages > Store. Consulter et télécharger des achats antérieurs dans l’iTunes Store Accédez à iTunes, puis touchez Achats. Consulter et télécharger des achats antérieurs dans l’App Store Accédez à l’App Store, touchez Mises à jour, puis touchez Achats. Consulter et télécharger des achats antérieurs dans l’iBookstore Accédez à iBooks, touchez Store, puis touchez Achats. Activer ou désactiver Flux de photos : Accédez à Réglages > iCloud. Localiser votre iPhone Consultez le site www.icloud.com. Important : Localiser mon iPhone doit être activé dans Réglages > iCloud sr votre iPhone pour que les fonctionnalités de Localiser mon iPhone soient disponibles. Acheter davantage de capacité de stockage iCloud Accédez à Réglages > iCloud > Stockage et sauvegarde, puis touchez Gérer le stockage. Pour en savoir plus sur l’achat d’espace de stockage iCloud, consultez la section help.apple.com/fr/icloud. Pour plus de renseignements sur l’iCloud, accédez à la page www.apple.com/fr/icloud. Pour obtenir des informations d’assistance, consultez la page www.apple.com/fr/support/icloud. Synchronisation avec iTunes La synchronisation avec iTunes copie des données à partir de votre ordinateur vers l’iPhone, et vice versa. Pour synchroniser, connectez l’iPhone à votre ordinateur à l’aide du Câble Connecteur Dock vers USB ou configurez une synchronisation automatique d’iTunes par Wi-Fi. Vous pouvez régler iTunes de manière à synchroniser votre musique, vos photos, vos vidéos, vos podcasts, vos apps, etc. Pour en savoir plus sur la synchronisation de l’iPhone avec un ordinateur, ouvrez iTunes puis sélectionnez Aide iTunes à partir du menu Aide. Configurer la synchronisation iTunes sans fil : Connectez l’iPhone à votre ordinateur à l’aide du câble Dock Connector vers USB. Sur iTunes, activez « Synchroniser par connexion Wi-Fi » dans la sous-fenêtre Résumé de l’appareil. Lorsque la synchronisation Wi-Fi est activée, l’iPhone se synchronise automatiquement chaque jour. L’iPhone doit être connecté à une source d’alimentation. L’iPhone et votre ordinateur doivent être connectés au même réseau sans fil, et iTunes doit être ouvert sur l’ordinateur. Pour en savoir plus, consultez la section « Synchronisation Wi-Fi d’iTunes » à la page 163. Astuces pour la synchronisation avec iTunes  Si vous utilisez iCloud pour stocker vos contacts, calendriers, signets et notes, ne les synchronisez pas à nouveau sur votre appareil à l’aide d’iTunes.  Les achats effectués avec l’iPhone sur l’iTunes Store ou l’App Store sont synchronisés vers la bibliothèque iTunes de votre ordinateur. Vous pouvez également acheter ou télécharger du contenu et des apps depuis l’iTunes Store sur votre ordinateur, puis les synchroniser sur votre iPhone.  Dans la sous-fenêtre Résumé de l’appareil, configurez iTunes pour synchroniser automatiquement votre appareil lorsqu’il est connecté à votre ordinateur. Pour temporairement passer outre ce réglage, maintenez enfoncées les touches Commande et Option (sur un Mac) ou Maj et Contrôle (sur un PC) jusqu’à ce que l’iPhone apparaisse dans la barre latérale. 18 Chapitre 2 Démarrage Dans la sous-fenêtre Résumé de l’appareil, sélectionnez « Chiffrer la sauvegarde de l’iPhone » pour chiffrer les informations stockées sur votre ordinateur au moment où iTunes crée une sauvegarde. Les sauvegardes chiffrées sont identifiées par une icône de cadenas et un mot de passe est nécessaire pour restaurer les sauvegardes. Si vous ne sélectionnez pas cette option, les mots de passe (tels que ceux pour les comptes de messagerie) ne sont pas inclus dans la sauvegarde et devront être saisis à nouveau si vous utilisez la sauvegarde pour restaurer l’appareil.  Dans la sous-fenêtre Infos de l’appareil, lorsque vous synchronisez des comptes de messagerie, seuls les réglages sont transférés à partir de votre ordinateur vers l’iPhone. Les modifications apportées à un compte de messagerie sur l’iPhone n’ont aucun effet sur le compte de votre ordinateur.  Dans la sous-fenêtre Infos de l’appareil, cliquez sur Avancé pour sélectionner les options vous permettant de remplacer, lors de la prochaine synchronisation, les informations qui se trouvent sur l’iPhone par celles qui se trouvent sur votre ordinateur.  Si vous écoutez une partie d’un podcast ou d’un livre audio, l’endroit où vous vous êtes arrêté est inclus lors de la synchronisation du contenu avec iTunes. Si vous avez commencé l’écoute sur l’iPhone, vous pouvez reprendre où vous vous êtes arrêté en utilisant iTunes sur votre ordinateur, et inversement.  Dans la sous-fenêtre Photos de l’appareil, vous pouvez synchroniser des photos et des vidéos à partir d’un dossier sur votre ordinateur. Chapitre 2 Démarrage 19Notions élémentaires 3 Utilisation des apps L’écran Multi-Touch haute résolution et des gestes simples des doigts rendent facile l’utilisation des apps de l’iPhone. Ouverture d’apps et basculement entre apps Appuyez sur le bouton principal pour accéder à l’écran principal et voir vos apps. Ouvrir une app : Touchez-le. Pour revenir à l’écran d’accueil, appuyez à nouveau sur le bouton principal . Feuilletez vers la gauche ou la droite pour afficher un autre écran d’accueil. Feuilletez vers la gauche ou la droite pour afficher un autre écran d’accueil. Appuyez deux fois le bouton principal pour afficher la barre multitâche, qui vous montre vos apps les plus récemment utilisées. Touchez une app pour la rouvrir ou feuilletez pour afficher d’autres d’apps. Apps récemment utilisées 20Supprimer une app de la barre multitâche Touchez l’icône de l’app et maintenez le doigt dessus jusqu’à ce qu’elle se mette à bouger, puis touchez . Supprimer une app de la barre multitâche en force également la fermeture. Défilement Faites glisser votre doigt vers le haut ou le bas pour faire défiler verticalement. Sur certains écrans, notamment les pages web, vous pouvez également faire défiler l’écran latéralement. Lorsque vous faites glisser votre doigt, vous ne choisissez ou activez aucune fonction sur l’écran. Feuilletez pour faire défiler l’affichage rapidement. Vous pouvez attendre que le défilement s’arrête ou toucher l’écran pour l’arrêter immédiatement. Si vous touchez l’écran pour arrêter le défilement, vous ne risquez pas de sélectionner ou d’activer des éléments affichés. Pour défiler rapidement vers le haut de la page, touchez la barre d’état située en haut de l’écran. Faites glisser votre doigt le long de l’index pour faire défiler rapidement. Touchez une lettre pour passer directement à la section. Chapitre 3 Notions élémentaires 21Touchez un élément dans une liste pour le sélectionner. Suivant la liste, le fait de toucher un élément peut avoir des conséquences différentes, par exemple l’ouverture d’une nouvelle liste, la lecture d’un morceau, l’ouverture d’un courrier électronique ou l’affichage des coordonnées de quelqu’un pour pouvoir l’appeler. Zoom avant ou arrière Lorsque vous consultez des photos, pages web, messages électroniques ou plans, vous pouvez les agrandir ou les réduire. Pour contrôler le zoom, pincez ou écartez les doigts. Pour les photos et les pages web, vous pouvez toucher deux fois (rapidement) pour effectuer un zoom avant, puis toucher à nouveau deux fois pour effectuer un zoom arrière. Sur les plans, touchez deux fois pour effectuer un zoom avant et touchez une fois avec deux doigts pour effectuer un zoom arrière. La fonction Zoom est également une fonction d’accessibilité spéciale avec laquelle vous pouvez agrandir l’écran de chaque app pour mieux voir ce qui est affiché. Consultez la section « Zoom » à la page 151. Affichage en orientation portrait ou paysage De nombreuses apps pour iPhone vous permettent d’afficher l’écran en orientation portrait ou paysage. Faites pivoter l’iPhone et l’affichage pivote également pour s’adapter automatiquement à la nouvelle orientation de l’écran. L’orientation paysage convient mieux à l’affichage de pages web dans Safari et à la saisie de texte, par exemple. Les pages web s’adaptent à l’écran plus large en orientation paysage, ce qui permet d’agrandir le texte et les images. Le clavier à l’écran est également plus grand. Les films regardés dans Vidéos et YouTube ne s’affichent qu’en mode paysage. L’affichage Street View dans Plans est également affiché seulement en mode paysage. Verrouiller l’écran en orientation portrait : Appuyez deux fois sur le bouton principal , feuilletez le bas de l’écran de gauche à droite, puis touchez . 22 Chapitre 3 Notions élémentairesL’icône de verrouillage en mode portrait apparaît dans la barre d’état lorsque l’orientation de l’écran est verrouillée. Personnalisation de l’écran d’accueil Réorganisation des apps Vous pouvez personnaliser la disposition des icônes des apps sur l’écran d’accueil (y compris les icônes du Dock du bas de l’écran). Vous avez la possibilité de les réorganiser sur plusieurs écrans d’accueil. Vous pouvez également organiser les apps en les rassemblant dans des dossiers. Modifier la disposition des icônes : 1 Touchez n’importe quelle app de l’écran d’accueil et maintenez le doigt dessus jusqu’à ce qu’elle se mette à bouger. 2 Réorganisez les apps en les faisant glisser. 3 Appuyez sur le bouton principal pour enregistrer votre disposition. Déplacer une icône vers un autre écran Lorsque vous changez la disposition des apps, faites-en glisser une vers le bord de l’écran. Créer des écrans d’accueil supplémentaires Lorsque vous changez la disposition des apps, feuilletez jusqu’à l’écran d’accueil le plus à droite et faites glisser une app vers le bord droit de l’écran. Il est possible de créer jusqu’à 11 écrans d’accueil. Réinitialiser votre écran d’accueil avec la disposition par défaut Accédez à Réglages > Général > Réinitialiser, puis touchez Réinitialiser l’écran d’accueil. La réinitialisation de l’écran d’accueil supprime les dossiers que vous avez créés et lui applique le fond d’écran par défaut. Vous pouvez ajouter des icônes sur l’écran d’accueil pour ouvrir vos pages web préférées. Consultez la section « Clips web » à la page 64. Lorsque l’iPhone est physiquement connecté à votre ordinateur (avec le câble Dock Connector vers USB), vous pouvez personnaliser vos écrans d’accueil à l’aide d’iTunes. Sur iTunes, sélectionnez l’iPhone dans la liste Appareils, puis cliquez sur Apps en haut de l’écran. Organisation à l’aide de dossiers Les dossiers vous permettent d’organiser les apps sur l’écran d’accueil. Vous pouvez placer jusqu’à 12 apps dans un dossier. L’iPhone attribue automatiquement un nom à un dossier lors de sa création en fonction de la catégorie d’apps que vous avez utilisée pour le créer. Vous pouvez modifier le nom à tout moment. Il est possible de réorganiser les dossiers, comme les apps, en les faisant glisser sur les écrans d’accueil ou vers le Dock. Chapitre 3 Notions élémentaires 23Créer un dossier : Touchez une app de l’écran d’accueil et gardez le doigt dessus jusqu’à ce que les apps se mettent à bouger, puis faites glisser l’app sur une autre. L’iPhone crée un nouveau dossier contenant les deux apps et affiche le nom du dossier. Vous pouvez toucher le champ du nom et saisir un autre nom. Touchez un dossier pour l’ouvrir, puis touchez une app à l’intérieur pour l’ouvrir. Pour fermer un dossier, touchez à l’extérieur du dossier ou appuyez sur le bouton principal . Lors de la réorganisation des apps : Ajouter une app à un dossier Faites glisser l’app sur le dossier. Supprimer une app d’un dossier Touchez le dossier pour l’ouvrir, puis faites glisser l’app hors du dossier. Supprimer un dossier Déplacez toutes les apps hors du dossier. Ce dernier est automatiquement supprimé. Renommer un dossier Touchez le dossier pour l’ouvrir, puis touchez le nom en haut et utilisez le clavier pour saisir un nouveau nom. Lorsque vous avez terminé l’organisation de votre écran d’accueil, appuyez sur le bouton principal pour enregistrer vos modifications. Ajout de fonds d’écran Vous pouvez définir une image ou une photo comme fond d’écran de l’écran verrouillé. Vous pouvez également définir le fond d’écran de votre écran d’accueil. Vous pouvez choisir une image fournie avec l’iPhone, une photo de votre Pellicule ou d’un autre album présent sur votre iPhone. Choisir le fond d’écran : 1 Dans Réglages, choisissez Fond d’écran, touchez l’image de l’écran verrouillé et de l’écran d’accueil puis touchez Fond d’écran ou un album. 2 Touchez pour choisir une image ou une photo. Si vous choisissez une photo, faites-la glisser pour la déplacer, pincez-la pour la réduire ou écartez les doigts pour l’agrandir, jusqu’à ce qu’elle ait l’aspect souhaité. 24 Chapitre 3 Notions élémentaires3 Touchez Définir, puis choisissez si vous souhaitez utiliser la photo comme fond d’écran pour votre écran verrouillé, votre écran d’accueil ou les deux. Saisie de texte Le clavier à l’écran s’affiche automatiquement chaque fois que vous devez saisir du texte. Saisie de texte Utilisez le clavier pour saisir du texte. Le clavier corrige les erreurs d’orthographe, prédit ce que vous saisissez et apprend à mesure que vous l’utilisez. Suivant l’app que vous utilisez, le clavier intelligent peut suggérer des corrections pendant que vous tapez pour éviter les fautes d’orthographe. Saisir du texte : Touchez un champ de texte pour faire apparaître le clavier, puis saisissez sur le clavier. Lors de votre saisie, chaque lettre apparaît au-dessus de votre doigt. Si vous touchez la mauvaise touche, vous pouvez faire glisser votre doigt jusqu’à la bonne. La lettre n’est pas validée tant que vous n’éloignez pas votre doigt de la touche. Supprimer le caractère précédent Touchez . Écrire en majuscules Touchez la touche Maj avant de toucher une lettre. Vous pouvez également maintenir la touche Maj enfoncée, puis faire glisser votre doigt sur une lettre. Saisir rapidement un point et une espace Touchez deux fois la barre d’espace. Pour activer ou désactiver cette fonctionnalité, accédez à Réglages > Général > Clavier. Activer le verrouillage des majuscules Touchez deux fois la touche Maj . Touchez à nouveau la touche Maj pour déverrouiller les majuscules. Vous pouvez activer ou désactiver cette fonctionnalité dans Réglages > Général > Clavier. Saisir des chiffres, la ponctuation ou des symboles Touchez la touche des chiffres . Touchez la touche des symboles pour afficher des signes de ponctuation et des symboles complémentaires. Régler les options de saisie Accédez à Réglages > Général > Clavier. Pour saisir un autre caractère, touchez une touche, maintenez le doigt dessus et faites glisser pour choisir l’une des options. Chapitre 3 Notions élémentaires 25Dictée Sur l’iPhone 4S, vous pouvez dicter du texte plutôt que de le saisir sur le clavier à l’écran. Par exemple, vous pouvez dicter un message dans Mail ou une note dans Notes. Siri doit être activé dans Réglages > Général > Siri. Dicter du texte : Sur le clavier à l’écran, touchez , puis dictez. Lorsque vous avez fini, touchez Terminé. Pour faire un ajout au message, touchez à nouveau . Saisir une virgule, un point ou un autre signe de ponctuation Dites le signe de ponctuation. Correction automatique et vérification de l’orthographe Pour de nombreuses langues, l’iPhone corrige automatiquement les fautes d’orthographe ou fait des suggestions à mesure de la saisie. Lorsque l’iPhone suggère un mot, vous pouvez accepter la suggestion sans interrompre la saisie. Remarque : Pour obtenir la liste des langues prises en charge, consultez la page web www.apple.com/fr/iphone/specs.html. Mot suggéré Accepter la suggestion : Saisissez une espace, un signe de ponctuation ou le caractère de retour. Refuser une suggestion : Touchez le « X ». Chaque fois que vous rejetez une suggestion pour un même mot, il devient plus probable que l’iPhone accepte le mot. L’iPhone peut également souligner des mots que vous avez déjà saisis et qui pourraient être mal orthographiés. Remplacer un mot mal orthographié Touchez le mot, puis touchez l’une des autres orthographes. Si le mot que vous souhaitez saisir n’apparaît pas, corrigez le mot en le saisissant à nouveau. Activer et désactiver la correction automatique ou la vérification orthographique Accédez à Réglages > Général > Clavier. Raccourcis et votre dictionnaire personnel Les raccourcis vous permettent de ne saisir que quelques caractères à la place d’un mot ou d’une expression plus longs. Le texte complet apparaît dès que vous saisissez le raccourci. Par exemple, le raccourci « bjr » saisit le texte complet « bonjour ». Créer un raccourci : Accédez à Réglages > Général > Clavier, puis touchez Ajouter un raccourci. 26 Chapitre 3 Notions élémentairesAjoutez un mot ou une expression à votre dictionnaire personnel de manière à ce que l’iPhone n’essaye pas de le corriger ou de le remplacer. Créez le raccourci, mais laissez le champ Raccourci vide. Modifier un raccourci Accédez à Réglages > Clavier, puis touchez le raccourci. Modification de texte Avec l’écran tactile, il est facile de modifier le texte saisi. Une loupe à l’écran vous aide à positionner le point d’insertion l’endroit précis où vous le souhaitez. Des poignées situées sur le texte sélectionné vous permettent de sélectionner rapidement moins de texte ou au contraire davantage. Vous pouvez également couper, copier et coller du texte et des photos dans des apps ou entre plusieurs apps. Positionner le point d’insertion : Touchez l’écran et gardez le doigt dessus pour afficher la loupe, puis faites glisser le doigt pour positionner le point d’insertion. Sélectionner du texte : Touchez le point d’insertion pour afficher les boutons de sélection. Vous pouvez également toucher deux fois un mot. Dans les documents en lecture seule, tels que les pages web ou les courriers électroniques que vous avez reçus, touchez un mot et laissez le doigt dessus pour le sélectionner. Faites glisser les poignées pour sélectionner plus ou moins de texte. Couper ou copier du texte Sélectionnez du texte, puis touchez Couper ou Copier. Coller du texte Touchez le point d’insertion, puis touchez Coller. Le dernier texte que vous avez coupé ou copié est inséré. Vous pouvez également sélectionner du texte puis toucher Coller pour remplacer le texte. Annuler la dernière modification Secouez l’iPhone et touchez Annuler. Mettre du texte en gras, en italique ou le souligner Touchez (si l’icône est disponible), puis touchez B/I/U. Chapitre 3 Notions élémentaires 27Obtenir la définition d’un mot Touchez (si l’icône est disponible), puis touchez Définition. Obtenir des mots alternatifs Touchez Suggérer lorsque cette option est disponible, puis touchez l’un des mots. Dispositions de clavier Vous pouvez utiliser Réglages pour définir les dispositions de vos claviers logiciels et matériels. Les dispositions disponibles dépendent de la langue choisie. Sélectionner une disposition de clavier : Accédez à Réglages > Général > Claviers > Claviers internationaux, puis sélectionnez un clavier. Pour chaque langue, vous pouvez effectuer des sélections différentes pour le clavier tactile et le clavier externe (le cas échéant). La disposition du clavier logiciel détermine la disposition du clavier tactile de votre iPhone. La disposition du clavier matériel détermine la disposition d’un clavier Apple sans fil connecté à l’iPhone. Utilisation d’un clavier sans fil Apple Vous pouvez utiliser un clavier sans fil Apple (vendu séparément) pour la saisie sur votre iPhone. Le clavier sans fil se connecte via Bluetooth. Consultez la section « Jumelage d’un appareil Bluetooth avec un iPhone » à la page 35. Une fois le clavier jumelé avec l’iPhone, il se connecte chaque fois que le clavier est à portée (jusqu’à 9 m). Vous savez que le clavier est connecté si le clavier tactile n’apparaît pas lorsque vous touchez un champ de texte. Pour économiser la batterie, désactivez le clavier ou son jumelage lorsque vous ne l’utilisez pas. Impression AirPrint AirPrint vous permet d’imprimer sans fil sur les imprimantes compatibles AirPrint. Vous pouvez imprimer depuis :  Mail : messages électroniques et pièces jointes qui s’ouvrent dans Coup d’œil.  Photos et Appareil photo : photos.  Safari : pages web, documents PDF et autres pièces jointes qui s’ouvrent dans Coup d’œil.  iBooks : documents PDF  Plans : vue d’un plan affiché à l’écran.  Notes : note actuellement affichée. D’autres apps disponibles sur l’App Store prennent également en charge AirPrint. Une imprimante compatible AirPrint n’a pas besoin de configuration, il vous suffit de la connecter au même réseau Wi-Fi que l’iPhone. Pour plus d’informations, consultez la page support.apple.com/kb/HT4356?viewlocale=fr_FR. Impression d’un document AirPrint utilise votre réseau Wi-Fi pour envoyer des travaux d’impression sans fil à votre imprimante. (L’iPhone et l’imprimante doivent être sur le même réseau Wi-Fi.) Imprimer un document : 1 Touchez , ou (suivant l’app que vous utilisez), puis touchez Imprimer. 2 Touchez Sélection pour sélectionner une imprimante. 28 Chapitre 3 Notions élémentaires3 Configurez les options d’imprimante, telles que le nombre de copies et l’impression recto verso (si votre imprimante la prend en charge). Certaines apps vous permettent de configurer un intervalle de pages à imprimer. 4 Touchez Imprimer. Consulter le statut d’une tâche d’impression Appuyez deux fois sur le bouton principal , puis touchez Impression. L’app Impression apparaît comme app la plus récente lorsqu’un document est en cours d’impression. Une pastille sur l’app indique le nombre de documents dans la file d’attente d’impression. Si vous imprimez plus d’un document, sélectionnez une tâche d’impression pour afficher le résumé de son état. Annuler une tâche d’impression Appuyez deux fois sur le bouton principal , touchez Impression, sélectionnez la tâche d’impression (si vous imprimez plusieurs documents), puis touchez Annuler l’impression. Recherche Vous pouvez faire des recherches dans de nombreuses apps de l’iPhone, notamment Contacts, Mail, Calendrier, Musique, Messages, Notes et Rappels. Vous pouvez effectuer une recherche dans une app particulière ou toutes les apps à la fois. Effectuer une recherche sur l’iPhone : Accédez à l’écran de recherche. (Depuis le premier écran d’accueil, feuilletez vers la droite ou appuyez sur le bouton principal .) Saisissez du texte dans le champ de recherche. Les résultats de la recherche apparaissent à mesure que vous tapez. Touchez un élément dans la liste pour l’ouvrir. Touchez Rechercher pour masquer le clavier et afficher plus de résultats. Les icônes qui apparaissent à côté des résultats de la recherche indiquent l’app dont proviennent les résultats. Chapitre 3 Notions élémentaires 29L’iPhone peut afficher un meilleur résultat, en fonction de vos recherches précédentes. Les résultats de recherche Safari comprennent des options pour rechercher sur le Web ou dans Wikipédia. App Éléments recherchés Contacts Le prénom, le nom et la raison sociale Mail Les champs À, De et Objet, et les messages de tous les comptes Calendrier Le nom de l’événement, les invités, le lieu et les notes Musique La musique (noms des morceaux, artistes et albums), ainsi que les titres des podcasts, des vidéos et des livres audio Messages Le titre et le texte des messages Notes Le texte des notes Rappels Titres Recherche recherche aussi les noms des apps natives et installées sur l’iPhone. Si vous disposez d’un grand nombre d’apps, vous pouvez donc utiliser Recherche pour les localiser et les ouvrir. Ouvrir des apps à partir de Recherche : Saisissez le nom de l’app, puis touchez l’écran pour ouvrir l’app directement à partir des résultats de la recherche. Utilisez le réglage Recherche Spotlight pour indiquer sur quel contenu doit porter la recherche et définir l’ordre de présentation des résultats. Consultez la section « Recherche Spotlight » à la page 164. Contrôle vocal Contrôle vocal vous permet de téléphoner et de contrôler la lecture de musique à l’aide de commandes vocales. Sur l’iPhone 4S, vous pouvez également utiliser Siri pour contrôler vocalement l’iPhone. Consultez la section Chapitre 4, « Siri, » à la page 40. Remarque : Contrôle Vocal peut ne pas être disponible dans toutes les langues. Contrôle vocal n’est pas disponible sur le modèle iPhone 4S lorsque Siri est activé. Utiliser Contrôle vocal : Maintenez enfoncé le bouton principal jusqu’à l’ouverture de l’écran Contrôle vocal, signalée par un bip sonore. Vous pouvez appuyer sur le bouton central des écouteurs de l’iPhone et maintenir le doigt dessus. 30 Chapitre 3 Notions élémentairesPour obtenir les